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Sample records for logos follow llnl

  1. NERSC's Names and Logos over the Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    names and logos over the years NERSC's Names and Logos over the Years April 16, 2014 by Francesca Verdier NERSC's name and logos have changed over the decades, reflecting the center's increasingly broad scientific mission. Founded in 1974 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center, NERSC has evolved from its early days supporting magnetic fusion research at LLNL to providing supercomputing resources across a spectrum of scientific

  2. NERSC Logos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Logos NERSC Logos »Please refer to the NERSC logo implementation guidelines before use. If you have any questions not addressed in the guidelines, please contact Margie Wylie mwylie@lbl.gov. NERSClogocolor.png NERSC Logo NERSCvertLOCKUP.png NERSC Logo with vertical type nerschorizLOCKUP.png NERSC logo with horizontal type NERSClogoslatepmssolid-sm.png NERSC Logo Solid Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:15

  3. Branding & Logos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  4. LLNL-POST-411531

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Administration LLNL Conducts First Plutonium Shot Using the JASPER Gas Gun LLNL Conducts First Plutonium Shot Using the JASPER Gas Gun Nevada Test Site, NV The National Nuclear Security Administration's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) successfully executes the first plutonium shot using the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun at NNSA's Nevada Test Site. LLNL scientists use the 100-foot, two-stage gas gun to fire a projectile at

  5. APS and Logos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Logos A quarterly magazine about Argonne research. The Argonne Logos articles in this section focus on APS-related research. APS Articles in Logos 2003 Cover of Logos Summer 2003...

  6. lustre-tools-llnl

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-17

    lustre-tools-llnl is a small set of commands that are helpful for using and administering a lustre file system.

  7. LLNL-PRES-655826

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5826 This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC ZFS and Lustre at LLNL Presented to Joint Facilities User Forum on Data-Intensive Computing Richard Hedges June 18, 2014 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL-PRES-xxxxxx 2 § Motivation of LLNL ZFS Strategy § ZFS features and advantages § Implementation efforts § ZFS based

  8. Milford, Utah FORGE Logo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Logo Milford, Utah FORGE Logo Milford, Utah FORGE Logo More Documents & Publications Milford, Utah FORGE Logo Milford, Utah FORGE Map Milford, Utah FORGE Logo West Flank FORGE Logo ...

  9. LLNL 1981: technical horizons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    Research programs at LLNL for 1981 are described in broad terms. In his annual State of the Laboratory address, Director Roger Batzel projected a $481 million operating budget for fiscal year 1982, up nearly 13% from last year. In projects for the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, the Laboratory applies its technical facilities and capabilities to nuclear weapons design and development and other areas of defense research that include inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnances, and particle-beam technology. LLNL is also applying its unique experience and capabilities to a variety of projects that will help the nation meet its energy needs in an environmentally acceptable manner. A sampling of recent achievements by LLNL support organizations indicates their diversity. (GHT)

  10. 2011 LLNL Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4341 This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC ATLAS Users Meeting 2014 May 15, 2014 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL-PRES-654341 2  Upgrade funded by DOE/SC/NP  Collaboration between U. of Rochester and LLNL  D. Cline and A. Hayes (U. of Rochester)  I.Y. Lee (LBNL)  B. DiGiovine, J. Anderson (ANL)  D. Swan (Swan

  11. logo | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    logo. Proper Use of NETL Logo The NETL Logo is available in eps, jpg and png formats in color and black & white. Combinations of both the Department of Energy logo and the NETL...

  12. LLNL-PRES-669100

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    69100 This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC SHE2015 held at Texas A&M University March 31-April 2, 2015 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL-PRES-669100 2 § Synthesis of the heaviest elements at DGFRS § Summary of even-Z data § Summary of odd-Z data § Future work Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  13. ARM - ARM Logos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govPublicationsARM Logos Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library...

  14. WebLogo

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-01-08

    WebLogo is a web based application designed to make the generation of sequence logos as easy and painless as possible. Sequesnce logos are a graphical representation of an amino acid or nucleic acid multiple sequence alignment developed by Tom Schneider and Mike Stephens. Each logo consists of stacks of symbols, one stack for each position in the sequence. The overall height of the stack indicates the sequence conservation at that position, while the height ofmore » symbols within the stack indicates the relative frequency of each amino or nucleic acid at that position. In general, a sequence logo provides a richer and more precise description of, for example, a binding site, than would a consensus sequence.« less

  15. LLNL Ocean General Circulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-12-29

    The LLNL OGCM is a numerical ocean modeling tool for use in studying ocean circulation over a wide range of space and time scales, with primary applications to climate change and carbon cycle science.

  16. Logo | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About / Logo Logo The PARC logo was designed by Chris Kirmaier, a PARC Principal Invesitgator and a Research Professor in the Washington University Department of Chemistry. Dr. Kirmaier's design was selected from a number of entries during the 2010 PARC Logo Contest. Faculty, staff, and students from all of PARC's partner institutions were invited to submit concepts and design ideas. The Operations Committee selected the top three logos, and the entire PARC community voted on their favorite. We

  17. LLNL-Earth3D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  18. LLNL NESHAPs, 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R.J.; Surano, K.A.; Biermann, A.H.; Gouveia, F.J.; Fields, B.C.; Tate, P.J.

    1994-06-01

    The standard defined in NESHAPSs CFR Part 61.92 limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to those that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem. In August 1993 DOE and EPA signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement which established a schedule of work for LLNL to perform to demonstrate compliance with NESHAPs, 40 CFR part 61, Subpart H. The progress in LLNL`s NESHAPs program - evaluations of all emission points for the Livermore site and Site 300, of collective EDEs for populations within 80 km of each site, status in reguard to continuous monitoring requirements and periodic confirmatory measurements, improvements in the sampling and monitoring systems and progress on a NESHAPs quality assurance program - is described in this annual report. In April 1994 the EPA notified DOE and LLNL that all requirements of the FFCA had been met, and that LLNL was in compliance with the NESHAPs regulations.

  19. LLNL E-Mail Utilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-10-31

    The LLNL E-mail Utilities software library is a Java API that simplifies the creation and delivery of email in Java business applications. It consists of a database-driven template engine, various strategies for composing, queuing, dispatching email and a Java Swing GUI for creating and editing email templates.

  20. Basic Energy Sciences (BES) at LLNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Energy Sciences at LLNL Eric Schwegler is the Point-of-Contact for DOE Office of Science Programs - Basic Energy Sciences (BES) at LLNL. Highlights Mesoscale Simulations of ...

  1. LLNL Section I Clauses/Prescriptions

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AC52-06NA27344 LLNL Section I, Page 56 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I I-1 CONTRACT CLAUSES Unless conditionally "Noted", all contract clauses are hereby incorporated by full text. The references cited herein are from the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) (48 CFR Chapter 1) and the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) (48 CFR Chapter 9). Note: The titles and page locations of the clauses are as follows: CLAUSE TITLE PAGE I001 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JUL 2004)

  2. LogoPostcardR2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the history of the Y-12 National Security Complex, there have been a number of logos used to represent the important activities taking place. Several of the logos are...

  3. LLNL NESHAPs 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, K.; Bertoldo, N.; Gallegos, G.; MacQueen, D.; Wegrecki, A.

    2015-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC operates facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H, which regulates radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Specifically, NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem (100 μSv) to any member of the public. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, LLNL personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 4.0.1.17, to calculate the dose to the maximally exposed individual member of the public for the Livermore Site and Site 300.

  4. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  5. LLNL NESHAPs 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoldo, N; Gallegos, G; MacQueen, D; Wegrecki, A; Wilson, K

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC operates facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H, which regulates radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Specifically, NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem (100 {mu}Sv) to any member of the public. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, LLNL personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 1.0, to calculate the dose to the maximally exposed individual for the Livermore site and Site 300. The dose for the LLNL site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2008 are summarized here: {sm_bullet} Livermore site: 0.0013 mrem (0.013 {mu}Sv) (26% from point source emissions, 74% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by EPA Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. {sm_bullet} Site 300: 0.000000044 mrem (0.00000044 {mu}Sv) (100% from point source emissions).

  6. LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This document is the February 14, 1990 version of the LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan (WMPP). The Waste Minimization Policy field has undergone continuous changes since its formal inception in the 1984 HSWA legislation. The first LLNL WMPP, Revision A, is dated March 1985. A series of informal revision were made on approximately a semi-annual basis. This Revision 2 is the third formal issuance of the WMPP document. EPA has issued a proposed new policy statement on source reduction and recycling. This policy reflects a preventative strategy to reduce or eliminate the generation of environmentally-harmful pollutants which may be released to the air, land surface, water, or ground water. In accordance with this new policy new guidance to hazardous waste generators on the elements of a Waste Minimization Program was issued. In response to these policies, DOE has revised and issued implementation guidance for DOE Order 5400.1, Waste Minimization Plan and Waste Reduction reporting of DOE Hazardous, Radioactive, and Radioactive Mixed Wastes, final draft January 1990. This WMPP is formatted to meet the current DOE guidance outlines. The current WMPP will be revised to reflect all of these proposed changes when guidelines are established. Updates, changes and revisions to the overall LLNL WMPP will be made as appropriate to reflect ever-changing regulatory requirements. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. LLNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class Prudhoe Bay Area Barrow Area Index Map Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Onshore Area BOE Reserve Class No 2004 Reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE

    Gas Reserve Class Prudhoe Bay Area Barrow Area Index Map Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Onshore Area Gas Reserve Class No 2004 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000 - 100,000 MMCF

  8. llnl

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    These database files include all NARAC-supported sites, and a worldwide library of potential incident sites to include nuclear power plants and fuel-cycle facilities. In...

  9. llnl

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    that more partnerships should be formed between the public and private sectors.

    The panel Discussion members are, from left: Brandon Cardwell, VP of i-GATE Innovation Hub,...

  10. Hazard classification process at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildum, J. S., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    An essential part of Integrated Safety Management is the identification of hazards in the workplace and the assessment of possible consequences of accidents involving those hazards. The process of hazard classification suggested by the DOE orders on Safety Analysis is the formalization of this identification and assessment for hazards that might cause harm to the public or workers external to the operation. Possible injury to workers in the facility who are exposed to the hazard is not considered in the designation of the hazard classification for facilities at LLNL, although worker safety is discussed in facility Safety Basis documentation.

  11. LLNL NESHAPs 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G.M.; Harrach, R.J.; Biermann, A.H.; Tate, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H; Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem to any member of the public. This document contains the EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1995 operations.

  12. Status of LLNL granite projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-12-31

    The status of LLNL Projects dealing with nuclear waste disposal in granitic rocks is reviewed. This review covers work done subsequent to the June 1979 Workshop on Thermomechanical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository and is prepared for the July 1980 Workshop on Thermomechanical-Hydrochemical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository. Topics reviewed include laboratory determination of thermal, mechanical, and transport properties of rocks at conditions simulating a deep geologic repository, and field testing at the Climax granitic stock at the USDOE Nevada Test Site.

  13. LLNL Energy Flow Charts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Lab Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Pathways analysis References: LLNL Energy Flow Charts 1 Decision makers have...

  14. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Right: Simulated evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Modified for the Web Several dynamic strength models have been implemented in LLNL hydrocodes, including the ...

  15. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, R. F.; Baker, K. L.; Barrios, M. A.; Beckwith, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Fournier, K. B.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Frenje, J.; Huntington, C. M.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Smith, R. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Widmann, K.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  16. Simulating Afterburn with LLNL Hydrocodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, L D

    2004-06-11

    Presented here is a working methodology for adapting a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) developed hydrocode, ALE3D, to simulate weapon damage effects when afterburn is a consideration in the blast propagation. Experiments have shown that afterburn is of great consequence in enclosed environments (i.e. bomb in tunnel scenario, penetrating conventional munition in a bunker, or satchel charge placed in a deep underground facility). This empirical energy deposition methodology simulates the anticipated addition of kinetic energy that has been demonstrated by experiment (Kuhl, et. al. 1998), without explicitly solving the chemistry, or resolving the mesh to capture small-scale vorticity. This effort is intended to complement the existing capability of either coupling ALE3D blast simulations with DYNA3D or performing fully coupled ALE3D simulations to predict building or component failure, for applications in National Security offensive strike planning as well as Homeland Defense infrastructure protection.

  17. Widget:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LogoCloud Jump to: navigation, search This widget adds css selectors and javascript for the Template:LogoCloud. For example: Widget:LogoCloud Retrieved from "http:...

  18. Logos - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Logos Logos are available for download in jpg format. To view the full-size logo file, click the description under the version of the logo you are interested in. When the logo loads, you may then save the file by right clicking the image and choosing "Save picture as..." Color Logos JCESR_logo_tagline-horiz_color Low Resolution for web applications High Resolution for print JCESR_logo_tagline-vrt_color Low Resolution for web applications High Resolution for print Black & White

  19. LLNL NESHAPs 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G.M.

    1997-01-06

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H; Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (10 microsieverts) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1996 operations were (1) Livermore site: 0. 093 mrem (0.93 microsievert) (52% from point-source emissions, 48% from diffuse-source emissions); (2) Site 300: 0.033 mrem (0.33 microsievert) (99% from point-source, 1% from diffuse-source emissions). The EDEs were generally calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air-dispersion/dose-assessment model. Site-specific meteorological data, stack flow data, and emissions estimates based on radionuclide inventory data or continuous-monitoring systems data were the specific input to CAP88-PC for each modeled source. 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. LLNL line-item construction projects Master Site Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-15

    This interim submittal is an updated 1996 overview of the Master Plan based on the 1995 LLNL Site Development Plan, illustrating the future land use considerations, and the locations of proposed facilities as documented through the line item development process and keyed to the summary table. The following components in addition to the line-item proposals remain key elements in the implementation strategy of the Master Plan: personnel migration, revitalization, space reduction, classified core contraction, utility systems, and environmental restoration.

  1. LLNL Distinguished Members of Technical Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    honors LLNL Distinguished Members of Technical Staff The Distinguised Members of Technical Staff (DMTS) classification, established in 2011, was created to serve as a career ladder for LLNL scientists and engineers within the Science & Engineering classification structure. It appropriately recognizes outstanding science and technology excellence with distinction and compensation while allowing the honored recipients to remain focused on delivering science and engineering solutions to

  2. LLNL NESHAPs project. 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surano, K.A.; Failor, R.A.; Biermann, A.H.; Berger, R.L.; Harrach, R.J.

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes work conducted during FY 1992 for the Environmental Monitoring and Analysis Division of the Environmental Protection Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This document contains information regarding environmental monitoring of a wide variety of radioisotopes which are emitted to the atmosphere. These radioisotopes include transuranics, biomedical tracers, tritium, mixed fission products, and other radioisotopes used for general research and nuclear weapons research. Information regarding radionuclide air emissions for each of the 56 buildings at LLNL where radionuclides are used or activation products occur is given. Detailed information is included for all point source emissions from 43 LLNL site buildings. In addition, dose equivalents and dose assessment are evaluated. Reported annual releases are based on inventory data and unabated EPA potential release fractions for unmonitored sources, and on actual emission measurements for continuously monitored facilities.

  3. Ames Laboratory Logos | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Logos The Ames Laboratory Logo comes in several formats. EPS files are vector graphics created in Adobe Illustrator and saved with a tiff preview so they will...

  4. EV Everywhere Logo Contest Federal Register Notice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a copy of the notice submitted to the Federal Register for the EV Everywhere logo contest. This document, concerning the EV Everywhere logo contest is an action issued by the Department of...

  5. ASC Logo Use Guidelines | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Use shapes from logo as a design element (as long as it is not used as the logo, but only for design). Leave space around the logo. DO NOT: Combine logo with other elements (i.e., ...

  6. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Logos Technologies, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Logos, Inc. and Edeniq, Inc. are retrofitting Edeniqs existing pilot plant in Visalia, California.

