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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Lone Star Healthy Streams Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Portions of this program were delivered to audiences at over 40 events throughout the state, reaching well over 2,200 participants. In addition, unique visitors to the ?Improving Water Quality of Grazing Lands? website exceeded 1,100. This highly... beneficial program will continue to be carried out throughout the state in coordination with the TSSWCB and other project partners. Lone Star Healthy Streams Final Report 2 Table of Contents Executive Summary...

Wagner, Kevin; Redmon, Larry

2

Clean Cities: Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) Coalition Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) Coalition The Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) coalition Contact Information Stacy Neef 512-773-8794 stacy.neef@lonestarcfa.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Stacy Neef Photo of Stacy Neef Stacy Neef has served as the coordinator for Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) (LSCFA) promoting and advancing the use of alternative fuel and vehicles for fleets in central Texas since 2000. The central Texas region includes Bastrop, Caldwell, Hays, Travis, Williamson Counties; Fort Hood and City of Temple, Texas. LSCFA works closely with other Texas Clean

3

Lone Star Healthy Streams: Teaching best managment practices statewide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

txH2O | pg. 22 Story by Leslie Lee The Lone Star Healthy Streams (LSHS) Program uses education to reduce the amount of bacteria entering Texas water bodies from livestock operations and feral hogs. This program, originally developed...

Lee, Leslie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Lone Star Healthy Streams: Teaching best management practices statewide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

txH2O | pg. 22 Story by Leslie Lee The Lone Star Healthy Streams (LSHS) Program uses education to reduce the amount of bacteria entering Texas water bodies from livestock operations and feral hogs. This program, originally developed...

Lee, Leslie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

I (Q3) Wind Farm I (Q3) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q3) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer RES/Horizon Energy Purchaser Direct Energy Location Callahan and Shackelford counties TX Coordinates 32.594885°, -99.506464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.594885,"lon":-99.506464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Q2) Wind Farm Q2) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q2) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer RES/Horizon Energy Purchaser Direct Energy Location Callahan and Shackelford counties TX Coordinates 32.594885°, -99.506464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.594885,"lon":-99.506464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Lone Star Wind Alliance LSWA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Alliance LSWA Wind Alliance LSWA Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star Wind Alliance (LSWA) Place Houston, Texas Sector Wind energy Product Texas-based research centres, focusing on large composite structures, wind engineering, electromechanical controls and power electronics. The organisation is led by the University of Houston. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Lone Star Reds: the Socialist Party and cotton tenancy in Texas, 1901-1917  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ideal, the party of Eugene Debs seized on the strong Texas tradition of agrarian revolt to build a formidable, if short-lived, Socialist movement in the Lone Star State. There were Socialist newspapers, unions, rural encampments, and a Socialist...

Mellard, Jason Dean

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Lone Star I (4Q07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lone Star I (4Q07) Wind Farm Lone Star I (4Q07) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (4Q07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer RES/Horizon Energy Purchaser Direct Energy Location Callahan and Shackleford Counties TX Coordinates 32.594885°, -99.506464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.594885,"lon":-99.506464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Lone Star II (1Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1Q08) Wind Farm 1Q08) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star II (1Q08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer RES/Horizon Energy Purchaser JAron Location Callahan and Shackelford counties TX Coordinates 32.594885°, -99.506464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.594885,"lon":-99.506464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Lone Star II (4Q07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4Q07) Wind Farm 4Q07) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star II (4Q07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer RES/Horizon Energy Purchaser JAron Location Callahan and Shackleford Counties TX Coordinates 32.594885°, -99.506464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.594885,"lon":-99.506464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

LoneSTAR Program: Maximizing Energy Efficiency while Protecting the Envrionment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Report (EAR) ? Utility Assessment Report (UAR) ? Systems Commissioning Report (in the case where the commissioning meets LoanSTAR payback requirements) ESL-KT-14-11-31 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18...Maximiz ing Energy Eff ic iency whi le Protect ing the Envi ronment LoanSTAR PROGRAM ESL-KT-14-11-31 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 ? Executed 240 loans totaling $407,923,762.32 ? 93 loans to publ...

Trevino, E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Audit of Lone Star Gas Invoices and Billing Procedures, Task #3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information on a SHEET NO. 3 "real-time" basis. Any such systems so installed shall be compatible with Shipper's SCADA system to the extent possible. (f) The other party may, at its option and expense, install and operate meters, instruments and equipment...

Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

EPA Natural Gas STAR Program Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Established in 1993, the Natural Gas STAR program is a partnership between the U.S. EPA and the oil and natural gas industry designed to cost-effectively reduce methane emissions from voluntary activities undertaken at oil and natural gas operations both

unknown authors

15

Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Voids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the detection of molecular gas using CO(1-0) line emission and follow up Halpha imaging observations of galaxies located in nearby voids. The CO(1-0) observations were done using the 45m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO) and the optical observations were done using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). Although void galaxies lie in the most under dense parts of our universe, a significant fraction of them are gas rich, spiral galaxies that show signatures of ongoing star formation. Not much is known about their cold gas content or star formation properties. In this study we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies using the NRO. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively higher IRAS fluxes or Halpha line luminosities. CO(1--0) emission was detected in four galaxies and the derived molecular gas masses lie between (1 - 8)E+9 Msun. The H$\\alpha$ imaging observations of three galaxies detected in CO emission indicates ongoing star formation and the derived star forma...

Das, M; Iono, D; Honey, M; Ramya, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Gas & Stars Aging low-mass stars eject their outer layers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recycling Gas & Stars #12;Aging low-mass stars eject their outer layers. M57:The Ring Nebula #12;Thor's Emerald Helmet Winds from high-mass stars blow bubbles of hot gas. #12;Supernova blast waves in stars are mixed back into the gas. NGC 6992: Filaments of theVeil Nebula #12;Bubbles blown by high

Barnes, Joshua Edward

17

Stars and gas in the Medusa merger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Medusa (NGC 4194) is a well-studied nearby galaxy with the disturbed appearance of a merger and evidence for ongoing star formation. In order to test whether it could be the result of an interaction between a gas-rich disk-like galaxy and a larger elliptical, we have carried out optical and radio observations of the stars and the gas in the Medusa, and performed $N$-body numerical simulations of the evolution of such a system. We used the Nordic Optical Telescope to obtain a deep V-band image and the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope to map the large-scale distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen. A single HI tail was found to the South of the Medusa with a projected length of 56 kpc (5') and a gas mass of 7* 10^8 M_sun, thus harbouring about one third of the total HI mass of the system. HI was also detected in absorption toward the continuum in the center. HI was detected in a small nearby galaxy to the North-West of the Medusa at a projected distance of 91 kpc. It is, however, unlikely that this galaxy has had a significant influence on the evolution of the Medusa. The simulations of the slightly prograde infall of a gas-rich disk galaxy on an larger, four time more massive elliptical (spherical) galaxy reproduce most of the observed features of the Medusa.Thus, the Medusa is an ideal object to study the merger-induced star formation contribution from the small galaxy of a minor merger.

E. Manthey; S. Huettemeister; S. Aalto; C. Horellou; P. Bjerkeli

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Energy Star Home Rebate |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Energy Star Home Rebate Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Energy Star Home Rebate Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Energy Star Home Rebate < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Full Adoption of Energy Star (Version 2.5) Standards: $750 Vectren Gold Star - HERS rating of 70 or less: $750 Furnace: $300 Boiler: $500 Tankless Water Heater: $150 Storage Water Heater: $50-$150 Programmable Thermostat: $20 Provider Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio offers a flat rebate to builders of residential single-family Energy Star certified homes that receive gas

19

ENERGY STAR Qualified Gas Furnaces | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Furnaces Gas Furnaces Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data ENERGY STAR Qualified Gas Furnaces Dataset Summary Description Gas Furnaces that have earned the ENERGY STAR are more efficient than standard models. ENERGY STAR is the trusted symbol for energy efficiency helping consumers save money and protect the environment through energy-efficient products and practices. More information on ENERGY STAR is available at www.energystar.gov. Tags {Furnaces,"Energy Star",products,"energy efficiency",efficient,"greenhouse gas emissions",climate,utility,utilities,household,savings,labels,partners,certification} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility

20

Lone Star Transmission LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip: 33408 Product: Wholly owned subsidiary of FPL Energy, developing transmission lines. First project is the DFW Express high voltage DC line from West Texas to DallasFort...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

HOT GAS LINES IN T TAURI STARS  

SciTech Connect

For Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), the resonance doublets of N V, Si IV, and C IV, as well as the He II 1640 A line, trace hot gas flows and act as diagnostics of the accretion process. In this paper we assemble a large high-resolution, high-sensitivity data set of these lines in CTTSs and Weak T Tauri Stars (WTTSs). The sample comprises 35 stars: 1 Herbig Ae star, 28 CTTSs, and 6 WTTSs. We find that the C IV, Si IV, and N V lines in CTTSs all have similar shapes. We decompose the C IV and He II lines into broad and narrow Gaussian components (BC and NC). The most common (50%) C IV line morphology in CTTSs is that of a low-velocity NC together with a redshifted BC. For CTTSs, a strong BC is the result of the accretion process. The contribution fraction of the NC to the C IV line flux in CTTSs increases with accretion rate, from {approx}20% to up to {approx}80%. The velocity centroids of the BCs and NCs are such that V{sub BC} {approx}> 4 V{sub NC}, consistent with the predictions of the accretion shock model, in at most 12 out of 22 CTTSs. We do not find evidence of the post-shock becoming buried in the stellar photosphere due to the pressure of the accretion flow. The He II CTTSs lines are generally symmetric and narrow, with FWHM and redshifts comparable to those of WTTSs. They are less redshifted than the CTTSs C IV lines, by {approx}10 km s{sup -1}. The amount of flux in the BC of the He II line is small compared to that of the C IV line, and we show that this is consistent with models of the pre-shock column emission. Overall, the observations are consistent with the presence of multiple accretion columns with different densities or with accretion models that predict a slow-moving, low-density region in the periphery of the accretion column. For HN Tau A and RW Aur A, most of the C IV line is blueshifted suggesting that the C IV emission is produced by shocks within outflow jets. In our sample, the Herbig Ae star DX Cha is the only object for which we find a P-Cygni profile in the C IV line, which argues for the presence of a hot (10{sup 5} K) wind. For the overall sample, the Si IV and N V line luminosities are correlated with the C IV line luminosities, although the relationship between Si IV and C IV shows large scatter about a linear relationship and suggests that TW Hya, V4046 Sgr, AA Tau, DF Tau, GM Aur, and V1190 Sco are silicon-poor, while CV Cha, DX Cha, RU Lup, and RW Aur may be silicon-rich.

Ardila, David R. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gregory, Scott G.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ingleby, Laura; Bergin, Edwin; Bethell, Thomas; Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); France, Kevin; Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Edwards, Suzan [Department of Astronomy, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Johns-Krull, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Yang, Hao [Institute for Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Valenti, Jeff A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Abgrall, Herve [LUTH and UMR 8102 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, Place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Alexander, Richard D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Brown, Joanna M.; Espaillat, Catherine [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hussain, Gaitee, E-mail: ardila@ipac.caltech.edu [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); and others

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY ON GAS SURFACE DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

Studies by Lada et al. and Heiderman et al. have suggested that star formation mostly occurs above a threshold in gas surface density {Sigma} of {Sigma}{sub c} {approx} 120 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} (A{sub K} {approx} 0.8). Heiderman et al. infer a threshold by combining low-mass star-forming regions, which show a steep increase in the star formation rate per unit area {Sigma}{sub SFR} with increasing {Sigma}, and massive cores forming luminous stars which show a linear relation. We argue that these observations do not require a particular density threshold. The steep dependence of {Sigma}{sub SFR}, approaching unity at protostellar core densities, is a natural result of the increasing importance of self-gravity at high densities along with the corresponding decrease in evolutionary timescales. The linear behavior of {Sigma}{sub SFR} versus {Sigma} in massive cores is consistent with probing dense gas in gravitational collapse, forming stars at a characteristic free-fall timescale given by the use of a particular molecular tracer. The low-mass and high-mass regions show different correlations between gas surface density and the area A spanned at that density, with A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -3} for low-mass regions and A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -1} for the massive cores; this difference, along with the use of differing techniques to measure gas surface density and star formation, suggests that connecting the low-mass regions with massive cores is problematic. We show that the approximately linear relationship between dense gas mass and stellar mass used by Lada et al. similarly does not demand a particular threshold for star formation and requires continuing formation of dense gas. Our results are consistent with molecular clouds forming by galactic hydrodynamic flows with subsequent gravitational collapse.

Burkert, Andreas [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Hartmann, Lee, E-mail: burkert@usm.lmu.de, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate Total Incentives: $600 ($1200 with KCP&L rebate) Wall Insulation: $600 Floor Insulation: $400 Attic Insulation: $500 Air Sealing: $400 Duct Sealing: $200 Window or Door: $400 Program Info Funding Source MGE State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single Family Energy Assessment: $400/unit Multi Family Energy Assessment: $200/unit Attic Insulation: $0.01-$0.02 x R-Value Added x sq. ft.

24

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Energy Star New Homes Program For  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Energy Star New Homes Program Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Energy Star New Homes Program For Builders Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Energy Star New Homes Program For Builders < Back Eligibility Construction Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 500, 1,000, or 5/MCF saved Provider Minnesota Energy Resources Minnesota Energy Resources offers the Home Energy Excellence Program to encourage builders to build energy efficient homes. As part of the program, Minnesota Energy Resources will review the home blueprints and make recommendations prior to construction; perform up to three on-site inspections with more recommendations and improvements during construction;

25

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company - Home Performance with Energy Star  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company - Home Performance with Energy Baltimore Gas and Electric Company - Home Performance with Energy Star Rebates Baltimore Gas and Electric Company - Home Performance with Energy Star Rebates < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate HVAC (Equipment Installation/Duct Sealing/Tune-up): $1,150 Air Sealing/Insulation/Gas Tankless Water Heater: $2,000 Total: $3,150 Program Info Funding Source Maryland Energy Administration State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Comprehensive Home Energy Audit: Reduced cost of $100

26

Gas Retention and Accumulation in Stellar Clusters and Galaxies: Implications for Star Formation and Black Hole Accretion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Star formation cannot proceed without the existence of an extensive gas reservoir. In particular, the supply of gas to form stars in dwarf galaxies and (more)

Naiman, Jill Palmer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Northern Illinois Gas Co IL  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Northern Northern Illinois Gas Co ............................ IL 254,574,988 4.60 Southern California Gas Co ...................... CA 233,632,354 6.89 Columbia Gas Dist Co............................... OH,KY,PA,MD 196,322,935 6.64 Pacific Gas and Elec Co............................ CA 190,864,262 5.83 Consumers Pwr Co ................................... MI 188,587,672 4.81 Michigan Consol Gas Co........................... MI 160,809,168 5.16 East Ohio Gas Co ..................................... OH 146,802,045 5.44 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co......................... NJ 140,712,209 6.62 Peoples Gas Lt and Coke Co.................... IL 126,356,925 6.40 Brooklyn Union Gas Co............................. NY 106,349,594 9.43 Atlanta Gas Lt Co ...................................... GA 106,075,815 6.66 Lone Star Gas Co......................................

28

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker

29

CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE- SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine Community propose to prepare a feasibility study for

30

Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation Timothy A. Davis Survey 2. The ATLAS3D CARMA Survey 3. Kinematic Misalignments 4. Origin of the molecular gas The ATLAS3D is to determine how (major and minor) mergers, gas, star formation and feedback affect the transformation

Bureau, Martin

31

MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and local conditions persist. In particular, we observe lower {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and enhanced CO excitation associated with nuclear gas concentrations in a subset of our targets. These appear to reflect real enhancements in the rate of star formation per unit gas, and although the distribution of {tau}{sub dep} does not appear bimodal in galaxy centers, {tau}{sub dep} does appear multivalued at fixed {Sigma}{sub H2}, supporting the idea of ''disk'' and ''starburst'' modes driven by other environmental parameters.

Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Schuster, Karl-Friedrich [IRAM, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 St. Martin d'Heres (France); Usero, Antonio [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, C/ Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Dust and Gas Debris Around Main Sequence Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Debris disks are dusty, gas-poor disks around main sequence stars (Backman & Paresce 1993; Lagrange, Backman & Artymowicz 2000; Zuckerman 2001). Micron-sized dust grains are inferred to exist in these systems from measurements of their thermal emission at infrared through millimeter wavelengths. The estimated lifetimes for circumstellar dust grains due to sublimation, radiation and corpuscular stellar wind effects are typically significantly smaller than the estimated ages for the stellar systems, suggesting that the grains are replenished from a reservoir, such as sublimation of comets or collisions between parent bodies. Since the color temperature for the excess emission is typically Tgr ~ 110 - 120 K, similar to that expected for small grains in the Kuiper Belt, these objects are believe to be generated by collisions between parent bodies analogous to Kuiper Belt objects in our solar system; however, a handful of systems possess warm dust, with Tgr > 300 K, at temperatures similar to the terrestrial planets. We describe the physical characteristics of debris disks, the processes that remove dust from disks, and the evidence for the presence of planets in debris disks. We also summarize observations of infalling comets toward beta Pictoris and measurements of bulk gas in debris disks.

Christine H. Chen

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

Lone Star Healthy Streams: Keeping Texas streams clean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-farm composting system using windrows, static piles and in-vessel composting can effectively reduce pathogens to levels that are acceptable in organic soil amendments. ... Association, Texas Association of Dairymen, Texas Horse, Texas Poultry Federation, Texas Pork Producers Association and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Funding for the LSHS program was provided by NRCS, the State of Texas and the Texas State Soil...

Boutwell, Kathryn S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Xcel Energy (Electric and Gas) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Xcel Energy (Electric and Gas) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Xcel Energy (Electric and Gas) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Rebates Xcel Energy (Electric and Gas) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,200 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount See Xcel's web site for current levels This program is available only to Minnesota residents who take both electric and natural gas service from Xcel Energy. Customers must undertake a low-cost energy audit ($60) before implementing energy-efficiency

35

THE EGNoG SURVEY: MOLECULAR GAS IN INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey, an observational study of molecular gas in 31 star-forming galaxies from z = 0.05 to z = 0.5, with stellar masses of (4-30) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and star formation rates of 4-100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This survey probes a relatively un-observed redshift range in which the molecular gas content of galaxies is expected to have evolved significantly. To trace the molecular gas in the EGNoG galaxies, we observe the CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) and CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) rotational lines using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detect 24 of 31 galaxies and present resolved maps of 10 galaxies in the lower redshift portion of the survey. We use a bimodal prescription for the CO to molecular gas conversion factor, based on specific star formation rate, and compare the EGNoG galaxies to a large sample of galaxies assembled from the literature. We find an average molecular gas depletion time of 0.76 {+-} 0.54 Gyr for normal galaxies and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 Gyr for starburst galaxies. We calculate an average molecular gas fraction of 7%-20% at the intermediate redshifts probed by the EGNoG survey. By expressing the molecular gas fraction in terms of the specific star formation rate and molecular gas depletion time (using typical values), we also calculate the expected evolution of the molecular gas fraction with redshift. The predicted behavior agrees well with the significant evolution observed from z {approx} 2.5 to today.

Bauermeister, A.; Blitz, L.; Wright, M. [Department of Astronomy and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bolatto, A.; Teuben, P. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bureau, M. [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Leroy, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ostriker, E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wong, T., E-mail: amberb@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

36

OY Car During Normal Outburst: Balmer Emission From The Red Star And The Gas Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of OY Car, obtained with the Anglo-Australian Telescope, during a normal outburst in August 1991. Two sinusoidal components are resolved in the H$\\beta$ trailed spectra and we determine the location of the narrow component to be on the secondary star with a maximum contributed flux of ~2.5 per cent to the total flux. Imaging of the line distribution reveals that the other emission component is associated with the gas stream. This follows a velocity close to the ballistic one from the red star to a distance of ~0.5 R$_{L_{1}}$ from the white dwarf. This emission penetrates the accretion disc (from 0.5--0.1 R$_{L_{1}}$), with a velocity now closer (but lower) to the keplerian velocities along the path of the gas stream. We finally discuss the implications of having observed simultaneously line emission from the gas stream and the red star during outburst.

E. T. Harlaftis; T. R. Marsh

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

OY Car in Outburst: Balmer emission from the red star and the gas stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of OY Car, obtained with the Anglo-Australian telescope, during a normal outburst in 1991. Two sinusoidal components are resolved in the Hbeta trailed spectra and we determine the location of the narrow component to be on the secondary star with a maximum contributed flux of ~2.5 per cent to the total flux. Imaging of the line distribution reveals that the other emission component is associated with the gas stream. This follows a velocity close to the ballistic one from the red star to a distance of ~0.5 R_L1 from the white dwarf. Then. its kinematics changes from 0.5-0.2 R_L1 (accretion disc) following velocities now closer to (but lower than) the keplerian velocities along the path of the gas stream. We finally dicsuss the implications of having observed simultaneously line emission from the gas stream and the red star during outburst.

E. T. Harlaftis; T. R. Marsh

1995-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

Warm Gas in the Inner Disks around Young Intermediate Mass Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of gas in the inner disks around young stars is of particular interest because of its connection to planet formation. In order to study the gas in inner disks, we have obtained high-resolution K-band and M-band spectroscopy of 14 intermediate mass young stars. In sources that have optically thick inner disks, i.e. E(K-L)>1, our detection rate of the ro-vibrational CO transitions is 100% and the gas is thermally excited. Of the five sources that do not have optically thick inner disks, we only detect the ro-vibrational CO transitions from HD 141569. In this case, we show that the gas is excited by UV fluorescence and that the inner disk is devoid of gas and dust. We discuss the plausibility of the various scenarios for forming this inner hole. Our modeling of the UV fluoresced gas suggests an additional method by which to search for and/or place stringent limits on gas in dust depleted regions in disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars.

Sean Brittain; Theodore Simon; Joan Najita; Terrence Rettig

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mass-loss rates and dust-to-gas ratios for obscured Asymptotic Giant Branch stars of different metallicities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mass-loss rates and dust-to-gas ratios of obscured Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are investigated for samples with different initial metallicities: in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC & LMC) and in the Milky Way. The properties of their circumstellar envelopes can be explained in a consistent way if, both for obscured M-type AGB stars and for obscured carbon stars, the total (gas+dust) mass-loss rate depends only weakly on initial metallicity whilst the dust-to-gas ratio depends approximately linearly on initial metallicity.

Jacco Th. van Loon

1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

40

TURBULENT MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN THE SHOCKED INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM OF STEPHAN'S QUINTET  

SciTech Connect

The Stephan's Quintet (hereafter SQ) is a template source to study the impact of galaxies interaction on the physical state and energetics of their gas. We report on IRAM single-dish CO observations of the SQ compact group of galaxies. These observations follow up the Spitzer discovery of bright mid-IR H{sub 2} rotational line emission (L(H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 35} W) from warm (10{sup 2-3} K) molecular gas, associated with a 30 kpc long shock between a galaxy, NGC 7318b, and NGC 7319's tidal arm. We detect CO(1-0), (2-1) and (3-2) line emission in the inter-galactic medium (IGM) with complex profiles, spanning a velocity range of Almost-Equal-To 1000 km s{sup -1}. The spectra exhibit the pre-shock recession velocities of the two colliding gas systems (5700 and 6700 km s{sup -1}), but also intermediate velocities. This shows that much of the molecular gas has formed out of diffuse gas accelerated by the galaxy-tidal arm collision. CO emission is also detected in a bridge feature that connects the shock to the Seyfert member of the group, NGC 7319, and in the northern star forming region, SQ-A, where a new velocity component is identified at 6900 km s{sup -1}, in addition to the two velocity components already known. Assuming a Galactic CO(1-0) emission to H{sub 2} mass conversion factor, a total H{sub 2} mass of Almost-Equal-To 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} is detected in the shock. The ratio between the warm H{sub 2} mass derived from Spitzer spectroscopy, and the H{sub 2} mass derived from CO fluxes is Almost-Equal-To 0.3 in the IGM of SQ, which is 10--100 times higher than in star-forming galaxies. The molecular gas carries a large fraction of the gas kinetic energy involved in the collision, meaning that this energy has not been thermalized yet. The kinetic energy of the H{sub 2} gas derived from CO observations is comparable to that of the warm H{sub 2} gas from Spitzer spectroscopy, and a factor Almost-Equal-To 5 greater than the thermal energy of the hot plasma heated by the collision. In the shock and bridge regions, the ratio of the PAH-to-CO surface luminosities, commonly used to measure the star formation efficiency of the H{sub 2} gas, is lower (up to a factor 75) than the observed values in star-forming galaxies. We suggest that turbulence fed by the galaxy-tidal arm collision maintains a high heating rate within the H{sub 2} gas. This interpretation implies that the velocity dispersion on the scale of giant molecular clouds in SQ is one order of magnitude larger than the Galactic value. The high amplitude of turbulence may explain why this gas is not forming stars efficiently.

Guillard, P.; Cluver, M. E.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P. M. [Spitzer Science Center (SSC), California Institute of Technology, MC 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Boulanger, F.; Pineau des Forets, G. [Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), UMR 8617, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud 11, Batiment 121, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Falgarone, E.; Gusdorf, A. [ENS, LERMA, UMR 8112, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond 75005 Paris (France); Appleton, P. N. [NASAHerschel Science Center (NHSC), California Institute of Technology, Mail code 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Duc, P.-A. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA-CNRS, Universite Paris VII, UMR 7158 (France); Xu, C. K. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A CORRELATION BETWEEN THE ECLIPSE DEPTHS OF KEPLER GAS GIANT CANDIDATES AND THE METALLICITIES OF THEIR PARENT STARS  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies of the interior structure of transiting exoplanets have shown that the heavy-element content of gas giants increases with host star metallicity. Since metal-poor planets are less dense and have larger radii than metal-rich planets of the same mass, one might expect that metal-poor stars host a higher proportion of gas giants with large radii than metal-rich stars. Here I present evidence for a negative correlation at the 2.3{sigma} level between eclipse depth and stellar metallicity in the Kepler gas giant candidates. Based on Kendall's {tau} statistics, the probability that eclipse depth depends on star metallicity is 0.981. The correlation is consistent with planets orbiting low-metallicity stars being, on average, larger in comparison with their host stars than planets orbiting metal-rich stars. Furthermore, since metal-rich stars have smaller radii than metal-poor stars of the same mass and age, a uniform population of planets should show a rise in median eclipse depth with [M/H]. The fact that I find the opposite trend indicates that substantial changes in the gas giant interior structure must accompany increasing [M/H]. I investigate whether the known scarcity of giant planets orbiting low-mass stars could masquerade as an eclipse depth-metallicity correlation, given the degeneracy between metallicity and temperature for cool stars in the Kepler Input Catalog. While the eclipse depth-metallicity correlation is not yet on firm statistical footing and will require spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements for validation, it is an intriguing window into how the interior structure of planets and even the planet formation mechanism may be changing with Galactic chemical evolution.

Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E., E-mail: sdr@astro.as.utexas.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Escape, Accretion or Star Formation? The Competing Depleters of Gas in Markarian 231  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on high resolution CO(1-0), CS(2-1) and 3mm continuum Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) observations of the molecular outflow host and nearest quasar Markarian 231. We use the CS(2-1) measurements to derive a dense gas mass within Mrk 231 of $1.8\\pm0.3\\times10^{10}$ $M_\\odot$, quite consistent with previous measurements. The CS(2-1) data also seem to indicate that the molecular disk of Mrk 231 is forming stars at normal efficiency. The high resolution CARMA observations were able to resolve the CO(1-0) outflow into two distinct lobes, allowing for a size estimate to be made and further constraining the molecular outflow dynamical time, further constraining the molecular gas escape rate. We find that 15% of the molecular gas within the Mrk 231 outflow actually exceeds the escape velocity in the central kiloparsec. Assuming that molecular gas is not constantly being accelerated, we find the depletion timescale of molecular gas in Mrk 231 to be 49 Myr, rather than 32 Myr, more...

Alatalo, Katherine

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations in the presence of the Chaplygin gas: Stars and wormholelike solutions  

SciTech Connect

We study static solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations for spherically symmetric objects (stars) living in a space filled with the Chaplygin gas. Two cases are considered. In the normal case, all solutions (excluding the de Sitter one) realize a three-dimensional spheroidal geometry because the radial coordinate achieves a maximal value (the 'equator'). After crossing the equator, three scenarios are possible: a closed spheroid having a Schwarzschild-type singularity with infinite blueshift at the 'south pole', a regular spheroid, and a truncated spheroid having a scalar curvature singularity at a finite value of the radial coordinate. The second case arises when the modulus of the pressure exceeds the energy density (the phantom Chaplygin gas). There is no more equator and all solutions have the geometry of a truncated spheroid with the same type of singularity. We also consider static spherically symmetric configurations existing in a universe filled with only the phantom Chaplygin gas. In this case, two classes of solutions exist: truncated spheroids and solutions of the wormhole type with a throat. However, the latter are not asymptotically flat and possess curvature singularities at finite values of the radial coordinate. Thus, they may not be used as models of observable compact astrophysical objects.

Gorini, V.; Moschella, U.; Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Pasquier, V.; Starobinsky, A. A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Mathematiche, Universita dell'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); INFN, sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Service de Physique Theorique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

The drop in the cosmic star formation rate below redshift 2 is caused by a change in the mode of gas accretion and by active galactic nucleus feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cosmic star formation rate below redshift 2 is caused...Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrabetae...cosmic star formation rate is observed to drop sharply...of the gas that did not pass through a virial shock...simulations to show that the rate at which the gas accretes......

Freeke van de Voort; Joop Schaye; C. M. Booth; Claudio Dalla Vecchia

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

u' m .,. . Society of Petroleum Engineers u I SPE 49259 StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells R.M. Graves, SPE, Colorado School of Mines; and D.G. O'Brien, PE, SPE, Solutions Engineering Copyr@ht 1998, Scdety of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. This paper was prapared for presentation at the 1998 SPE Annual Technicar Conference and Exhibition bald in New Orteans, Lcuisiana, 27-30 September 1998, This paper waa selected for presentation by en SPE Program Commiftee folrowing review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(a). Contents of the paper, as prasented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The materiar, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the .%ciety of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers prasented at SPE meetings

46

CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING): MOLECULAR GAS STAR FORMATION LAW IN NGC 4254  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the effects of different assumptions and systematics on the determination of the local, spatially resolved star formation law. Using four star formation rate (SFR) tracers (H{alpha} with azimuthally averaged extinction correction, mid-infrared 24 {mu}m, combined H{alpha} and mid-infrared 24 {mu}m, and combined far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared 24 {mu}m), several fitting procedures, and different sampling strategies, we probe the relation between SFR and molecular gas at various spatial resolutions (500 pc and larger) and surface densities ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}})approx. 10-245 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}) within the central {approx}6.5 kpc in the disk of NGC 4254. We explore the effect of diffuse emission using an unsharp masking technique with varying kernel size. The fraction of diffuse emission, f{sub DE}, thus determined is a strong inverse function of the size of the filtering kernel. We find that in the high surface brightness regions of NGC 4254 the form of the molecular gas star formation law is robustly determined and approximately linear ({approx}0.8-1.1) and independent of the assumed fraction of diffuse emission and the SFR tracer employed. When the low surface brightness regions are included, the slope of the star formation law depends primarily on the assumed fraction of diffuse emission. In such a case, results range from linear when the fraction of diffuse emission in the SFR tracer is f{sub DE} {approx}< 30% (or when diffuse emission is removed in both the star formation and the molecular gas tracer) to super-linear ({approx}1.4) when f{sub DE} {approx}> 50%. We find that the tightness of the correlation between gas and star formation varies with the choice of star formation tracer. The 24 {mu}m SFR tracer by itself shows the tightest correlation with the molecular gas surface density, whereas the H{alpha} corrected for extinction using an azimuthally averaged correction shows the highest dispersion. We find that for R < 0.5R{sub 25} the local star formation efficiency is constant and similar to that observed in other large spirals, with a molecular gas depletion time {tau}{sub dep} {approx} 2 Gyr.

Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Jameson, Katherine; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Wong, Tony; Xue Rui [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosolowsky, Erik [I. K. Barber School of the Arts and Science, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC V1V1V7 (Canada); West, Andrew A. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Bigiel, Frank; Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ott, Juergen, E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals that leave noticeable voids in the crystal structure. At the ALS, researchers from the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S. have now obtained definitive experimental evidence that this lone-pair model must be revised. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have clarified the subtle electronic origins of the prototypical distortions in these crystal structures. The results have important implications for the tantalizing possibility of spintronic or superconducting devices combining ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.

48

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals that leave noticeable voids in the crystal structure. At the ALS, researchers from the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S. have now obtained definitive experimental evidence that this lone-pair model must be revised. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have clarified the subtle electronic origins of the prototypical distortions in these crystal structures. The results have important implications for the tantalizing possibility of spintronic or superconducting devices combining ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.

49

BAUCHE TALLIES LONE GOAL IN HUSKIE WIN By Nicole Betker, University of Saskatchewan Sports Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BAUCHE TALLIES LONE GOAL IN HUSKIE WIN By Nicole Betker, University of Saskatchewan Sports Information SASKATOON, SK - University of Saskatchewan rookie Mitch Bauche tallied his first CIS goal in a 1 sides had numerous opportunities to score. Saskatchewan tallied 30 shots in the game, while UNBC had 16

Northern British Columbia, University of

50

Policy Recommendations for Establishing the LoneSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Texas The Monitoring and Analysis Program should be conducted by: A Monitoring and Analysis Contractor (MAC) Data Acquisition Subcontractors (DAS) A Monitoring Advisory and Review Committee (MARC) Monitoring and data analysis should be conducted at three... primary levels: Facility/whole building(s) utility data Facility/whole building (s) short-term demand and consumption data Sub-metered retrofit data Monitoring and Analysis Program cost is expected to be approximately: Three percent of retrofit cost...

Claridge, D. E.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Development of a Synergistic, Comprehensive Statewide Lone Star Healthy Streams Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) March 9, 2011 Victoria Co. TPWD and USDA-NRCS personnel (32) March 12, 2011 Brazos Co. (96) March 22, 2011 Weatherford (67) March 28, 2011 McLennan Co. (60) March 31, 2011 Caldwell Co. (31) April 7, 2011 Henderson Co. (137...

Wagner, K.; Redmon, L.; Peterson, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

"Climate Wise" in the Lone Star State: A Successful Partnership for Energy Efficiency in Austin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The City of Austin, Texas is forming partnerships with local companies to lower energy consumption and improve environmental performance within the industrial sector. As a local government participant in the federal Climate Wise program, Austin...

Allen, S. J.; Schare, S.

53

Physiological Ageing as it is Related to Gene Function in the Lone Star Tick, Amblyomma americanum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................ 15 Figure 4 Electrophoresis gel results for the expression of the 16S gene in Amblyomma americanum subdivided by the mortality percentile to the right of the result, the sample number over the top of the result, and the group... as assessed by Image J software displaying the expression of Amblyomma americaum gene 16S for the female control (FC), male control (MC), female experimental (FE), and male experimental (ME) groups from Day 0 to Day 77...

Catena, Amanda M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

Doing science: teachers' authentic experiences at the Lone Star Dinosaur Field Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Winkler and Dr. Louis Jacobs also deserve special thanks for being great science teachers. Though I was engaged primarily as an educational researcher, I found myself to be a science student as well. Through the experience that the scientists help... of excavating fossils, teachers, museum educators, and scientists sat around the campfire ruminating over their experiences. The team's videographer tumed his camera on paleontologist Louis Jacobs. With the campfire in the background, Louis Jacobs took...

Stiles, Thomas William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

ALMA observations of the molecular gas in the debris disk of the 30 Myr old star HD 21997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 30 Myr old A3-type star HD 21997 is one of the two known debris dust disks having a measurable amount of cold molecular gas. With the goal of understanding the physical state, origin, and evolution of the gas in young debris disks, we obtained CO line observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Here we report on the detection of 12CO and 13CO in the J=2-1 and J=3-2 transitions and C18O in the J=2-1 line. The gas exhibits a Keplerian velocity curve, one of the few direct measurements of Keplerian rotation in young debris disks. The measured CO brightness distribution could be reproduced by a simple star+disk system, whose parameters are r_in Sun, and i = 32.6 +/- 3.1 degrees. The total CO mass, as calculated from the optically thin C18O line, is about (4-8) x 10^-2 M_Earth, while the CO line ratios suggest a radiation temperature on the order of 6-9 K. Comparing our results with those obtained for the dust component of th...

Kspl, ; Juhsz, A; brahm, P; Apai, D; Csengeri, T; Grady, C A; Henning, Th; Hughes, A M; Kiss, Cs; Pascucci, I; Schmalzl, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DeLone & McLean IS Success Model in Evaluating Knowledge Transfer in a Virtual Learning Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DeLone & McLean's success model has been actively used since its first introduction in 1992. In this article, the authors extend this model to describe the success of knowledge sharing in an information system that included a part of the knowledge ... Keywords: Apprenticeship, DeLone & McLean Success Model, Knowledge Management, Knowledge Sharing, Systems Analysis, User Attitudes, Virtual Learning Environment

Raija Halonen; Heli Thomander; Elisa Laukkanen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

VALIDATION OF THE EQUILIBRIUM MODEL FOR GALAXY EVOLUTION TO z ? 3 THROUGH MOLECULAR GAS AND DUST OBSERVATIONS OF LENSED STAR-FORMING GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We combine IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements to study the dust and gas contents of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We present new observations for a sample of 17 lensed galaxies at z = 1.4-3.1, which allow us to directly probe the cold interstellar medium of normal star-forming galaxies with stellar masses of ?10{sup 10} M{sub ?}, a regime otherwise not (yet) accessible by individual detections in Herschel and molecular gas studies. The lensed galaxies are combined with reference samples of submillimeter and normal z ? 1-2 star-forming galaxies with similar far-infrared photometry to study the gas and dust properties of galaxies in the SFR-M{sub *}-redshift parameter space. The mean gas depletion timescale of main-sequence (MS) galaxies at z > 2 is measured to be only ?450 Myr, a factor of ?1.5 (?5) shorter than at z = 1 (z = 0), in agreement with a (1 + z){sup 1} scaling. The mean gas mass fraction at z = 2.8 is 40% 15% (44% after incompleteness correction), suggesting a flattening or even a reversal of the trend of increasing gas fractions with redshift recently observed up to z ? 2. The depletion timescale and gas fractions of the z > 2 normal star-forming galaxies can be explained under the 'equilibrium model' for galaxy evolution, in which the gas reservoir of galaxies is the primary driver of the redshift evolution of specific star formation rates. Due to their high star formation efficiencies and low metallicities, the z > 2 lensed galaxies have warm dust despite being located on the star formation MS. At fixed metallicity, they also have a gas-to-dust ratio 1.7 times larger than observed locally when using the same standard techniques, suggesting that applying the local calibration of the ?{sub GDR}-metallicity relation to infer the molecular gas mass of high-redshift galaxies may lead to systematic differences with CO-based estimates.

Saintonge, Amlie; Lutz, Dieter; Genzel, Reinhard; Tacconi, Linda J.; Berta, Stefano; Frster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sturm, Eckhard; Wuyts, Eva; Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Magnelli, Benjamin [Argelander-Institut fr Astronomy, Universitt Bonn, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nordon, Raanan [School of Physics and Astronomy, The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Baker, Andrew J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Bandara, Kaushala [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada)

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ultraviolet absorption by interstellar gas near the LMC star HD 36402 in the interstellar bubble N51D  

SciTech Connect

We have studied ultraviolet high-dispersion IUE spectra of the LMC star HD 36402 in the nebulosity N51D. Apart from absorption due to Milky Way gas, we find four interstellar absorption components associated with the immediate surroundings of HD 36402. The absorption at 305 km/sup -1/ originates in low-density, n(e)roughly-equal0.1 cm/sup -3/, 10/sup 4/ K gas. At 280 km s/sup -1/, strong absroption from the excited fine-structure level of carbon points to densities n(e)>1 cm/sup -3/ at 10/sup 4/ K. The velocity and density structure agree with that derived from visual emission lines. Additional weak absorption by common interstellar ions is seen near 260 km s/sup -1/. From a fit to the observed Lv..cap alpha.. profile, it is found that there is N(H)roughly-equal10/sup 20.2/ cm/sup -2/ in front of HD 36402, while the large N(H)roughly-equal10/sup 21.3/ cm/sup -2/ from 21 cm data clearly places most of the neutral gas behind N51D. The fourth component near 270 km s/sup -1/ shows strong N V, C IV, and Si IV, more than is consistent with a wind-blown interstellar bubble; hence there is additional absorption outside the bubble. The overall pattern of absorbtion-line strengths suggests solar abundance ratios for the metals. The earlier evolution of the large stellar association LH 77 may have induced star formation leading to bright nebulosities around LH 77, one of them being the bubble N51D.

de Boer, K.S.; Nash, A.G.

1982-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Star formation, metallicity gradient and ionized gas: clues to the formation of the elliptical galaxies NGC6868 and NGC5903  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stellar population, metallicity distribution and ionized gas in the elliptical galaxies NGC 6868 and NGC 5903 are investigated in this paper by means of long-slit spectroscopy and stellar population synthesis. Lick indices in both galaxies present a negative gradient indicating an overabundance of Fe, Mg, Na and TiO in the central parts with respect to the external regions. Concerning the emitting gas conspicuously detected in NGC 6868, we test three hypotheses as ionizing source: an H II region, post-AGB stars and an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Diagnostic diagrams involving the ratios $[NII]_{\\lambda6584}/H\\alpha$, $[OI]_{\\lambda6300}/H\\alpha$ and $[SII]_{\\lambda6717,31}/H\\alpha$, indicate that values measured in the central region of NGC 6868 are typical of LINERs. Together with the stellar population synthesis, this result suggests that the main source of gas ionization in NGC 6868 is non-thermal, produced by a low-luminosity AGN, probably with some contribution of shocks to explain ionization at distances of $\\sim3.5$ kpc from the nucleus.

Mauro G. Rickes; Miriani G. Pastoriza; Charles Bonatto

2007-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations in presence of the Chaplygin gas: stars and wormhole-like solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study static solutions of the Tolman--Oppenheimer--Volkoff equations for spherically symmetric objects (stars) living in a space filled with the Chaplygin gas. Two cases are considered. In the normal case all solutions (excluding the de Sitter one) realize a three-dimensional spheroidal geometry because the radial coordinate achieves a maximal value (the "equator"). After crossing the equator, three scenarios are possible: a closed spheroid having a Schwarzschild-type singularity with infinite blue-shift at the "south pole", a regular spheroid, and a truncated spheroid having a scalar curvature singularity at a finite value of the radial coordinate. The second case arises when the modulus of the pressure exceeds the energy density (the phantom Chaplygin gas). There is no more equator and all solutions have the geometry of a truncated spheroid with the same type of singularity. We consider also static spherically symmetric configurations existing in a universe filled with the phantom Chaplygin gas only. In this case two classes of solutions exist: truncated spheroids and solutions of the wormhole type with a throat. However, the latter are not asymptotically flat and possess curvature singularities at finite values of the radial coordinate. Thus, they may not be used as models of observable compact astrophysical objects.

V. Gorini; A. Yu. Kamenshchik; U. Moschella; V. Pasquier; A. A. Starobinsky

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

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61

DECIPHERING THE IONIZED GAS CONTENT IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING COMPLEX G75.78+0.34  

SciTech Connect

We present subarcsecond observations toward the massive star-forming region G75.78+0.34. We used the Very Large Array to study the centimeter continuum and H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 3}OH maser emission, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Submillimeter Array to study the millimeter continuum and recombination lines (H40{alpha} and H30{alpha}). We found radio continuum emission at all wavelengths, coming from three components: (1) a cometary ultracompact (UC) H II region with an electron density {approx}3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, excited by a B0 type star, and with no associated dust emission; (2) an almost unresolved UCH II region (EAST), located {approx}6'' to the east of the cometary UCH II region, with an electron density {approx}1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and associated with a compact dust clump detected at millimeter and mid-infrared wavelengths; and (3) a compact source (CORE), located {approx}2'' to the southwest of the cometary arc, with a flux density increasing with frequency, and embedded in a dust condensation of 30 M{sub Sun }. The CORE source is resolved into two compact and unresolved sources which can be well fit by two homogeneous hypercompact H II regions each one photoionized by a B0.5 zero-age main sequence star, or by free-free radiation from shock-ionized gas resulting from the interaction of a jet/outflow system with the surrounding environment. The spatial distribution and kinematics of water masers close to the CORE-N and S sources, together with excess emission at 4.5 {mu}m and the detected dust emission, suggest that the CORE source is a massive protostar driving a jet/outflow.

Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)] [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Kurtz, Stan; Lizano, Susana [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)] [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Palau, Aina [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain)] [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Dpt d'Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)] [Dpt d'Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Shepherd, Debra [NRAO, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States)] [NRAO, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Franco, Jose [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Garay, Guido, E-mail: asanchez@arcetri.astro.it [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino el Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino el Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

KECK OBSERVATIONS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER SOURCE G2: GAS CLOUD OR STAR?  

SciTech Connect

We present new observations and analysis of G2-the intriguing red emission-line object which is quickly approaching the Galaxy's central black hole. The observations were obtained with the laser guide star adaptive optics systems on the W. M. Keck I and II telescopes (2006-2012) and include spectroscopy (R {approx} 3600) centered on the hydrogen Br{gamma} line as well as K' (2.1 {mu}m) and L' (3.8 {mu}m) imaging. Analysis of these observations shows the Br{gamma} line emission has a positional offset from the L' continuum. This offset is likely due to background source confusion at L'. We therefore present the first orbital solution derived from Br{gamma} line astrometry, which, when coupled with radial velocity measurements, results in a later time of closest approach (2014.21 {+-} 0.14), closer periastron (130 AU, 1600 R{sub s}), and higher eccentricity (0.9814 {+-} 0.0060) compared to a solution using L' astrometry. It is shown that G2 has no K' counterpart down to K' {approx} 20 mag. G2's L' continuum and the Br{gamma} line emission appears unresolved in almost all epochs, which implies that the bulk of the emission resides in a compact region. The observations altogether suggest that while G2 has a gaseous component that is tidally interacting with the central black hole, there is likely a central star providing the self-gravity necessary to sustain the compact nature of this object.

Phifer, K.; Meyer, L.; Ghez, A. M.; Witzel, G.; Yelda, S.; Boehle, A.; Morris, M. R.; Becklin, E. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Do, T. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Lu, J. R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Matthews, K., E-mail: ghez@astro.ucla.edu [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of How the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastructures. EPA - Region 6's ENERGY STAR and Green Building Program assistance has led to some unique solutions and the beginning workups for the integrated expansion of effort to support State Implementation Plans in new innovative voluntary approaches...

Patrick, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Detection of a large fraction of atomic gas not associated with star-forming material in M17 SW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We probe the column densities and masses traced by the ionized and neutral atomic carbon with spectrally resolved maps, and compare them to the diffuse and dense molecular gas traced by [C I] and low-$J$ CO lines toward the star-forming region M17SW. We mapped a 4.1pc x 4.7pc region in the [C I] 609 m$\\mu$ line using the APEX telescope, as well as the CO isotopologues with the IRAM 30m telescope. We analyze the data based on velocity channel maps that are 1 km/s wide. We correlate their spatial distribution with that of the [C II] map obtained with SOFIA/GREAT. Optically thin approximations were used to estimate the column densities of [C I] and [C II] in each velocity channel. The spatial distribution of the [C I] and all CO isotopologues emission was found to be associated with that of [C II] in about 20%-80% of the mapped region, with the high correlation found in the central (15-23 km/s ) velocity channels. The excitation temperature of [C I] ranges between 40 K and 100 K in the inner molecular region of ...

Perez-Beaupuits, J P; Ossenkopf, V; Spaans, M; Gusten, R; Wiesemeyer, H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ALMA Observations of Warm Dense Gas in NGC 1614 --- Breaking of Star Formation Law in the Central kpc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435um dust continuum emission in the central kpc of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1 arcsec = 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0".26 x 0".20) into a circum-nuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f_{CO(6-5)} = 898 (+-153) Jy km/s, which is 63(+-12)% of the total CO(6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100pc dispersion of 40 km/s. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with \\Sigma_{SFR} 100 M_\\sun/yr/kpc^{2} and \\Sigma_{Gas} 1.0E4 M_\\sun/pc^{2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435um continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick AGN in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation fro...

Xu, C K; Lu, N; Gao, Y; Diaz-Santos, T; Herrero-Illana, R; Meijerink, R; Privon, G; Zhao, Y -H; Evans, A S; Knig, S; Mazzarella, J M; Aalto, S; Appleton, P; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Chu, J; Haan, S; Inami, H; Murphy, E J; Sanders, D B; Schulz, B; van der Werf, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

DISCOVERY OF COLD, PRISTINE GAS POSSIBLY ACCRETING ONTO AN OVERDENSITY OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT z {approx} 1.6  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of large amounts of cold (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K), chemically young gas in an overdensity of galaxies at redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1.6 located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey southern field. The gas is identified thanks to the ultra-strong Mg II {lambda}2800 absorption features it imprints onto the rest-frame UV spectra of galaxies in the background of the overdensity. There is no evidence that the optically thick gas is part of any massive galaxy (i.e., M{sub star} > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }), but rather is associated with the overdensity; less massive and fainter galaxies (25.5 mag < z < 27.5 mag) have too large an impact parameter to be causing ultra-strong absorption systems, based on our knowledge of such systems. The lack of corresponding Fe II absorption features, not detected even in co-added spectra, suggests that the gas is chemically more pristine than the interstellar medium and outflows of star-forming galaxies at similar redshift, including the galaxies of the overdensity itself, and comparable to the most metal-poor stars in the Milky Way halo. A crude estimate of the projected covering factor of the high-column-density gas (N{sub H} {approx}> 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}) based on the observed fraction of galaxies with ultra-strong absorbers is C{sub F} Almost-Equal-To 0.04. A broad, continuum absorption profile extending to the red of the interstellar Mg II absorption line by {approx}< 2000 km s{sup -1} is possibly detected in two independent co-added spectra of galaxies belonging to the overdensity, consistent with a large-scale infall motion of the gas onto the overdensity and its galaxies. Overall, these findings provide the first tentative evidence of accretion of cold, chemically young gas onto galaxies at high redshift, possibly feeding their star formation activity. We suggest the fact that the galaxies are members of a large structure, as opposed to field galaxies, might play a significant role in our ability to detect the accreting gas.