  7. Feasibility Study: Potential Enhancements for the LLNL Renewables Website

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearns, F; Krawchuk, M; Moritz, M; Stephens, S; Goldstein, N

    2008-01-25

    This feasibility study investigates additional improvements/extensions to the LLNL Renewables Website. Currently, the Renewables Website focuses on wind energy in California. Future enhancements will include other renewable energy sources. The extensions described below are focused along two separate yet related avenues: (1) Forecasting wildfire risk in the regions of California where new development may occur, as a part of the 'Million Solar Roofs' program. (2) Gaining a better understanding of the ecological components and potential of biofuels from forests in California. These two avenues are further described in the report. Following is a technical description of the Center for Fire Research and Outreach computing and web service capabilities.

  8. LLNL NESHAPs Project 1994 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surano, K.A.; Biermann, A.H.; Harrach, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    The NESHAPs standared in 40 CFR part 61, Subpart H limites the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem to any member of the public. The EDEs to the LLNL site-wide maximally exposed member of the public from 1994 operations were: Livermore 0.065 mrem; site 300 - 0.081 mrem. A complete LLNL-wide radionuclide-inventory update was conducted for 1994. Inventory and site-specific meteorological data, together with results from continuous-monitoring systems, were used as inputs to the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air-dispersion/dose-assessment model to calculate the reported EDEs.

  9. NERSC's Names and Logos over the Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Founded in 1974 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center, NERSC has evolved from its early days supporting...

  10. LLNL ASC V&V Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. LL-DNT-U-2007-012184.1 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED LLNL ASC V&V Strategy Associate Program Leader Defense and Nuclear Technologies Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Salishan Conference April 22, 2007 Dr. Joseph A. Sefcik UCRL-PRES-229957 LL-DNT-U-2007-012184.2 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED QMU is best understood from the perspective of the overall Stockpile Stewardship enterprise Original

  11. Status of gadolinium enrichment technology at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynam, C.; Comaskey, B.; Conway, J.; Eggert, J.; Glaser, J.; Ng, E.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1993-01-01

    A method based on,polarization selectivity and three step laser photoionization is presented for separation of the odd isotopes of gadolinium. Measurements of the spectroscopic parameters needed to quantify the excitation pathway are discussed. Model results are presented for the efficiency of photoionization. The vapor properties of electron beam vaporized gadolinium are presented which show dramatic cooling during the expansion of the hot dense vapor into a vacuum. This results in a significant increase in the efficiency of conversion of natural feed into enriched product in the AVLIS process. Production of enriched gadolinium for use in commercial power reactors appears to be economically viable using technology in use at LLNL.

  12. LANL, LLNL researchers among Early Career Research Program award...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Program awards for 2013. LLNL physicist Yuan Ping's project, selected by the Office of Fusion Research, aims to provide high quality data on critical energy transport properties of...

  13. FY 2006 University of California (LLNL), PER Summary | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FY 2006 University of California (LLNL), PER Summary SUMMARY OF FY 2006 UNIVERISTY OF CALIFORNIA AWARD FEE DETERMINATION Total Available Fee Total Fee Earned % 4,300,000 ...

  14. LLNL scientist receives NNSA award for developing uncrackable...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    LLNL scientist receives NNSA award for developing uncrackable code for nuclear weapons Mark Hart, a scientist and engineer in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Defense ...

  15. William H. Goldstein named director of LLNL | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Enterprise support nation's preparedness NNSA's work aids in fight against cancer NASA features LLNL star-formation simulations Consortium Led by University of...

  16. LLNL Final Design for PDV Measurements of Godiva for Validation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Multi-Physics Simulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LLNL Final Design for PDV Measurements of Godiva for Validation of Multi-Physics Simulation ...

  17. EERE Publication, Exhibit, Template, and Logo Standards and Guidelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publication, Exhibit, Template, and Logo Standards and Guidelines EERE Publication, Exhibit, Template, and Logo Standards and Guidelines The Office of Energy Efficiency and ...

  18. EERE Office, Subprogram, and Speciality Logos | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ENERGY STAR logo ENERGY STAR See ENERGY STAR Brand Book Labs 21 logo Labs21: ... Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Project Peer Review Communication Standards & ...

  19. LLNL NESHAPs project 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G.M.

    1998-06-01

    NESHAP`s limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 ({mu}Sv) to any member of the public The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site- wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1997 operations were Livermore site. 0 097 mrem (0 97 {mu}Sv) (80% from point-source emissions), 20% from diffuse-source emissions), Site 300 0 014 mrem (O 14 {mu}Sv) (38% from point-source emissions, 62% from diffuse-source emissions) The EDEs were generally calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air- dispersion/dose-assessment model Site-specific meteorological data, stack flow data, and emissions estimates based on radionuclide inventory data or continuous-monitoring systems data were the specific input to CAP88-PC for each modeled source.

  20. EERE Office, Subprogram, and Speciality Logos

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Identity and Design Guidelines outline the approval process for new logos, and define branding categories and EERE identifier requirements.

  1. SC Logos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SC Logos About About Home Organization Budget Field Offices Federal Advisory Committees History Scientific and Technical Information Honors & Awards Jobs Brochures, Logos, & Information Resources Brochures Fact Sheets SC Logos Newsletters Connect with SC Contact Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Brochures, Logos, & Information Resources SC Logos Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page

  2. Regional seismic discrimination research at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.R.; Mayeda, K.M.; Goldstein, P.; Patton, H.J.; Jarpe, S.; Glenn, L.

    1995-10-01

    The ability to verify a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) depends in part on the ability to seismically detect and discriminate between potential clandestine underground nuclear tests and other seismic sources, including earthquakes and mining activities. Regional techniques are necessary to push detection and discrimination levels down to small magnitudes, but existing methods of event discrimination are mainly empirical and show much variability from region to region. The goals of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) regional discriminant research are to evaluate the most promising discriminants, improve the understanding of their physical basis and use this information to develop new and more effective discriminants that can be transported to new regions of high monitoring interest. In this report the authors discuss preliminary efforts to geophysically characterize the Middle East and North Africa. They show that the remarkable stability of coda allows one to develop physically based, stable single station magnitude scales in new regions. They then discuss progress to date on evaluating and improving physical understanding and ability to model regional discriminants, focusing on the comprehensive NTS dataset. The authors apply this modeling ability to develop improved discriminants including slopes of P to S ratios. They find combining disparate discriminant techniques is particularly effective in identifying consistent outliers such as shallow earthquakes and mine seismicity. Finally they discuss development and use of new coda and waveform modeling tools to investigate special events.

  3. LLNL Final Design for PDV Measurements of Godiva for Validation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Multi-Physics Simulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LLNL Final Design for PDV Measurements of Godiva for Validation of Multi-Physics Simulation You are ...

  4. LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy May 18, 2015 - 5:05pm Addthis A multicolored scatter plot that curves from left to right, bottom to top to show the wind power capacity factor and wind speed meters per second. The colors relate atmospheric stability conditions to reported power-output observations with black, dark blue, and lighter blue representing stable conditions; light blue, green and light green representing neutral conditions;

  5. LLNL Scientist Named NNSA Science and Technology Excellence Award Winner |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Library / Press Releases LLNL Scientist Named NNSA Science and Technology Excellence Award Winner July 19, 2012 LIVERMORE, Calif. - Administrator Thomas D'Agostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration today awarded the first ever NNSA Science and Technology Excellence Award to Dr. Michel McCoy from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for his groundbreaking computer science research and leadership with the Advanced Simulation and

  6. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  7. EERE Publication, Exhibit, Template, and Logo Standards and Guidelines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Publication, Exhibit, Template, and Logo Standards and Guidelines EERE Publication, Exhibit, Template, and Logo Standards and Guidelines The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) standards and guidelines for publications, exhibits, templates, and logos help ensure that EERE's products are consistently branded, written, and produced. The EERE Product Governance Team (PGT) reviews the publications, exhibits, logos, and templates for all EERE

  8. Approval of VPP Logo and Flag

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, patterned after the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Voluntary Protection Programs, is a visible symbol of our commitment to worker health and safety at Departmental facilities. One implementation activity remaining is formal authorization for flags to be awarded to sites in the program and permission to use a related logo.

  9. LLNL Contribution to LLE FY09 Annual Report: NIC and HED Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, R F; Landen, O L; Hsing, W W; Fournier, K B

    2009-10-01

    In FY09, LLNL led 238 target shots on the OMEGA Laser System. Approximately half of these LLNL-led shots supported the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The remainder was dedicated to experiments for the high-energy-density stewardship experiments (HEDSE). Objectives of the LLNL led NIC campaigns at OMEGA included: (1) Laser-plasma interaction studies in physical conditions relevant for the NIF ignition targets; (2) Demonstration of Tr = 100 eV foot symmetry tuning using a reemission sphere; (3) X-ray scattering in support of conductivity measurements of solid density Be plasmas; (4) Experiments to study the physical properties (thermal conductivity) of shocked fusion fuels; (5) High-resolution measurements of velocity nonuniformities created by microscopic perturbations in NIF ablator materials; (6) Development of a novel Compton Radiography diagnostic platform for ICF experiments; and (7) Precision validation of the equation of state for quartz. The LLNL HEDSE campaigns included the following experiments: (1) Quasi-isentropic (ICE) drive used to study material properties such as strength, equation of state, phase, and phase-transition kinetics under high pressure; (2) Development of a high-energy backlighter for radiography in support of material strength experiments using Omega EP and the joint OMEGA-OMEGA-EP configuration; (3) Debris characterization from long-duration, point-apertured, point-projection x-ray backlighters for NIF radiation transport experiments; (4) Demonstration of ultrafast temperature and density measurements with x-ray Thomson scattering from short-pulse laser-heated matter; (5) The development of an experimental platform to study nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) physics using direct-drive implosions; (6) Opacity studies of high-temperature plasmas under LTE conditions; and (7) Characterization of copper (Cu) foams for HEDSE experiments.

  10. follow

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AUDIT FOLLOW-UP PROCESS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES JULY 1999 DOE/IG-0447 AUDIT REPORT July 7, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Report on "The U.S. Department of Energy's Audit Follow-up Process" BACKGROUND Audit follow-up is an integral part of good management. According to Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, corrective action taken by Departmental

  11. Capabilities required to conduct the LLNL plutonium mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, J.; Bish, W.; Copeland, A.; West, J.; Sack, S.; Myers, B.

    1991-09-10

    This report outlines the LLNL plutonium related mission anticipated over the next decade and defines the capabilities required to meet that mission wherever the Plutonium Facility is located. If plutonium work is relocated to a place where the facility is shared, then some capabilities can be commonly used by the sharing parties. However, it is essential that LLNL independently control about 20000 sq ft of net lab space, filled with LLNL controlled equipment, and staffed by LLNL employees. It is estimated that the cost to construct this facility should range from $140M to $200M. Purchase and installation of equipment to replace that already in Bldg 332 along with additional equipment identified as being needed to meet the mission for the next ten to fifteen years, is estimated to cost $118M. About $29M of the equipment could be shared. The Hardened Engineering Test Building (HETB) with its additional 8000 sq ft of unique test capability must also be replaced. The fully equipped replacement cost is estimated to be about $10M. About 40000 sq ft of setup and support space are needed along with office and related facilities for a 130 person resident staff. The setup space is estimated to cost $8M. The annual cost of a 130 person resident staff (100 programmatic and 30 facility operation) is estimated to be $20M.

  12. Proceedings of the LLNL technical women`s symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Holtz, E.

    1994-12-31

    Women from institutions such as LLNL, LBL, Sandia, and SLAC presented papers at this conference. The papers deal with many aspects of global security, global ecology, and bioscience; they also reflect the challenges faced in improving business practices, communicating effectively, and expanding collaborations in the industrial world. Approximately 87 ``abstracts`` are included in six sessions; more are included in the addendum.

  13. Proceedings of the LLNL Technical Women`s Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Holtz, E.

    1993-12-31

    This report documents events of the LLNL Technical Women`s Symposium. Topics include; future of computer systems, environmental technology, defense and space, Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics, technical communication, tools and techniques for biology in the 1990s, automation and robotics, software applications, materials science, atomic vapor laser isotope separation, technical communication, technology transfer, and professional development workshops.

  14. Report on the B-Fields at NIF Workshop Held at LLNL October 12...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report on the B-Fields at NIF Workshop Held at LLNL October 12-13, 2015 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Report on the B-Fields at NIF Workshop Held at LLNL October ...

  15. Red Cross honors LLNL as biggest blood donor west of Mississippi...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Red Cross honors LLNL as biggest blood donor west of Mississippi Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 3:19pm For more than 22 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has ...

  16. LLNL MSP-GSS-001 PIA, Office of the Chief Information Officer | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy LLNL MSP-GSS-001 PIA, Office of the Chief Information Officer LLNL MSP-GSS-001 PIA, Office of the Chief Information Officer LLNL MSP-GSS-001 PIA, Office of the Chief Information Officer PDF icon LLNL MSP-GSS-001 PIA, Office of the Chief Information Officer More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho

  17. LLNL Conducts First Plutonium Shot Using the JASPER Gas Gun | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration LLNL Conducts First Plutonium Shot Using the JASPER Gas Gun LLNL Conducts First Plutonium Shot Using the JASPER Gas Gun Nevada Test Site, NV The National Nuclear Security Administration's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) successfully executes the first plutonium shot using the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun at NNSA's Nevada Test Site. LLNL scientists use the 100-foot, two-stage gas gun to fire a projectile at

  18. Brochures, Logos, & Information Resources | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brochures, Logos, & Information Resources About About Home Organization Budget Field ... Contact Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., ...

  19. ASC Logo Use Guidelines | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Computing / Publications ASC Logo Use Guidelines JPG Format Use any of the JPEG versions below for ordinary, everyday use in Word documents or in viewgraphs. These logos will have a white or black background, so please use them appropriately. To download a logo, right-click on the image and Save As. For a larger version of the logo, click on the link to the right. Large Large Large Large Large EPS Format The file below contains the EPS format in Adobe Illustrator(tm) for use by graphic designers

  20. LLNL scientist receives NNSA award for developing uncrackable code for

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration LLNL scientist receives NNSA award for developing uncrackable code for nuclear weapons Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 12:19pm Mark Hart, a scientist and engineer in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Defense Technologies Division, has been awarded the 2015 Surety Transformation Initiative (STI) Award from the NNSA Enhanced Surety Program. The STI award aims to stimulate and encourage the development of potentially

  1. NASA features LLNL star-formation simulations | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration NASA features LLNL star-formation simulations Friday, January 29, 2016 - 5:56pm NNSA Blog These high performance computing (HPC) simulations of star formation account for a broad range of physical processes, including: gravity, supersonic turbulence, hydrodynamics, outflows, magnetic fields, chemistry and ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Image courtesy of Pak Shing Li/ University of California, Berkeley High performance computing (HPC) simulations exploring star formation

  2. Aerosol Simulations by LLNL IMPACT and Comparisons with Field Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations by LLNL IMPACT and Comparisons with Field Measurements C. C. Chuang, D. Bergman, J. Dignon, and P. Connell Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Introduction The first step needed to assess aerosol climate effects is to provide the global concentrations and vertical profiles of different aerosol components. These distributions cannot be easily obtained from satellite retrievals or field measurements but are key to estimating the magnitude of aerosol forcing. A

  3. GAMA-LLNL Alpine Basin Special Study: Scope of Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M J; Visser, A; Esser, B K; Moran, J E

    2011-12-12

    For this task LLNL will examine the vulnerability of drinking water supplies in foothills and higher elevation areas to climate change impacts on recharge. Recharge locations and vulnerability will be determined through examination of groundwater ages and noble gas recharge temperatures in high elevation basins. LLNL will determine whether short residence times are common in one or more subalpine basin. LLNL will measure groundwater ages, recharge temperatures, hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, major anions and carbon isotope compositions on up to 60 samples from monitoring wells and production wells in these basins. In addition, a small number of carbon isotope analyses will be performed on surface water samples. The deliverable for this task will be a technical report that provides the measured data and an interpretation of the data from one or more subalpine basins. Data interpretation will: (1) Consider climate change impacts to recharge and its impact on water quality; (2) Determine primary recharge locations and their vulnerability to climate change; and (3) Delineate the most vulnerable areas and describe the likely impacts to recharge.

  4. LLNL Middle East and North Africa research database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, D; Hauk, T; Moore, R M; O'Boyle, J; Ruppert, S

    1999-07-23

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Research and Development (CTBT R and D) program has made significant progress populating a comprehensive seismic research database (RDB) for seismic events and derived research products in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Our original ME/NA study region has enlarged and is now defined as an area including the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Southwest Asia, the Former Soviet Union and the Scandinavian/Arctic region. The LLNL RDB will facilitate calibration of all International Monitoring System (IMS) stations (primary and auxiliary) or their surrogates (if not yet installed) as well as a variety of gamma stations. The RDB provides not only a coherent framework in which to store and organize large volumes of collected seismic waveforms and associated event parameter information, but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment for deriving location and discrimination correction sur faces and capabilities. In order to accommodate large volumes of data from many sources with diverse formats the RDB is designed to be flexible and extensible in addition to maintaining detailed quality control information and associated metadata. Station parameters, instrument responses, phase pick information, and event bulletins were compiled and made available through the RDB. For seismic events in the MENA region occurring between 1976 and 1999, we have systematically assembled, quality checked and organized event waveforms; continuous seismic data from 1990 to present are archived for many stations. Currently, over 11,400 seismic events and 1.2 million waveforms are maintained in the RDB and made readily available to researchers. In addition to open sources of seismic data, we have established collaborative relationships with several ME/NA countries that have yielded additional ground truth and broadband waveform data essential for regional calibration and capability studies. Additional data and ground truth from other countries are also currently being sought. Research results, along with descriptive metadata are stored and organized within the LLNL RDB and prepared for delivery and integration into the Department of Energy (DOE) Knowledge Base (KB). Deliverables consist of primary data products (raw materials for calibration) and derived products (distilled from the organized raw seismological data). By combining travel-time observations, event characterization studies, and regional wave-propagation studies of the LLNL CTBT research team for ground truth events and regional events, we have assembled a library of ground truth information, event location correction surfaces, tomographic models and mine explosion histories required to support the ME/NA regionalization program. Corrections and parameters distilled from the LLNL RDB provide needed contributions to the KB for the MENA region and will enable the United States National Data Center (NDC) to effectively verify CTBT compliance. The LLNL portion of the DOE KB supports critical NDC pipeline functions in detection, location, feature extraction, discrimination, and analyst review in the Middle East and North Africa.

  5. Evaluation of OGC Standards for Use in LLNL GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R M; Chubb, K K; Schek, J L

    2006-06-23

    Over the summer of 2005, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Computer Applications and Research Department conducted a small project that examined whether Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards might be useful in meeting program mission requirements more effectively. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to lower development costs and to avoid duplication of effort and vendor lock-in. Some OGC standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and so an evaluation was deemed appropriate.

  6. Aerosol Modeling at LLNL - Our capability, results, and perspective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Aerosol Indirect Effects to Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 Over the Southern Great Plains during May 2003 IOP Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 Catherine Chuang, James Boyle Shaocheng Xie and James Kelly LLNL-POST-401948 March 11, 2008 Why are aerosol/cloud interactions important? The greatest uncertainty in

  7. DOE Logo, Seal and Word Mark | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Graphics » DOE Logo, Seal and Word Mark DOE Logo, Seal and Word Mark The DOE logo, seal, and word mark are official graphical identifiers of the U.S. Department of Energy and are meant for official use only, to represent the Department's official position. They may be used to recognize funding or official support by the Department if the usage has proper qualifying language to explain its presence on non-DOE materials and it is reviewed and explicitly approved by the Department. They cannot be

  8. General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications Projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) will bear a newly-designed emblem. The emblem is a symbol of President Obama's commitment to the American People to invest their tax dollars wisely to put Americans back to work. The purpose of this document is to provide general guidelines and specifications for using the ARRA emblem and corresponding logomark. PDF icon

  9. GAMMA-RAY COMPTON LIGHT SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartemann, F V; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-08-15

    A new class of tunable, monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources capable of operating at high peak and average brightness is currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photoscience and applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector. A prototype, capable of producing > 10{sup 8} 0.7 MeV photons in a single shot, with a fractional bandwidth of 1%, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is currently under construction at LLNL; this system will be used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments. A new symmetrized S-band rf gun, using a Mg photocathode, will produce up to 1 nC of charge in an 8 ps bunch, with a normalized emittance modeled at 0.8 mm.mrad; electrons are subsequently accelerated up to 120 MeV to interact with a 500 mJ, 10 ps, 355 nm laser pulse and generate {gamma}-rays. The laser front end is a fiber-based system, using corrugated-fiber Bragg gratings for stretching, and drives both the frequency-quadrupled photocathode illumination laser and the Nd:YAG interaction laser. Two new technologies are used in the laser: a hyper-Michelson temporal pulse stacker capable of producing 8 ps square UV pulses, and a hyper-dispersion compressor for the interaction laser. Other key technologies, basic scaling laws, and recent experimental results will also be presented, along with an overview of future research and development directions.

  10. Summary Statistics for Homemade ?Play Dough? -- Data Acquired at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallman, J S; Morales, K E; Whipple, R E; Huber, R D; Martz, A; Brown, W D; Smith, J A; Schneberk, D J; Martz, Jr., H E; White, III, W T

    2010-03-11

    Using x-ray computerized tomography (CT), we have characterized the x-ray linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) of a homemade Play Dough{trademark}-like material, designated as PDA. Table 1 gives the first-order statistics for each of four CT measurements, estimated with a Gaussian kernel density estimator (KDE) analysis. The mean values of the LAC range from a high of about 2700 LMHU{sub D} 100kVp to a low of about 1200 LMHUD at 300kVp. The standard deviation of each measurement is around 10% to 15% of the mean. The entropy covers the range from 6.0 to 7.4. Ordinarily, we would model the LAC of the material and compare the modeled values to the measured values. In this case, however, we did not have the detailed chemical composition of the material and therefore did not model the LAC. Using a method recently proposed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we estimate the value of the effective atomic number, Z{sub eff}, to be near 10. LLNL prepared about 50mL of the homemade 'Play Dough' in a polypropylene vial and firmly compressed it immediately prior to the x-ray measurements. We used the computer program IMGREC to reconstruct the CT images. The values of the key parameters used in the data capture and image reconstruction are given in this report. Additional details may be found in the experimental SOP and a separate document. To characterize the statistical distribution of LAC values in each CT image, we first isolated an 80% central-core segment of volume elements ('voxels') lying completely within the specimen, away from the walls of the polypropylene vial. All of the voxels within this central core, including those comprised of voids and inclusions, are included in the statistics. We then calculated the mean value, standard deviation and entropy for (a) the four image segments and for (b) their digital gradient images. (A digital gradient image of a given image was obtained by taking the absolute value of the difference between the initial image and that same image offset by one voxel horizontally, parallel to the rows of the x-ray detector array.) The statistics of the initial image of LAC values are called 'first order statistics;' those of the gradient image, 'second order statistics.'

  11. Summary Statistics for Fun Dough Data Acquired at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallman, J S; Morales, K E; Whipple, R E; Huber, R D; Brown, W D; Smith, J A; Schneberk, D J; Martz, Jr., H E; White, III, W T

    2010-03-11

    Using x-ray computerized tomography (CT), we have characterized the x-ray linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) of a Play Dough{trademark}-like product, Fun Dough{trademark}, designated as PD. Table 1 gives the first-order statistics for each of four CT measurements, estimated with a Gaussian kernel density estimator (KDE) analysis. The mean values of the LAC range from a high of about 2100 LMHU{sub D} at 100kVp to a low of about 1100 LMHU{sub D} at 300kVp. The standard deviation of each measurement is around 1% of the mean. The entropy covers the range from 3.9 to 4.6. Ordinarily, we would model the LAC of the material and compare the modeled values to the measured values. In this case, however, we did not have the composition of the material and therefore did not model the LAC. Using a method recently proposed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we estimate the value of the effective atomic number, Z{sub eff}, to be near 8.5. LLNL prepared about 50mL of the Fun Dough{trademark} in a polypropylene vial and firmly compressed it immediately prior to the x-ray measurements. Still, layers can plainly be seen in the reconstructed images, indicating that the bulk density of the material in the container is affected by voids and bubbles. We used the computer program IMGREC to reconstruct the CT images. The values of the key parameters used in the data capture and image reconstruction are given in this report. Additional details may be found in the experimental SOP and a separate document. To characterize the statistical distribution of LAC values in each CT image, we first isolated an 80% central-core segment of volume elements ('voxels') lying completely within the specimen, away from the walls of the polypropylene vial. All of the voxels within this central core, including those comprised of voids and inclusions, are included in the statistics. We then calculated the mean value, standard deviation and entropy for (a) the four image segments and for (b) their digital gradient images. (A digital gradient image of a given image was obtained by taking the absolute value of the difference between the initial image and that same image offset by one voxel horizontally, parallel to the rows of the x-ray detector array.) The statistics of the initial image of LAC values are called 'first order statistics;' those of the gradient image, 'second order statistics.'

  12. New EV Everywhere Logo is Ready for the Road | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EV Everywhere Logo is Ready for the Road New EV Everywhere Logo is Ready for the Road November 6, 2015 - 1:17pm Addthis The brand-new logo for EV Everywhere, the effort to encourage the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles. The Energy Department ran a contest to choose a logo, and the winning design was submitted by Brian Marquis. The brand-new logo for EV Everywhere, the effort to encourage the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles. The Energy Department ran a contest to choose a logo, and the

  13. LLNL Compliance Plan for TRUPACT-2 Authorized Methods for Payload Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This document describes payload control at LLNL to ensure that all shipments of CH-TRU waste in the TRUPACT-II (Transuranic Package Transporter-II) meet the requirements of the TRUPACT-II SARP (safety report for packaging). This document also provides specific instructions for the selection of authorized payloads once individual payload containers are qualified for transport. The physical assembly of the qualified payload and operating procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II, including loading and unloading operations, are described in HWM Procedure No. 204, based on the information in the TRUPACT-II SARP. The LLNL TRAMPAC, along with the TRUPACT-II operating procedures contained in HWM Procedure No. 204, meet the documentation needs for the use of the TRUPACT-II at LLNL. Table 14-1 provides a summary of the LLNL waste generation and certification procedures as they relate to TRUPACT-II payload compliance.

  14. Training the Masses ? Web-based Laser Safety Training at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprague, D D

    2004-12-17

    The LLNL work smart standard requires us to provide ongoing laser safety training for a large number of persons on a three-year cycle. In order to meet the standard, it was necessary to find a cost and performance effective method to perform this training. This paper discusses the scope of the training problem, specific LLNL training needs, various training methods used at LLNL, the advantages and disadvantages of these methods and the rationale for selecting web-based laser safety training. The tools and costs involved in developing web-based training courses are also discussed, in addition to conclusions drawn from our training operating experience. The ILSC lecture presentation contains a short demonstration of the LLNL web-based laser safety-training course.

  15. Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) ... Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building ...

  16. Report on the B-Fields at NIF Workshop Held at LLNL October 12...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Report on the B-Fields at NIF Workshop Held at LLNL October 12-13, 2015 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Report on the B-Fields at NIF Workshop Held at ...

  17. Environmental Protection Department LLNL NESHAPs 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoldo, N A; Larson, J M; Wilson, K R

    2008-06-25

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs; Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61, Subpart H). Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 {micro}Sv) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2007 are summarized here. Livermore site: 0.0031 mrem (0.031 {micro}Sv) (42% from point source emissions, 58% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. Site 300: 0.0035 mrem (0.035 {micro}Sv) (90% from point source emissions, 10% from diffuse source emissions). The EDEs were calculated using the U.S. EPA-approved CAP88-PC air dispersion/dose-assessment model, except for doses for two diffuse sources that were estimated using measured radionuclide concentrations and dose calculations. Specific inputs to CAP88-PC for the modeled sources included site-specific meteorological data and source emissions data, the latter variously based on continuous stack effluent monitoring data, stack flow or other release-rate information, ambient air monitoring data, and facility knowledge.

  18. LLNL Final Design for PDV Measurements of Godiva for Validation of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multi-Physics Simulation (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: LLNL Final Design for PDV Measurements of Godiva for Validation of Multi-Physics Simulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LLNL Final Design for PDV Measurements of Godiva for Validation of Multi-Physics Simulation Authors: Heinrichs, D ; Scorby, J ; Bandong, B ; Beller, T ; Burch, J ; Goda, J ; Halvorson, C ; Hickman, D ; May, M ; Sinibaldi, J ; Whitworth, T ; Klingensmith, A Publication Date:

  19. The National Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL SC08 BOF: Computing with Massive and Persistent Data LLNL-PRES-408909. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344 2 Target chamber One Terabyte of data to be downloaded in ~50 Minutes for each shot. 5 Full Aperture Backscatter Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) X-ray imager

  20. Guidelines for Correctly Using the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Name and Logo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Guidelines for Correctly Using the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Name and Logo Guidelines for Correctly Using the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Name and Logo PDF icon ZERH Logo Use Guidelines More Documents & Publications Builder Partner Agreement Verifier Partner Agreement Training Partner Agreement

  1. Using the DOE Logo, Seal, or Identifier on Non-Federal Products |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Publications, Exhibits, & Logos » Using the DOE Logo, Seal, or Identifier on Non-Federal Products Using the DOE Logo, Seal, or Identifier on Non-Federal Products The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) logos, seals, and identifiers are meant for official use only. If your company is not part of DOE, you must request permission to use these images on your products. The logos, seals, and identifiers may be used by outside

  2. DOE Policy Re Recovery Act Recipient Use of Recovery Act Logos on Signage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (“DOE”) policy regarding use of the Recovery Act logo by Recovery Act recipients and subgrantees.

  3. LLNL Results from CALIBAN-PROSPERO Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Experiments in September 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobaugh, M. L.; Hickman, D. P.; Wong, C. W.; Wysong, A. R.; Merritt, M. J.; Heinrichs, D. P.; Topper, J. D.

    2015-05-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses thin neutron activation foils, sulfur, and threshold energy shielding to determine neutron component doses and the total dose from neutrons in the event of a nuclear criticality accident. The dosimeter also uses a DOELAP accredited Panasonic UD-810 (Panasonic Industrial Devices Sales Company of America, 2 Riverfront Plaza, Newark, NJ 07102, U.S.A.) thermoluminescent dosimetery system (TLD) for determining the gamma component of the total dose. LLNL has participated in three international intercomparisons of nuclear accident dosimeters. In October 2009, LLNL participated in an exercise at the French Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission- CEA) Research Center at Valduc utilizing the SILENE reactor (Hickman, et.al. 2010). In September 2010, LLNL participated in a second intercomparison at CEA Valduc, this time with exposures at the CALIBAN reactor (Hickman et al. 2011). This paper discusses LLNL’s results of a third intercomparison hosted by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN) with exposures at two CEA Valduc reactors (CALIBAN and PROSPERO) in September 2014. Comparison results between the three participating facilities is presented elsewhere (Chevallier 2015; Duluc 2015).

  4. Fast Steering Mirror systems for the U-AVLIS program at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.; Avicola, K.; Payne, A.; Peterson, R.L.; Ward, R.

    1994-07-01

    We have successfully deployed several fast steering mirror systems in the Uranium Atomic Vapor Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) facility at LLNL. These systems employ 2 mm to 150 mm optics and piezoelectric actuators to achieve microradian pointing accuracy with disturbance rejection bandwidths to a few hundred hertz.

  5. LLNL Site plan for a MOX fuel lead assembly mission in support of surplus plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, M.C.