Giavalisco, Mauro; Salimbeni, Sara; Tripp, Todd M.; Cassata, Paolo; Guo Yicheng; Tang Yuping [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Vanzella, Eros; Nonino, Mario [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Renzini, Alvio [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cimatti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Kurk, Jaron [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mignoli, Marco, E-mail: mauro@astro.umass.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ligand Lone-Pair Influence on Hydrocarbon C-H Activation: A Computational Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Mid to late transition metal complexes that break hydrocarbon C?H bonds by transferring the hydrogen to a heteroatom ligand while forming a metal?alkyl bond offer a promising strategy for C?H activation. Here we report a density functional (B3LYP, M06, and X3LYP) analysis of cis-(acac){sub 2}MX and TpM(L)X (M = Ir, Ru, Os, and Rh; acac = acetylacetonate, Tp = tris(pyrazolyl)borate; X = CH{sub 3}, OH, OMe, NH{sub 2}, and NMe{sub 2}) systems for methane C?H bond activation reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. We address the importance of whether a ligand lone pair provides an intrinsic kinetic advantage through possible electronic d{sub ?}?p{sub ?} repulsions for M?OR and M?NR{sub 2} systems versus M?CH{sub 3} systems. This involves understanding the energetic impact of the X ligand group on ligand loss, C?H bond coordination, and C?H bond cleavage steps as well as understanding how the nucleophilicity of the ligand X group, the electrophilicity of the transition metal center, and cis-ligand stabilization effect influence each of these steps. We also explore how spectator ligands and second- versus third-row transition metal centers impact the energetics of each of these C?H activation steps.

Ess, Daniel H; Gunnoe, T. Brent; Cundari, Thomas R; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

69

Evaluation and Demonstration of BMPs for Cattle on Grazing Lands for the Lone Star Healthy Streams Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Research Center at McGregor utilizing Lotek GPS collars. Results suggest that stocking rates heavier than 6 ha/AUY (14.8 ac/AUY) increased E. coli loading, but only when sites were actively or recently (within the last two weeks) stocked when runoff.../Objectives........................................................................................................................... 6 Methods and Results .................................................................................................................................... 7 Task 1: Project Coordination and Administration...

Wagner, K.; Redmon, L.; Gentry, T.; Clary, C.

70

Spatially resolved physical conditions of molecular gas and potential star formation tracers in M83, revealed by the Herschel SPIRE FTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory, our understanding about the photo-dissociation regions (PDR) has taken a step forward. In the bandwidth of the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) on board Herschel, ten CO rotational transitions, including J=4-3 to J=13-12, and three fine structure lines, including [CI] 609, [CI] 370, and [NII] 250 micron, are covered. In this paper, I present our findings from the FTS observations at the nuclear region of M83, based on the spatially resolved physical parameters derived from the CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) map and the comparisons with the dust properties and star-formation tracers. I will discuss (1) the potential of using [NII] 250 and [CI] 370 micron as star-formation tracers; (2) the reliability of tracing molecular gas with CO; (3) the excitation mechanisms of warm CO; (4) the possibility of studying stellar feedback by tracing the thermal pressure of molecular gas in the nuclear ...

Wu, Ronin; Galliano, Frdric; Wilson, Christine D; Kamenetzky, Julia; Lee, Min-Young; Schirm, Maximilien; Hony, Sacha; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Spinoglio, Luigi; Cormier, Diane; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip R; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rmy-Ruyer, Aurlie; Baes, Martin; Boselli, Alexandro; Bournaud, Frdric; De Looze, Ilse; Hughes, Thomas M; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Rangwala, Naseem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

LARGE-SCALE SHOCK-IONIZED AND PHOTOIONIZED GAS IN M83: THE IMPACT OF STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the ionization structure of the nebular gas in M83 using the line diagnostic diagram, [O III](5007 A)/H{beta} versus [S II](6716 A+6731 A)/H{alpha}, with the newly available narrowband images from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We produce the diagnostic diagram on a pixel-by-pixel (0.''2 x 0.''2) basis and compare it with several photo- and shock-ionization models. We select four regions from the center to the outer spiral arm and compare them in the diagnostic diagram. For the photoionized gas, we observe a gradual increase of the log ([O III]/H{beta}) ratios from the center to the spiral arm, consistent with the metallicity gradient, as the H II regions go from super-solar abundance to roughly solar abundance from the center out. Using the diagnostic diagram, we separate the photoionized from the shock-ionized component of the gas. We find that the shock-ionized H{alpha} emission ranges from {approx}2% to about 15%-33% of the total, depending on the separation criteria used. An interesting feature in the diagnostic diagram is a horizontal distribution around log ([O III]/H{beta}) {approx} 0. This feature is well fit by a shock-ionization model with 2.0 Z{sub sun} metallicity and shock velocities in the range of 250-350 km s{sup -1}. A low-velocity shock component, <200 km s{sup -1}, is also detected and is spatially located at the boundary between the outer ring and the spiral arm. The low-velocity shock component can be due to (1) supernova remnants located nearby, (2) dynamical interaction between the outer ring and the spiral arm, and (3) abnormal line ratios from extreme local dust extinction. The current data do not enable us to distinguish among those three possible interpretations. Our main conclusion is that, even at the HST resolution, the shocked gas represents a small fraction of the total ionized gas emission at less than 33% of the total. However, it accounts for virtually all of the mechanical energy produced by the central starburst in M83.

Hong, Sungryong; Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dopita, Michael A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Balick, Bruce [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Carollo, Marcella [Department of Physics, ETH-Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Disney, Michael J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Frogel, Jay A. [Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Washington, DC 20005 (United States); Hall, Donald [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kimble, Randy A. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McCarthy, Patrick J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101-1292 (United States); O'Connell, Robert W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Paresce, Francesco [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, INAF, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Saha, Abhijit [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Silk, Joseph I. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Trauger, John T. [NASA-Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Walker, Alistair R., E-mail: wpb@pha.jhu.edu [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

ENERGY STAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGY STAR ENERGY STAR Jump to: navigation, search Logo: ENERGY STAR Name ENERGY STAR Year founded 1992 Notes Partnered with more than 20,000 public sector organizations. Website https://www.energystar.gov/ind References About ENERGY STAR[1] LinkedIn Connections Contents 1 About ENERGY STAR 1.1 For the Home 1.2 For Business 1.3 References About ENERGY STAR ENERGY STAR is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy helping us all save money and protect the environment through energy efficient products and practices. Results are already adding up. Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR, saved enough energy in 2010 alone to avoid greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those from 33 million cars - all while saving nearly $18 billion on their

73

Home : ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who dared imagine? Who dared imagine? Our newest video celebrates 20 years of success with our innovative ENERGY STAR partners. See the Video EPA Logo ENERGY STAR is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency voluntary program that helps businesses and individuals save money and protect our climate through superior energy efficiency. Learn more about ENERGY STAR. A comprehensive review of ENERGY STAR and other EPA climate protection partnerships. See 2011 Annual Report. Basic information on climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, and climate change science. See Climate Change. With help from ENERGY STAR, by 2012, Americans had cumulatively prevented more than 1.8 billion metric tons of GHG emissions. See 2012 Achievements. Energy Efficiency For Your Home

74

Energy Star | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Star Star Jump to: navigation, search Energystarlogo.jpg Contents 1 What's new 2 About ENERGY STAR 3 For the Home 4 For Business 5 History 6 References What's new On March 15, 2012, the EPA released a press release announcing 2012's ENERGY STAR award winners, and celebrating the 20 year anniversary of the award. Overall, the EPA estimates that American's have saved nearly $230 billion over two decades of the award. About ENERGY STAR ENERGY STAR is a joint program of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the United States Department of Energy helping us all save money and protect the environment through energy efficient products and practices. Results are already adding up. Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR, saved enough energy in 2009 alone to avoid greenhouse gas emissions

75

Understanding the Hydrogen Bond in Terms of the Location of the Bond Critical Point and the Geometry of the Lone Pairs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The origin of such high dCP values has been related to the constellation of the various interaction centersthe lone pairs and the atom cores of the donor and the acceptor oxygens and the hydrogen atom. ... Furthermore, for closed-shell interactions, the kinetic energy density, G(rCP), and the potential energy density, V(rCP), at the critical point depend exponentially on the HO distance. ... The crystal contains three short strong N-H ? O hydrogen bonds (HBs) with dN?O energies above 13 kcal mol-1, although the hydrogen atoms are firmly localized in the "nitrogen wells". ...

Anupama Ranganathan; G. U. Kulkarni; C. N. R. Rao

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

STAR METRICS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy continues to define Phase II of the STAR METRICS program, a collaborative initiative to track Research and Development expenditures and their outcomes. Visit the STAR METRICS website for...

77

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

78

Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars Supermassive stars in the early universe gave supermassive black holes a head start March 25, 2013 simulations suggest that star formation conditions back then allowed the first stars to become supermassive themselves In this simulation, a black hole that was just formed by the collapse of a supermassive star is surrounded by a distribution of gas (color indicates density). Because the black hole (located at the center but too small to see) grows by consuming the available gas, simulations like this one help determine how quickly the black hole can grow. The progenitor of this black

79

ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Other and Other Climate Protection Partnerships 2011 Annual Report CONTENTS Letter from the Administrator ............................................................................................................................................................................. 1 Executive Summary .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 2 Highlights of 2011 ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 ENERGY STAR Overview ......................................................................................................................................................................................

80

Electron lone pair distortion facilitated metal-insulator transition in ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires  

SciTech Connect

The electronic structure of ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires has been studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The recent synthesis of defect-free ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires resulted in the discovery of an abrupt voltage-induced metal insulator transition. First principle calculations predicted an additional V-O-Pb hybridized in-gap state unique to this vanadium bronze playing a significant role in facilitating the transition. We confirm the existence, energetic position, and orbital character of the in-gap state. Moreover, we reveal that this state is a hybridized Pb 6sO 2p antibonding lone pair state resulting from the asymmetric coordination of the Pb{sup 2+} ions.

Wangoh, L.; Quackenbush, N. F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Marley, P. M.; Banerjee, S. [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Sallis, S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Piper, L. F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Start Date 7/1/2009 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Home Certification: $500 Storage Water Heater: $50 Tankless Water Heater: $300 Furnace: $300 Boiler: $400 Provider Questar Gas Questar Gas provides incentives for home builders to construct energy efficient homes. Rebates are provided for both energy efficient gas equipment and whole home Energy Star certification. All equipment and

82

The Star Formation History of NGC 6822  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Images of five fields in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 obtained with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} in the F555W and F814W filters are presented. Photometry for the stars in these images was extracted using the Point-Spread-Function fitting program HSTPHOT/MULTIPHOT. The resulting color-magnitude diagrams reach down to $V\\approx26$, a level well below the red clump, and were used to solve quantitatively for the star formation history of NGC 6822. Assuming that stars began forming in this galaxy from low-metallicity gas and that there is little variation in the metallicity at each age, the distribution of stars along the red giant branch is best fit with star formation beginning in NGC 6822 12-15 Gyr ago. The best-fitting star formation histories for the old and intermediate age stars are similar among the five fields and show a constant or somewhat increasing star formation rate from 15 Gyr ago to the present except for a possible dip in the star formation rate from 3 to 5 Gyr ago. The main differences among the five fields are in the higher overall star formation rate per area in the bar fields as well as in the ratio of the recent star formation rate to the average past rate. These variations in the recent star formation rate imply that stars formed within the past 0.6 Gyr are not spatially very well mixed throughout the galaxy.

Ted K. Wyder

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

84

PECO Energy (Gas) Heating Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The PECO Smart Gas Efficiency Upgrade Program offers rebates and incentives to commercial or residential customers that install an ENERGY STAR qualified high-efficiency natural gas furnace or...

85

Massive Stars: Their Birth Sites and Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stellar IMF has been found to be an invariant Salpeter power-law (alpha=2.35) above about 1 Msun, but at the same time a massive star typically has more than one companion. This constrains the possible formation scenarios of massive stars, but also implies that the true, binary-star corrected stellar IMF could be significantly steeper than Salpeter, alpha>2.7. A significant fraction of all OB stars are found relatively far from potential birth sites which is most probably a result of dynamical ejections from cores of binary-rich star clusters. Such cores form rapidly due to dynamical mass segregation, or they are primordial. Probably all OB stars thus form in stellar clusters together with low-mass stars, and they have a rather devastating effect on the embedded cluster by rapidly driving out the remaining gas leaving expanding OB associations and bound star clusters. The distributed population of OB stars has a measured IMF with alpha about 4, which however, does not necessarily constitute a different physical mode for isolated star formation. A steep field-star IMF is obtained naturally because stars form in clusters which are distributed according to a power-law cluster mass function.

Pavel Kroupa

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

OBSERVATIONS OF Arp 220 USING HERSCHEL-SPIRE: AN UNPRECEDENTED VIEW OF THE MOLECULAR GAS IN AN EXTREME STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect

We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 {mu}m, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }; very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with {tau}{sub dust} {approx} 5 at 100 {mu}m. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L{sub FIR} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T {approx} 50 K and warm molecular gas at T {approx} 1350{sup +280}{sub -100} K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L{sub CO}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -4} (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L{sub CO,J=6-5}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -5}). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H{sub 2} rotational lines. At 1350 K, H{sub 2} dominates the cooling ({approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }) in the interstellar medium compared to CO ({approx}0.4 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }). We have ruled out photodissociation regions, X-ray-dominated regions, and cosmic rays as likely sources of excitation of this warm molecular gas, and found that only a non-ionizing source can heat this gas; the mechanical energy from supernovae and stellar winds is able to satisfy the large energy budget of {approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }. Analysis of the very high-J lines of HCN strongly indicates that they are solely populated by infrared pumping of photons at 14 {mu}m. This mechanism requires an intense radiation field with T > 350 K. We detect a massive molecular outflow in Arp 220 from the analysis of strong P Cygni line profiles observed in OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 2}O. The outflow has a mass {approx}> 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} and is bound to the nuclei with velocity {approx}< 250 km s{sup -1}. The large column densities observed for these molecular ions strongly favor the existence of an X-ray luminous AGN (10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in Arp 220.

Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 1255 38th street, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Wilson, Christine D.; Mentuch, Erin; Schirm, Maximilien R. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Rykala, Adam [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Isaak, Kate [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Baes, Maarten [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, George J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boselli, Alessandro [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Bradford, Charles M. [JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter [Blue Sky Spectroscopy Inc, Suite 9-740 4th Avenue South, Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 0N9 (Canada); Madden, Suzanne C.; Sauvage, Marc [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sacchi, Nicola [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); and others

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The empirical laws of star formation suggest that galactic-scale gravity is involved, but they do not identify the actual triggering mechanisms for clusters in the final stages. Many other triggering processes satisfy the empirical laws too, including turbulence compression and expanding shell collapse. The self-similar nature of the gas and associated young stars suggests that turbulence is more directly involved, but the small scale morphology of gas around most embedded clusters does not look like a random turbulent flow. Most clusters look triggered by other nearby stars. Such a prominent local influence makes it difficult to understand the universality of the Kennicutt and Schmidt laws on galactic scales. A unified view of multi-scale star formation avoids most of these problems. Ambient self-gravity produces spiral arms and drives much of the turbulence that leads to self-similar structures, while localized energy input from existing clusters and field supernovae triggers new clusters in pre-existing clouds. The hierarchical structure in the gas made by turbulence ensures that the triggering time scales with size, giving the Schmidt law over a wide range of scales and the size-duration correlation for young star fields. The efficiency of star formation is determined by the fraction of the gas above a critical density of around 10^5 m(H2)/cc. Star formation is saturated to its largest possible value given the fractal nature of the interstellar medium.

Bruce G. Elmegreen

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction Home Options Builder Option Package 1: $50 (single family), $50 (multifamily) Builder Option Package 2: $100 (single family), $100 (multifamily) Energy Star 3.0: $300 (single family), $200 (multifamily) High Performance Home: $500 (single family), $300 (multifamily)

89

Petrologic and stable isotopic evidence for reaction-enhanced fluid flow during metamorphism of Precambrian-Cambrian sedimentary rocks, Lone Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Upper Precambrian to Cambrian sedimentary rocks, regionally metamorphosed during the Mesozoic to produce marbles and calc-silicate rocks, were contact metamorphosed at the end of the Cretaceous by the Lone Mountain granitic pluton. Mineral assemblages within the calc-silicates were in equilibrium with H[sub 2]O-rich fluids, while the marbles were in equilibrium with more CO[sub 2]-rich fluids. Mineralogical variation between two different calc-silicate lithologies is the result of differences in bulk rock chemical composition, which also results in differences in isotopic composition between the calc-silicate lithologies. delta O-18 and delta C-13 values show differences of greater than 6 and 4 per mil respectively across lithologic boundaries between interlayered calc-silicates and between interlayered marbles and calc-silicates. The absence of any systematic variation between delta O-18 and delta C-13 values in the calc-silicates suggests that isotopic variation due to decarbonation reactions was limited. The differences in mineralogy and isotopic composition indicate that permeability was enhanced by reaction, permitting the focused flow of fluid through the calc-silicates. Calculated mass balance variations in delta O-18 based on reaction space analysis and Rayleigh decarbonation cannot explain the observed variations of delta O-18, requiring infiltration of externally derived fluids, while the delta C-13 compositions in the calc-silicates can be explained by Rayleigh decarbonation alone.

Richards, I.J.; Labotka, T.C. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geochemical Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection Agency program helping businesses and individuals fight global warming through superior energy efficiency. Bring Your Green to Work with ENERGY STAR ® 1 Give It a rest Use the ENERGY STAR power management settings on your computer and monitor so they go into power save mode when not in use. Also use a power strip as a central "turn off" point when you are using equipment to completely disconnect the power supply. 2 Unplug It Unplug electronics such as cell phones and laptops once they are charged. Adapters plugged into outlets use energy even if they are not charging. 3 Light Up Your Work Life Replace the light bulb in your desk lamp with an ENERGY STAR qualified bulb. It will last up to 10 times longer and use about 75 percent less energy. Turn off the lights when

91

Gas & Galaxy Evolution ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas & Galaxy Evolution ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, 2000 J. E. Hibbard, M. P. Rupen and J. H. van Gorkom, eds. Gas/Star O#11;sets in Tidal Tails J. C. Mihos Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 Abstract. We use numerical simulations to study the development of gas/star o#11;sets

Mihos, Chris

92

Star Power  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

None

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

Star Power  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

None

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

94

SNAPSHOT … THE ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fall 2008 Introduction At mid-year 2008*, commercial and industrial (C&I) leaders continued to make great progress in their efforts to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions across their buildings and facilities. In the first six months of 2008, key indicators of progress have already exceeded activity levels from 2007. More than 1,500 organizations and individuals now participate in the ENERGY STAR Challenge Close to 2 billion new square feet of commercial building floor space rated in the first half of the year bringing the total to about 9.5 billion over 71,000 buildings Labels awarded through June 2008 almost equal the 2007 total, with about 5,000 facilities now qualified as ENERGY STAR ENERGY STAR Leader activity on the rise this year; almost 60 commercial partners achieved key

95

ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Air and Radiation * For more information www.energystar.gov or call 1.888.STAR.YES (1.888.782.7937) * (6202J) EPA 430-H-08-002 * December 2008 * Recycled/Recyclable - Printed with Vegetable Oil Based Inks on Recycled Paper (Minimum 50% Post-consumer Content) of Air and Radiation * For more information www.energystar.gov or call 1.888.STAR.YES (1.888.782.7937) * (6202J) EPA 430-H-08-002 * December 2008 * Recycled/Recyclable - Printed with Vegetable Oil Based Inks on Recycled Paper (Minimum 50% Post-consumer Content) Enable power management settings so they automatically enter a low-power mode when not in use. monitor/computer Use a power strip as a central "turn off" point when you are done using office equipment to completely disconnect the power supply. power strip Unplug electronics

96

Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003a. Commercial Steam Cookers. Energy Star ProgramRequirements for Steam Cookers Electric Gas Cooking Energyfreezer Commercial steam cooker Computer Copier Decorative

Sanchez, Marla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Energy Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR ENERGY TARGETS ESL-KT-12-10-08 CATEE 2012: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, Galveston, TX, October 9-11, 2012 POP QUIZ!!!! What is EUI?? Energy Use Intensity Do you know the EUI and any of the buildings you designed... this past year? Do you know what a good EUI is for an Office building? K-12 School? ESL-KT-12-10-08 CATEE 2012: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, Galveston, TX, October 9-11, 2012 POP QUIZ!!!! ESL-KT-12-10-08 CATEE 2012: Clean Air...

Reihl, K.; Tullos, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

From Gas to Stars Over Cosmic Time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...decrease the Jeans mass by M J ? {rho} s...typically have shock velocity vs ? vrms . When we combine...efficiency, the velocity dispersion observed...galaxies comparable in mass to the Milky Way...67). Lower-mass dwarf galaxies have lower accretion velocities, though, and so...

Mordecai-Mark Mac Low

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

Columbia Gas of Virginia - Home Savings Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Gas of Virginia - Home Savings Rebate Program Columbia Gas of Virginia - Home Savings Rebate Program Columbia Gas of Virginia - Home Savings Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Virginia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Gas Storage Water Heater: $50 Energy Star Gas Tankless Water Heater: $300 High Efficiency Gas Furnace: $300 High Efficiency Windows (Replacement): $1/sq. ft. Attic and Floor Insulation (Replacement): $0.30/sq. ft. Duct Insulation (Replacement): $200 - $250/site Provider Columbia Gas of Virginia

100

Social networks for lonely objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visions of ubiquitous computing describe a network of devices that quietly supports human goals, but this may also add complexity to an already frustrating relationship between humans and their electronic objects. As we ...

Kestner, John Anthony

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

THE STAR FORMATION LAW AT LOW SURFACE DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing H I maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV - r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and far-infrared (FIR) data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than 1, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and H I maps to measure the star formation rate (SFR) and hydrogen gas surface density within the same region for all the galaxies. The LSB galaxy star formation rate surface densities lie below the extrapolation of the power law fit to the SFR surface density as a function of the total gas density for higher surface brightness galaxies. Although there is more scatter, the LSB galaxies also lie below a second version of the star formation law in which the SFR surface density is correlated with the gas density divided by the orbital time in the disk. The downturn seen in both star formation laws is consistent with theoretical models that predict lower star formation efficiencies in LSB galaxies due to the declining molecular fraction with decreasing density.

Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D. [California Institute of Technology, MC 278-17, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neff, Susan G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Heckman, Timothy M.; Szalay, Alex S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lee, Young-Wook; Yi, Sukyoung K. [Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Energy Technology 2754 Compass Drive, Grand Junction, CO 81506 Business: Energy Management Services/Consulting Sarah Faverman Phone: 970-243-0255 / Fax: 970-245-4268 Email: sarah@newenergytech.net Customer JCPenney Company, Inc. 6501 Legacy Drive, Plano, TX 75024 Business: Retail Rob Keller, P.E., Energy Management & Engineering Services Director Phone: 972-431-1788 / Fax: 972-531-1788 Email: rkeller@jcpenney.com New Energy Technology helped JCPenney earn the first ENERGY STAR labels for retail buildings and Partner of the Year Award. Project Scope New Energy Technology (NET) supports JCPenney's (JCP) energy conservation culture through three programs focused on high-quality energy data and energy management. Through its automated benchmarking

103

ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Team Checklist Green Team Checklist One person cannot do it all! So when it comes to making your workplace greener and more energy efficient, nothing beats a team. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has learned from ENERGY STAR partners that forming a green team with coworkers is a great way to help increase energy efficiency and reduce office waste. Consider the following checklist of creative ideas from EPA to help your green team get started. Once you've formed your team, start by planting the seeds for success with small changes in individual workspaces. Then move through the list and help success bloom with bigger changes that can affect the whole organization. Together, these actions can help your green team build a better world! Start Off Right-Meet with management to get approval and buy-in for the idea of forming a green team. Not only does support

104

2014 ENERGY STAR Awards : ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partner Resources Partner Resources Manufacturers Retailers New Home Industry Utilities/EEPS Residential & Commercial Products Programs Service & Product Providers Buildings & Plants Small Businesses Congregations For Contractors For Federal Agencies Join ENERGY STAR Home > Partner Resources > ENERGY STAR Awards 2014 ENERGY STAR Awards The application submission period for the 2014 ENERGY STAR Awards has closed. Each year, the ENERGY STAR program honors organizations that have made outstanding contributions to protecting the environment through energy efficiency. Please save the date for our awards ceremony on April 29, 2014. Ceremony registration information will be available on this website in January 2014. If you have any questions, please contact Rebecca Hudson, at

105

Effects of a Supermassive Black Hole Binary on a Nuclear Gas Disk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study influence of a galactic central supermassive black hole (SMBH) binary on gas dynamics and star formation activity in a nuclear gas disk by making three-dimensional Tree+SPH simulations. Due to orbital motions of SMBHs, there are various resonances between gas motion and the SMBH binary motion. We have shown that these resonances create some characteristic structures of gas in the nuclear gas disk, for examples, gas elongated or filament structures, formation of gaseous spiral arms, and small gas disks around SMBHs. In these gaseous dense regions, active star formations are induced. As the result, many star burst regions are formed in the nuclear region.

Hidenori Matsui; Asao Habe; Takayuki R. Saitoh

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hypersonic Molecular Shocks in Star Forming Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much emission from star forming regions is from shock-excited gas. Shocks in molecular clouds are still not fully understood, as magnetic fields, dust and chemistry all play significant roles. I review the history, physics and current work in understanding these shocks, and in their possible use as diagnostics of local conditions.

Brand, P W J L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hypersonic Molecular Shocks in Star Forming Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much emission from star forming regions is from shock-excited gas. Shocks in molecular clouds are still not fully understood, as magnetic fields, dust and chemistry all play significant roles. I review the history, physics and current work in understanding these shocks, and in their possible use as diagnostics of local conditions.

Peter W. J. L. Brand

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

108

ENERGY STAR SNAPSHOT … Spring 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 Introduction In 2008, leading commercial and industrial organizations outpaced their 2007 efforts to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Rating activity continued to be strong, particularly for offices and schools; and new organizations partnering with ENERGY STAR nearly tripled. Recognition for improvement and top performance grew significantly in 2008. Almost 3,300 buildings earned the ENERGY STAR, bringing the overall total to more than 6,200 facilities representing over 1 billion square feet. Twenty-seven partners reduced overall energy use to be designated as an ENERGY STAR Leader, 14 for the first time. By the end of the year, a total of 65 partners had demonstrated reaching such milestones. The ENERGY STAR Snapshot provides an at-a-glance summary of the key performance indicators

109

Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnace: $150 High Efficiency Natural Gas Hearth: $70 Conventional Natural Gas Water Heater: $40 Condensing Tankless Water Heater: $200 Combined Domestic Water/Hydronic Space Heating System (usingTankless Water Heater): $800 Energy Star Certified Home: $350 Energy Star Certified Plus Home: $750

110

ENERGY STAR SNAPSHOT - Spring 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Progress in the Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors Fall 2009 Summary By mid-year 2009, key commercial and industrial organizations have already surpassed their 2008 efforts to improve energy performance and reduce greenhouse gas emissions: * More buildings have been rated at mid year 2009 than in all of last year. This brings the total number of buildings with energy performance ratings to more than 97,000. * Nearly 1,850 buildings have earned the ENERGY STAR in 2009, ahead of the 2008 mid-year total. * Almost 30 organizations, mostly among our nation's public school districts, have already achieved significant portfolio-wide energy improvements or top performance. The ENERGY STAR Snapshot provides an at-a-glance summary of the key performance indicators behind

111

STAR Test Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment These instructions describe how to set up the STAR environment independent of the production environment in order to test different installations in $OPTSTAR and $GROUP_DIR. If you want to modify those installations you will need access to the starofl account. Bypass STAR envionment login Edit your ~/.pdsf_setup file changing the STAR_LINUX_SETUP to "use_none" and start a new session. You should not see all the STAR environmental variables defined when you do this (and it will probably be much quicker than usual, too). Do a manual STAR login If you want to modify what test environment you use copy the test login scripts to your own working area: cp -r /common/star/startest /path/to/myworkdir/. If you don't want to modify these files you can source them directly from

112

Giant molecular clouds: star factories of the galaxy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......molecular gas, the fuel for new stars. The...interstellar medium, ISM). This gas accumulates...1990, Bate 1995, Price and Monaghan 2007...disproportionate effects on the ISM - they have short...depositing energy in the ISM, and contributing...Rollig M, et al. Price D J and Monaghan J......

Clare Dobbs

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Quasar feedback: accelerated star formation and chaotic accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing Supermassive Black Holes (SMBH) are believed to influence their parent galaxies in a negative way, terminating their growth by ejecting gas out before it could turn into stars. Here we present some of the most sophisticated SMBH feedback simulations to date showing that quasar's effects on galaxies are not always negative. We find that when the ambient shocked gas cools rapidly, the shocked gas is compressed into thin cold dense shells, filaments and clumps. Driving these high density features out is much more difficult than analytical models predict since dense filaments are resilient to the feedback. However, in this regime quasars have another way of affecting the host -- by triggering a massive star formation burst in the cold gas by over-pressurising it. Under these conditions SMBHs actually accelerate star formation in the host, having a positive rather than negative effect on their host galaxies. The relationship between SMBH and galaxies is thus even more complex and symbiotic than currently b...

Nayakshin, Sergei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Modeling feedback from stars and black holes in galaxy mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe techniques for incorporating feedback from star formation and black hole accretion into simulations of isolated and merging galaxies. At present, the details of these processes cannot be resolved in simulations on galactic scales. Our basic approach therefore involves forming coarse-grained representations of the properties of the interstellar medium and black hole accretion starting from basic physical assumptions, so that the impact of these effects can be included on resolved scales. We illustrate our method using a multiphase description of star-forming gas. Feedback from star formation pressurises highly overdense gas, altering its effective equation of state. We show that this allows the construction of stable galaxy models with much larger gas fractions than possible in earlier numerical work. We extend the model by including a treatment of gas accretion onto central supermassive black holes in galaxies. Assuming thermal coupling of a small fraction of the bolometric luminosity of accreting...

Springel, V; Hernquist, L; Springel, Volker; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Hernquist, Lars

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

ENERGY STAR Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Challenge STAR Challenge for Industry Participant Handbook June 2013 ENERGY STAR is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Program helping organizations and individuals fight climate change through superior energy efficiency. Learn more at energystar.gov/buildings. 2 Contents Overview ............................................................................................................................. 3 Participation Eligibility .......................................................................................................... 4 How to Participate ............................................................................................................... 5 Step 1: Establish an energy intensity metric ................................................................ 5

117

Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic blue. The lines used in this work were 4603.03A, 4844.33A and 5292.22A.

M. M. Dworetsky; J. L. Persaud; K. Patel

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Sterrewacht Gas evolution in protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sterrewacht Leiden Gas evolution in protoplanetary disks W.F. Thi , E.F. van Dishoeck , G are surrounded by 10 ­10 M of gas+dust in disks with sizes of 100­400 AU. This material may form extrasolar planets. 3 Disks have also been imaged around Vega-like stars, but are thought to be gas­poor with "!#$ M

Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan van

119

Star Formation in Las Campanas Compact Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact groups (CGs) of galaxies offer an exceptional laboratory for the study of dense galaxian environments --- where interactions, tidally induced activity, and mergers are expected to be at their highest rate of occurrence. Here, we present first results from a new catalogue of compact groups, one based upon the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS). Using the equivalent width of [OII]3727, we have studied the star formation activity in LCRS CGs: we find strong evidence of depressed star formation in CGs relative to that in loose groups or the field. Although much of this effect can be ascribed to morphological mix (CGs contain a high fraction of early-type galaxies), there is some evidence that the star formation rate in late-type galaxies is particularly deficient --- perhaps only one-half to one-third that of field spirals. We conclude that gas stripping mechanisms may play a role in CG environments.

Sahar S. Allam; Douglas L. Tucker; Huan Lin; Yasuhiro Hashimoto

1999-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

120

Star Formation in Mergers and Interacting Galaxies: Gathering the Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selected results from recent studies of star formation in galaxies at different stages of interaction are reviewed. Recent results from the Spitzer Space Telescope are highlighted. Ideas on how large-scale driving of star formation in interacting galaxies might mesh with our understanding of star formation in isolated galaxies and small scale mechanisms within galaxies are considered. In particular, there is evidence that on small scales star formation is determined by the same thermal and turbulent processes in cool compressed clouds as in isolated galaxies. If so, this affirms the notion that the primary role of large-scale dynamics is to gather and compress the gas fuel. In gas-rich interactions this is generally done with increasing efficiency through the merger process.

Curtis Struck

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

IC 3418: STAR FORMATION IN A TURBULENT WAKE  

SciTech Connect

Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations of IC 3418, a low surface brightness galaxy in the Virgo Cluster, revealed a striking 17 kpc UV tail of bright knots and diffuse emission. H{alpha} imaging confirms that star formation is ongoing in the tail. IC 3418 was likely recently ram pressure stripped on its first pass through Virgo. We suggest that star formation is occurring in molecular clouds that formed in IC 3418's turbulent stripped wake. Tides and ram pressure stripping (RPS) of molecular clouds are both disfavored as tail formation mechanisms. The tail is similar to the few other observed star-forming tails, all of which likely formed during RPS. The tails' morphologies reflect the forces present during their formation and can be used to test for dynamical coupling between molecular and diffuse gas, thereby probing the origin of the star-forming molecular gas.

Hester, Janice A.; Neill, James D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Gil de Paz, Armando [Dpto. de Astrofisica, Universidad Computense de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Rich, R. Michael, E-mail: jhester@srl.caltech.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

ANALYTICAL STAR FORMATION RATE FROM GRAVOTURBULENT FRAGMENTATION  

SciTech Connect

We present an analytical determination of the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds, based on a time-dependent extension of our analytical theory of the stellar initial mass function. The theory yields SFRs in good agreement with observations, suggesting that turbulence is the dominant, initial process responsible for star formation. In contrast to previous SFR theories, the present one does not invoke an ad hoc density threshold for star formation; instead, the SFR continuously increases with gas density, naturally yielding two different characteristic regimes, thus two different slopes in the SFR versus gas density relationship, in agreement with observational determinations. Besides the complete SFR derivation, we also provide a simplified expression, which reproduces the complete calculations reasonably well and can easily be used for quick determinations of SFRs in cloud environments. A key property at the heart of both our complete and simplified theory is that the SFR involves a density-dependent dynamical time, characteristic of each collapsing (prestellar) overdense region in the cloud, instead of one single mean or critical freefall timescale. Unfortunately, the SFR also depends on some ill-determined parameters, such as the core-to-star mass conversion efficiency and the crossing timescale. Although we provide estimates for these parameters, their uncertainty hampers a precise quantitative determination of the SFR, within less than a factor of a few.

Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, Ecole Normale Superieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Chabrier, Gilles [Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CRAL, UMR CNRS 5574, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

Galaxy Ecosystems: gas contents, inflows and outflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a set of observational data for galaxy cold gas mass fraction and gas phase metallicity to constrain the content, inflow and outflow of gas in central galaxies hosted by halos with masses between $10^{11} M_{\\odot}$ to $10^{12} M_{\\odot}$. The gas contents in high redshift galaxies are obtained by combining the empirical star formation histories of Lu et al. (2014) and star formation models that relate star formation rate with the cold gas mass in galaxies. We find that the total baryon mass in low-mass galaxies is always much less than the universal baryon mass fraction since $z = 2$, regardless of star formation model adopted. The data for the evolution of the gas phase metallicity require net metal outflow at $z\\lesssim 2$, and the metal loading factor is constrained to be about $0.01$, or about $60\\%$ of the metal yield. Based on the assumption that galactic outflow is more enriched in metal than both the interstellar medium and the material ejected at earlier epochs, we are able to put stringent c...

Lu, Zhankui; Lu, Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

ENERGY STAR Qualified Room Air Conditioners | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data ENERGY STAR Qualified Room Air Conditioners Dataset Summary Description Room Air Conditioners that have earned the ENERGY STAR are more efficient than standard models. ENERGY STAR is the trusted symbol for energy efficiency helping consumers save money and protect the environment through energy-efficient products and practices. More information on ENERGY STAR is available at www.energystar.gov. Tags {"Room Air Conditioners","Energy Star",products,"energy efficiency",efficient,"greenhouse gas emissions",climate,utility,utilities,household,savings,labels,partners,certification}

125

Maintaining STAR - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP CampaignPosters VPP Tools VPP Presentations VPP Awareness VPP Communications VPP Conferences...

126

Star-ND (Multi-Dimensional Star-Identification)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to perform star-identification with lower processing requirements, multi-dimensional techniques are implemented in this research as a database search as well as to create star pattern parameters. New star pattern parameters are presented...

Spratling, Benjamin

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Furnaces Gas Furnaces Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces October 7, 2013 - 10:39am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential gas furnaces, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

128

Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Storage Water Heaters Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters October 7, 2013 - 10:43am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

129

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ENERGY STAR certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR certification ENERGY STAR certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants ENERGY STAR certification Featured research and reports Facts and stats Climate change and buildings ENERGY STAR certification

131

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Relics of metal-free low mass stars exploding as thermonuclear supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewed interest in the first stars that were formed in the universe has led to the discovery of extremely iron-poor stars. Since several competing scenarios exist, our understanding of the mass range that determines the observed elemental abundances remains unclear. In this study, we consider three well-studied metal-poor stars in terms of the theoretical supernovae (SNe) model. Our results suggest that the observed abundance patterns in the metal-poor star BD +80 245 and the pair of stars HD 134439/40 agree strongly with the theoretical possibility that these stars inherited their heavy element abundance patterns from SNe initiated by thermonuclear runaways in the degenerate carbon-oxygen cores of primordial asymptotic giant branch stars with \\~3.5-5 solar masses. Recent theoretical calculations have predicted that such SNe could be originated from metal-free stars in the intermediate mass range. On the other hand, intermediate mass stars containing some metals would end their lives as white dwarfs after expelling their envelopes in the wind due to intense momentum transport from outgoing photons to heavy elements. This new pathway for the formation of SNe requires that stars are formed from the primordial gas. Thus, we suggest that stars of a few solar masses were formed from the primordial gas and that some of them caused thermonuclear explosions when the mass of their degenerate carbon-oxygen cores increased to the Chandrasekhar limit without experiencing efficient mass loss.

Takuji Tsujimoto; Toshikazu Shigeyama

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

Neutron Stars and Fractal Dimensionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that the material inside Neutron stars behaves anomalously with fractal statistics and that in principle, we could induce mini Neutron stars, with the release of energy.

Burra G. Sidharth

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

Carbon Stars | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stars Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Stars Place: Netherlands Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References:...

135

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

136

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

137

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

138

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

139

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

140

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

142

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

143

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

144

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

145

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

146

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

147

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

148

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric central star Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of young stars in concert with new high-dynamic range maps of the distribution molecular gas... and dust, we can answer several key long-standing questions related to the...

150

Star Formation and Tidal Encounters with the Low Surface Brightness Galaxy UGC 12695 and Companions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612, email:koneil@naic.edu 2 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Box 0 where the column density is above this star formation threshold. The low surface brightness nature of this galaxy could thus be attributed to an insu?cient gas surface density, inhibiting star formation on a more

O'Neil, Karen

151

arXiv:astroph/0002191 Star Formation and Tidal Encounters with the Low Surface Brightness Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observatory, HC03 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612, email:koneil@naic.edu 2 National Radio Astronomy Observatory regions where the column density is above this star formation threshold. The low surface brightness nature of this galaxy could thus be attributed to an insufficient gas surface density, inhibiting star formation

O'Neil, Karen

152

Three-dimensional modeling of ionized gas. II. Spectral energy distributions of massive and very massive stars in stationary and time-dependent modeling of the ionization of metals in HII regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HII regions play a crucial role in the measurement of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium and provide fundamental data about element abundances that constrain models of galactic chemical evolution. Discrepancies that still exist between observed emission line strengths and those predicted by nebular models can be partly attributed to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the sources of ionizing radiation used in the models as well as simplifying assumptions made in nebular modeling. The influence of stellar metallicity on nebular line strength ratios, via its effect on the SEDs, is of similar importance as variations in the nebular metallicity. We have computed a grid of model atmosphere SEDs for massive and very massive O-type stars covering a range of metallicities from significantly subsolar (0.1 Zsun) to supersolar (2 Zsun). The SEDs have been computed using a state-of-the-art model atmosphere code that takes into account the attenuation of the ionizing flux by the spectral lines of ...

Weber, J A; Hoffmann, T L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dark Stars: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark Stars (DS) are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of ordinary atomic material but powered by the heat from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation (rather than by fusion). Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for DM, can be their own antimatter and can accumulate inside the star, with their annihilation products thermalizing with and heating the DS. The resulting DSs are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. Though DM constituted only $power the star for millions to billions of years. Depending on their DM environment, early DSs can become very massive ($>10^6 M_\\odot$), very bright ($>10^9 L_\\odot$), and potentially detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Once the DM runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus DSs can provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses DSs existing today but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

Katherine Freese; Tanja Rindler-Daller; Douglas Spolyar; Monica Valluri

2015-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Abundance Anomalies in NGC6752 - Do AGB Stars Have a Role?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are in the process of testing a popular theory that the observed abundance anomalies in the Globular Cluster NGC 6752 are due to `internal pollution' from intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch stars. To this end we are using a chemical evolution model incorporating custom-made stellar evolution yields calculated using a detailed stellar evolution code. By tracing the chemical evolution of the intracluster gas, which is polluted by two generations of stars, we are able to test the internal pollution scenario in which the Na- and Al-enhanced ejecta from intermediate mass stars is either accreted onto the surfaces of other stars, or goes toward forming new stars. In this paper we focus mainly on the nucleosynthetic yields of the AGB stars and discuss whether these stars are the source of the observed Na-O anticorrelation. Comparing our preliminary results with observational data suggests that the qualitative theory is not supported by this quantitative study.

S. W. Campbell; Y. Fenner; A. I. Karakas; J. C. Lattanzio; B. K. Gibson

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Helium enhancements in globular cluster stars from Asymptotic Giant Branch star pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a chemical evolution model we investigate the intriguing suggestion that there are populations of stars in some globular clusters (e.g. NGC 2808, omega Centauri) with enhanced levels of helium (Y from about 0.28 to 0.40) compared to the majority of the population that presumably have a primordial helium abundance. We assume that a previous generation of massive low-metallicity Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars has polluted the cluster gas via a slow stellar wind. We use two independent sets of AGB yields computed from detailed models to follow the evolution of helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen in the cluster gas using a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and a number of top-heavy IMFs. In no case were we able to fit the observational constraints, Y > 0.30 and C+N+O approximately constant. Depending on the shape of the IMF and the yields, we either obtained Y approximately greater than 0.30 and large increases in C+N+O or Y < 0.30 and C+N+O approximately constant. These results suggest that either AGB stars alone are not responsible for the large helium enrichment or that any dredge-up from this generation of stars was less than predicted by standard models.

Amanda Karakas; Yeshe Fenner; Alison Sills; Simon Campbell; John Lattanzio

2006-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Leading organizations choose ENERGY STAR | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading organizations choose ENERGY STAR Leading organizations choose ENERGY STAR Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why design to earn ENERGY STAR Leading organizations choose ENERGY STAR Sell others on the idea of ENERGY STAR An overview of the ENERGY STAR lifecycle Design to earn ENERGY STAR Leading organizations choose ENERGY STAR Facebook's data center achieved Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR More than

157

Hyperons in neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach, the properties of neutron-star matter including hyperons are investigated. In the calculation, we consider both time and space components of the vector self-energies of baryons as well as the scalar ones. Furthermore, the effect of negative-energy states of baryons is partly taken into account. We obtain the maximum neutron-star mass of $2.08\\,M_{\\odot}$, which is consistent with the recently observed, massive neutron stars. We discuss a universal, repulsive three-body force for hyperons in matter.

Katayama, Tetsuya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

On the conversion of neutron stars into quark stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible existence of two families of compact stars, neutron stars and quark stars, naturally leads to a scenario in which a conversion process between the two stellar objects occurs with a consequent release of energy of the order of $10^{53}$ erg. We discuss recent hydrodynamical simulations of the burning process and neutrino diffusion simulations of cooling of a newly formed strange star. We also briefly discuss this scenario in connection with recent measurements of masses and radii of compact stars.

Giuseppe Pagliara

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

Nuclear Reactions in Stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

21 February 1961 research-article Nuclear Reactions in Stars T. G. Cowling Thermonuclear reactions important for the generation of stellar energy during different phases of stellar evolution are discussed. The Royal...

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Neutron stars - thermal emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Confronting theoretical models with observations of thermal radiation emitted by neutron stars is one of the most important ways to understand the properties of both, superdense matter in the interiors of the neutron stars and dense magnetized plasmas in their outer layers. Here we review the theory of thermal emission from the surface layers of strongly magnetized neutron stars, and the main properties of the observational data. In particular, we focus on the nearby sources for which a clear thermal component has been detected, without being contaminated by other emission processes (magnetosphere, accretion, nebulae). We also discuss the applications of the modern theoretical models of the formation of spectra of strongly magnetized neutron stars to the observed thermally emitting objects.

Potekhin, A Y; Pons, J A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Masers and star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observational and theoretical advances concerning astronomical masers in star forming regions are reviewed. Major masing species are considered individually and in combination. Key results are summarized with emphasis on present science and future prospects.

Vincent L. Fish

2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

One Hundred First Stars : Protostellar Evolution and the Final Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a large set of radiation hydrodynamics simulations of primordial star formation in a fully cosmological context. Our statistical sample of 100 First Stars show that the first generation of stars have a wide mass distribution M_popIII = 10 ~ 1000 M_sun. We first run cosmological simulations to generate a set of primordial star-forming gas clouds. We then follow protostar formation in each gas cloud and the subsequent protostellar evolution until the gas mass accretion onto the protostar is halted by stellar radiative feedback. The accretion rates differ significantly among the primordial gas clouds which largely determine the final stellar masses. For low accretion rates the growth of a protostar is self-regulated by radiative feedback effects and the final mass is limited to several tens of solar masses. At high accretion rates the protostar's outer envelope continues to expand and the effective surface temperature remains low; such protostars do not exert strong radiative feedback and can grow in ...

Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki; Umeda, Hideyuki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Chiaki, Gen; Yorke, Harold W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Comet Riders--Nuclear nomads to the stars  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the potential role of an evolutionary family of advanced space nuclear power systems (solid core reactor, gas core reactor, and thermonulcear fusion systems) in the detailed exploration of Solar System comets and in the use of interstellar comes to support migratory journeys to the stars by both human beings and their smart robot systems. 14 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Angelo, J.A. Jr. (Science Applications International Corp., Melbourne, FL (United States)); Buden, D. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

165

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential gas furnaces, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

166

Holographic Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence degenerate composite operators in the conformal field theory that are holographically dual to degenerate stars in anti de Sitter space. We calculate the effect of the gravitational back-reaction using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations, and determine the "Chandrasekhar limit" beyond which the star undergoes gravitational collapse towards a black hole.

Jan de Boer; Kyriakos Papadodimas; Erik Verlinde

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS NEUTRAL HYDROGEN Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Quasar Quasar Absorption Lines Keck/HIRES Quasar Spectrum Observer baryons dark matter potential isotropic UV only on and the radiation field intensity... H I #12;5 GOAL: the primordial dark matter power spectrum

Steidel, Chuck

168

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

169

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

170

A star cluster at the edge of the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study stars and molecular gas in the direction of IRAS06145+1455 (WB89-789) through NIR (JHK), molecular line-, and dust continuum observations. The kinematic distance of the associated molecular cloud is 11.9 kpc. With a galactocentric distance of about 20.2 kpc, this object is at the edge of the (molecular) disk of the Galaxy. The near-IR data show the presence of an (embedded) cluster of about 60 stars, with a radius ca. 1.3 pc and an average stellar surface density of ca. 12 pc^{-2}. We find at least 14 stars with NIR-excess, 3 of which are possibly Class I objects. The cluster is embedded in a 1000 Mo molecular/dust core, from which a molecular outflow originates. The temperature of most of the outflowing gas is < 40 K, and the total mass of the swept-up material is < 10 Mo. Near the center of the flow, indications of much higher temperatures are found, probably due to shocks. A spectrum of one of the probable cluster members shows a tentative likeness to that of a K3III-star (with an age of at least 20 Myr). If correct, this would confirm the kinematic distance. This cluster is the furthest one from the Galactic center yet detected. The combination of old and recent activity implies that star formation has been going on for at least 20 Myr, which is difficult to understand considering the location of this object, where external triggers are either absent or weak, compared to the inner Galaxy. This suggests that once star formation is occurring, later generations of stars may form through the effect of the first generation of stars on the (remnants of) the original molecular cloud.

J. Brand; J. G. A. Wouterloot

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

171

AEP Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program AEP Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Homes Program: Contact AEP Ohio In-home Energy Audit: $75 Pin Based CFL Indoor Fixture: $20 Pin Based CFL Outdoor Fixture: $35 CFL Torchieres: $20 Wall Insulation: $75 Air Sealing: $50 Window Film: $45 ENERGY STAR Window Replacement: $75 Attic Insulation: $90 Shower Start/Stop: $25

172

Star Formation in Isolated Disk Galaxies. II. Schmidt Laws and Efficiency of Gravitational Collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged). We model gravitational instability in a wide range of isolated disk galaxies, using GADGET, a three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. The model galaxies include a dark matter halo and a disk of stars and isothermal gas. The global Schmidt law observed in disk galaxies is quantitatively reproduced by our models. We find that the surface density of star formation rate directly correlates with the strength of local gravitational instability. The local Schmidt laws of individual galaxies in our models show clear evidence of star formation thresholds. Our results suggest that the non-linear development of gravitational instability determines the local and global Schmidt laws, and the star formation thresholds.