    1997-10-01

    The principal facilities that LLNL would use to support a MOX Fuel Lead Assembly Mission are Building 332 and Building 334. Both of these buildings are within the security boundary known as the LLNL Superblock. Building 332 is the LLNL Plutonium Facility. As an operational plutonium facility, it has all the infrastructure and support services required for plutonium operations. The LLNL Plutonium Facility routinely handles kilogram quantities of plutonium and uranium. Currently, the building is limited to a plutonium inventory of 700 kilograms and a uranium inventory of 300 kilograms. Process rooms (excluding the vaults) are limited to an inventory of 20 kilograms per room. Ongoing operations include: receiving SSTS, material receipt, storage, metal machining and casting, welding, metal-to-oxide conversion, purification, molten salt operations, chlorination, oxide calcination, cold pressing and sintering, vitrification, encapsulation, chemical analysis, metallography and microprobe analysis, waste material processing, material accountability measurements, packaging, and material shipping. Building 334 is the Hardened Engineering Test Building. This building supports environmental and radiation measurements on encapsulated plutonium and uranium components. Other existing facilities that would be used to support a MOX Fuel Lead Assembly Mission include Building 335 for hardware receiving and storage and TRU and LLW waste storage and shipping facilities, and Building 331 or Building 241 for storage of depleted uranium.

  6. UCRL-ID-124563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivity (BAM) Test

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivity (BAM) Test . * - L. Richard Simpson M. Frances Foltz June 1996 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any o f their employes, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibifity for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness o f any information, apparatus, product, or

  7. A probabilistic risk assessment of the LLNL Plutonium facility`s evaluation basis fire operational accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumburgh, G.

    1994-08-31

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility conducts numerous involving plutonium to include device fabrication, development of fabrication techniques, metallurgy research, and laser isotope separation. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the building 332 Plutonium Facility was completed rational safety and acceptable risk to employees, the public, government property, and the environment. This paper outlines the PRA analysis of the Evaluation Basis Fire (EDF) operational accident. The EBF postulates the worst-case programmatic impact event for the Plutonium Facility.

  8. Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Office of Science (SC) Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown

  9. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tweed, J.

    1996-10-01

    This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. LLNL Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Agent Modeling Commercial Codes Stochastic and Optimization Programming High Performance Computing 13 The Labs can provide risk- and uncertainty-quantified decision support to...

  11. LLNL Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Livermore National Laboratory SEAB1213 Kobza R et al. Circulation 2005;111:e173-e174 ECG calculated from simulation with E-4031 ECG measured in patient with polymorphic...

  12. Evaluation of Open Geospatial Consortium Standards fur Use In LLNL Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R; Chubb, K; Schek, J

    2005-09-28

    The objective of this project is to evaluate existing and emerging Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards for use in LLNL programs that rely heavily on geographic data. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to avoid duplication of effort, lower development costs, and encourage competition based on improved capability and performance rather than vendor lock-in. Some of these standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, DOE and DHS. A serious evaluation of this technology is appropriate at this time due to increasing interest and mandated compliance in the Federal government in some situations. A subset of OGC standards is identified and reviewed with a focus on applications to LLNL programs. Each standard or recommendation reviewed was evaluated in general terms. In addition, for specific programs such as Gen&SIS and NARAC, a specific evaluation was made of several of the standards and how they could be used most effectively. It is also important to evaluate the acceptance of these standards in the commercial arena. The implementation of OGC standards by the largest GIS vendor (ESRI) was reviewed. At present, OGC standards are primary useful in specific situations. More generally, many of the standards are immature and their impact on the government and commercial sectors is unclear. Consequently, OGC and related developments need to be observed. As specific standards or groups of standards mature and establish their relevance, these can also be incorporated in LLNL programs as requirements dictate, especially if open implementations and commercial products are available.

  13. National Science Bowl Logos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Logos National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos and Videos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending the National Finals Volunteers 2016 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  14. Isentropic Compression Experiments Performed By LLNL On Energetic Material Samples Using The Z Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandersall, K S; Reisman, D B; Forbes, J W; Hare, D E; Garcia, F; Uphaus, T M; Elsholz, A J; Tarver, C M; Eggert, J H

    2007-10-25

    Several experiments have been conducted by LLNL researchers using isentropic compression experiments (ICE) on energetic materials as samples from Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01) to Fiscal Year 2005 (FY05). Over this span of time, advancements of the experimental techniques and modeling of the results have evolved to produce improved results. This report documents the experiments that have been performed, provides details of the results generated, and modeling and analysis advances to fully understand the results. Publications on the topics by the various principal investigators (PI's) are detailed in the Appendices for quick reference for the work as it progressed.

  15. M4FT-15LL0806062-LLNL Thermodynamic and Sorption Data FY15 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavarin, M.; Wolery, T. J.

    2015-08-31

    This progress report (Milestone Number M4FT-15LL0806062) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within Work Package Number FT-15LL080606. The focus of this research is the thermodynamic modeling of Engineered Barrier System (EBS) materials and properties and development of thermodynamic databases and models to evaluate the stability of EBS materials and their interactions with fluids at various physicochemical conditions relevant to subsurface repository environments. The development and implementation of equilibrium thermodynamic models are intended to describe chemical and physical processes such as solubility, sorption, and diffusion.

  16. Summary of the LLNL gasoline spill demonstration - dynamic underground stripping project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.; Aines, R.D.

    1995-04-03

    Underground spills of volatile hydrocarbons (solvents or fuels) can be difficult to clean up when the hydrocarbons are present both above and below the water table and are found in relatively impermeable clays. Years of groundwater pumping may not completely remove the contamination. Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the College of Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) have collaborated to develop a technique called Dynamic Underground Stripping to remove localized underground spills in a relatively short time. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has sponsored a full-scale demonstration of this technique at the LLNL gasoline spill site. When highly concentrated contamination is found above the standing water table, vacuum extraction has been very effective at both removing the contaminant and enhancing biological remediation through the addition of oxygen. Below the water table, however, these advantages cannot be obtained. For such sites where the contamination is too deep for excavation, there are currently no widely applicable cleanup methods. Dynamic Underground Stripping removes separate-phase organic contaminants below the water table by heating the subsurface above the boiling point of water, and then removing both contaminant and water by vacuum extraction. The high temperatures both convert the organic to vapor and enhance other removal paths by increasing diffusion and eliminating sorption. Because this method uses rapid, high-energy techniques in cleaning the soil, it requires an integrated system of underground monitoring and imaging methods to control and evaluate the process in real time.

  17. LLNL's Big Science Capabilities Help Spur Over $796 Billion in U.S. Economic Activity Sequencing the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S.

    2015-07-28

    LLNL’s successful history of taking on big science projects spans beyond national security and has helped create billions of dollars per year in new economic activity. One example is LLNL’s role in helping sequence the human genome. Over $796 billion in new economic activity in over half a dozen fields has been documented since LLNL successfully completed this Grand Challenge.

  18. EnergyPlus Logo Debuts on Revit Toolbar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Logo Debuts on Revit Toolbar EnergyPlus Logo Debuts on Revit Toolbar December 7, 2015 - 9:30am Addthis With Insight 360, Revit and FormIt 360 Pro users can use EnergyPlus to calculate building heating and cooling loads and map the results onto the model for easy identification of high load zones and spaces. Image credit: Autodesk. With Insight 360, Revit and FormIt 360 Pro users can use EnergyPlus to calculate building heating and cooling loads and map the results onto the model for easy

  19. © 2013, Intel Corporation. All rights reserved. Intel and the Intel logo are tr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, Intel Corporation. All rights reserved. Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. Composer XE 2013 SP1 Getting Started Xeon Phi edition Fall 2013 1 © 2013, Intel Corporation. All rights reserved. Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. Agenda New User

  20. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort, January 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cena, R.J.

    1993-11-01

    Our objective, together with our CRADA partners, is to demonstrate advanced technology that could lead to an economic and environmentally acceptable commercialization of oil shale. We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  1. Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL: Beam Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1989-02-15

    Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multistage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In Part A of this paper, we survey the US induction linac technology, emphasizing electron machines. We also give a simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. We give an example of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In Part B we address the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single mass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately ''tapered'', as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs.

  2. 50 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM FOR A PHOTOINJECTOR TEST STATION AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Beer, G K; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Houck, T L; Adolphsen, C; Candel, A; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Li, Z; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Zhou, F; Deis, G A

    2011-03-11

    In support of X-band photoinjector development efforts at LLNL, a 50 MW test station is being constructed to investigate structure and photocathode optimization for future upgrades. A SLAC XL-4 klystron capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 microsecond pulses will be the high power RF source for the system. Timing of the laser pulse on the photocathode with the applied RF field places very stringent requirements on phase jitter and drift. To achieve these requirements, the klystron will be powered by a state of the art, solid-state, high voltage modulator. The 50 MW will be divided between the photoinjector and a traveling wave accelerator section. A high power phase shifter is located between the photoinjector and accelerator section to adjust the phasing of the electron bunches with respect to the accelerating field. A variable attenuator is included on the input of the photoinjector. The distribution system including the various x-band components is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of the RF system.

  3. User:GregZiebold/Lab Cloud | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lbnl logo.jpg Lbnl logo.jpg LLNL logo.jpg LLNL logo.jpg LANL.jpg LANL.jpg NETL-Logo-Color-1.jpg NETL-Logo-Color-1.jpg Nrel full.jpg Nrel full.jpg OakRidgeNationalLaboratory...

  4. LLNL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. LLNL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within a Category 1 area. Building 332 will be used to receive and store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, and assemble fuel rods. Building 334 will be used to assemble, store, and ship fuel bundles. Only minor modifications would be required of Building 332. Uncontaminated glove boxes would need to be removed, petition walls would need to be removed, and minor modifications to the ventilation system would be required.

  5. LLNL's Response to 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report Comments B113 Issue #1 and B271 Issue #2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, W W

    2009-11-19

    This is LLNL's responses to comments in the 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report concerning Underground Storage Tank (UST) 113-D1U2 (Issue No.1) at Building 113 and UST 271-D2U1 (Issue No.2) at Building 271. Also provided is the required Application for Underground Storage Tank Modification for USTs 113-D1U2 and 271-D2U1 and the specification sheet for the Phil-Tite spill bucket that is proposed to be installed in the 271-D2U1 sump.

  6. U.S. OpenLabs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. OpenLabs (Redirected from Openlabs) Jump to: navigation, search ArgonneNationalLaboratory logo.png 200px-Brookhaven National Laboratory logo.svg.png Lbnl logo.jpg LLNL...

  7. LLNL Genomic Assessment: Viral and Bacterial Sequencing Needs for TMTI, Tier 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slezak, T; Borucki, M; Lenhoff, R; Vitalis, E

    2009-09-29

    The Lawrence Livermore National Lab Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies Initiative (TMTI). The high-level goal of TMTI is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve those goals, TMTI has a near term need to obtain more sequence information across a large range of pathogens, near neighbors, and across a broad geographical and host range. Our role in this project is to research available sequence data for the organisms of interest and identify critical microbial sequence and knowledge gaps that need to be filled to meet TMTI objectives. This effort includes: (1) assessing current genomic sequence for each agent including phylogenetic and geographical diversity, host range, date of isolation range, virulence, sequence availability of key near neighbors, and other characteristics; (2) identifying Subject Matter Experts (SME's) and potential holders of isolate collections, contacting appropriate SME's with known expertise and isolate collections to obtain information on isolate availability and specific recommendations; (3) identifying sequence as well as knowledge gaps (eg virulence, host range, and antibiotic resistance determinants); (4) providing specific recommendations as to the most valuable strains to be placed on the DTRA sequencing queue. We acknowledge that criteria for prioritization of isolates for sequencing falls into two categories aligning with priority queues 1 and 2 as described in the summary. (Priority queue 0 relates to DTRA operational isolates whose availability is not predictable in advance.) 1. Selection of isolates that appear to have likelihood to provide information on virulence and antibiotic resistance. This will include sequence of known virulent strains. Particularly valuable would be virulent strains that have genetically similar yet avirulent, or non human transmissible, counterparts that can be used for comparison to help identify key virulence or host range genes. This approach will provide information that can be used by structural biologists to help develop therapeutics and vaccines. We have pointed out such high priority strains of which we are aware, and note that if any such isolates should be discovered, they will rise to the top priority. We anticipate difficulty locating samples with unusual resistance phenotypes, in particular. Sequencing strategies for isolates in queue 1 should aim for as complete finishing status as possible, since high-quality initial annotation (gene-calling) will be necessary for the follow-on protein structure analyses contributing to countermeasure development. Queue 2 for sequencing determination will be more dynamic than queue 1, and samples will be added to it as they become available to the TMTI program. 2. Selection of isolates that will provide broader information about diversity and phylogenetics and aid in specific detection as well as forensics. This approach focuses on sequencing of isolates that will provide better resolution of variants that are (or were) circulating in nature. The finishing strategy for queue 2 does not require complete closing with annotation. This queue is more static, as there is considerable phylogenetic data, and in this report we have sought to reveal gaps and make suggestions to fill them given existing sequence data and strain information. In this report we identify current sequencing gaps in both priority queue categories. Note that this is most applicable to the bacterial pathogens, as most viruses are by default in queue 1. The Phase I focus of this project is on viral hemorrhagic fever viruses and Category A bacterial agents as defined to us by TMTI. We have carried out individual analyses on each species of interest, and these are included as chapters in this report. Viruses and bacteria are biologically very distinct from each other and require different methods of analysis and criteria for sequencing prioritization. Therefore, we will describe our methods, analyses and conclusions separately for each category.

  8. Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radev, R

    2009-09-04

    In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

  9. Normalized Tritium Quantification Approach (NoTQA) a Method for Quantifying Tritium Contaminated Trash and Debris at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, J L; Rasmussen, C L

    2008-07-23

    Several facilities and many projects at LLNL work exclusively with tritium. These operations have the potential to generate large quantities of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) with the same or similar radiological characteristics. A standardized documented approach to characterizing these waste materials for disposal as radioactive waste will enhance the ability of the Laboratory to manage them in an efficient and timely manner while ensuring compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements. This standardized characterization approach couples documented process knowledge with analytical verification and is very conservative, overestimating the radioactivity concentration of the waste. The characterization approach documented here is the Normalized Tritium Quantification Approach (NoTQA). This document will serve as a Technical Basis Document which can be referenced in radioactive waste characterization documentation packages such as the Information Gathering Document. In general, radiological characterization of waste consists of both developing an isotopic breakdown (distribution) of radionuclides contaminating the waste and using an appropriate method to quantify the radionuclides in the waste. Characterization approaches require varying degrees of rigor depending upon the radionuclides contaminating the waste and the concentration of the radionuclide contaminants as related to regulatory thresholds. Generally, as activity levels in the waste approach a regulatory or disposal facility threshold the degree of required precision and accuracy, and therefore the level of rigor, increases. In the case of tritium, thresholds of concern for control, contamination, transportation, and waste acceptance are relatively high. Due to the benign nature of tritium and the resulting higher regulatory thresholds, this less rigorous yet conservative characterization approach is appropriate. The scope of this document is to define an appropriate and acceptable characterization method for quantification of tritium contaminated trash and debris. The characterization technique is applicable to surface and subsurface tritium contaminated materials with surfaces amenable to swiping. Some limitations of this characterization technique are identified.

  10. 2013 LLNL Template

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... breakout Fabricate CVD diamond ablator Laser- drill fill- hole Create inner foam layer ... Tritium Focus Group, 5515 M. Marinak E laser 1.8MJ E X-ray 1.3MJ 60-70% Lawrence ...

  11. Donald Frederick, LLNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o f t he n ext generaBon o f h igh---Z m aterials s imulaBons w hile a t t he s ame B me straighlorward f or o thers t o r eplicate a nd c ompare p erformance...

  12. 2013 LLNL Template

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review The 2013 Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office Program Review was held April 2-4, 2013 in Washington, DC. This inaugural review encompassed active work done by the Building Technologies Office (BTO), with a total of 59 individual activities reviewed. Sixty independent experts assessed the progress and contributions of each project toward BTO's mission and goals, and these

  13. LLNL-PRES-549691

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for specific applications * Statistical error detection techniques * Automation of resilience transformations Checkpointrestart too slow even on current large-scale systems...

  14. LLNL-PRES-670050

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC Bend but don't break: Prospects for resilience without recovery in algorithms for hyperbolic systems 2015 Salishan Conference on...