Yuexing Li; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Ralf S. Klessen

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

173

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership New ENERGY STAR industrial partners Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation

174

Use ENERGY STAR benchmarking tools | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use ENERGY STAR benchmarking tools Use ENERGY STAR benchmarking tools Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Earn the ENERGY STAR and other recognition Benchmark energy use Learn about benchmarking Use ENERGY STAR benchmarking tools ENERGY STAR in action Communicate and educate

175

The quenching of star formation in accretion-driven clumpy turbulent tori of active galactic nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic gas-gas collisions involving a turbulent multiphase ISM share common ISM properties: dense extraplanar gas visible in CO, large linewidths (>= 50 km/s), strong mid-infrared H_2 line emission, low star formation activity, and strong radio continuum emission. Gas-gas collisions can occur in the form of ICM ram pressure stripping, galaxy head-on collisions, compression of the intragroup gas and/or galaxy ISM by an intruder galaxy which flies through the galaxy group at a high velocity, or external gas accretion on an existing gas torus in a galactic center. We suggest that the common theme of all these gas-gas interactions is adiabatic compression of the ISM leading to an increase of the turbulent velocity dispersion of the gas. The turbulent gas clouds are then overpressured and star formation is quenched. Within this scenario we developed a model for turbulent clumpy gas disks where the energy to drive turbulence is supplied by external infall or the gain of potential energy by radial gas accretion wi...

Vollmer, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Star Power | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Star Power Star Power The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released "Star Power," a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful...

177

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

178

Dark Stars: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark Stars (DS) are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of ordinary atomic material but powered by the heat from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation (rather than by fusion). Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for DM, can be their own antimatter and can accumulate inside the star, with their annihilation products thermalizing with and heating the DS. The resulting DSs are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. Though DM constituted only $10^6 M_\\odot$), very bright ($>10^9 L_\\odot$), and potentially detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Once the DM runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus DSs can provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The curre...

Freese, Katherine; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Holographic cold nuclear matter and neutron star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have previously found a new phase of cold nuclear matter based on a holographic gauge theory, where baryons are introduced as instanton gas in the probe D8/$\\overline{\\rm D8}$ branes. In our model, we could obtain the equation of state (EOS) of our nuclear matter by introducing fermi momentum. Then, here we apply this model to the neutron star and study its mass and radius by solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equations in terms of the EOS given here. We give some comments for our holographic model from a viewpoint of the other field theoretical approaches.

Kazuo Ghoroku; Kouki Kubo; Motoi Tachibana; Fumihiko Toyoda

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

182

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

183

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

186

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

187

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

188

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

189

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

190

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

191

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

192

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

193

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

194

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

195

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

197

Cooling of neutron stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of current physical understanding, it is impossible to predict with confidence the interior constitution of neutron stars. Cooling of neutron stars provides a possible way of discriminating among possible states of matter within them. In the standard picture of cooling by neutrino emission developed over the past quarter of a century, neutron stars are expected to cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and to cool faster if matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been called into question by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

C. J. Pethick

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

A UNIVERSAL, LOCAL STAR FORMATION LAW IN GALACTIC CLOUDS, NEARBY GALAXIES, HIGH-REDSHIFT DISKS, AND STARBURSTS  

SciTech Connect

Star formation laws are rules that relate the rate of star formation in a particular region, either an entire galaxy or some portion of it, to the properties of the gas, or other galactic properties, in that region. While observations of Local Group galaxies show a very simple, local star formation law in which the star formation rate per unit area in each patch of a galaxy scales linearly with the molecular gas surface density in that patch, recent observations of both Milky Way molecular clouds and high-redshift galaxies apparently show a more complicated relationship in which regions of equal molecular gas surface density can form stars at quite different rates. These data have been interpreted as implying either that different star formation laws may apply in different circumstances, that the star formation law is sensitive to large-scale galaxy properties rather than local properties, or that there are high-density thresholds for star formation. Here we collate observations of the relationship between gas and star formation rate from resolved observations of Milky Way molecular clouds, from kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies, and from unresolved observations of both disk and starburst galaxies in the local universe and at high redshift. We show that all of these data are in fact consistent with a simple, local, volumetric star formation law. The apparent variations stem from the fact that the observed objects have a wide variety of three-dimensional size scales and degrees of internal clumping, so even at fixed gas column density the regions being observed can have wildly varying volume densities. We provide a simple theoretical framework to remove this projection effect, and we use it to show that all the data, from small solar neighborhood clouds with masses {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} to submillimeter galaxies with masses {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, fall on a single star formation law in which the star formation rate is simply {approx}1% of the molecular gas mass per local free-fall time. In contrast, proposed star formation laws in which the star formation timescale is set by the galactic rotation period are inconsistent with the data from the Milky Way and the Local Group, while those in which the star formation rate is linearly proportional to the gas mass above some density threshold fail both in the Local Group and for starburst galaxies.

Krumholz, Mark R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); McKee, Christopher F., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org, E-mail: dekel@phys.huji.ac.il, E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

On the efficiency of field star capture by star clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exciting recent finding regarding scaling relations among globular clusters is the so-called 'blue tilt': clusters of the blue sub-population follow a trend of redder colour with increasing luminosity. In this paper we evaluate to which extent field star capture over a Hubble time may explain the 'blue tilt'. We perform collisional N-body simulations to quantify the amount of field star capture occuring over a Hubble time to star clusters with 10^3 to 10^6 stars. In the simulations we follow the orbits of field stars passing through a star cluster and calculate the energy change that the field stars experience due to gravitational interaction with cluster stars during one passage through the cluster. The capture condition is that their total energy after the passage is smaller than the gravitational potential at the cluster's tidal radius. By folding this with the fly-by rates of field stars with an assumed space density as in the solar neighbourhood and a range of velocity dispersions, we derive estimates on the mass fraction of captured field stars as a function of environment. We find that integrated over a Hubble time, the ratio between captured field stars and total number of clusters stars is very low (capture is not a probable mechanism for creating the colour-magnitude trend of metal-poor globular clusters.

Steffen Mieske; Holger Baumgardt

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Star on Earth  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Star on Earth  

SciTech Connect

At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

Formation of Planets Around the Sun and Other Stars  

SciTech Connect

The quest to understand the formation of planets and planetary systems has entered an era of renaissance. Driven by observational discoveries in solar system exploration, protostellar disks, and extra solar planets, we have established a rich data bank which contains not only relic clues around mature stars, including the Sun, but also direct image of ongoing processes around young stars. For the first time in this scientific endeavor, we have adequate information to construct quantitative models to account for the ubiquity of planets and diversity of planetary systems. Some of the most intriguing theoretical questions facing us today include: (a) how did the planets in the solar system form with their present-day mass, composition, and orbital elements, (b) is planet formation a deterministic or chaotic process, and (c) what are the observable signatures of planet formation and evolution around nearby young and mature stars? I will present a comprehensive scenario which suggests (a) gas giant planets formed through coagulation of planetsimals and gas accretion onto earth-like cores; (b) the final assemblage of the terrestrial planets in the solar system occurred through the propagation of Jupiter's secular resonance 4-30 Myrs after the emergence of the gas giant; and (c) although they are yet to be discovered, Earth-like planets are expected to be common around nearby stars.

Lin, Doug

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Star Formation in Space and Time: Taurus-Auriga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the formation of stellar groups, one must first document carefully the birth pattern within real clusters and associations. In this study of Taurus-Auriga, we combine pre-main-sequence ages from our own evolutionary tracks with stellar positions from observational surveys. Aided by the extensive, millimeter data on the molecular clouds, we develop a picture of the region's history. Star formation began, at a relatively low level and in a spatially diffuse manner, at least 10 Myr in the past. Within the last few million years, new stars have been produced at an accelerating rate, almost exclusively within a confined group of striated cloud filaments. The gas both inside and around the filaments appears to be in force balance. Thus, the appearance of the filaments is due to global, quasi-static contraction of the parent cloud material. Gravity drives this contraction and shock dissipation mediates it, but the internal motion of the gas does not appear to be turbulent. The accelerating nature of recent star formation means that the condensation of cloud cores is a threshold phenomenon, requiring a minimum background density. Other, nearby cloud regions, including Lupus and Chamaeleon, contain some locales that have attained this density, and others that have not. In the latter, we find extensive and sometimes massive molecular gas that is still devoid of young stars.

Francesco Palla; Steven W. Stahler

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Star Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India Sector: Biomass Product: Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References: Star Biomass1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Star Biomass...

206

Star clusters as diaries of galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most if not all stars form in star clusters. Thus the distribution of star clusters preserves the information on the star formation history of a galaxy. Massive clusters form only during episodes of high star formation activity whereas periods of low star formation activity cannot produce them. We present here the method of Maschberger & Kroupa (2007) to derive the star formation history of a galaxy from its star-cluster content.

Th. Maschberger; P. Kroupa

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fusion energy Fusion powers the Sun, and all stars, in which light nuclei fuse together at high temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion energy · Fusion powers the Sun, and all stars, in which light nuclei fuse together at high in excess of 100 million degrees, much higher than in the Sun. The hot hydrogen gas (known as a `plasma

208

ENERGY STAR plant certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» ENERGY STAR plant certification » ENERGY STAR plant certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year Award

209

Campaigns and incentive programs that incorporate ENERGY STAR | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Campaigns and incentive programs that incorporate ENERGY STAR Campaigns and incentive programs that incorporate ENERGY STAR Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Policies that specify the use of ENERGY STAR tools Campaigns and incentive programs that incorporate ENERGY STAR Lead by example Gather support Develop programs and policies Host a competition Use financing vehicles

210

ENERGY STAR service and product provider training series | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

service and product provider training series service and product provider training series Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can ENERGY STAR help your business? Get started Join ENERGY STAR as a partner ENERGY STAR service & product provider training series Service and product provider's marketing toolkit ENERGY STAR sales tools for service and product providers

211

Massive Star Outflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular outflows in the form of wide-angle winds and/or well-collimated jets are associated with young stellar objects of all luminosities. Independent studies have established that the mass outflow rate is proportional to L_bol^0.6 for L_bol = 0.3 to 10^5 L_sun, suggesting that there is a strong link between accretion and outflow for a wide range of source luminosity and there is reasonable evidence that accretion-related processes are responsible for generating massive molecular flows from protostars up to spectral type B0. Beyond L_bol ~ 10^4 L_sun, O stars generate powerful wide-angle, ionized winds that can dramatically affect outflow morphology and even call into question the relationship between outflow and accretion. Recently Beuther & Shepherd (2005) proposed an evolutionary scenario in which massive protostellar flows (up to early B spectral type) begin collimated. Once the star reaches the Main Sequence, ionizing radiation may affect the balance between magnetic and plasma pressure, inducing changes in the flow morphology and energetics. Here I review the properties of outflows from young OB stars, discuss implications and observational tests of this proposed evolutionary scenario, and examine differences between low-mass and massive star formation.

D. S. Shepherd

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Physical Processes in Stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... : Structure and Evolution of the Stars (Princeton University Press, 1958), by M. Schwarzschild, and Physical Processes in Stellar Interiors (Israel Program for Scientific Translations, 1962), ... the years 1954-57 and there are only a few references of later date than Schwarzschild's book.

R. J. TAYLER

1964-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

213

Explosive Nucleosynthesis in Stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in hydrostatic equilibrium, with considerable effect on the abundances of the ejected matter. The overheating may result either from the fact that the fuels first ignite in a degenerate electron ... pressure wave propagates outward from an exploding core. In either case, large amounts of thermal energy are liberated in a time short compared with the star's ability to compensate ...

W. DAVID ARNETT; DONALD D. CLAYTON

1970-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

Young stars with discs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...central star. The ultraviolet excess was originally proposed to...in terms of modelling the UV excess as a contribution from a boundary...spectral features caused by lithium, calcium and iron. They report...hotspots with temperatures in excess of 5000 K, compared with the...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...

Phillips, J. N.

216

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

217

Leading firms choose ENERGY STAR | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading firms choose ENERGY STAR Leading firms choose ENERGY STAR Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why you should design to earn the ENERGY STAR Leading firms choose ENERGY STAR Why new doesn't always mean efficient Follow EPA's step-by-step process ENERGY STAR Challenge for Architects Leading firms choose ENERGY STAR Facebook data center Hundreds of leading A/E firms have already partnered

218

About ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants ENERGY STAR certification Featured research and reports Facts and stats Climate change and buildings

219

Earn ENERGY STAR certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earn ENERGY STAR certification Earn ENERGY STAR certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Earn the ENERGY STAR and other recognition Benchmark energy use ENERGY STAR in action Communicate and educate ENERGY STAR communications toolkit Bring Your Green to Work with ENERGY STAR

220

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lone hunger striker spurs Nepal to action  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... leadership team in universities are selected by the ruling party or coalition, says Kedar Bhakta Mathema, a former vice-chancellor of TU. From executive level to department heads, ...

Smriti Mallapaty

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

222

ENERGY STAR Update: Change the World, Start with ENERGY STAR Kicks Off (April 12, 2013)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2013 2, 2013 Change the World, Start with ENERGY STAR Kicks Off with Announcement of Top Pledge Drivers Earth Day is right around the corner and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is celebrating this important holiday by once again by announcing our top pledge drivers and inviting you to join all of us in changing the world with ENERGY STAR. Congratulations to: Georgia Power Company, Girl Scouts of the USA, Samsung Electronics, Nissan North America, and Ameren Illinois. Saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas pollution are more important than ever. Climate change is a real and urgent challenge affecting people and the environment worldwide. Through our collective energy-saving efforts, representing more than 3 million Americans, we are on track to save nearly $1.2

223

Star clusters in a nuclear star-forming ring: The disappearing string of pearls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of the star cluster population in a low-luminosity early type galaxy, NGC 2328, is presented. The clusters are found in a tight star-forming nuclear spiral/ring pattern and we also identify a bar from structural 2D decomposition. These massive clusters are forming very efficiently in the circum-nuclear environment, they are young, possibly all less than 30 Myr of age. The clusters indicate an azimuthal age gradient, consistent with a "pearls-on-a-string" formation scenario suggesting bar driven gas inflow. The cluster mass function has a robust down-turn at low masses at all age bins. Assuming clusters are born with a power-law distribution, this indicates extremely rapid disruption at time-scales of just several Myr. If found to be typical, it means that clusters born in dense circum-nuclear rings do not survive to become old globular clusters in non-interacting systems.

Vaisanen, Petri; Randriamanakoto, Zara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

UV Star Formation Rates in the Local Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure star formation rates of ~50,000 optically-selected galaxies in the local universe (z~0.1), spanning a range from gas-rich dwarfs to massive ellipticals. We obtain dust-corrected SFRs by fitting the GALEX (UV) and SDSS (optical) photometry to a library of population synthesis models that include dust attenuation. For star-forming galaxies, our UV-based SFRs compare remarkably well with those derived from SDSS H alpha. Deviations from perfect agreement between these two methods are due to differences in the dust attenuation estimates. In contrast to H alpha, UV provides reliable SFRs for galaxies with weak or no H alpha emission, and where H alpha is contaminated with an emission from an AGN. We use full-SED SFRs to calibrate a simple prescription that uses GALEX UV magnitudes to produce good SFRs for normal star-forming galaxies. The specific SFR is considered as a function of stellar mass for (1) star-forming galaxies with no AGN, (2) those hosting an AGN, and for (3) galaxies without H alpha emission. We find that the three have distinct star formation histories, with AGN lying intermediate between the star-forming and the quiescent galaxies. Normal star forming galaxies (without an AGN) lie on a relatively narrow linear sequence. Remarkably, galaxies hosting a strong AGN appear to represent the massive continuation of this sequence. Weak AGN, while also massive, have lower SFR, sometimes extending to the realm of quiescent galaxies. We propose an evolutionary sequence for massive galaxies that smoothly connects normal star-forming galaxies to quiescent (red sequence) galaxies via strong and weak AGN. We confirm that some galaxies with no H alpha emission show signs of SF in the UV. We derive a UV-based cosmic SFR density at z=0.1 with smaller total error than previous measurements (abridged).

Samir Salim; R. Michael Rich; Stphane Charlot; Jarle Brinchmann; Benjamin D. Johnson; David Schiminovich; Mark Seibert; Ryan Mallery; Timothy M. Heckman; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; D. Christopher Martin; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; Todd Small; Ted K. Wyder; Luciana Bianchi; Jose Donas; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Bruno Milliard; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Sukyoung K. Yi

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

226

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

227

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

228

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

229

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

230

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

231

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

232

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

233

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

234

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

235

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

236

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

237

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

238

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

239

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

240

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Home Performance with Energy Star Financing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Performance with Energy Star Financing Home Performance with Energy Star Financing Home Performance with Energy Star Financing < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Bioenergy Solar Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS)/Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) State New York Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Up to 100% of costs; loans from $3,000 - $25,000 (minimum loan of $1,500 for income qualified customers); loan limit is $13,000 for projects with a

244

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

Texaco T-STAR Process for ebullated bed hydrotreating/hydrocracking  

SciTech Connect

Texaco has developed an ebullated bed hydrotreater/hydrocracker process called the T-STAR Process. This process is based upon the well known residuum H-Oil[reg sign] Process and Texaco's fixed bed hydrotreating/hydrocracking technology experience. T-STAR is ideally suited for hard to process feedstocks and for difficult processing requirements for the 90's such as FCCU feed pretreating, gas oil hydrocracking, and diesel aromatics reduction. The T-STAR reactors can be used in-line as hydrotreaters/hydrocrackers within an H-Oil[reg sign] unit. Pilot plant data are presented for several reactor/process configurations as well as commercial data and yields for a heavy gas oil operation. Texaco and HRI are offering the T-STAR Process to refiners for license and use.

Johns, W.F.; Kaufman, H. (Texaco Development Corp., Bellaire, TX (United States)); Clausen, G.; Nongbri, G. (Texaco Research and Development, Port Arthur, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The H II Region of a Primordial Star  

SciTech Connect

The concordance model of cosmology and structure formation predicts the formation of isolated very massive stars at high redshifts in dark matter dominated halos of 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} Msun. These stars photo-ionize their host primordial molecular clouds, expelling all the baryons from their halos. When the stars die, a relic H II region is formed within which large amounts of molecular hydrogen form which will allow the gas to cool efficiently when gravity assembles it into larger dark matter halos. The filaments surrounding the first star hosting halo are largely shielded and provide the pathway for gas to stream into the halo when the star has died. We present the first fully three dimensional cosmological radiation hydrodynamical simulations that follow all these effects. A novel adaptive ray casting technique incorporates the time dependent radiative transfer around point sources. This approach is fast enough so that radiation transport, kinetic rate equations, and hydrodynamics are solved self-consistently. It retains the time derivative of the transfer equation and is explicitly photon conserving. This method is integrated with the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code enzo, and runs on distributed and shared memory parallel architectures. Where applicable the three dimensional calculation not only confirm expectations from earlier one dimensional results but also illustrate the multi-fold hydrodynamic complexities of H II regions. In the absence of stellar winds the circumstellar environments of the first supernovae and putative early gamma-ray bursts will be of low density {approx}1 cm{sup -3}. Albeit marginally resolved, ionization front instabilities lead to cometary and elephant trunk like small scale structures reminiscent of nearby star forming regions.

Abel, Tom; Wise, John H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bryan, Greg L.; /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys.

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

248

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

249

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

250

Misaligned And Alien Planets From Explosive Death Of Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exoplanets whose orbit is misaligned with the spin of their host star could have originated from high-speed gas blobs, which are observed in multitudes in nearby supernova remnants and planetary nebulae. These blobs grow in mass and slow down in the interstellar medium (ISM) by mass accretion and cool by radiation. If their mass exceeds the Jeans mass, they collapse into hot giant gas planets. Most of the 'missing baryons' in galaxies could have been swept into such free-floating objects, which could perturb stellar planetary systems, kick bound planets into misaligned orbits or be captured themselves into misaligned orbits. The uncollapsed ones can then collapse or be tidally disrupted into a tilted gas disk where formation of misaligned planets can take place. Giant gas planets free floating in the Galactic ISM may be detected by their microlensing effects or by deep photometry if they are hot.

Dado, Shlomo; Ribak, Erez

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation Weatherization: $2,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Insulation Weatherization: 75% of project cost Energy Star homes: $350 - $8,000, varies by number of units and efficiency Warm Air Furnace: $500 - $800 Gas Boiler: $1,000 - $1,500 Integrated Water Heater/Boiler: $1,200

252

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

253

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

ENERGY STAR Webinar: Financing Energy Efficient Upgrades with ENERGY STAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hosted by ENERGY STAR, this webinar will show how public sector organizations are improving energy efficiency with innovative solutions to financial barriers.

255

THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF MULTIPHASE GALACTIC DISKS WITH STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK. I. REGULATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES  

SciTech Connect

The energy and momentum feedback from young stars has a profound impact on the interstellar medium (ISM), including heating and driving turbulence in the neutral gas that fuels future star formation. Recent theory has argued that this leads to a quasi-equilibrium self-regulated state, and for outer atomic-dominated disks results in the surface density of star formation ?{sub SFR} varying approximately linearly with the weight of the ISM (or midplane turbulent + thermal pressure). We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations to test the theoretical predictions for thermal, turbulent, and vertical dynamical equilibrium, and the implied functional dependence of ?{sub SFR} on local disk properties. Our models demonstrate that all equilibria are established rapidly, and that the expected proportionalities between mean thermal and turbulent pressures and ?{sub SFR} apply. For outer disk regions, this results in ?{sub SFR}???(?{sub sd}), where ? is the total gas surface density and ?{sub sd} is the midplane density of the stellar disk (plus dark matter). This scaling law arises because ?{sub sd} sets the vertical dynamical time in our models (and outer disk regions generally). The coefficient in the star formation law varies inversely with the specific energy and momentum yield from massive stars. We find proportions of warm and cold atomic gas, turbulent-to-thermal pressure, and mean velocity dispersions that are consistent with solar-neighborhood and other outer disk observations. This study confirms the conclusions of a previous set of simulations, which incorporated the same physics treatment but was restricted to radial-vertical slices through the ISM.

Kim, Chang-Goo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Ostriker, Eve C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kim, Woong-Tae, E-mail: ckim256@uwo.ca, E-mail: eco@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

ENERGY STAR SNAPSHOT - Spring 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Snapshot data runs through June 30, 2010. Summary By mid-year 2010, commercial and industrial organizations have almost exceeded activity levels reached throughout all of 2009. From January through June 30, 2010: More than 80,000 buildings have benchmarked their energy usage with ENERGY STAR, of which 63,000 buildings received an ENERGY STAR energy performance score-nearly equivalent to the amount for all of 2009. Close to 3,200 buildings earned the ENERGY STAR label-the highest amount earned through two quarters of any year, and 80% higher than mid-year 2009. The ENERGY STAR Snapshot provides an at-a-glance summary of the latest national ENERGY STAR metrics to help you, our partners, see the impact of your efforts. The ENERGY STAR Snapshot is

257

ENERGY STAR EEPS Partnership Agreement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approval expires 02/29/2016 1 EPA Form No. 5900-33 ENERGY STAR Partnership Agreement Instructions for Partnering with ENERGY STAR ® As an Energy Efficiency Program Sponsor Organizations interested in partnering with ENERGY STAR as an Energy Efficiency Program Sponsor should take the following steps: 1. Review the Energy Efficiency Program Sponsors Program Definitions and Program Requirements documents. 2. Select the area(s) of interest for a new partnership on the Participation Form. Please

258

Anisotropic charged dark energy star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the stars carry electrical charges, we present in this paper a model for charged dark energy star which is singularity free. We take Krori-Barua space time. We assume that the radial pressure exerted on the system due to the presence of dark energy is proportional to the isotropic perfect fluid matter density and the difference between tangential and radial pressure is proportional to the square of the electric field intensity. The solution satisfies the physical conditions inside the star

Kanika Das; Nawsad Ali

2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Creating a Star on Earth  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: creating a star on Earth.

262

The dynamics of star-forming regions - which mechanisms set the cluster formation efficiency?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fraction of star formation that results in bound stellar clusters (cluster formation efficiency or CFE) is a central quantity in many studies of star formation, star clusters and galaxies. Recent results suggest that contrary to popular assumption, the CFE is not (solely) set by gas expulsion, but is also influenced by the primordial environment, although its precise behaviour remains unknown. Here it is discussed which mechanisms set the CFE, which recent advancements have been made to disentangle their contributions, and which studies are needed in the near future to achieve a quantitative understanding of the CFE.

Kruijssen, J M Diederik

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Misalignment between cold gas and stellar components in early-type galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent work suggests blue ellipticals form in mergers and migrate quickly from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of passively evolving galaxies, perhaps as a result of black hole feedback. Such rapid reddening of stellar populations implies that large gas reservoirs in the pre-merger star-forming pair must be depleted on short time scales. Here we present pilot observations of atomic hydrogen gas in four blue early-type galaxies that reveal increasing spatial offsets between the gas reservoirs and the stellar components of the galaxies, with advancing post-starburst age. Emission line spectra show associated nuclear activity in two of the merged galaxies, and in one case radio lobes aligned with the displaced gas reservoir. These early results suggest that a kinetic process (possibly feedback from black hole activity) is driving the quick truncation of star formation in these systems, rather than a simple exhaustion of gas supply.

Wong, O Ivy; Jzsa, G I G; Urry, C M; Lintott, C J; Simmons, B D; Kaviraj, S; Masters, K L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Upsilon measurement in STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present preliminary results of Upsilon production in p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV at central rapidity. This measurement was performed at the STAR experiment through the Upsilon->e^+e^- decay channel. In this manuscript we describe the experimental details, from the development of a specially designed trigger setup to the analysis methods used to discriminate electrons from hadrons. The production cross-section obtained B*{(dsigma/dy)|(y=0)}=91(28)(22) pb is compatible with our expectations based on pQCD calculations.

Mauro R. Cosentino

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

266

On Magnetized Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we review the formalism normally used in the literature about the effects of density-dependent magnetic fields on the properties of neutron stars, expose some ambiguities that arise and propose a way to solve the related problem. Our approach uses a different prescription for the calculation of the pressure based on the chaotic field formalism for the stress tensor and also a different way of introducing a variable magnetic field, which depends on the energy density rather than on the baryonic density.

Lopes, Luiz L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Star Canticle Issue 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

StA ft CANtJClt 2 * 1 1 STAR CANTICLE 2 DOTTY BARRY PRICE: P.O. BOX 921 $5.50 1st class CLAREMONT, CA 91711 4.50 book rate CON TEN TS 2 Prelude 3 Poetry ?Untitled Dotty Barry k Fiction ?"Scotty? s Decision" Joy Mancinelli 6.... .Poetry..." Rayelle Roe m Poetry ?"Shouldn't You Ask Me First?" .Susan Meek k>2 Poetry ?"Storm Haven" Ellen Kobrin ^3 Poetry ?"Fire and Ice" ? ? .Gerry Downes kk Fiction ?"Viewpoint" Kay McElvain ty Poetry ?"Threads" Susan Burr 48 Poetry ?"The Starless Sky" Liz...

Multiple Contributors

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Cost Update, STAR-TOFp Implementation STAR-TOFp Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Update, STAR-TOFp Implementation STAR-TOFp Group November 22, 1999 Abstract This document updates the cost sections of the TOFp Implementation Plan. In this update1 to the TOFp Implementation plan of Oct. 5, 1999,2 the cost estimates based on the latest quotes and the nal design are discussed

Llope, William J.

270

Helium enhancements in globular cluster stars from Asymptotic Giant Branch star pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a chemical evolution model we investigate the intriguing suggestion that there are populations of stars in some globular clusters (e.g. NGC 2808, omega Centauri) with enhanced levels of helium (Y from about 0.28 to 0.40) compared to the majority of the population that presumably have a primordial helium abundance. We assume that a previous generation of massive low-metallicity Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars has polluted the cluster gas via a slow stellar wind. We use two independent sets of AGB yields computed from detailed models to follow the evolution of helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen in the cluster gas using a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and a number of top-heavy IMFs. In no case were we able to fit the observational constraints, Y > 0.30 and C+N+O approximately constant. Depending on the shape of the IMF and the yields, we either obtained Y approximately greater than 0.30 and large increases in C+N+O or Y < 0.30 and C+N+O approximately constant. These results suggest that eith...

Karakas, A I; Sills, A; Campbell, S; Lattanzio, J C; Karakas, Amanda; Fenner, Yeshe; Sills, Alison; Campbell, Simon; Lattanzio, John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Physics of Neutron Star Crusts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics of neutron star crusts is vast, involving many different research fields, from nuclear and condensed matter physics to general relativity. This review summarizes the progress, which has been achieved over the last few years, in modeling neutron star crusts, both at the microscopic and macroscopic levels. The confrontation of these theoretical models with observations is also briefly discussed.

N. Chamel; P. Haensel

2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

Wind from T Tauri Stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......December 1998 research-article Papers 8680 Wind from T Tauri Stars Masayoshi Kiguchi Shinji...was shown by DeCampli that an isothermal wind of T Tauri stars cannot explain both the...Since the assumption of an isothermal wind does not hold in general, we recalculated......

Masayoshi Kiguchi; Shinji Narita; Chushiro Hayashi

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Verifying the ENERGY STAR Certification Application  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Do you verify commercial building applications for ENERGY STAR certification? This webinar, based on the ENERGY STAR Guide for Licensed Professionals, covers the role of the licensed professional,...

274

Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision Called the Christmas Burst, GRB 101225A was freakishly lengthy and it produced...

275

ENERGY STAR Snapshot Spring 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spring 2012 Spring 2012 Snapshot data runs through December 31, 2011. The ENERGY STAR Snapshot provides an at-a-glance summary of the latest national ENERGY STAR metrics to help you, our partners, see the impact of your efforts. The ENERGY STAR Snapshot is distributed twice a year and provides: * Trends in energy benchmarking of commercial and industrial buildings. * State-by-state activity along with activity for the top Designated Market Areas. * Industrial sector participation in ENERGY STAR. * Trends in ENERGY STAR certified commercial and industrial facilities. Summary By the end of calendar year 2011, commercial and industrial organizations exceeded figures for benchmarking and certification that were achieved in 2010. Since June, 2011:

276

TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS: STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE WESTERN TAIL OF NGC 2782  

SciTech Connect

While major mergers and their tidal debris are well studied, they are less common than minor mergers (mass ratios {approx}< 0.3). The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a merger between two disk galaxies with a mass ratio of {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun to occur in that tidal tail. However, deep H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail. Across the entire western tail, we find the global star formation rate per unit area ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) to be several orders of magnitude less than expected from the total gas density. Together with extended FUV+NUV emission from Galaxy Evolution Explorer along the tail, this indicates a low global star formation efficiency in the tidal tail producing lower mass star clusters. The H II region that we observed has a local (few-kiloparsec scale) {Sigma}{sub SFR} from H{alpha} that is less than that expected from the total gas density, which is consistent with other observations of tidal debris. The star formation efficiency of this H II region inferred from the total gas density is low, but normal when inferred from the molecular gas density. These results suggest the presence of a very small, locally dense region in the western tail of NGC 2782 or of a low-metallicity and/or low-pressure star-forming region.

Knierman, Karen; Scowen, Paul; Jansen, Rolf A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 550 East Tyler Mall, Room PSF-686 (P.O. Box 871404), Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Knezek, Patricia M. [WIYN Consortium, Inc., 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Wehner, Elizabeth, E-mail: karen.knierman@asu.edu, E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu, E-mail: rolf.jansen@asu.edu, E-mail: pknezek@noao.edu, E-mail: ewehner@haverford.edu [Department of Astronomy, Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Clustered Star Formation in W75 N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present 2" to 7" resolution 3 mm continuum and CO(J=1-0) line emission and near infrared Ks, H2, and [FeII] images toward the massive star forming region W75 N. The CO emission uncovers a complex morphology of multiple, overlapping outflows. A total flow mass of greater than 255 Msun extends 3 pc from end-to-end and is being driven by at least four late to early-B protostars. More than 10% of the molecular cloud has been accelerated to high velocities by the molecular flows (> 5.2 km/s relative to v{LSR}) and the mechanical energy in the outflowing gas is roughly half the gravitational binding energy of the cloud. The W75 N cluster members represent a range of evolutionary stages, from stars with no apparent circumstellar material to deeply embedded protostars that are actively powering massive outflows. Nine cores of millimeter-wavelength emission highlight the locations of embedded protostars in W75 N. The total mass of gas & dust associated with the millimeter cores ranges from 340 Msun to 11 Msun. The infrared reflection nebula and shocked H2 emission have multiple peaks and extensions which, again, suggests the presence of several outflows. Diffuse H2 emission extends about 0.6 parsecs beyond the outer boundaries of the CO emission while the [FeII] emission is only detected close to the protostars. The infrared line emission morphology suggests that only slow, non-dissociative J-type shocks exist throughout the pc-scale outflows. Fast, dissociative shocks, common in jet-driven low-mass outflows, are absent in W75 N. Thus, the energetics of the outflows from the late to early B protostars in W75 N differ from their low-mass counterparts -- they do not appear to be simply scaled-up versions of low-mass outflows.

D. S. Shepherd; L. Testi; D. P. Stark

2002-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

280

White Dwarf Properties and the Degenerate Electron Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Dwarf Properties and the Degenerate Electron Gas Nicholas Rowell April 10, 2008 Contents 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.2 Consequences for the Mass of White Dwarfs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 1 Introduction White dwarfs are the second most common type of star in the Galaxy, and represent

Tittley, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate Program (Arizona) Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate Program (Arizona) < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Residential: 2 per household Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: $450 Natural Gas Clothes Dryer: $30 Windows: $0.95/sq ft Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq ft Floor Insulation: $0.30/sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: $450 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: $450 Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq ft

282

Sample ENERGY STAR performance documents | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Existing buildings Existing buildings » Use Portfolio Manager » Verify and document your savings » Sample ENERGY STAR performance documents Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit

283

ENERGY STAR Focus on Energy Efficiency in Metalcasting | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metalcasting Metalcasting Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants

284

ENERGY STAR certification for your building | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

certification for your building certification for your building Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Find financing Earn recognition 20-percent recognition ENERGY STAR certification How to apply for ENERGY STAR certification Tips for low-cost verifications Submit a profile of your building

285

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Purchase energy-saving products Put computers to sleep Get help from an expert Take a comprehensive approach

286

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: ENERGY STAR Score | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Score ENERGY STAR Score Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

287

The evolution of star clusters: The resolved-star approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results of a new technique to detect, locate, and characterize young dissolving star clusters. Using HST/ACS archival images of the nearby galaxy IC2574, we performed stellar PSF photometry and selected the most massive stars as our first test sample. We used a group-finding algorithm on the selected massive stars to find cluster candidates. We then plot the color-magnitude diagrams for each group, and use stellar evolutionary models to estimate their age. So far, we found 79 groups with ages of up to about 100 Myr, displaying various sizes and densities.

Anne Pellerin; Martin J. Meyer; Jason Harris; Daniela Calzetti

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre´,1,2 C. M. Oliveira,2 J. C. Howk,2 R. Ferlet,1 J gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines toward 19 early-type Galactic stars at an average mag?1 with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance

Howk, Jay Christopher

289

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.1 ENERGY STAR  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Specification Dates for ENERGY STAR-Labeled HVAC and Residential Appliances Heating and Cooling Equipment Dates of updated specification Central AC 1995 2002, 2006, 2009 Air-Source Heat Pumps 1995 2002, 2006, 2009 Oil Furnaces 1995 2006, 2008, 2012, 2013 Gas Furnaces 1995 2006, 2008, 2012, 2013 Programable Thermostats - Gas Boilers 1996 2002 Oil Boilers 1996 2002 Gas-Fired Heat Pumps - Geothermal Heat Pumps 2001 2009, 2011, 2012 Ventilating Fans 2001 2003, 2009, 2012 Ceiling Fans 2001 2003, 2006, 2009, 2012 Light Commercial HVAC 2002 2004, 2010, 2011 Residential Appliances Dishwashers 1996 2001, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014 Room AC 1996 2000, 2003, 2005 Refrigerators 1996 2001, 2003, 2004, 2008 Clothes Washers 1997 2001, 2004, 2007, 2009, 2011 Dehumidifiers 2001 2006, 2008 Freezers 2004 2008 Air Cleaners

290

ENERGY STAR Webinar: Financing Energy Efficient Upgrades with ENERGY STAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGY STAR is hosting a webinar on how public sector organizations are improving energy efficiency with innovative solutions to financial barriers on Oct. 21, 2014, from 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

291

EPA ENERGY STAR Webinar: ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager 201  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Continue to learn about EPAs ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool, with a deeper dive into more advanced functionalities such as: managing and tracking changes to your property uses over time; using...

292

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Value of ENERGY STAR Certification  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

For thousands of organizations, ENERGY STAR is the simple choice for saving money and demonstrating environmental leadership to the public. Lower energy costs aren't the only financial benefit of...

293

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant Industrial Plant Certification Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Performance Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division June 2013 ii Introduction The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR program provides guidance, tools, and recognition to help companies improve the energy performance of their facilities and strengthen the effectiveness of their energy management program. Through ENERGY STAR, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) offers a number of forms of recognition, including certification for facility energy efficiency. ENERGY STAR certification for industrial plants recognizes individual manufacturing plants whose

294

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.1 ENERGY STAR  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Total Heating Equipment Shipments (Thousands) and ENERGY STAR Market Share 1995 2,592 22% 109 N/A 156 N/A 146 1% 1996 2,871 24% 198 4% 161 48% 152 1% 1997 2,779 27% 206 6% 160 55% 124 1% 1998 2,977 29% 185 8% 148 67% 128 1% 1999 3,126 31% 201 10% 149 74% 125 1% 2000 3,104 35% 224 15% 144 85% 121 3% 2001 3,063 39% 221 17% 149 89% 122 4% 2002 3,202 40% 214 21% 148 98% 117 6% 2003 3,266 42% 235 21% 167 54% 127 7% 2004 3,519 47% 237 41% 162 71% 130 7% 2005 3,512 37% 224 25% 146 57% 111 7% 2006 3,197 37% 196 38% 121 90% 100 6% 2007 2,782 37% 201 38% 123 80% 84 13% 2008 2,300 43% 192 57% 122 62% 59 12% 2009 2,190 50% 192 46% 123 62% 54 24% 2010 2,197 61% 192 52% 123 61% 56 36% Note(s): Source(s): Gas Furnaces Gas Boilers Oil Boilers Oil Furnaces N/A = Not Applicable. ENERGY STAR specification did not exist. LBNL, Climate Change Action Plan spreadsheet, 2009; EPA, ENERGY STAR Unit Shipment and Market Penetration Report Calendar Year 2010 Summary;

296

A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR  

SciTech Connect

We propose to construct a Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment at RHIC. The HFT will bring new physics capabilities to STAR and it will significantly enhance the physics capabilities of the STAR detector at central rapidities. The HFT will ensure that STAR will be able to take heavy flavor data at all luminosities attainable throughout the proposed RHIC II era.

Xu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Kleinfelder, S.; Koohi, A.; Li, S.; Huang, H.; Tai, A.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Himmi,A.; Hu, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Surrow,B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Bieser, F.; Gareus, R.; Greiner, L.; Lesser,F.; Matis, H.S.; Oldenburg, M.; Ritter, H.G.; Pierpoint, L.; Retiere, F.; Rose, A.; Schweda, K.; Sichtermann, E.; Thomas, J.H.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Kotov, I.

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

297

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars David Cohen Department of Physics and Astronomy Swarthmore be related to the production of X-rays on massive stars. If so, massive stars' X-rays are much different than those found our own Sun and other cooler stars like the Sun that produce X-rays via magnetic activity

Cohen, David

298

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: $100,000 Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Trap Survey: $2500 (+$2500 if complete recommended repairs) ENERGY STAR Programmable Thermostats: 5 units Boiler Reset Controls: 2 unit max Pipe Insulation: 500 ln. ft. Building Insulation: $10,000/account for roof, attic and wall insulation

299

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction Program Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Fund State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology for prescriptive measures and whether the applicant is seeking ENERGY STAR Certification or Home Energy Rating System (HERS)

300

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Attic and Wall Insulation: $1000 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Construction: $600-$3500/home Home Energy Audit: Free Boilers: $150 or $400 depending on AFUE Furnaces: $250 or $400 depending on AFUE Programmable Thermostats: $25

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NW Natural (Gas) - New Homes Stand Alone Incentive Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NW Natural (Gas) - New Homes Stand Alone Incentive Program NW Natural (Gas) - New Homes Stand Alone Incentive Program NW Natural (Gas) - New Homes Stand Alone Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Certified Gas Home: $600 Tankless Water Heater: $200 Provider Energy Trust of Oregon Builders with new construction projects in NW Natural's Washington gas service territory are eligible to receive cash incentives from Energy Trust of Oregon for gas heated homes that receive Energy Star certification.

302

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

INFRARED AND ULTRAVIOLET STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE ACCEPT SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

We present infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) photometry for a sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The BCGs are from a heterogeneous but uniformly characterized sample, the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), of X-ray galaxy clusters from the Chandra X-ray telescope archive with published gas temperature, density, and entropy profiles. We use archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Spitzer Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) observations to assemble spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and colors for BCGs. We find that while the SEDs of some BCGs follow the expectation of red, dust-free old stellar populations, many exhibit signatures of recent star formation in the form of excess UV or mid-IR emission, or both. We establish a mean near-UV (NUV) to 2MASS K color of 6.59 {+-} 0.34 for quiescent BCGs. We use this mean color to quantify the UV excess associated with star formation in the active BCGs. We use both fits to a template of an evolved stellar population and library of starburst models and mid-IR star formation relations to estimate the obscured star formation rates (SFRs). We show that many of the BCGs in X-ray clusters with low central gas entropy exhibit enhanced UV (38%) and mid-IR emission (43%) from 8 to 160 {mu}m, above that expected from an old stellar population. These excesses are consistent with ongoing star formation activity in the BCG, star formation that appears to be enabled by the presence of high-density, X-ray-emitting intergalactic gas in the core of the cluster of galaxies. This hot, X-ray-emitting gas may provide the enhanced ambient pressure and some of the fuel to trigger star formation. This result is consistent with previous works that showed that BCGs in clusters with low central gas entropies host H{alpha} emission-line nebulae and radio sources, while clusters with high central gas entropy exhibit none of these features. GALEX UV and Spitzer mid-IR measurements combined provide a complete picture of unobscured and obscured star formation occurring in these systems. We present IR and UV photometry and estimated equivalent continuous SFRs for a sample of BCGs.

Hoffer, Aaron S.; Donahue, Megan; Hicks, Amalia [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States); Barthelemy, R. S., E-mail: hofferaa@msu.edu, E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: hicksam@msu.edu, E-mail: ramon.s.barthelemy@wmich.edu [Physics Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5252 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Challenge for Industry Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Improvement Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division May 2013 Revised ii Introduction The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) ENERGY STAR program provides guidance, tools, and recognition to help companies improve their energy performance. ENERGY STAR is a voluntary partnership program that companies choose to join. Through ENERGY STAR, U.S. EPA offers a number of forms of recognition for achievements in energy efficiency. The ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry recognizes individual industrial sites for achieving a 10 percent reduction in energy intensity within 5 years from the conclusion of an established baseline. To be

306

Appendix 5 - STARS Architectual Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Last saved by Coombs Page 1 7/27/2012 Last saved by Coombs Page 1 7/27/2012 Draft Appendix 5 - STARS Architectural Overview ARC101 - Architectural Overview for Department of Energy iManage Program - STARS Project Deliverable ID: IT0013 Version number: 1.09 Draft/Final as of: 18 Oct 2005 Printed on: 27 Jul 2012 Author: Richard Popovich, STARS System Architect Richard.Popovich@hq.doe.gov (301) 903-2223 Owner: Laura Kramer, STARS Project Manager Status of Document Draft Delivered Accepted Last saved by Coombs Page 2 7/27/2012 Draft Document information Document source This document is maintained as an online document. Contact the author for the latest version. Revision history Version number Date Summary of changes Revised By 1.01 08 Jul 03 Version 1 Richard Popovich,

307

New subdwarf B star periods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subdwarf B (sdB) stars are thought to be helium burning stars with low mass hydrogen envelopes. Several evolutionary paths have been proposed to explain the formation of these systems. One of these scenarios is the evolution of the sdB progenitor within a binary system. We have looked systematically at bright sdB stars from the PG survey. By taking spectra at several different epochs we have measured the radial velocity shifts caused by the motion of the sdB star within the binary. Our data have been taken over a long time base line (2 years) which allowed us to find longer period binaries than known before. Here we present results for 29 sdB systems.

L. Morales-Rueda; P. F. L. Maxted; T. R. Marsh; R. C. North

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

Neutron skins and neutron stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: The neutron skin of a heavy nucleus as well as many neutron-star properties are highly sensitive to the poorly constrained density dependence of the symmetry energy.Purpose: To provide for the first time meaningful theoretical errors and to assess the degree of correlation between the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb and several neutron-star properties.Methods: A proper covariance analysis based on the predictions of an accurately calibrated relativistic functional FSUGold is used to quantify theoretical errors and correlation coefficients.Results: We find correlation coefficients of nearly 1 (or ?1) between the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb and a host of observables of relevance to the structure, dynamics, and composition of neutron stars.Conclusions: We suggest that a follow-up Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) measurement, ideally with a 0.5% accuracy, could significantly constrain the equation of state of neutron-star matter.

F. J. Fattoyev and J. Piekarewicz

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

309

ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager 101  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Join us as we introduce and demonstrate the core functionality of EPAs ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool. Attendees will learn how to: navigate Portfolio Manager; add a property and enter details...

310

ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager 201  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Continue to learn about EPAs new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool, with a deeper dive into more advanced functionalities such as: managing and tracking changes to your property uses over time;...

311

Inversion of the star transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the star transform as a generalization of the broken ray transform introduced by us in previous work. The advantages of using the star transform include the possibility to reconstruct the absorption and the scattering coefficients of the medium separately and simultaneously (from the same data) and the possibility to utilize scattered radiation which, in the case of the conventional X-ray tomography, is discarded. In this paper, we derive the star transform from physical principles, discuss its mathematical properties and analyze numerical stability of inversion. In particular, it is shown that stable inversion of the star transform can be obtained only for configurations involving odd number of rays. Several computationally-efficient inversion algorithms are derived and tested numerically.

Fan Zhao; John C. Schotland; Vadim A. Markel

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

Shooting Star | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shooting Star Shooting Star Jump to: navigation, search Name Shooting Star Facility Shooting Star Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exelon Wind Developer Infinity Wind Power Energy Purchaser Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Location Greensburg KS Coordinates 37.55019151°, -99.27585125° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.55019151,"lon":-99.27585125,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

TITANIUM AND VANADIUM CHEMISTRY IN LOW-MASS DWARF STARS Katharina Lodders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The most profound effect of a decrease in temperature is that carbon monoxide (CO) con- verts to methaneTITANIUM AND VANADIUM CHEMISTRY IN LOW-MASS DWARF STARS Katharina Lodders Planetary Chemistry The equilibrium gas and condensation chemistry of titanium and vanadium in M, L, and T dwarf atmos- pheres

Fegley Jr., Bruce

314

The sun is an active star that produces explosions of matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sun is an active star that produces explosions of matter and energy. The space between CME. The white circle is the size of the sun. Solar Storm Timeline Day Time What Happened Tuesday 4:50 PM Gas eruption on Sun Thursday 3:36 AM Plasma storm reaches Earth. Thursday 5:20 AM Storm at maximum

315

Xcel Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Xcel Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Xcel Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Xcel Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Home Performance with Energy Star:$1,200 Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with Energy Star: Up to $1,200 Furnace: $25-$250 Boilers: $100 Tank Water Heater: $40-$200 Tankless Water Heater: $400 Insulation: 20% of labor and product, up to $300 In addition to home energy audits, Xcel Energy offers rebates to its

316

STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development  

SciTech Connect

We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented.

Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu,Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

GRBs from the First Stars  

SciTech Connect

We present an estimate of the Gamma Ray Bursts which should be expected from metal-free, elusive first generation of stars known as PopulationIII (PopIII). We derive the GRB rate from these stars from the Stellar Formation Rate obtained in several Reionization scenarios available in the literature. In all of the analyzed models we find that GRBs from PopIII are subdominant with respect to the ''standard'' (PopII) ones up to z {approx} 10.

Iocco, Fabio; /Naples U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

Magnesium Isotopes in Halo Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have determined Mg isotope ratios in halo field dwarfs and giants in the globular cluster M71 based on high S/N high spectral resolution (R = 10$^5$) Keck HIRES spectra. Unlike previous claims of an important contribution from intermediate-mass AGB stars to the Galactic halo, we find that our $^{26}$Mg/$^{24}$Mg ratios can be explained by massive stars.

Jorge Melendez; Judith G. Cohen

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

320

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

322

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

323

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

324

Star-formation rates from young-star counts and the structure of the ISM across the NGC346/N66 complex in the SMC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rate at which interstellar gas is converted into stars, and its dependence on environment, is one of the pillars on which our understanding of the visible Universe is build. We present a comparison of the surface density of young stars (Sigma_*) and dust surface density (Sigma_d) across NGC346 (N66) in 115 independent pixels of 6x6 pc^2. We find a correlation between Sigma_* and Sigma_d with a considerable scatter. A power law fit to the data yields a steep relation with an exponent of 2.6+-0.2. We convert Sigma_d to gas surface density (Sigma_g) and Sigma_* to star formation rate (SFR) surface densities (Sigma_SFR), using simple assumptions for the gas-to-dust mass ratio and the duration of star formation. The derived total SFR (4+-1 10^-3 M_sun/yr) is consistent with SFR estimated from the Ha emission integrated over the Ha nebula. On small scales the Sigma_SFR derived using Ha systematically underestimates the count-based Sigma_SFR, by up to a factor of 10. This is due to ionizing photons escaping the ...