  15. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, S

    2007-09-05

    Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an accidental release was calculated for a release of about 1,500 Ci HTO that occurred in October 1954. The likely dose for this release was probably less than 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem), but, because of many unknowns (e.g., release-specific meteorological and accidental conditions) and conservative assumptions, the uncertainty was very high. As a result, the upper confidence limit on the predictions, considered a dose that could not have been exceeded, was estimated to be 2 mSv (200 mrem). The next highest dose, from the 1970 accidental release of about 290,000 Ci (10,700 TBq) HT when wind speed and wind direction were known, was one-third as great. Doses from LLNL accidental releases were well below regulatory reporting limits. All doses, from both routine and accidental releases, were far below the level (3.6 mSv [360 mrem] per year) at which adverse health effects have been documented in the literature.

  16. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

  17. 2015 OSTIblog Bottom Border Logo | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version User login (If you're a human, don't change the following field) Enter your name: 18c3986718c...

  18. STIP Logo Image | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Account Login Is Required for this Page (If you're a human, don't change the following field) Enter your name: 5942a5a85942 Your first name. Please enable Javascript to use this ...

  19. Official AEF Logos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of the General Counsel Organization Chart Office of the General Counsel Organization Chart The following graphic is an organization chart for the Office of the General Counsel. The office is separated into four major departmental groups: Litigation, Regulation and Enforcement (GC-30) Environment and Compliance (GC-50) Transactions, Technology and Contractor Human Resources (GC-60) Energy Policy (GC-70) PDF icon GCORG 2015 04 names More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart -

  20. Leaching study of PNL 76-68 glass beads using the LLNL continuous-flow method and the PNL modified IAEA method. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, D.G.; Mensing, R.W.; Rego, J.; Weed, H.C.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1982-10-04

    A long-term single-pass continuous-flow (SPCF) leaching test was conducted on the glass waste form PNL 76-68. Leaching rates of Np, Pu and various stable elements were measured at 25 and 75/sup 0/C with three different solutions and three different flow rates. The SPCF leaching results were compared with results of a modified IAEA leach test performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). Elemental leach rates and their variation with temperature, flow rate and solution composition were established. The LLNL and PNL leach test results appear to agree within experimental uncertainties. The magnitude of the leach rates determined for Np and the glass matrix elements is 10/sup -5/ grams of glass/cm/sup 2/ geometric solid surface area/day. The rates increase with temperature and with solution flow rate, and are similar in brine and distilled water but higher in a bicarbonate solution. Other cations exhibit somewhat different behavior, and Pu in particular yields a much lower apparent leach rate, probably because of sorption or precipitation effects after release from the glass matrix. After the initial few days, most elements are leached at a constant rate. Matrix dissolution appears to be the most probable rate controlling step for the leaching of most elements. 23 figures, 12 tables.

  1. Measurements of the Radiated Fields and Conducted Current Leakage from the Pulsed Power Systems in the National Ignition Facility at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R A; Clancy, T J; Fulkerson, S; Petersen, D; Pendelton, D; Hulsey, S; Ullery, G; Tuck, J; Polk, M; Kamm, R; Newton, M; Moore, W B; Arnold, P; Ollis, C; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Fornes, J; Watson, J

    2003-07-31

    An important pulsed power system consideration is that they inherently generate fields and currents that can cause interference in other subsystems and diagnostics. Good pulsed power design, grounding and isolation practices can help mitigate these unwanted signals. During the laser commissioning shots for the NIF Early Light milestone at LLNL, measurements were made of the radiated field and conducted currents caused by the Power Conditioning System (PCS) modules with flash lamp load and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) driver. The measurements were made in the capacitor bay, laser bay, control room and target bay. The field measurements were made with B-dot and E-dot probes with bandwidth of about 100MHz. The current measurements were made with a clamp on probe with a bandwidth of about 20 MHz. The results of these measurements show fields and currents in the NIF Facility well below that required for interference with other subsystems. Currents on the target chamber from the pulsed power systems are well below the background noise currents.

  2. LLNL-TR-411568 Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    568 Evaluation of Simulated Precipitation in CCSM3: Annual Cycle Performance Metrics at Watershed Scales Peter J. Gleckler, David C. Bader March 26, 2009 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

  3. Excess Property LLNL.PDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LABORATORY NOVEMBER 2001 November 8, 2001 MEMORANDUM ... Management Regulations" (DOE-PMR), in the area of ... Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation Director, ...

  4. llnl | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Yesterday Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz hosted a ... flexibility in collecting data for stockpile stewardship ... The solar power system installed at Lawrence Livermore ...

  5. llnl | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    is leading the Hydrogen Materials - Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC) to advance SOLAR POWER PURCHASE FOR DOE LABORATORIES WASHINGTON D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy...

  6. LLNL NESHAPs 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R; Gallegos, G; Peterson, R; Wilson, K; Harrach, R J; Gallegos, G M; Peterson, S R; Wilson, K R

    2005-06-27

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs; Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61, Subpart H). Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

  7. LLNL GB Award4.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  8. Template with Color logo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interim Safe Storage (ISS) Minimizes worker safety issues dealing with height, industrial hazards, and waste management issues Stand alone encapsulation approach minimizes...

  9. ZERH Logo Use Guidelines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Energy Ready Home marks in an unapproved color. 14. Do not let text run into the mark. ... used in any other company name, product name, service name, domain name or Web site title. ...

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300 should be considered separately when deciding on an approach for reducing the salt discharge to the subsurface. The smaller units may justify moderate changes to equipment, and may benefit from increased cleaning frequencies, more accurate and suitable chemical treatment, and sources of make up water and discharge re-use. The larger cooling towers would be more suitable for automated systems where they don't already exist, re-circulation and treatment of blow down water, and enhanced chemical dosing strategies. It may be more technically feasible and cost efficient for the smaller cooling towers to be replaced by closed loop dry coolers or hybrid towers. There are several potential steps that could be taken at each location to reduce the TDS concentration and/or water use. These include: sump water filtration, minimization of drift, accurate chemical dosing, and use of scale and corrosion coupons for chemical calibration. The implementation of some of these options could be achieved by a step-wise approach taken at two representative facilities. Once viable prototype systems have been proven in the field, systematic implementation should proceed for the remaining systems, with cost, desired reduction, and general feasibility taken into consideration for such systems.

  11. Thermocouple split follower

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howell, deceased, Louis J.

    1980-01-01

    Thermoelectric generator assembly accommodating differential thermal expansion between thermoelectric elements by means of a cylindrical split follower forming a slot and having internal spring loaded wedges that permit the split follower to open and close across the slot.

  12. Robotic Follow Algorithm

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The Robotic Follow Algorithm enables allows any robotic vehicle to follow a moving target while reactively choosing a route around nearby obstacles. The robotic follow behavior can be used with different camera systems and can be used with thermal or visual tracking as well as other tracking methods such as radio frequency tags.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Hydrogen Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for solving practical problems of interest to industry High Performance Computing ... development by highly integrated theorycharacterization synthesis efforts for ...

  14. LLNL-MSP-GSS-001.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LES' URENCO-USA Facility LES' URENCO-USA Facility PowerPoint slides on LES's URENCO-USA Facility PDF icon LES' URENCO-USA Facility More Documents & Publications Excess Uranium Management 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the Commercial Markets Memorandum Memorializing Ex Parte Communication

    LINAC Coherent Light Source LINAC Coherent Light Source Forty years after the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (now the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  15. LLNL-TR-411072 A Predictive Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    072 A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model A. E. Koniges, N. D. Masters, A. C. Fisher, R. W. Anderson, D. C. Eder, D. Benson, T. B. Kaiser, B. T. Gunney, P. Wang, B. R. Maddox, J. F. Hansen, D. H. Kalantar, P. Dixit, H. Jarmakani, M. A. Meyers March 5, 2009 -2- Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore

  16. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modifi ed for the Web Project Description The objective of the project is to obtain new ... Modifi ed for the Web Physical processes in space and time are described by systems of ...

  17. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The image on the top is from a FormZ model of a reactor system. The image on the bottom is a model of a radiation dose phantom. Modified for the Web MCGen makes it possible to ...

  18. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modifi ed for the Web 1 4 5 2 3 t 1 2.34ms t 2 2.39ms t 3 2.44ms t 4 2.47ms X 12 X 21 L (t) 1 6 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 t, ms L(t), mm Modifi ed for the Web ...

  19. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    52 6 72 8 Modifi ed for the Web Simple picture derived from the ... PDOS 5f (statesxeVatom) Atom 8 Atom 8 Modifi ed for the Web With the benefi t of new ...

  20. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperature Exact solution Numerical solution, 100100 Numerical solution, 5050 Numerical solution, 2525 Modified for the Web Technical Purpose and Benefits The accurate ...

  1. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    perform molecular dynamics simulations of the interaction of shocks with crystal grain boundaries, dislocations, and inclusions to investigate elasticplastic deformation of ...

  2. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.6 0.4 0.2 1 0 .857286 0.714571 0.571857 0.429143 0.286429 0.143714 0.001 Modified for the Web The simulation of multidimensional transport processes is an area of great interest. ...

  3. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The cube rotation problem: currently, the number of zones is 3500, compared to 125 zones initially. Modified for the Web The accurate simulation of hydrodynamic and heat conducting ...

  4. RussiaLLNL2-web.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacuum T r 400 1.0 cm 1.0 cm 0.2 cm Schematic of test problem for energy adaptive studies. Modified for the Web The simulation of multidimensional transport processes is an area ...

  5. Relativistic klystron research at SLAC and LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Morton, P.L.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Schwarz, H.D.; Takeuchi, Y.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We are developing relativistic klystrons as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications such as large linear electron-positron colliders and compact accelerators. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here briefly on our experiments so far. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. LLNL/LANS mission committee meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Michael J

    2010-12-06

    Recent events continue to show the national security imperative of the global security mission: (1) Fighting Proliferation - (a) At Yongbyon, 'a modern, industrial-scale U-enrichment facility w/2000 centrifuges' seen Nov. 2010, (b) In Iran, fueling began at Bushehr while P5+1/lran talks delayed to Dec. 2010; (2) Continuing need to support the warfighter and IC - (a) tensions on the Korean peninsula, (b) primitative IEDs a challenge in Afghanistan, (c) cyber command, (d)another Georgian smuggling event; and (3) Countering terrorisms on US soil - (a) toner cartridge bomb, (b) times square bomb, (c) christmas tree bomb. Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) and Accident Response Group (ARG) elements deployed to two East Coast locations in November to work a multi-weapon scenario. LANL provided 70% of on-duty field and reconstitution teams for both Marble Challenge 11-01 and JD 11-01. There were a total of 14 deployments in FY10.

  7. LLNL-TR-400563 Seismic Data

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site ... Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site ...

  8. The LLNL MPI_Tool Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-10-25

    MPI_T is an interface for tools introduced in the 3.0 version of MPI. The interface provides mechanisms for tools to access and set performance and control variables that are exposed by an MPI implementation. We have developed an MPI_T tool suite to provide a first set of tools exploiting the new interface and to get tool writers started on the path to more sophisticated support.

  9. LLNL: Science in the National Interest

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Miller

    2010-09-01

    This is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. located in the Livermore Valley about 50 miles east of San Francisco, the Lab is where the nations topmost science, engineering and technology come together. National security, counter-terrorism, medical technologies, energy, climate change our researchers are working to develop solutions to these challenges. For more than 50 years, we have been keeping America strong.

  10. Robotic follow system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Anderson, Matthew O [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-05-01

    Robot platforms, methods, and computer media are disclosed. The robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for a robot to follow a target in its environment. The method includes receiving a target bearing and sensing whether the robot is blocked front. If the robot is blocked in front, then the robot's motion is adjusted to avoid the nearest obstacle in front. If the robot is not blocked in front, then the method senses whether the robot is blocked toward the target bearing and if so, sets the rotational direction opposite from the target bearing, and adjusts the rotational velocity and translational velocity. If the robot is not blocked toward the target bearing, then the rotational velocity is adjusted proportional to an angle of the target bearing and the translational velocity is adjusted proportional to a distance to the nearest obstacle in front.

  11. "V Doc with logo.doc"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and improvement activities, customer service, and internal grievance resolution. Health care operations also include vendor evaluations, credentialing, training,...

  12. Template:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other Additional Comments Cancel Submit Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

  13. Logos and Templates | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Logistic Management Forms (4000-4999) Logistic Management Forms (4000-4999) DOE F 4200.33 (fillable pdf) Procurement Request-Authorization DOE F 4200.34 (fillable pdf) Procurement Request-Authorization Funding Data (Continuation Sheet) DOE F 4200.40 (pdf) Individual Procurement Action Report (IPAR) DOE F 4200.40A (pdf) Individual Procurement Action Report (IPAR) DOE F 4200.41 (pdf) Individual Procurement Action Report Supplement for Procurement and Financial Assistance DOE F 4220.2 (fillable

  14. PROJECT PROFILE: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (PREDICTS 2) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (PREDICTS 2) PROJECT PROFILE: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (PREDICTS 2) Funding Opportunity: PREDICTS 2 LLNL Logo.png SunShot Subprogram: PV Location: Livermore, CA Amount Awarded: $570,000 Awardee Cost Share: $375,000 Principal Investigator: Mihail Bora As a part of their PREDICTS 2 award, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will explore the use of spectral imaging as a non-destructive means of

  15. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; North-West University ; Pope, Jenny; Integral Sustainability; Curtin University ; Bond, Alan; University of East Anglia ; Retief, Francois

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  16. Preparing for Hurricane Irene: Follow Local Direction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hurricane Irene is heading towards the East Coast, and while the extent of its impact is not yet known, those who may be effected (even inland areas), should get prepared and follow the direction...

  17. Follow the Light | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Follow the Light Just like watching boats in the night, seeing movement at the nanoscale is easier when the object you are watching has a beacon.Dynamic three-dimensional tracking with high precision is possible with nanoscale light emitting particles known as quantum dots at better resolution than 10 nanometers in the vertical direction. This opens up the possibility for understanding three dimensional movement in nanoscale structures and biological systems. The quantum dots are followed using

  18. Microsoft Word - Blue Cover Report - Beryllium Controls at LLNL

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Implementation of Beryllium Controls at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory DOE/IG-0851 June 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 17, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Implementation of Beryllium Controls at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy has a long history of using beryllium - a metal essential for nuclear operations and other processes.

  19. Detonation equation of state at LLNL, 1995. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P.C.; Wu, B.; Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1996-02-01

    JWL`s and 1-D Look-up tables are shown to work for ``one-track`` experiments like cylinder shots and the expanding sphere. They fail for ``many-track`` experiments like the compressed sphere. As long as the one-track experiment has dimensions larger than the explosive`s reaction zone and the explosive is near-ideal, a general JWL with R{sub 1} = 4.5 and R{sub 2} = 1.5 can be constructed, with both {omega} and E{sub o} being calculated from thermochemical codes. These general JWL`s allow comparison between various explosives plus recalculation of the JWL for different densities. The Bigplate experiment complements the cylinder test by providing continuous oblique angles of shock incidence from 0{degrees} to 70{degrees}. Explosive reaction zone lengths are determined from metal plate thicknesses, extrapolated run-to-detonation distances, radius size effects and detonation front curvature. Simple theories of the cylinder test, Bigplate, the cylinder size effect and detonation front curvature are given. The detonation front lag at the cylinder edge is shown to be proportional to the half-power of the reaction zone length. By calibrating for wall blow-out, a full set of reaction zone lengths from PETN to ANFO are obtained. The 1800--2100 K freezing effect is shown to be caused by rapid cooling of the product gases. Compiled comparative data for about 80 explosives is listed. Ten Chapters plus an Appendix.

  20. LLNL researchers outline what happens during metal 3D printing...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    - examine a 3D-printed part manufactured using the selective laser melting process. ... The powder bed fusion process, also known as selective laser melting (SLM), requires thin ...

  1. Groundbreaking Leader of Computation at LLNL Retires | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    her retirement last week after 15 years of leading Livermore's Computation ... world-class organization for nearly 15 years," Crawford said. "I have the utmost ...

  2. LLNL input to FY94 hydrogen annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, R.N.; Smith, J.R.; Rambach, G.; Pekala, R.W.; Westbrook, C.K.; Richardson, J.H.

    1994-12-16

    This report summarizes the FY 1994 progress made in hydrogen research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Research programs covered include: Technical and Economic Assessment of the Transport and Storage of Hydrogen; Research and Development of an Optimized Hydrogen-Fueled Internal Combustion Engine; Hydrogen Storage in Engineered Microspheres; Synthesis, Characterization and Modeling of Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage; Chemical Kinetic Modeling of H2 Applications; and, Municipal Solid Waste to Hydrogen.

  3. LLNL Small-Scale Friction sensitivity (BAM) Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1996-06-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives, propellants and other energetic materials, is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. Testing is done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing {open_quotes}BAM{close_quotes} Small-Scale Friction Test, and the methods used to determine the friction sensitivity pertinent to handling energetic materials. The accumulated data for the materials tested is not listed here - that information is in a database. Included is, however, a short list of (1) materials that had an unusual response, and (2), a few {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} materials representing the range of typical responses usually seen.

  4. LLNL Electrical Safety Committee Summary report for 1993 and 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niven, W.A.; Trost, S.R.

    1995-03-01

    The ESC is presently organized with three subcommittees: Guidelines and Regulations, Programs and Training, and Performance Measurement and Analysis. Current membership is attached for information, as well as the charters of the three subcommittees. The committee at large meets once a quarter, the Executive Committee, comprised of the Committee Chair, the Executive Secretary and the Subcommittee Chairs meets twice quarterly, and the subcommittees meet once or twice per month. Minutes of meetings are distributed to the ES&H Working Group and senior Laboratory management.

  5. Microsoft Word - LLNL 2011 SA_8_1.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... to the descriptions in the 2005 SWEIS; - Chemical inventory and management modifications; ... potentially hazardous airborne chemical compounds, the most significant of which is ozone. ...

  6. Microsoft Word - Buff Cover Report - LLNL Classified IT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is responsible for the maintenance and security of the Nation's nuclear stockpile, management of nuclear nonproliferation activities, and operation of the naval reactor programs....

  7. LLNL to deliver next-generation supercomputer | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    national labs (CORAL) to accelerate the development of high performance computing. ... to deploy systems of about 150 petaflops to advance science and ensure national security. ...

  8. Microsoft Word - HPCOR-LLNL-TR-648169.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Application readiness facilitators need to be prepared to do "whatever it takes." The appropriate people need to be involved early so that appropriate NDA presentations and ...

  9. LLNL Conducts First Plutonium Shot Using the JASPER Gas Gun ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Shock physics experiments complement the ongoing subcritical experiment program at NTS as part of the NNSA's stockpile stewardship program to maintain the safety and reliability of ...

  10. LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and relative to climate observations remain significant and poorly understood. The nature and causes of these disagreements must be accounted for in a systematic fashion in...

  11. Microsoft Word - LLNL 2011 CRD_8_1.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Livermore Site Office ... andor Demolition DOE U.S. Department of Energy EIS Environmental Impact Statement EPA ...

  12. Microsoft Word - Environmental Review of B832 Canyon at LLNL...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... (1) monitoring ground water to evaluate the effectiveness of the remedy in achieving cleanup standards, and to ensure there is no impact to downgradient water-supply wells; (2) ...

  13. Microsoft Word - LLNL Security Clearances Final 121108a _2_.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Security Clearances at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory-California INS-O-09-01 December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries Inspection Report Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 December 11, 2008 MEMORAliDUM FOR ADMINISTRATQR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CHIEF HEALTH: SAFETY AbD, SECURITY OFFICER FROM: Christopher R. Sharpley . Deputy hlspector General for

  14. Microsoft Word - LLNL 2011 CRD_8_1.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Livermore Site Office Livermore, California SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS of the 2005 Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement For Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory VOLUME II: Comment Response Document AUGUST 2011 DOE/EIS-0348-SA-03 ii (This page intentionally left blank.) iii Contents

  15. Microsoft Word - LLNL 2011 SA_8_1.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Livermore Site Office Livermore, California SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS of the 2005 Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement For Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Volume I: Main Report AUGUST 2011 DOE/EIS-0348-SA-03 i CONTENTS NOTATION.............................................................................................................................. v

  16. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a ...

  17. When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells | ANSER Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells...

  18. Ex Parte Communication Following Meeting Between DOE and the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Following Meeting Between DOE and the National Marine Manufacturers Association Ex Parte Communication Following Meeting Between DOE and the National Marine Manufacturers ...

  19. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 January 2012 Follow-up Review of ...

  20. Follow-up Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - December 2001 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Follow-up Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - December 2001 Follow-up Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - December 2001 December 2001 Follow-up Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health Services Division This report summarizes the results of a follow-up evaluation to an occupational medicine program review that was performed at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health Services Division in September 1998. The follow-up review

  1. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Hanford Site - June 2011...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program This report provides the results of a follow-up independent oversight review of the Hanford Site...

  2. When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells | ANSER Center |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells

  3. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Molecular Foundry Logo Released Following the merge of the Molecular Foundry and the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) at the start of FY 2015, a new logo has been created to represent the newly integrated center. The logo, as well as the design package that accompanies it, was developed professionally and guided by input from staff and users throughout the Foundry. Signifying a sense of place that integrates seven distinct scientific facilities, the new logo features a clean

  4. Follow-up on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrodynamic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Follow-up on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrodynamic Test Program DOEIG-0930 ... Alamos National Laboratory Hydrodynamic Test Program" BACKGROUND A primary mission of ...

  5. Savannah River Site Contractor Resumes Full Operations Following...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River Site Contractor Resumes Full Operations Following Pause April 27, 2016 - 12:25pm Addthis AIKEN, S.C. - Savannah River Site management and operations contractor ...

  6. Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell PDF icon Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake:...

  7. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record of the Follow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Record of the Follow-up Review of Engineeing Configuration Management Processes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record...

  8. Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2014 Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and...

  9. Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Hanford...

  10. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review of Activity Level Implementatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordinator FMF Fuel Manufacturing Facility HCA High ... This action followed a history of poor performance with ... action item entitled "Apply LEAN techniques to evaluate RWP ...

  11. Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using an In Situ Nuclear ... cell electrochemical reactions in Li-S batteries using a microbattery design Interphase ...

  12. DOE Logo, Seal and Word Mark | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The color scheme of the seal is derived from nature, symbolizing both the source of energy ... By invoking this symbolism the color scheme represents the Nation's commitment to meet its ...

  13. Bisfuel Logo | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BISfuel is abbreviation of Bio-Inspired Solar Fuels BIS is a prefix or suffix designating the second instance of a thing, which symbolizes bio-inspired solar fuels as an artificial ...

  14. "V Doc with logo.doc"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL HIPAA Privacy Notice: This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information. Please review it carefully. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) imposes numerous requirements on employer health Plans concerning the use and disclosure of individual health information. This information, known as protected health information, includes virtually all individually identifiable health

  15. Microsoft Word - CRT 50 yr News Release with logos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014 CONTACTS: Mike Hansen, BPA, 503-230-4328 or Michael Coffey, Corps, 503-808-3722 U.S. Entity...

  16. AEF Logos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Usage (CMYK): .PDF .pdf file (1.2MB) | .EPS .eps file (734KB) | .TIF .tif file (4.1MB) Web, Video, and Presentation Usage (RGB): Low-res .JPG .jpg file (20KB) | High-res .JPG...

  17. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Hanford Site - February...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013 February 2013 Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight...

  18. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Hanford Site - January...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 January 2014 Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight...

  19. Follow Live Dec 24: Los Alamos National Lab Tracks Rudolph's...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    www.santa.lanl.gov"> follow along live as Santa circles the globe this Christmas Eve. | Image credit: Hantz Leger. Thanks to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, you can...

  20. Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow-up Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic...

  1. Elevated Radioxenon Detected Remotely Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowyer, Ted W.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Miley, Harry S.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woods, Vincent T.

    2011-04-21

    We report on the first measurements of short-lived gaseous fission products detected outside of Japan following the Fukushima nuclear releases, which occurred after a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011.

  2. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project will provide the first ever formal evaluation of fracture and fracture flow evolution in an EGS reservoir following a hydraulic stimulation.

  3. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Idaho Site - January 2014 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Idaho Site - January 2014 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Idaho Site - January 2014 January 2014 Follow-up Review of Activity-Level Implementation of Radiation Controls and Radiological Work Planning at the Materials and Fuels Complex of the Idaho Site This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of radiation protection program (RPP) implementation at the Idaho Site conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and

  4. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - January 2012 | Department of Energy Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 January 2012 Follow-up Review of Implementation Verification Reviews at the Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Site This report provides the results of an independent review of the identification and implementation of safety basis hazard controls associated with "flashing spray release"

  5. Ex Parte Communication Following Meeting Between DOE and the National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Manufacturers Association | Department of Energy Following Meeting Between DOE and the National Marine Manufacturers Association Ex Parte Communication Following Meeting Between DOE and the National Marine Manufacturers Association At 2 p.m. ET on Wednesday, May 7 2014 the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA) along with representatives from three of its member organizations met with Jeremy Dommu of the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable

  6. Final report for the flow excursion follow-on testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.A.; Walters, T.W.

    1992-08-05

    The purpose of the Mark 22 Flow Excursion Follow-On testing was to investigate the theory that approximately 15% of the flow bypassed the primary flow channels in previous testing, whereas the design called for only a 3% bypass. The results of the follow-on tests clearly confirmed this theory. The testing was performed in two phases. During the first phase, characterization tests performed during the earlier test program were repeated.

  7. Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Inspection, DOE Milestone | Department of Energy Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the

  8. Microstructure changes and thermal conductivity reduction in UO2 following

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3.9 MeV He2+ ion irradiation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Microstructure changes and thermal conductivity reduction in UO2 following 3.9 MeV He2+ ion irradiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microstructure changes and thermal conductivity reduction in UO2 following 3.9 MeV He2+ ion irradiation The microstructural changes and associated effects on thermal conductivity were examined in UO2 after irradiation using 3.9 MeV He2+ ions. Lattice expansion of UO2 was observed in

  9. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Follow-Up

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of the Idaho Site Fire Protection Program as Implemented for the IMCL and the AMWTP, OAR # EA-ID-2015-10-22 | Department of Energy Follow-Up Review of the Idaho Site Fire Protection Program as Implemented for the IMCL and the AMWTP, OAR # EA-ID-2015-10-22 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Follow-Up Review of the Idaho Site Fire Protection Program as Implemented for the IMCL and the AMWTP, OAR # EA-ID-2015-10-22 December 2015 Enterprise Assessments Operational

  10. Organized investigation expedites insurance claims following a blowout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstreet, R.

    1996-01-22

    Various types of insurance policies cover blowouts to different degrees, and a proper understanding of the incident and the coverage can expedite the adjustment process. Every well control incident, and the claim arising therefrom, has a unique set of circumstances which must be analyzed thoroughly. A blowout incident, no matter what size or how severe, can have an emotional impact on all who become involved. Bodily injuries or death of friends and coworkers can result in additional stress following a blowout. Thus, it is important that all parties involved remain mindful of sensitive matters when investigating a blowout. This paper reviews the definition of a blowout based on insurance procedures and claims. It reviews blowout expenses and contractor cost and accepted well control policies. Finally, it reviews the investigation procedures normally followed by an agent and the types of information requested from the operator.

  11. NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Announcement of $25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs | National Nuclear Security Administration Library / Press Releases NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House Announcement of $25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs January 16, 2015 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) hosted a roundtable today with 13 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to discuss new funding that will strengthen American

  12. NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Announcement of $25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs | National Nuclear Security Administration Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House Announcement of $25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs Friday, January 16, 2015 - 12:42pm The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) hosted a roundtable today with 13 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to discuss new funding that will strengthen American cybersecurity expertise. A five-year,

  13. ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP ECT FOLLOW-UP REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , EGsG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP ECT FOLLOW-UP REPORT DECEMBER 1979 EGG-R-003 AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SHPACK PROPERTY Norton, Massachusetts DATE OF SURVEY: AUGUST 1979 C. M . BLUITT Project Scientist APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION ?4@ t!lz- T. P. Stuart, Manager Remote Sensing Sciences Department THE REMOTE SENSING. lA!ORATORY OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ____--- I(-__ ABSTRACT An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over the

  14. Direct assay of filter media following DEOX testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, B.R.; Lind, R.P.; Giglio, J.J.; Cummings, D.G.; Huntley, M.W.; Morgan, C.D.; Bateman, K.J.; Wahlquist, D.L.; Sell, D.A.

    2007-07-01

    The direct assay of filter media by gamma spectrometry following DEOX testing has distinct advantages over analytical chemistry. Prior to using gamma spectrometry for the quantification of cesium (Cs- 137), a calibration must be established with known sources since gamma spectrometry yields relative results. Quantitative analytical chemistry, in particular ICP-MS, has been performed on the filter media for comparison to the gamma spectrometry data. The correlation of gamma spectrometry to ICP-MS data is presented to justify the continued use of gamma spectrometry for filter media. (authors)

  15. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  16. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  17. Quinine-induced thrombocytopenia following intravenous use of heroin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christie, D.J.; Walker, R.H.; Kolins, M.D.; Wilner, F.M.; Aster, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    Profound thrombocytopenia developed in a 22-year-old man after intravenous use of heroin. A high-titer, quinine-dependent, platelet-specific antibody was detected in his serum using lysis of normal platelets labeled with chromium 51 and an electroimmunoassay for measurement of platelet-associated IgG. The antibody was specific for quinine and failed to react with platelets in the presence of quinidine hydrochloride or two structural analogues of heroin. Quinine, a common adulterant found in heroin, was detected in the patient's blood and urine. On the basis of these observations, the patient was judged to have quinine-induced immunologic thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first to confirm that quinine used as an adulterant can induce immunologic thrombocytopenia following an injection of heroin.

  18. Volume rendering of 3D scalar and vector fields at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawfis, R.; Max, N.; Becker, B.; Cabral, B.

    1993-04-01

    Simulation of complex 3-dimensional phenomena data sets which are hard to comprehend using conventional 2-dimensionally oriented visualization tools. One way to overcome this limitation is to employ various volume visualization techniques. While early volume visualization techniques worked well on simple scalar volumes they failed to exploit frame buffer hardware capabilities and handle higher order data such as vector field. Work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has centered on developing new techniques and extending existing techniques.

  19. Volume rendering of 3D scalar and vector fields at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawfis, R.; Max, N.; Becher, B.; Cabral, B.

    1993-12-31

    Simulation of complex 3-dimensional phenomena generate data sets which are hard to comprehend using conventional 2-dimensionally oriented visualization tools. One way to overcome this limitation is to employ various volume visualization techniques. While early volume visualization techniques worked well on simple scalar volumes they failed to exploit frame buffer hardware capabilities and handle higher order data such as vector fields. Work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has centered on developing new techniques and extending existing techniques. This paper describes the various algorithms developed for volume rendering, and presents new methods of examining vector fields in a volumetric fashion.

  20. LLNL Genomic Assessment: Viral and Bacterial Sequencing Needs for TMTI, Task 1.4.2 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slezak, T; Borucki, M; Lam, M; Lenhoff, R; Vitalis, E

    2010-01-26

    Good progress has been made on both bacterial and viral sequencing by the TMTI centers. While access to appropriate samples is a limiting factor to throughput, excellent progress has been made with respect to getting agreements in place with key sources of relevant materials. Sharing of sequenced genomes funded by TMTI has been extremely limited to date. The April 2010 exercise should force a resolution to this, but additional managerial pressures may be needed to ensure that rapid sharing of TMTI-funded sequencing occurs, regardless of collaborator constraints concerning ultimate publication(s). Policies to permit TMTI-internal rapid sharing of sequenced genomes should be written into all TMTI agreements with collaborators now being negotiated. TMTI needs to establish a Web-based system for tracking samples destined for sequencing. This includes metadata on sample origins and contributor, information on sample shipment/receipt, prioritization by TMTI, assignment to one or more sequencing centers (including possible TMTI-sponsored sequencing at a contributor site), and status history of the sample sequencing effort. While this system could be a component of the AFRL system, it is not part of any current development effort. Policy and standardized procedures are needed to ensure appropriate verification of all TMTI samples prior to the investment in sequencing. PCR, arrays, and classical biochemical tests are examples of potential verification methods. Verification is needed to detect miss-labeled, degraded, mixed or contaminated samples. Regular QC exercises are needed to ensure that the TMTI-funded centers are meeting all standards for producing quality genomic sequence data.