Hony, S; Galliano, F; Galametz, M; Cormier, D; Chen, C -H R; Dib, S; Hughes, A; Klessen, R S; Roman-Duval, J; Smith, L; Bernard, J -P; Bot, C; Carlson, L; Gordon, K; Indebetouw, R; Lebouteiller, V; Lee, M -Y; Madden, S C; Meixner, M; Oliveira, J; Rubio, M; Sauvage, M; Wu, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Upsilon Productions at STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The $\\Upsilon(1S+2S+3S)\\to e^{+}e^{-}$ cross section is measured at mid-rapidity ($y$) in $p+p$ collisions and in d$+Au$ collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. In $p+p$, the measured cross section is found to be consistent with the world data trend as a function of $\\sqrt{s}$, in agreement with the Color Evaportaion Model (CEM), and underestimated by the Color Singlet Model (CSM) up to the Next-to-Leading-Order Quantum Chromodynamics (NLO QCD) calculations. In d+$Au$, the measured cross section is in agreement with the CEM prediction with anti-shadowing effects, and the nuclear modification factor indicates that $\\Upsilon(1S+2S+3S)$ production follows binary scaling within the current uncertainties. These measurements provide a benchmark for the future measurements of $\\Upsilon$ production in $Au+Au$ collisions.

A. M. Hamed

2010-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

326

The dense gas mass fraction in the W51 cloud and its protoclusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new 2 cm and 6 cm maps of H2CO, radio recombination lines, and the radio continuum in the W51 star forming complex acquired with Arecibo and the Green Bank Telescope at ~50" resolution. We use H2CO absorption to determine the relative line-of-sight positions of molecular and ionized gas. We measure gas densities using the H2CO densitometer, including continuous measurements of the dense gas mass fraction (DGMF) over the range 10^4 cm^-3 ~70% above n>10^4 cm^-3, while it is low, f 10^4 cm-3 is weakly correlated with low and moderate mass star formation, but does not strongly correlate with high-mass star formation. (3) The nondetection of H2CO emission implies that the emission detected in other galaxies, e.g. Arp 220, comes from high-density gas that is not directly affiliated with already-formed massive stars. Either the non-star-forming ISM of these galaxies is very dense, implying the star formation density threshold is higher, or H ii regions have their emission suppressed.

Ginsburg, Adam; Battersby, Cara; Youngblood, Allison; Darling, Jeremy; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Hector; Santos, Mayra E Lebrn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ENERGY STAR Success Story VA Beach Convention Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Success Story: STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Located in Virginia's most populous city, the Virginia Beach Convention Center (VBCC) comprises more than 516,000 square feet and typically hosts 400 events a year. Fully opened in 2007, the VBCC has served as the anchor for the successful revitalization of Virginia Beach's old beach district. With historical references and maritime themes integrated into the structure's modern design, the Center features many technological advances that make it a prime location for meetings, conferences, and trade shows. However, even with a newly constructed building, the VBCC has demonstrated an important energy management principle: all buildings, regardless of their age and building systems they employ, can reduce energy consumption, save money, and offset greenhouse gas

328

Propagation of light in low pressure gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The criticism by W. E. Lamb, W. Schleich, M. Scully, C. Townes of a simplified quantum electrodynamics which represents the photon as a true particle is illustrated. Collisions being absent in low-pressure gas, exchanges of energy are radiative and coherent. Thin shells of plasma containing atoms in a model introduced by Str\\"omgren are superradiant, seen as circles possibly dotted. Spectral radiance of novae has magnitude of laser radiance, and column densities are large in nebulae: Superradiance, multiphoton effects, etc., work in astrophysics. The superradiant beams induce multiphotonic scatterings of light emitted by the stars, brightening the limbs of plasma bubbles and darkening the stars. In excited atomic hydrogen, impulsive Raman scatterings shift frequencies of light. Microwaves exchanged with the Pioneer probes are blueshifted, simulating anomalous accelerations. Substituting coherence for wrong calculations in astrophysical papers, improves results, avoids "new physics".

Jacques Moret-Bailly

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

The impact of feedback on cosmological gas accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the way galaxies acquire their gas across cosmic time in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations is modified by a comprehensive physical model for baryonic feedback processes. To do so, we compare two simulations -- with and without feedback -- both evolved with the moving mesh code AREPO. The feedback runs implement the full physics model of the Illustris simulation project, including star formation driven galactic winds and energetic feedback from supermassive blackholes. We explore: (a) the accretion rate of material contributing to the net growth of galaxies and originating directly from the intergalactic medium, finding that feedback strongly suppresses the raw, as well as the net, inflow of this "smooth mode" gas at all redshifts, regardless of the temperature history of newly acquired gas. (b) At the virial radius the temperature and radial flux of inflowing gas is largely unaffected at z=2. However, the spherical covering fraction of inflowing gas at 0.25 rvir decreases substantially,...

Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Sijacki, Debora; Torrey, Paul; Hernquist, Lars

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Home Performance with Energy Star: 50% Utility Rebate up to $4,000 Home Energy Assistance (Low-income residents): $5,000 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2011 State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Warm Air Furnace: $500 or $800 Natural Gas Boiler: $1,000 or $1,500

331

PIA - I-Manage STARS | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

STARS PIA - I-Manage STARS PIA - I-Manage STARS More Documents & Publications PIA - INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change...

332

Intirion: ENERGY STAR Referral (MFRA-4GF) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

specification. Intirion: ENERGY STAR Referral (MFRA-4GF) More Documents & Publications Samsung: ENERGY STAR Referral (RF26VAB) Friedrich: ENERGY STAR Referral (CP15F10) Friedrich:...

333

DOE Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR, April 22...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR, April 22, 2011 DOE Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR, April 22, 2011 This document describes ENERGY STAR verificaion...

334

ENERGY STAR Test Procedures and Verification | Department of...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Appliance & Equipment Standards ENERGY STAR ENERGY STAR Test Procedures and Verification ENERGY STAR Test Procedures and Verification The Department of Energy (DOE) is the...

335

Wave Star Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Star Energy Star Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Wave Star Energy Place Denmark Zip DK-2920 Product Denmark-based private wave device developer. References Wave Star Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: C5 WaveStar This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Wave Star Energy is a company located in Denmark . References ↑ "Wave Star Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wave_Star_Energy&oldid=678928" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

336

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

339

Bipolar Outflows and the Evolution of Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hypersonic bipolar outflows are a ubiquitous phenomena associated with both young and highly evolved stars. Observations of Planetary Nebulae, the nebulae surrounding Luminous Blue Variables such as $\\eta$ Carinae, Wolf Rayet bubbles, the circumstellar environment of SN 1987A and Young Stellar Objects all revealed high velocity outflows with a wide range of shapes. In this paper I review the current state of our theoretical understanding of these outflows. Beginning with Planetary Nebulae considerable progress has been made in understanding bipolar outflows as the result of stellar winds interacting with the circumstellar environment. In what has been called the "Generalized Wind Blown Bubble" (GWBB) scenario, a fast tenuous wind from the central star expands into a ambient medium with an aspherical (toroidal) density distribution. Inertial gradients due to the gaseous torus quickly lead to an expanding prolate or bipolar shell of swept-up gas bounded by strong shock waves. Numerical simulations of the GWBB scenario show a surprisingly rich variety of gasdynamical behavior, allowing models to recover many of the observed properties of stellar bipolar outflows including the development of collimated supersonic jets. In this paper we review the physics behind the GWBB scenario in detail and consider its strengths and weakness. Alternative models involving MHD processes are also examined. Applications of these models to each of the principle classes of stellar bipolar outflow (YSO, PNe, LBV, SN87A) are then reviewed. Outstanding issues in the study of bipolar outflows are considered as are those questions which arise when the outflows are viewed as a single class of phenomena occuring across the HR diagram.

Adam Frank

1998-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Shear viscosity in hybrid stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of the shear viscosity of hadrons and quarks in hybrid stars has been performed in the framework of the microscopic transport theory. The neutron-star structure has been determined employing the equation of state from the Brueckner theory with three-body force for the hadron phase, and the equation of state from the MIT bag model for the deconfined quark phase. The nucleon-nucleon cross sections in dense matter have been consistently calculated from the Brueckner G matrix, whereas for the quark-quark cross sections the perturbative QCD has been adopted. Despite that the quark contribution to the shear viscosity is quite small at low temperature, the transition to the deconfined phase makes the equation of state much softer with the result that the baryon viscosity turns out to be enhanced instead of reduced in hybrid stars. The damping time scale of r-modes due to the shear viscosity has been evaluated for several stable configurations of a hybrid star and compared with the neutron-star spin-down time scale induced by the emission gravitation radiation from the r-modes. The enhancement of the total viscosity makes the viscosity time scale comparable with the gravitation radiation one at low temperature.

D. Jaccarino; S. Plumari; V. Greco; U. Lombardo; A. B. Santra

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermodynamics of Ideal Gas in Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state and the state functions for the gravitational source are necessary conditions for solving cosmological model and stellar structure. The usual treatments are directly based on the laws of thermodynamics, and the physical meanings of some concepts are obscure. This letter show that, we can actually derive all explicit fundamental state functions for the ideal gas in the context of cosmology via rigorous dynamical and statistical calculation. These relations have clear physical meanings, and are valid in both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic cases. Some features of the equation of state are important for a stable structure of a star with huge mass.

Ying-Qiu Gu

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

ENERGY STAR Score for Warehouses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warehouses in the United States Page 1 Warehouses in the United States Page 1 ENERGY STAR Score for Warehouses in the United States Technical Reference OVERVIEW The ENERGY STAR Score for warehouses applies to unrefrigerated or refrigerated buildings that are used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise or raw materials. The objective of the ENERGY STAR score is to provide a fair assessment of the energy performance of a property relative to its peers, taking into account the climate, weather, and business activities at the property. To identify the aspects of building activity that are significant drivers of energy use and then normalize for those factors, a statistical analysis of the peer building population is

344

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

345

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

346

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

347

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

348

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

349

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

350

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

351

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

352

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

353

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

354

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

355

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

356

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

357

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

358

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

359

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

360

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Neutron skins and neutron stars  

SciTech Connect

The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nuclear Physics of Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of cold nuclear matter, namely, the relation between the pressure and energy density, is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the special role that nuclear physics plays in constraining the EOS of cold baryonic matter and its impact on the properties of neutron stars.

J. Piekarewicz

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

Towards a realistic axion star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we estimate the radius and the mass of a self-gravitating system made of axions. The quantum axion field satisfies the Klein-Gordon equation in a curved space-time and the metric components of this space-time are solutions to the Einstein equations with a source term given by the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum operator constructed from the axion field. As a first step towards an axion star we consider the up to the sixth term in the axion potential expansion. We found that axion stars would have masses of the order of asteroids and radius of the order of few centimeters.

J. Barranco; A. Bernal

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

ENERGY STAR Success Story Fleet Science Center Dec 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story: Reuben H. Fleet Science Center The Reuben H. Fleet Science Center (the Fleet) is one of twenty-four arts, science, and cultural institutions that are part of San Diego's Balboa Park Cultural Partnership. The Partnership launched a sustainability initiative in 2008 along with the City of San Diego and San Diego Gas & Electric ® (SDG&E) with the goal of improving energy efficiency and reducing resource consumption at the Park's cultural institutions. To date, Balboa Park venues have decreased electricity usage by more than 3.5 million kWh and 87,000 therms of natural gas, realizing savings of $530,000. Built in 1973, the Fleet serves as a leader and a model in environmental sustainability to venues of Balboa Park and other entertainment facilities across the country. For over a decade, the Fleet has

365

Beryllium abundances in metal-poor stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......standard big bang nucleosynthesis. Be cannot be produced by nuclear fusion in the interiors of stars; in contrast, Be would be...model of Allen Santillan (1991) for our sample stars. Input parameters, such as radial velocities, parallaxes and......

K. F. Tan; J. R. Shi; G. Zhao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cold quark matter in compact stars  

SciTech Connect

We used an equation of state for the cold quark matter to the study of properties of quark stars. We also discuss the absolute stability of quark matter and compute the mass-radius relation for self-bound stars.

Franzon, B.; Fogaca, D. A.; Navarra, F. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Horvath, J. E. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 1226, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

Haier: ENERGY STAR Referral (ESA408J)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE referred Haier room air conditioner model ESA408J to EPA, brand manager of the ENERGY STAR program, for appropriate action after DOE testing revealed that the model does not meet ENERGY STAR requirements.

368

Haier: ENERGY STAR Referral (ESA3087)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE referred Haier room air conditioner model ESA3087 to EPA, brand manager of the ENERGY STAR program, for appropriate action after DOE testing revealed that the model does not meet ENERGY STAR requirements.

369

Equator Appliance: ENERGY STAR Referral (EZ 3720)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE referred Equator Appliance clothes washer EZ 3720 to EPA, brand manager of the ENERGY STAR program, for appropriate action after DOE testing revealed that the model does not meet ENERGY STAR requirements.

370

Review: Magnetic fields of O stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2002, strong, organized magnetic fields have been firmly detected at the surfaces of about 10 Galactic O-type stars. In this paper I will review the characteristics of the inferred fields of individual stars, as well as the overall population. I will discuss the extension of the 'magnetic desert', first inferred among the A-type stars, to O stars up to 60 solar masses. I will discuss the interaction of the winds of the magnetic stars with the fields above their surfaces, generating complex 'dynamical magnetosphere' structures detected in optical and UV lines, and in X-ray lines and continuum. Finally, I will discuss the detection of a small number of variable O stars in the LMC and SMC that exhibit spectral characteristics analogous to the known Galactic magnetic stars, and that almost certainly represent the first known examples of extra-Galactic magnetic stars.

Wade, G A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

ENERGY STAR Webinar: Portfolio Manager 101  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGY STAR is hosting a webinar on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool on Oct. 28, 2014, from 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

372

How to Apply for the ENERGY STAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join us to learn about applying for ENERGY STAR Certification in Portfolio Manager. Understand the value of the ENERGY STAR certification, see the step-by-step process of applying, and gain tips to...

373

Nuclei embedded in an electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of nuclei embedded in an electron gas are studied within the relativistic mean-field approach. These studies are relevant for nuclear properties in astrophysical environments such as neutron-star crusts and supernova explosions. The electron gas is treated as a constant background in the Wigner-Seitz cell approximation. We investigate the stability of nuclei with respect to alpha and beta decay. Furthermore, the influence of the electronic background on spontaneous fission of heavy and superheavy nuclei is analyzed. We find that the presence of the electrons leads to stabilizing effects for both $\\alpha$ decay and spontaneous fission for high electron densities. Furthermore, the screening effect shifts the proton dripline to more proton-rich nuclei, and the stability line with respect to beta decay is shifted to more neutron-rich nuclei. Implications for the creation and survival of very heavy nuclear systems are discussed.

Thomas J. Buervenich; Igor N. Mishustin; Walter Greiner

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hubble Sees a Neutron Star Alone in Space Nearest Known Neutron Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hubble Sees a Neutron Star Alone in Space Nearest Known Neutron Star #12;Birth of a Neutron Star In the core, nuclei are smashed into protons & neutrons; the protons combine with electrons to make neutrons & neutrinos. The birth temperature of a neutron star is ~5?1011 K, but neutrino emission cools it to `only

Barnes, Joshua Edward

376

NuSTAR: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array  

SciTech Connect

Bill Craig, an astrophysicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, describes the NASA NuSTAR mission, launched June 13, 2012.

Craig, Bill

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

Tanmay Vachaspati

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

ENERGY STAR Guide to Retro-Commissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGY STAR Guide to Retro-Commissioning gives an overview of RCx and provides detailed project guidance.

379

The nuclear physics of neutron stars  

SciTech Connect

We explore the unique and fascinating structure of neutron stars. Although neutron stars are of interest in many areas of Physics, our aim is to provide an intellectual bridge between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. We argue against the naive perception of a neutron star as a uniform assembly of neutrons packed to enormous densities. Rather, by focusing on the many exotic phases that are speculated to exist in a neutron star, we show how the reality is different and far more interesting.

Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

380

ON THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF LOW-METALLICITY STARS: THE IMPORTANCE OF DUST COOLING  

SciTech Connect

The first stars to form in the universe are believed to have distribution of masses biased toward massive stars. This contrasts with the present-day initial mass function, which has a predominance of stars with masses lower than 1 M{sub Sun }. Therefore, the mode of star formation must have changed as the universe evolved. Such a transition is attributed to a more efficient cooling provided by increasing metallicity. Especially dust cooling can overcome the compressional heating, which lowers the gas temperature thus increasing its instability to fragmentation. The purpose of this paper is to verify if dust cooling can efficiently cool the gas, and enhance the fragmentation of gas clouds at the early stages of the universe. To confirm that, we calculate a set of hydrodynamic simulations that include sink particles, which represent contracting protostars. The thermal evolution of the gas during the collapse is followed by making use of a primordial chemical network and also a recipe for dust cooling. We model four clouds with different amounts of metals (10{sup -4}, 10{sup -5}, 10-6 Z{sub Sun }, and 0), and analyze how this property affect the fragmentation of star-forming clouds. We find evidence for fragmentation in all four cases, and hence conclude that there is no critical metallicity below which fragmentation is impossible. Nevertheless, there is a clear change in the behavior of the clouds at Z {approx}< 10{sup -5} Z{sub Sun }, caused by the fact that at this metallicity, fragmentation takes longer to occur than accretion, leading to a flat mass function at lower metallicities.

Dopcke, Gustavo [Member of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg, IMPRS-HD, Germany. (Germany)] [Member of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg, IMPRS-HD, Germany. (Germany); Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Klessen, Ralf S., E-mail: gustavo@uni-hd.de [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Star Formation Histories of Four Fields Spanning the Minor Axis of NGC 6822  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The star formation histories of four fields within the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 are presented. Each of the fields was imaged by the WFPC2 aboard the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} and were used to obtain $VI$ color-magnitude diagrams for each field reaching $V\\simeq26$. The magnitude of the tip of the red giant branch and the red clump were used to determine distances to NGC 6822 that are consistent with previous ground-based measurements. The distance, extinction and star formation history were also determined by fitting the entire color-magnitude diagram in each field. The distances from these fits are consistent with the other determinations within the estimated errors once the systematic effects of uncertainties in the age-metallicity relation are taken into account. The extinction varies among the four fields from approximately the foreground Galactic value to $\\approx 0.4$ mag higher in $V$ and roughly correlates with the $60\\micron$ surface brightness. The star formation histories in the four fields are similar for ages $\\gtrsim 1$ Gyr and are relatively constant or somewhat increasing with time. These old star formation rates are comparable to that expected from the typical gas surface densities at these galactocentric radii and suggest that no large scale redistribution of gas or stars is required to account for the inferred star formation rates. Three of the fields show a drop of a factor of $\\sim 2-4$ in the star formation rate about 600 Myr ago while the remaining field centered on the bar shows an increase.

Ted K. Wyder

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

THE SCHMIDT-KENNICUTT LAW OF MATCHED-AGE STAR-FORMING REGIONS; Pa{alpha} OBSERVATIONS OF THE EARLY-PHASE INTERACTING GALAXY TAFFY I  

SciTech Connect

In order to test a recent hypothesis that the dispersion in the Schmidt-Kennicutt law arises from variations in the evolutionary stage of star-forming molecular clouds, we compared molecular gas and recent star formation in an early-phase merger galaxy pair, Taffy I (UGC 12915/UGC 12914, VV 254) which went through a direct collision 20 Myr ago and whose star-forming regions are expected to have similar ages. Narrowband Pa{alpha} image is obtained using the ANIR near-infrared camera on the mini-TAO 1 m telescope. The image enables us to derive accurate star formation rates within the galaxy directly. The total star formation rate, 22.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, was found to be much higher than previous estimates. Ages of individual star-forming blobs estimated from equivalent widths indicate that most star-forming regions are {approx}7 Myr old, except for a giant H II region at the bridge which is much younger. Comparison between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for the regions with the same age exhibits a surprisingly tight correlation, a slope of unity, and star formation efficiencies comparable to those of starburst galaxies. These results suggest that Taffy I has just evolved into a starburst system after the collision, and the star-forming sites are at a similar stage in their evolution from natal molecular clouds except for the bridge region. The tight Schmidt-Kennicutt law supports the scenario that dispersion in the star formation law is in large part due to differences in evolutionary stage of star-forming regions.

Komugi, S. [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago 763-0355 (Chile); Tateuchi, K.; Motohara, K.; Kato, N.; Konishi, M.; Koshida, S.; Morokuma, T.; Takahashi, H.; Tanabe, T.; Yoshii, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Takagi, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-31-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Iono, D.; Kaneko, H.; Ueda, J. [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory, 462-2 Nobeyama, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Saitoh, T. R., E-mail: skomugi@alma.cl [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro 152-0033 (Japan)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Join ENERGY STAR as a partner | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join ENERGY STAR as a partner Join ENERGY STAR as a partner Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can ENERGY STAR help your business? Get started Join ENERGY STAR as a partner Service and Product Provider associations partnering with ENERGY STAR ENERGY STAR service & product provider training series Service and product provider's marketing toolkit

384

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

385

STAR Highlights on Heavy Ion Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RHIC-STAR is a mid-rapidity collider experiment for studying high energy nuclear collisions. The main physics goals of STAR experiment are 1) studying the properties of the strongly coupled Quark Gluon Plasma, 2) explore the QCD phase diagram structure. In these proceedings, we will review the recent results of heavy ion physics at STAR.

Shusu Shi

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE NINTH MAGNITUDE CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STAR BD+44 Degree-Sign 493  

SciTech Connect

We present detailed chemical abundances for the bright carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star BD+44 Degree-Sign 493, previously reported on by Ito et al. Our measurements confirm that BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 is an extremely metal-poor ([Fe/H] =-3.8) subgiant star with excesses of carbon and oxygen. No significant excesses are found for nitrogen and neutron-capture elements (the latter of which place it in the CEMP-no class of stars). Other elements that we measure exhibit abundance patterns that are typical for non-CEMP extremely metal-poor stars. No evidence for variations of radial velocity has been found for this star. These results strongly suggest that the carbon enhancement in BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 is unlikely to have been produced by a companion asymptotic giant-branch star and transferred to the presently observed star, nor by pollution of its natal molecular cloud by rapidly-rotating, massive, mega metal-poor ([Fe/H] < - 6.0) stars. A more likely possibility is that this star formed from gas polluted by the elements produced in a ''faint'' supernova, which underwent mixing and fallback, and only ejected small amounts of elements of metals beyond the lighter elements. The Li abundance of BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 (A(Li) = log (Li/H)+12 =1.0) is lower than the Spite plateau value, as found in other metal-poor subgiants. The upper limit on Be abundance (A(Be) = log (Be/H)+12 < - 1.8) is as low as those found for stars with similarly extremely-low metallicity, indicating that the progenitors of carbon- (and oxygen-) enhanced stars are not significant sources of Be, or that Be is depleted in metal-poor subgiants with effective temperatures of {approx}5400 K.

Ito, Hiroko; Aoki, Wako [Department of Astronomical Science, School of Physical Sciences, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Honda, Satoshi [Kwasan Observatory, School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 377-0702 (Japan); Carollo, Daniela, E-mail: aoki.wako@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: beers@noao.edu, E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: honda@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: daniela.carollo@mq.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonic Research Center, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Toy stars in one dimension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......equilibrium position due to forces from much greater masses...toy star stayed in the fundamental mode regardless of the...suggested that maybe the fundamental was an exact solution...really a many-body force that Newton had used...Stegun I. A., 1972, Handbook of Mathematical Functions......

J. J. Monaghan; D. J. Price

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

BPS Skyrmions as neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BPS Skyrme model has been demonstrated already to provide a physically intriguing and quantitatively reliable description of nuclear matter. Indeed, the model has both the symmetries and the energy-momentum tensor of a perfect fluid, and thus represents a field theoretic realization of the "liquid droplet" model of nuclear matter. In addition, the classical soliton solutions together with some obvious corrections (spin-isospin quantization, Coulomb energy, proton-neutron mass difference) led to an accurate modeling of nuclear binding energies for heavier nuclei. These results lead to the rather obvious proposal to try to describe also neutron stars by the BPS Skyrme model coupled to gravity. We find that the resulting self-gravitating BPS Skyrmions provide an excellent description of neutron stars when the parameter values of the model are extracted from nuclear physics. Specifically, the maximum possible mass of a neutron star before black-hole formation sets in is a few solar masses, the precise value depending on the precise values of the model parameters, and the resulting neutron star radius is of the order of 10 km.

C. Adam; C. Naya; J. Sanchez-Guillen; R. Vazquez; A. Wereszczynski

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

BPS Skyrmions as neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BPS Skyrme model has been demonstrated already to provide a physically intriguing and quantitatively reliable description of nuclear matter. Indeed, the model has both the symmetries and the energy-momentum tensor of a perfect fluid, and thus represents a field theoretic realization of the "liquid droplet" model of nuclear matter. In addition, the classical soliton solutions together with some obvious corrections (spin-isospin quantization, Coulomb energy, proton-neutron mass difference) provide an accurate modeling of nuclear binding energies for heavier nuclei. These results lead to the rather natural proposal to try to describe also neutron stars by the BPS Skyrme model coupled to gravity. We find that the resulting self-gravitating BPS Skyrmions provide excellent results as well as some new perspectives for the description of bulk properties of neutron stars when the parameter values of the model are extracted from nuclear physics. Specifically, the maximum possible mass of a neutron star before black-hole formation sets in is a few solar masses, the precise value depending on the precise values of the model parameters, and the resulting neutron star radius is of the order of 10 km.