  1. STUDY OF THERMAL SENSITIVITY AND THERMAL EXPLOSION VIOLENCE OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN THE LLNL ODTX SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HSU, P C; Hust, G; May, C; Howard, M; Chidester, S K; Springer, H K; Maienschein, J L

    2011-08-03

    Some energetic materials may explode at fairly low temperatures and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults for safe handling and storage of energetic materials. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory can measure times to explosion, lowest explosion temperatures, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also generate useful data for determining thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. We also performed detonation experiments of LX-10 in aluminum anvils to determine the detonation violence and validated the Zerilli Armstrong aluminum model. Results of the detonation experiments agreed well with the model prediction.

  2. System Modeling of kJ-class Petawatt Lasers at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shverdin, M Y; Rushford, M; Henesian, M A; Boley, C; Haefner, C; Heebner, J E; Crane, J K; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-14

    Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) project at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energetic, ultrafast x-rays in the range of 70-100 keV for backlighting NIF targets. The chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system will deliver kilo-Joule pulses at an adjustable pulse duration from 1 ps to 50 ps. System complexity requires sophisticated simulation and modeling tools for design, performance prediction, and comprehension of experimental results. We provide a brief overview of ARC, present our main modeling tools, and describe important performance predictions. The laser system (Fig. 1) consists of an all-fiber front end, including chirped-fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) stretchers. The beam after the final fiber amplifier is split into two apertures and spatially shaped. The split beam first seeds a regenerative amplifier and is then amplified in a multi-pass Nd:glass amplifier. Next, the preamplified chirped pulse is split in time into four identical replicas and injected into one NIF Quad. At the output of the NIF beamline, each of the eight amplified pulses is compressed in an individual, folded, four-grating compressor. Compressor grating pairs have slightly different groove densities to enable compact folding geometry and eliminate adjacent beam cross-talk. Pulse duration is adjustable with a small, rack-mounted compressor in the front-end. We use non-sequential ray-tracing software, FRED for design and layout of the optical system. Currently, our FRED model includes all of the optical components from the output of the fiber front end to the target center (Fig. 2). CAD designed opto-mechanical components are imported into our FRED model to provide a complete system description. In addition to incoherent ray tracing and scattering analysis, FRED uses Gaussian beam decomposition to model coherent beam propagation. Neglecting nonlinear effects, we can obtain a nearly complete frequency domain description of the ARC beam at different stages in the system. We employ 3D Fourier based propagation codes: MIRO, Virtual Beamline (VBL), and PROP for time-domain pulse analysis. These codes simulate nonlinear effects, calculate near and far field beam profiles, and account for amplifier gain. Verification of correct system set-up is a major difficulty to using these codes. VBL and PROP predictions have been extensively benchmarked to NIF experiments, and the verified descriptions of specific NIF beamlines are used for ARC. MIRO has the added capability of treating bandwidth specific effects of CPA. A sample MIRO model of the NIF beamline is shown in Fig. 3. MIRO models are benchmarked to VBL and PROP in the narrow bandwidth mode. Developing a variety of simulation tools allows us to cross-check predictions of different models and gain confidence in their fidelity. Preliminary experiments, currently in progress, are allowing us to validate and refine our models, and help guide future experimental campaigns.

  3. DOE's NREL and LLNL team with NOAA and University of Colorado to Study Wind Inflow Conditions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To gain new insights into turbine wind wakes, the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program and the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) joined together to fund a high-tech study in April and May of 2011.

  4. LLNL oil shale project review: METC third annual oil shale contractors meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cena, R.J.; Coburn, T.T.; Taylor, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combines laboratory and pilot-scale experimental measurements with mathematical modeling of fundamental chemistry and physics to provide a technical base for evaluating oil shale retorting alternatives. Presented herein are results of four research areas of interest in oil shale process development: Recent Progress in Solid-Recycle Retorting and Related Laboratory and Modeling Studies; Water Generation During Pyrolysis of Oil Shale; Improved Analytical Methods and Measurements of Rapid Pyrolysis Kinetics for Western and Eastern Oil Shale; and Rate of Cracking or Degradation of Oil Vapor In Contact with Oxidized Shale. We describe operating results of a 1 tonne-per-day, continuous-loop, solid-recycle, retort processing both Western And Eastern oil shale. Sulfur chemistry, solid mixing limits, shale cooling tests and catalyst addition are all discussed. Using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, we measure individual species evolution with greater sensitivity and selectivity. Herein we discuss our measurements of water evolution during ramped heating of Western and Eastern oil shale. Using improved analytical techniques, we determine isothermal pyrolysis kinetics for Western and Eastern oil shale, during rapid heating, which are faster than previously thought. Finally, we discuss the rate of cracking of oil vapor in contact with oxidized shale, qualitatively using a sand fluidized bed and quantitatively using a vapor cracking apparatus. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. LLNL Input to SNL L2 MS: Report on the Basis for Selection of Disposal Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Halsey, W G

    2011-03-02

    This mid-year deliverable has two parts. The first part is a synopsis of J. Blink's interview of the former Nevada Attorney General, Frankie Sue Del Papa, which was done in preparation for the May 18-19, 2010 Legal and Regulatory Framework Workshop held in Albuquerque. The second part is a series of sections written as input for the SNL L2 Milestone M21UF033701, due March 31, 2011. Disposal of high-level radioactive waste is categorized in this review into several categories. Section II discusses alternatives to geologic disposal: space, ice-sheets, and an engineered mountain or mausoleum. Section III discusses alternative locations for mined geologic disposal: islands, coastlines, mid-continent, and saturated versus unsaturated zone. Section IV discusses geologic disposal alternatives other than emplacement in a mine: well injection, rock melt, sub-seabed, and deep boreholes in igneous or metamorphic basement rock. Finally, Secton V discusses alternative media for mined geologic disposal: basalt, tuff, granite and other igneous/metamorphic rock, alluvium, sandstone, carbonates and chalk, shale and clay, and salt.

  6. National Ignition Facility LLNL-AR-585912_NIF-0135637-AA_2012...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . 47 6 * NIF User Guide * Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contents 5.11. Final Optics Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  7. LLNL-TM-411345 HotSpot Health Physics Codes Version

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... A checkmark and message indicating that all systems pass should appear in green. In the ... and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, U.S. Department of Energy, 1982). ...

  8. LLNL flash x-ray radiography machine (FXR) double-pulse upgrade diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, M.; Avalee, C.; Richardson, R.; Zentler, J.

    1997-06-26

    When the FXR machine was first tuned on the 1980`s, a minimal amount of diagnostics was available and consisted mostly of power monitors. During the recent accelerator upgrade, additional beam diagnostics were added. The sensor upgrades included beam bugs (resistive wall beam motion sensors) and high-frequency B-dot. Even with this suite of measurement tools, tuning was difficult. For the current Double- Pulse Upgrade, beam transport is a more complex problem--the beam characteristics must be measured better. Streak and framing cameras, which measure beam size and motions, are being added. Characterization of the beam along the entire accelerator is expected and other techniques will be evaluated also. Each sensor has limitations and only provides a piece of the puzzle. Besides providing more beam data, the set of diagnostics used should be broad enough so results can be cross validated. Results will also be compared to theoretical calculations and computer models, and successes and difficulties will be reported.

  9. DOE's NREL and LLNL team with NOAA and University of Colorado...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    To gain new insights into turbine wind wakes, the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program ... Related Articles New Modeling Tool Analyzes Floating Platform Concepts 5-MW Dynamometer ...

  10. Cyber Science and Security - An R&D Partnership at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brase, J; Henson, V

    2011-03-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has established a mechanism for partnership that integrates the high-performance computing capabilities of the National Labs, the network and cyber technology expertise of leading information technology companies, and the long-term research vision of leading academic cyber programs. The Cyber Science and Security Center is designed to be a working partnership among Laboratory, Industrial, and Academic institutions, and provides all three with a shared R&D environment, technical information sharing, sophisticated high-performance computing facilities, and data resources for the partner institutions and sponsors. The CSSC model is an institution where partner organizations can work singly or in groups on the most pressing problems of cyber security, where shared vision and mutual leveraging of expertise and facilities can produce results and tools at the cutting edge of cyber science.

  11. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Park, H S ; Patel, P ; Perez, F ; Ping, Y ; Pollock, B ; Ross, J S ; Rygg, J R ; Smith, R ; Zylstra, A ; Collins, G ; Landen, O ; Wan, A ; Hsing, W less Publication Date:...

  12. Experimental Validation of LLNL Finite Element Codes for Nonlinear Seismic Simulations (Progress, Year 1 of 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves, S W; Noble, C R

    2006-12-06

    Shake table tests were performed on a full-scale 7-story slice of a reinforced concrete building at UC San Diego between October 2005 and January 2006. The tests were performed on the NEES Large High-Performance Outdoor Shake Table (LHPOST) at the Engelkirk Structural Engineering Center of UCSD. The structure was subjected to four uniaxial earthquake ground motions of increasing amplitude. The accelerations measured at the base of the structure and the measured roof displacements have been provided by UCSD. Details of the building construction have also been provided by UCSD. The measured response of this structure was used to assess the capability of the homogenized rebar model in DYNA3D/ParaDyn [1,2] to simulate the seismic response of reinforced concrete structures. The homogenized rebar model is a composite version of the Karagozian & Case concrete model [3]. Work has been done to validate this material model for use in blast simulations, but seismic simulations require longer durations. The UCSD experiment provides full-scale data that can be used to validate seismic modeling capabilities.

  13. Microsoft Word - Renewable Energy Project at LLNL_June 2011_jb...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PURSUING DEVELOPMENT OF A RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE ... and development of renewable energy at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ...

  14. LLNL researchers outline what happens during metal 3D printing, enhancing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    confidence | National Nuclear Security Administration researchers outline what happens during metal 3D printing, enhancing confidence Friday, February 19, 2016 - 12:00am NNSA Blog From left, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers Ibo Matthews, a principal investigator leading the lab's effort on the joint open source software project; Wayne King, director of the Accelerated Certification of Additively Manufactured Metals Initiative; and Gabe Guss, engineering associate - examine

  15. UCRL-ID-119665 LLNL Small-Scale Drop-Hammer Impact Sensitivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Out-of-calibration electronic equipment an.d oxidized connectors can change the results of tests, sometimes causing a systematic error over a long period of time, or spuriously ...

  16. LLNL Data Disk Evaluation Report and Information Gathering Document #449.R1.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BeLue, A.

    2015-09-29

    This is a report on Data Storage Disk Evaluation and characterization. The purpose of this memo is to capture new recipients due to some recent characterization issues with the Hammer Mill process. The Data Storage Disk Evaluation report was generated utilizing data acquired during 2009 and 2010 from submitted storage media.

  17. Microsoft Word - IG-0742 LLNL ProForce Supply Room 101106.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Inspection Report Protective Force Property Management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory DOE/IG-0742 October 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries PROTECTIVE FORCE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AT LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objective 1 Observations and Conclusions 2 DETAILS OF FINDINGS Mission Equipment Management 3 Mission Equipment Availability 6 Security Police Officer

  18. LLNL MSP-GSS-001 PIA, Office of the Chief Information Officer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA,...

  19. Borehole induction logging for the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project LLNL gasoline spill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, S.; Newmark, R.; Wilt, M.

    1994-01-21

    Borehole induction logs were acquired for the purpose of characterizing subsurface physical properties and monitoring steam clean up activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work was part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project`s demonstrated clean up of a gasoline spin. The site is composed of unconsolidated days, sands and gravels which contain gasoline both above and below the water table. Induction logs were used to characterize lithology, to provide ``ground truth`` resistivity values for electrical resistance tomography (ERT), and to monitor the movement of an underground steam plume used to heat the soil and drive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the extraction wells.

  20. Preliminary report on LLNL mine seismicity deployment at the Twentymile Coal Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.R.; Hunter, S.L.; Glenn, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of a just completed experiment at the Twentymile Coal Mine, operated by the Cyprus Amax Coal Company near Oak Creek, CO. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain local and regional seismic data from roof caves associated with long-wall mining activities and to use this data to help determine the effectiveness with which these events can be discriminated from underground nuclear explosions under a future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  1. LLNL`s partnership with selected US mines, for CTBT verification: A pictorial and some reflections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    The verification of an upcoming Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will involve seismic monitoring and will provide for on-site inspections which may include drilling. Because of the fact that mining operations can send out strong seismic signals, many mining districts in the US and abroad may come under special scrutiny. The seismic signals can be generated by the use of large quantities of conventional explosives, by the collapse of underground workings, or by sudden energy release in the ground such as in rock bursts and coal bumps. These mining activities may be the cause of false alarms, but may also offer opportunities for evasive nuclear testing. So in preparing for future verification of a CTBT it becomes important to address the mining-related questions. For the United States, these are questions to be answered with respect to foreign mines. But there is a good amount of commonality in mining methods worldwide. Studies conducted at US mine sites can provide good analogs of activities that may be carried out for overseas CTBT verification, save for the expected logistical impediments.

  2. Microsoft Word - S09IS004 _LLNL_PF_Authority_08262009a FINAL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stops for administrative traffic violations. We noted that the protective force was using the California Law Enforcement Telecommunication System (CLETS) to access the ...

  3. UCRL-ID-119665 LLNL Small-Scale Drop-Hammer Impact Sensitivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... release control, the control for the vacuum system solenoid and a manual height control. ... A large industrial vacuum cleaner provides continuous air flow during operation. A water ...

  4. Overview of the Tritium research activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 35th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Princeton, New Jersey on May 05-07, 2015.

  5. Microsoft Word - Environmental Document for Continued Operation of LLNL August 2011.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy News Media Contact For Immediate Release John Belluardo August 11, 2011 (925) 422-2567 DETERMINATION ISSUED REGARDING ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENT FOR CONTINUED OPERATION OF LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY: Livermore, CA --The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration / Livermore Site Office announced today a determination regarding the Supplement Analysis of the 2005 Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of

  6. Microsoft Word - Renewable Energy Project at LLNL_June 2011_jb _2_

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    For Immediate Release John Belluardo June 3, 2011 (925) 422-2567 NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION PURSUING DEVELOPMENT OF A RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Livermore, CA - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is reaching out to industry regarding the pursuit of research and development of renewable energy at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The project would potentially encompass a commercially sized

  7. Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following a postulated accident in PHWRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, N.; Kansal, M.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following postulated accident i.e Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with failed Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), performed as part of the reactor safety analysis of a typical 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). The rationale behind the assessment is that the public needs to be protected in the event that the postulated accident results in radionuclide release outside containment. Radionuclides deliver dose to the human body through various pathways namely, plume submersion, exposure due to ground deposition, inhalation and ingestion. The total exposure dose measured in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is the sum of doses to a hypothetical adult human at exclusion zone boundary by all the exposure pathways. The analysis provides the important inputs to decide upon the type of emergency counter measures to be adopted during the postulated accident. The importance of the various pathways in terms of contribution to the total effective dose equivalent(TEDE) is also assessed with respect to time of exposure. Inhalation and plume gamma dose are the major contributors towards TEDE during initial period of accident whereas ingestion and ground shine dose start dominating in TEDE in the extended period of exposure. Moreover, TEDE is initially dominated by I-131, Kr-88, Te-132, I-133 and Sr-89, whereas, as time progresses, Xe-133,I-131 and Te-132 become the main contributors. (authors)

  8. Short-period pulsar oscillations following a glitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Eysden, C. A.

    2014-07-10

    Following a glitch, the crust and magnetized plasma in the outer core of a neutron star are believed to rapidly establish a state of co-rotation within a few seconds by process analogous to classical Ekman pumping. However, in ideal magnetohydrodynamics, a final state of co-rotation is inconsistent with conservation of energy of the system. We demonstrate that, after the Ekman-like spin up is completed, magneto-inertial waves continue to propagate throughout the star, exciting torsional oscillations in the crust and plasma. The crust oscillation is irregular and quasi-periodic, with a dominant frequency of the order of seconds. Crust oscillations commence after an Alfvn crossing time, approximately half a minute at the magnetic pole, and are subsequently damped by the electron viscosity over approximately an hour. In rapidly rotating stars, the magneto-inertial spectrum in the core approaches a continuum, and crust oscillations are damped by resonant absorption analogous to quasi-periodic oscillations in magnetars. The oscillations predicted are unlikely to be observed in timing data from existing radio telescopes, but may be visible to next generation telescope arrays.