C. Adam; C. Naya; J. Sanchez-Guillen; R. Vazquez; A. Wereszczynski

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Capture of field stars by giant interstellar clouds: the formation of moving stellar groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the solar neighbourhood, there are moving groups of stars with similar ages and others of stars with heterogeneous ages as the field stars. To explain these facts, we have constructed a simple model of three phases. Phase A: a giant interstellar cloud is uniformly accelerated (or decelerated) with respect to the field stars during a relatively short period of time (10 Myr) and the cloud's mass is uniformly increased; phase B: the acceleration (or deceleration) and mass accretion of the cloud cease. The star formation spreads throughout the cloud, giving origin to stellar groups of similar ages; and phase C: the cloud loses all its gaseous component at a constant rate and in parallel is uniformly decelerated (or accelerated) until reaching the initial velocity of phase A (case 1) or the velocity of the gas cloud remains constant (case 2). Both cases give equivalent results. The system equations for the star motions governed by a time-dependent gravitational potential of the giant cloud and referred to a coo...

Olano, Carlos A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The Nature of the Massive Young Stars in W75 N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed the W75 N massive star forming region in SiO(J=2-1 & J=1-0) at 3" - 5" resolution and in 6 cm, 2 cm, and 7 mm continuum emission at 1.4" - 0.2" resolution. The abundance ratio of [SiO]/[H2] is roughly 5-7 x 10^-11 which is typical for what is expected in the ambient component of molecular clouds with active star formation. The SiO morphology is diffuse and centered on the positions of the ultracompact HII regions - no collimated, neutral jet was discovered. The ionized gas surrounding the protostars have emission measures ranging from 1-15 x 10^6 pc cm^-6, densities from 0.4-5 x 10^4 cm^-3, and derived spectral types of the central ionizing stars ranging from B0.5 to B2. Most of the detected sources have spectral indicies which suggest optically thin to moderately optically thick HII regions produced by a central ionizing star. The spread in ages between the oldest and youngest early-B protostars in the W75 N cluster is 0.1-5 x 10^6 years. This evolutionary timescale for W75 N is consistent with that found for early-B stars born in clusters forming more massive stars (Mstar > 25 Msun).

D. S. Shepherd; S. E. Kurtz; L. Testi

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Southern California Gas Co ..................... CA 269,739,909 7.31 Pacific Gas and Elec Co........................... CA 224,402,286 6.32 Northern Illinois Gas Co ........................... IL 196,608,329 4.63 Consumers Pwr Co .................................. MI 153,128,350 4.92 Columbia Gas Dist Co.............................. OH,KY,PA,MD 138,064,908 7.21 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co........................ NJ 126,142,540 6.61 Michigan Consol Gas Co.......................... MI 125,456,377 5.35 East Ohio Gas Co .................................... OH 117,574,196 6.21 Peoples Gas Lt and Coke Co................... IL 89,685,006 6.81 Atlanta Gas Lt Co ..................................... GA 89,103,601 6.69 Lone Star Gas Co..................................... TX 84,559,915 5.95 Brooklyn Union Gas Co............................ NY

394

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Northern Illinois Gas Co ........................... IL 241,353,299 5.25 Southern California Gas Co ..................... CA 237,581,205 7.28 Pacific Gas and Elec Co........................... CA 191,919,171 6.12 Consumers Pwr Co .................................. MI 178,690,154 4.80 Columbia Gas Dist Co.............................. OH,KY,PA,MD 178,512,589 7.64 Michigan Consol Gas Co.......................... MI 152,111,213 5.59 East Ohio Gas Co .................................... OH 147,197,186 6.36 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co........................ NJ 138,404,765 7.58 Peoples Gas Lt and Coke Co................... IL 113,561,765 6.96 Lone Star Gas Co..................................... TX 100,079,759 6.13 Atlanta Gas Lt Co ..................................... GA 96,381,162 7.41 Brooklyn Union Gas Co............................

395

Dark Stars: the First Stars in the Universe may be powered by Dark Matter Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new line of research on Dark Stars is reviewed, which suggests that the first stars to exist in the universe were powered by dark matter heating rather than by fusion. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, which may be there own antipartmers, collect inside the first stars and annihilate to produce a heat source that can power the stars. A new stellar phase results, a Dark Star, powered by dark matter annihilation as long as there is dark matter fuel.

Katherine Freese; Peter Bodenheimer; Paolo Gondolo; Douglas Spolyar

2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

397

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

398

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

399

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

405

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

406

Natural Gas in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a recent meeting of the Institution of Gas Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe ... Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe Gas Council, stated that an intensive, large-scale search for ...

1953-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

407

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

408

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A direct constraint on the gas content of a massive, passively evolving elliptical galaxy at z = 1.43  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In comparison to gas and dust in star-forming galaxies at the peak epoch of galaxy assembly, which are presently the topic of intense study, little is known about the interstellar medium (ISM) of distant, passively evolving galaxies. We report on a deep 3 mm-band search with IRAM/PdBI for molecular gas in a massive ($M_{\\star}{\\sim}6{\\times}10^{11}M_{\\odot}$) elliptical galaxy at z=1.4277, the first observation of this kind ever attempted. We place a 3$\\sigma$ upper limit of 0.30 Jy km/s on the flux of the CO($J$=$2\\rightarrow$1) line or $L'_{\\rm CO}$$gas mass of $gas fraction of $\\lesssim$5% assuming a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and an ISM dominated by molecular gas, as observed in local early-type galaxies (ETGs). This low gas fraction approaches that of loc...

Sargent, Mark T; Bournaud, F; Onodera, M; Feruglio, C; Martig, M; Gobat, R; Dannerbauer, H; Schinnerer, E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage rack, a wall mounted cylinder rack, anchored to a fixed bench top, vented gas cabinet, or other

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

413

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Natural Gas Reforming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

417

Fuel: Bargain Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council has done well to agree on low prices for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The ... for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The price finally agreed is both much less than the two companies wanted and much less than ...

1968-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

419

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

420

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Energy Transformation Limit Theorem for Gas Flow Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The limit energy theorem which determines the possibility of transformation the energy flow in power systems in the absence of technical work is investigated and proved for such systems as gas lasers and plasmatrons, chemical gas reactors, vortex tubes, gas-acoustic and other systems, as well as a system of close stars. In the case of the same name ideal gas in the system the maximum ratio of energy conversion effectiveness is linked to the Carnot theorem, which in its turn is connected with the Nernst theorem. However, numerical analyses show that the class of flow energy systems is non-carnot one. The ratio of energy conversion effectiveness depends on the properties of the working medium; a conventional cycle in open-circuit is essentially irreversible. The proved theorem gives a more strongly worded II law of thermodynamics for the selected class of flow energy systems. Implications for astrophysical thermodynamic systems and the theory of a strong shock wave are discussed.

Volov, V T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Star Perfomer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Star Perfomer Star Perfomer Star Perfomer logo. Outlines simple steps to help office building owners, managers and tenants improve their greenhouse and energy efficiency performance, simply by asking some straightforward questions about the size, operating hours, current performance and equipment standards of the building. Star Performer is a diagnostic tool that uses the current operational energy performance of the building measured against a national benchmark, obtained through the Australian Building Greenhouse Rating scheme (see links below), as a basis for making recommendations. The tool covers all areas of the building which affect operational energy performance, including building fabric, equipment and operational practices. Star Perfomer will point you in the right direction and give

424

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

425

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

426

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

427

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

428

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

429

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

430

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

431

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

432

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

433

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

434

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

435

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

436

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

437

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

438

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

439

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

440

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

442

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

443

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

444

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

445

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

446

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

447

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

448

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

449

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

450

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

451

STAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS IN THE OUTER DISKS OF NEARBY GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present a Large Binocular Telescope imaging study that characterizes the star cluster component of nearby galaxy outer disks (beyond the optical radius R{sub 25}). Expanding on the pilot project of Herbert-Fort et al., we present deep ({approx}27.5 mag V-band point-source limiting magnitude) U- and V-band imaging of six galaxies: IC 4182, NGC 3351, NGC 4736, NGC 4826, NGC 5474, and NGC 6503. We find that the outer disk of each galaxy is populated with marginally resolved star clusters with masses {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} and ages up to {approx}1 Gyr (masses and ages are limited by the depth of our imaging and uncertainties are large given how photometry can be strongly affected by the presence or absence of a few stars in such low-mass systems), and that they are typically found out to at least 2 R{sub 25} but sometimes as far as 3-4 R{sub 25}-even beyond the apparent H I disk. The mean rate of cluster formation for 1 R{sub 25} {<=} R {<=} 1.5 R{sub 25} is at least one every {approx}2.5 Myr and the clusters are spatially correlated with the H I, most strongly with higher density gas near the periphery of the optical disk and with lower density neutral gas at the H I disk periphery. We hypothesize that the clusters near the edge of the optical disk are formed in the extension of spiral structure from the inner disk and are a fairly consistent phenomenon and that the clusters formed at the periphery of the H I disk are the result of accretion episodes.

Herbert-Fort, Stephane; Zaritsky, Dennis [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Moustakas, John [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Di Paola, Andrea [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Pogge, Richard W. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Ragazzoni, Roberto, E-mail: s.herbertfort@gmail.com, E-mail: dennis.zaritsky@gmail.com [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Metro  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metro New York) Metro New York) National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Metro New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Other Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom Incentives including Combined Heat and Power: $250,000 Large Industrial Gas Incentives: $250,000 Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Traps: $2,500 All Insulation: $10,000/account Boiler Controls: 2 units ENERGY STAR Programmable Thermostats: 5 units Pipe Insulation: 500 ft Program Info State New York Program Type

453

New Mexico Gas Company - Residential Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Efficiency Programs Residential Efficiency Programs New Mexico Gas Company - Residential Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation: $500 Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR Qualifying Home: $750 New Mexico Energy$mart Income Qualifying Weatherization: Free Tankless Water Heater: $300 Insulation: 25% of cost up to $500 The New Mexico Gas Company provides incentives for energy saving measures and improvements to residential homes. Rebates are available for adding

454

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Greenhouse Gas Emissions | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

455

Avista Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Avista Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives should not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnace/Boiler: $400 Water Heater: $30 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft. ENERGY STAR rated homes: $650 - $900 Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance Space Heat: $750 Provider

456

Build Your Business with ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service and Product Providers: Service and Product Providers: Build Your Business with ENERGY STAR ® Let ENERGY STAR Be Your Market Advantage Look to ENERGY STAR to help you bring value to your customers and more sales to your organization. Service and Product Providers (SPPs) are integral in helping existing commercial buildings use energy more efficiently. Partnering with ENERGY STAR provides you with access to free tools and resources to help you devise and implement energy- efficient strategies that are right for your customers: > Use the ENERGY STAR Brand to Enhance Your Credibility: Use the nationally recognized ENERGY STAR partner logo on your promotional materials to symbolize your commitment to delivering energy efficiency and financial savings to customers. Help customers build their reputation as environmental and social leaders through work with an ENERGY STAR SPP partner.

457

ORISE: Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Star Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Star Status Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Star Status Within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP), there are three levels of recognition: STAR, MERIT and DEMONSTRATION. Contractors' programs that meet the requirements for outstanding safety and health programs, earn VPP STAR status-the highest achievement level. In December of 2003, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) first earned STAR distinction following a comprehensive evaluation of its application for the VPP program. At that time, ORISE was just the 21st DOE site and the first in Tennessee to earn such exemplary recognition. In 2011 ORISE received its seventh consecutive Star of Excellence award. Today, ORISE is one of more than two dozen DOE sites to achieve VPP STAR

458

Energy Star Rebate Finder | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Star Rebate Finder Energy Star Rebate Finder Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Star Rebate Finder Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Mobile Device Website: m.epa.gov/apps/energy.html Web Application Link: m.epa.gov/apps/energy.html Cost: Free Energy Star Rebate Finder Screenshot References: EPA[1] Logo: Energy Star Rebate Finder Find special offers and rebates from Energy Star partners by entering your zip code. Overview To encourage customers to buy energy efficient products, Energy Star partners occasionally sponsor special offers, such as sales tax exemptions or credits, or rebates on qualified products. Partners also occasionally

459

Green Star Alternative Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Star Alternative Energy Green Star Alternative Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Star Alternative Energy Place San Diego, California Zip 92108 Sector Wind energy Product A US-based wind energy project developer. References Green Star Alternative Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Green Star Alternative Energy is a company located in San Diego, California . References ↑ "Green Star Alternative Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Green_Star_Alternative_Energy&oldid=346056" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

460

Atmospheres and radiating surfaces of neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a breakthrough in the studies of thermal radiation of neutron stars. Observations with modern space telescopes have provided a wealth of valuable information. Being correctly interpreted, this information can elucidate physics of superdense matter in the interiors of these stars. The theory of formation of thermal spectra of neutron stars is based on the physics of plasmas and radiative processes in stellar photospheres. It provides the framework for interpretation of observational data and for extracting neutron-star parameters from these data. This paper presents a review of the current state of the theory of surface layers of neutron stars and radiative processes in these layers, with the main focus on the neutron stars that possess strong magnetic fields. In addition to the conventional deep (semi-infinite) atmospheres, radiative condensed surfaces of neutron stars and "thin" (finite) atmospheres are also considered.

Potekhin, A Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lone star gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nuclear and gravitational energies in stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The force that governs the evolution of stars is gravity. Indeed this force drives star formation, imposes thermal and density gradients into stars at hydrostatic equilibrium and finally plays the key role in the last phases of their evolution. Nuclear power in stars governs their lifetimes and of course the stellar nucleosynthesis. The nuclear reactions are at the heart of the changes of composition of the baryonic matter in the Universe. This change of composition, in its turn, has profound consequences on the evolution of stars and galaxies. The energy extracted from the gravitational, respectively nuclear reservoirs during the lifetimes of stars of different masses are estimated. It is shown that low and intermediate mass stars (M 8 Msol), which explode in a supernova explosion, extract more than 5 times more energy from the gravitational reservoir than from the nuclear one. We conclude by discussing a few important nuclear reactions and their link to topical astrophysical questions.

Meynet, Georges; Ekstrm, Sylvia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

COSMIC EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ENHANCEMENT IN CLOSE MAJOR-MERGER GALAXY PAIRS SINCE z = 1  

SciTech Connect

The infrared (IR) emission of 'M {sub *} galaxies' (10{sup 10.4} {<=} M {sub star} {<=} 10{sup 11.0} M {sub Sun }) in galaxy pairs, derived using data obtained in Herschel (PEP/HerMES) and Spitzer (S-COSMOS) surveys, is compared to that of single-disk galaxies in well-matched control samples to study the cosmic evolution of the star formation enhancement induced by galaxy-galaxy interaction. Both the mean IR spectral energy distribution and mean IR luminosity of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in SFG+SFG (S+S) pairs in the redshift bin of 0.6 < z < 1 are consistent with no star formation enhancement. SFGs in S+S pairs in a lower redshift bin of 0.2 < z < 0.6 show marginal evidence for a weak star formation enhancement. Together with the significant and strong sSFR enhancement shown by SFGs in a local sample of S+S pairs (obtained using previously published Spitzer observations), our results reveal a trend for the star formation enhancement in S+S pairs to decrease with increasing redshift. Between z = 0 and z = 1, this decline of interaction-induced star formation enhancement occurs in parallel with the dramatic increase (by a factor of {approx}10) of the sSFR of single SFGs, both of which can be explained by the higher gas fraction in higher-z disks. SFGs in mixed pairs (S+E pairs) do not show any significant star formation enhancement at any redshift. The difference between SFGs in S+S pairs and in S+E pairs suggests a modulation of the sSFR by the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the dark matter halos hosting these pairs.

Xu, C. K.; Shupe, D. L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Cooray, A.; Lu, N.; Schulz, B. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bethermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Riguccini, L. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Franceschini, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, vicolo Osservatorio, 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Marsden, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Oliver, S. J. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Pozzi, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); and others

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Multi-Wavelength Studies of Spectacular Ram Pressure Stripping of a Galaxy. II. Star Formation in the Tail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With multiband photometric data in public archives, we detected four intracluster star-forming regions in the Virgo cluster. Two of them were at a projected distance of 35 kpc away from NGC4388, and the other two were 66 kpc away. Our new spectroscopic observation revealed that their recession velocities were comparable to the ram-pressure-stripped tail of NGC4388 and confirmed their association. The stellar mass of the star-forming regions ranged from 10^4 - 10^4.5 M_sun except for that of the faintest one which would be solar abundance, and the age of the stars was ~ 10^6.8 years. Their young stellar age meant that the star formation should have started after the gas was stripped from NGC4388. This implied in situ condensation of the stripped gas. We also found that two star-forming regions lay near the leading edge of a filamentary dark cloud. The extinction of the filament was smaller than that derived from the Balmer decrement of the star-forming regi...

Yagi, Masafumi; Fujita, Yutaka; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Akahori, Takuya; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Makishima, Kazuo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT OF NGC 6946: Br ? AND H{sub 2} RESULTS FROM KECK INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect

We present a three-dimensional data cube of the K-band continuum and the Br ?, H{sub 2} S(0), and S(1) lines within the central 18.''5 13.''8 (520 pc 390 pc) region of NGC 6946. Data were obtained using OSIRIS, a near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph at Keck Observatory, with Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics. The 0.''3 resolution allows us to investigate the stellar bulge and the forming star clusters in the nuclear region on 10 pc scales. We detect giant H II regions associated with massive young star clusters in the nuclear spiral/ring (R ? 30 pc) and in the principal shocks along the nuclear bar. Comparisons of the Br ? fluxes with Pa ? line emission and radio continuum indicate A{sub K} ? 3, A{sub V} ? 25 for the nuclear star-forming regions. The most luminous H II regions are restricted to within 70 pc of the center, despite the presence of high gas columns at larger radii (R ? 200 pc). H{sub 2} emission is restricted to clouds within R ? 60 pc of the center, resembling the distribution of HCN line emission. We propose that gas-assisted migration of the young star clusters is contributing to the buildup of the nuclear bar and nuclear star cluster (R < 30 pc) in this galaxy.

Tsai, Chao-Wei [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Turner, Jean L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Beck, Sara C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv (Israel); Meier, David S. [Department of Physics, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Wright, Shelley A., E-mail: Chao-Wei.Tsai@jpl.nasa.gov [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

Constraining the Star Formation Histories of Spiral Bulges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-slit spectroscopic observations of line-strengths and kinematics made along the minor axes of four spiral bulges are reported. Comparisons are made between central line-strengths in spiral bulges and those in other morphological types. The bulges are found to have central line-strengths comparable with those of single stellar populations (SSPs) of approximately solar abundance or above. Negative radial gradients are observed in line-strengths, similar to those in elliptical galaxies. The bulge data are consistent with correlations between Mg2, and central velocity dispersion observed in elliptical galaxiess. In contrast to elliptical galaxies, central line-strengths lie within the loci defining the range of and Mg2 achieved by Worthey's (1994) solar abundance ratio, SSPs. The implication of solar abundance ratios indicates differences in the star formation histories of spiral bulges and elliptical galaxies. A ``single zone with in- fall'' model of galactic chemical evolution, using Worthey's (1994) SSPs, is used to constrain possible star formation histories in our sample. We show that , Mg2 and Hbeta line-strengths observed in these bulges cannot be reproduced using primordial collapse models of formation but can be reproduced by models with extended in-fall of gas and star formation (2-17 Gyr) in the region modelled. One galaxy (NGC 5689) shows a central population with luminosity weighted average age of ~5 Gyr, supporting the idea of extended star formation. Kinematic substructure, possibly associated with a central spike in metallicity, is observed at the centre of the Sa galaxy NGC 3623.

R. N. Proctor; A. E. Sansom

1999-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

466

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

467

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

468

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

470

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

471

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

472

Enrichment of the dust-to-gas mass ratio in Bondi/Jeans accretion/cloud systems due to unequal changes in dust and gas incoming velocities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ratio of the Bondi and Jeans lengths is used to develop a cloud-accretion model that describes both an inner Bondi-type regime where gas pressure is balanced by the gravity of a central star and an outer Jeans-type regime where gas pressure is balanced by gas self-gravity. The gas density profile provided by this model makes a smooth transition from a wind-type inner solution to a Bonnor-Ebert type outer solution. It is shown that high-velocity dust impinging on this cloud will tend to pile-up due to having a different velocity profile than gas so that the dust-to-gas ratio is substantially enriched above the 1% ISM level.

P. M. Bellan

2008-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

473

2013 Licensed Professional's Guide to the ENERGY STAR Label for Commercial Buldings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Licensed Professional's Guide: Understanding the Roles and Requirements for Verifying Commercial Building Applications for ENERGY STAR Certification Contents Introduction 1 Verifying the Data Checklist 6 Verifying the Statement of Energy Performance 21 Verifying the Indoor Environmental Conditions 23 Appendix A: Sample Applications for ENERGY STAR Certification 27 Appendix B: Steps to Correct Information on the Data Checklist and Statement of Energy Performance 33 The Licensed Professional's Guide 1 Introduction Energy use in commercial buildings accounts for nearly 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year. Through ENERGY STAR, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) works with owners and managers of our nation's

474

ENERGY STAR Snapshot: Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Spring 2008.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors Spring 2008 Introduction Through 2007, commercial and industrial (C&I) leaders have made unprecedented progress in their efforts to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions across their buildings and facilities. This includes: y Hundreds of organizations and individuals stepping forward to take the ENERGY STAR Challenge to improve the energy efficiency of America's buildings by 10 percent or more y Measuring the energy performance in tens of thousands of buildings y Achieving energy savings across millions of square feet y Designating more than 4,000 efficient buildings and facilities with the ENERGY STAR label ENERGY STAR partners are building tremendous momentum for energy efficiency and seeing important

475

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

476

$J/?$ and $?$ measurements in STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy-quarkonium states are expected to evidenciate the deconfinement of the nuclear matter into a Quark-Gluon Plasma in heavy-ion collisions. To strive conclusive information from quarkonium production modification in A+A collisions, systematic measurements of the $J/\\psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ states in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions are necessary. To accomplish this mission the STAR experiment has a Quarkonium program based on the development of specific trigger setups that take advantage of the large STAR acceptance. In this work we present the preliminary results of the $J/\\psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ measurement in 200 GeV p+p and the first measurements of $\\Upsilon$ in 200 GeV heavy ion collisions.

Mauro R. Cosentino; for the Star Collaboration

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

477

Massive Stars and their Supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massive stars and their supernovae are prominent sources of radioactive isotopes, the observations of which thus can help to improve our astrophysical models of those. Our understanding of stellar evolution and the final explosive endpoints such as supernovae or hypernovae or gamma-ray bursts relies on the combination of magneto-hydrodynamics, energy generation due to nuclear reactions accompanying composition changes, radiation transport, and thermodynamic properties (such as the equation of state of stellar matter). Nuclear energy production includes all nuclear reactions triggered during stellar evolution and explosive end stages, also among unstable isotopes produced on the way. Radiation transport covers atomic physics (e.g. opacities) for photon transport, but also nuclear physics and neutrino nucleon/nucleus interactions in late phases and core collapse. Here we want to focus on the astrophysical aspects, i.e. a description of the evolution of massive stars and their endpoints, with a special emphasis ...

Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Liebendrfer, Matthias; Diehl, Roland; 10.1007/978-3-642-12698-7_4

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Home Performance with Energy Star  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- HPwES - HPwES Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Ely Jacobsohn U.S. Department of Energy Ely.jacobsohn@ee.doe.gov, 202-287-1333 April 3, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives: Problem Statement Works to advance the Department's and Administration's energy-related goals in the residential sector Face challenging and often conflicting mandates to save energy, meet environmental goals, and satisfy needs of

479

Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Buildings & Plants » Buildings & Plants » About us » Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants Registry of ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants

480

Neutron stars and strange stars in the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the equations of state for pure neutron matter and strange hadronic matter in $\\beta$-equilibrium, including $\\Lambda$, $\\Sigma$ and $\\Xi$ hyperons. The masses and radii of pure neutron stars and strange hadronic stars are obtained. For a pure neutron star, the maximum mass is about $1.8 M_{\\mathrm{sun}}$, while for a strange hadronic star, the maximum mass is around $1.45 M_{\\mathrm{sun}}$. The typical radii of pure neutron stars and strange hadronic stars are about 11.0-12.3 km and 10.7-11.7 km, respectively.

P. Wang; S. Lawley; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Supermassive Stars: Fact or Fiction?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermassive black holes are now realized to exist in the centers of most galaxies. The recent discoveries of luminous quasars at redshifts higher than 6 require that these black holes were assembled already when the Universe was less than a billion years old. They might originate from the collapse of supermassive stars, a scenario which could ensure a sufficiently rapid formation. Supermassive stars are dominated by photon pressure and radiate at their Eddington limit, which drives their quasi-static evolution to a final relativistic instability. Above some critical value of the metallicity, their collapse can lead to a gigantic explosion, powered by the energy release due to hydrogen burning, but below this critical metallicity their collapse inevitably ends in the formation of a black hole, accompanied by the emission of huge amounts of energy in the form of neutrinos. Although collapsing supermassive stars are the most powerful known burst sources of neutrinos, the associated conditions do not appear favorable for producing highly relativistic outflows that can explain cosmic gamma-ray bursts.

H. -Th. Janka

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

Vigan, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z