  9. Jefferson Lab Public Affairs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Media print version Public Affairs Links Home Journalists' Newsroom Media Photographic Archives What is Jefferson Lab? Community Outreach Jefferson Lab Graphic Identity Standards and Style Guide Usage of the Jefferson Lab Logo - The following examples demonstrate correct use of the lab logo. Requests to use the Jefferson Lab logo by outside entities for conference posters, advertisements, presentations, websites, or other communications may be granted for one-time use on a

  10. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Follow The Yellow Brick Road to Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Follow The Yellow Brick Road to Safety

  11. A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho This report reviews power outages and restoration efforts following the June 29, 2012 Derecho and compares them to outages and restoration efforts following other spring and summer storms in the Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic regions. PDF icon A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho More

  12. The Follow-Up Crisis: Optimizing Science in an Opportunity-Rich...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: The Follow-Up Crisis: Optimizing Science in an Opportunity-Rich Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Follow-Up Crisis: Optimizing Science in...

  13. A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho August 7, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a report that reviews power outages and restoration efforts following the June 29, 2012 Derecho and compares them to outages and restoration efforts following other spring and summer storms in the Ohio Valley and

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2009.10.27 Bridge Inspection Follow-up | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 2009.10.27 Bridge Inspection Follow-up Microsoft PowerPoint - 2009.10.27 Bridge Inspection Follow-up PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - 2009.10.27 Bridge Inspection Follow-up More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Slide 1 Microsoft Word - Issue FY2009 Q4 Draft 20090910.doc

  15. Car Following

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Capturing the Motion of the Ocean: Wave Energy Explained Capturing the Motion of the Ocean: Wave Energy Explained July 6, 2015 - 11:44am Addthis Energy Department-supported "Azura" wave energy converter is installed at a U.S. Navy test site in Hawaii. | Photo courtesy of Northwest Energy Innovations. Energy Department-supported "Azura" wave energy converter is installed at a U.S. Navy test site in Hawaii. | Photo courtesy of Northwest Energy Innovations. Matt

  16. Memo_for_Elizabeth_Montoya_Transition_Team_Follow_Up.pdf | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Memo_for_Elizabeth_Montoya_Transition_Team_Follow_Up.pdf Memo_for_Elizabeth_Montoya_Transition_Team_Follow_Up.pdf PDF icon Memo_for_Elizabeth_Montoya_Transition_Team_Follow_Up.pdf More Documents & Publications The Chief Information Officer (CIO) at the U Audit Report: OAS-RA-09-03 Responses to IT-related Questions from the Transition Team

  17. Guidance for the Implementation and Follow-Up of Identified Energy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Efficiency Measures in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy the Implementation and Follow-Up of Identified Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Covered Facilities Guidance for the Implementation and Follow-Up of Identified Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Covered Facilities Document provides specific guidance to agencies on the implementation and follow-up of energy and water efficiency measures identified and undertaken per Section 432 of the Energy Independence and

  18. Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2015 | Department of Energy Assessments Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2015 June 2015 Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

  19. Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention...

  20. Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell

  1. Follow-up on the Department of Energy's Implementation of the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Follow-up on the Department of Energy's Implementation of the Advanced Batteries and ... Energy's Implementation of the Advanced Batteries and Hybrid Components Program Funded ...

  2. Energy and Technology Review, October 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.C.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Sanford, N.M.

    1990-10-01

    This report discuss the following topics: History of Cold Fusion Experiments; LLNL Experiments on Cold Fusion; Roundtable Discussion on Cold Fusion; and Using MeV Ions To Characterize and Modify Materials.

  3. EA follow-up in the Ghanaian mining sector: Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appiah-Opoku, Seth; Bryan, Hobson C.

    2013-07-15

    Environmental assessment (EA) follow-up provides a means for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of environmental impact studies. It is integral to the success or failure of a project or program. In spite of its importance, very little attention is given to the need for follow-up programs in most jurisdictions in Africa. Using a case study in the Ghanaian mining sector, this paper explores the challenges and opportunities within the country's EA process for an effective follow-up program. The paper is based on informal interviews, content analysis of relevant publications, official EA documents, and internet searches. The authors suggest a standard EA follow-up program to be formalized as an integral part of Ghana's environmental assessment policy. They also propose a follow-up process that harnesses existing opportunities within the country's EA system. This approach can be replicated in other African countries.

  4. Radiology-led Follow-up System for IVC Filters: Effects on Retrieval Rates and Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, L.; Taylor, J.; Munneke, G.; Morgan, R.; Belli, A.-M.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Successful IVC filter retrieval rates fall with time. Serious complications have been reported following attempts to remove filters after 3-18 months. Failed retrieval may be associated with adverse clinical sequelae. This study explored whether retrieval rates are improved if interventional radiologists organize patient follow-up, rather than relying on the referring clinicians. Methods: Proactive follow-up of patients who undergo filter placement was implemented in May 2008. At the time of filter placement, a report was issued to the referring consultant notifying them of the advised timeframe for filter retrieval. Clinicians were contacted to arrange retrieval within 30 days. We compared this with our practice for the preceding year. Results: The numbers of filters inserted during the two time periods was similar, as were the numbers of retrieval attempts and the time scale at which they occurred. The rate of successful retrievals increased but not significantly. The major changes were better documentation of filter types and better clinical follow-up. After the change in practice, only one patient was lost to follow-up compared with six the preceding year. Conclusions: Although there was no significant improvement in retrieval rates, the proactive, radiology-led approach improved follow-up and documentation, ensuring that a clinical decision was made about how long the filter was required and whether retrieval should be attempted and ensuring that patients were not lost to follow-up.

  5. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  6. Expanded-mode semiconductor laser with tapered-rib adiabatic-following fiber coupler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vawter, G.A.; Smith, R.E.; Hou, H.; Wendt, J.R.

    1997-02-01

    A new diode laser using a Tapered-Rib Adiabatic-Following Fiber Coupler to achieve 2D mode expansion and narrow, symmetric far-field emission without epitaxial regrowth or sharply-defined tips on tapered waveguides is presented.

  7. Annealing a Follow-up Program: Improvement of the Dark Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Galaxy Cluster Surveys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Annealing a Follow-up Program: Improvement of the Dark Energy Figure of Merit for Optical Galaxy Cluster Surveys ...

  8. Annealing a Follow-up Program: Improvement of the Dark Energy Figure of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Merit for Optical Galaxy Cluster Surveys (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Annealing a Follow-up Program: Improvement of the Dark Energy Figure of Merit for Optical Galaxy Cluster Surveys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Annealing a Follow-up Program: Improvement of the Dark Energy Figure of Merit for Optical Galaxy Cluster Surveys The precision of cosmological parameters derived from galaxy cluster surveys is limited by uncertainty in relating observable signals to cluster mass.

  9. The Department's Audit Resolution and Follow-up Process, IG-0766 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy The Department's Audit Resolution and Follow-up Process, IG-0766 The Department's Audit Resolution and Follow-up Process, IG-0766 Over the years, the Office of Inspector General has issued findings and recoinmendations addressing numerous aspects of the Department of Energy's programs, operations and management hnctions. In many cases, the Department has concurred with the findings and reported that corrective actions to resolve problems or improve the efficiency of its

  10. Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0878

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program DOE/IG-0878 December 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 11, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of

  11. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases Purpose: We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently

  12. Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project Researchers have collaborated to craft a request that could fundamentally alter how the antibodies used in research are identified. March 1, 2015 Researchers from around the world want to fundamentally

  13. Serving the Nation for Fifty Years: 1952 - 2002 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], Fifty Years of Accomplishments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been making history and making a difference. The outstanding efforts by a dedicated work force have led to many remarkable accomplishments. Creative individuals and interdisciplinary teams at the Laboratory have sought breakthrough advances to strengthen national security and to help meet other enduring national needs. The Laboratory's rich history includes many interwoven stories -- from the first nuclear test failure to accomplishments meeting today's challenges. Many stories are tied to Livermore's national security mission, which has evolved to include ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons without conducting nuclear tests and preventing the proliferation and use of weapons of mass destruction. Throughout its history and in its wide range of research activities, Livermore has achieved breakthroughs in applied and basic science, remarkable feats of engineering, and extraordinary advances in experimental and computational capabilities. From the many stories to tell, one has been selected for each year of the Laboratory's history. Together, these stories give a sense of the Laboratory -- its lasting focus on important missions, dedication to scientific and technical excellence, and drive to made the world more secure and a better place to live.

  14. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

    2011-07-19

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic is minimized while still offering the desired low temperature coefficient of resistance compared to sodium thiosulfate. The characterization experiments and comparison with the sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors will be fully discussed and the final design described.

  15. Evaluation of the LLNL Spectrometer for Possible use with the NSTec Optical Streak Camera as a Light Gas Gun Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, J., Cradick, J.

    2012-09-27

    In fiscal year 2012, it was desired to combine a visible spectrometer with a streak camera to form a diagnostic system for recording time-resolved spectra generated in light gas gun experiments. Acquiring a new spectrometer was an option, but it was possible to borrow an existing unit for a period of months, which would be sufficient to evaluate both “off-line” and in-gas gun shots. If it proved adequate for this application, it could be duplicated (with possible modifications); if not, such testing would help determine needed specifications for another model. This report describes the evaluation of the spectrometer (separately and combined with the NSTec LO streak camera) for this purpose. Spectral and temporal resolutions were of primary interest. The first was measured with a monochromatic laser input. The second was ascertained by the combination of the spectrometer’s spatial resolution in the time-dispersive direction and the streak camera’s intrinsic temporal resolution. System responsivity was also important, and this was investigated by measuring the response of the spectrometer/camera system to black body input—the gas gun experiments are expected to be similar to a 3000K black body—as well as measuring the throughput of the spectrometer separately over a range of visible light provided by a monochromator. The flat field (in wavelength) was also measured and the final part of the evaluation was actual fielding on two gas gun shots. No firm specifications for spectral or temporal resolution were defined precisely, but these were desired to be in the 1–2 nm and 1–2 ns ranges, respectively, if possible. As seen below, these values were met or nearly met, depending on wavelength. Other performance parameters were also not given (threshold requirements) but the evaluations performed with laser, black body, and successful gas gun shots taken in aggregate indicate that the spectrometer is adequate for this purpose. Even still, some (relatively minor) opportunities for improvement were noticed and these were documented for incorporation into any near-duplicate spectrometer that might be fabricated in the future.

  16. Recent progress in the development of a circular ion induction accelerator for space charge dominated beams at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahle, L; Autrey, D; Barnard, J; Berners, D; Craig, G; Debeling, A; Eylon, S; Friedman, A; Fritz, W; Grote, D P; Halaxa, E; Hanks, R L; Hernandez, M; Judd, D L; Kirbie, H C; Logan, B G; Lund, S M; Mant, G; Molvik, A W; Reginato, L; Sangster, T C; Sharp, W M

    1998-08-19

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has for several years been developing the world's first circular ion induction accelerator. This machine has recently been extended to 90 degrees, or 10 half-lattice periods (HLP) with full beam transport. In addition, induction cores have been installed on five of the HLP's, each with an independent arbitrary waveform pulser. An arbitrary waveform pulser for the bending electrostatic dipoles has also been enabled. Together, they have allowed the first attempts at coordinated bending and acceleration of the beam. The results of these first attempts will be reported on in the paper by examining the output of various diagnostic devices, such as the capacitive Beam Probes (C-probes), slit scanners, and the Gated Beam Imager(GBI).

  17. Microsoft Word - Environmental Review of B832 Canyon at LLNL Site 300 2.24.11.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Department of Energy News Media Contact For Immediate Release John Belluardo February 25, 2011 (925) 422-2567 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 832 CANYON OPERABLE UNIT AT LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY'S SITE 300 BY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION STARTED Livermore, CA -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) /National Nuclear Security Administration has begun the first Five-Year Review of its environmental cleanup of the Building 832 Canyon Operable

  18. DOE RFI Policy & Logistical Challenges_PHI_response_vFinal_logo

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... These business cases included the costs, operational benefits and the benefits that customers could expect to see from AMI-enabled demand response. PHI enlisted the assistance of ...

  19. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel Xeon Phi(tm), Intel Xeon Processor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    en-usmic-developer 2015 Intel Corporation "I need a cookbook" http: store.elsevier.co mHigh- Performance- Parallelism- PearlsJames- Reinders isbn-978012802 1187...

  20. The effect of chlorine substitution on the disposition of polychlorinated biphenyls following dermal administration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, C. Edwin . E-mail: cegarner@rti.org; Demeter, Jennifer; Matthews, H.B.

    2006-10-01

    The fate of selected polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) was investigated following single dermal administration (0.4 mg/kg) to determine the effects of chlorine content and position on the disposition of PCBs following dermal absorption. Single dermal doses of {sup 14}C-labeled mono-, di-, tetra- and hexachlorobiphenyls were administered to 1 cm{sup 2} areas on the backs of F-344 male rats. Distribution of radioactivity in selected tissues and excreta was determined by serial sacrifice at time points up to 2 weeks. Unabsorbed radioactivity was removed from the dose site at either sacrifice or 48 h post-dose. The time course of radioactivity in the tissues showed a dependence on rate and extent of absorption. The most rapidly absorbed PCBs reached peak tissue concentrations at early times and were cleared from the tissues rapidly. The higher chlorinated PCBs were slowly absorbed and tended to accumulate in the adipose and skin after removal of unabsorbed dose. Excretion of absorbed radioactivity varied with chlorine content ranging from 27% to ca. 100% at 2 weeks post-dose. Excretion profiles following dermal doses tended to differ from profiles following equivalent IV doses, as did the metabolite profiles in excreta. Skin slice incubation experiments suggested that first pass metabolism in the dermal dose site was responsible for metabolism and disposition differences between routes of administration. The data further suggest that the rate of absorption, and therefore the disposition of PCBs following dermal administration may be mediated, either in part or fully, by transdermal metabolism.

  1. High field strength following the Kauai R-N geomagnetic reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, H.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The paleomagnetism of superposed lava flows on Kauai, Hawaii shows that the ancient geomagnetic field was unusually strong following a reverse-to-normal polarity transition that occurred about 4 million years ago. Paleointensities were determined by a standard experimental procedure (Thelliers' method) that recreates the process of remanence acquisition in volcanic rocks. This experiment makes it possible to infer the strength of the geomagnetic field present with each lava flow formed, thus producing an accurate picture of the ancient field's behavior after the reversal. Samples from 10 volcanic units yielded virtual dipole moments (VDMs) ranging from 7.4 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] to 14.5 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] with an average of 11.1[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. This value is high in comparisons to the average VDM for the past 5 m.y., approximately 8.7[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. In contrast to the highly variable dipole moment observed following a 15 m.y. old reversal at Steen s Mountain, Oregon, the field following the Kauai transition was relatively steady. Surprisingly, the maximum dipole moments following the two reversals were nearly equal. This similarity hints that high field strength may be a systematic feature of the geodynamo immediately following a polarity reversal.

  2. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Lois C., E-mail: Lois.Friedman@UHhospitals.org [Department of Psychiatry, CASE Comprehensive Cancer Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH (United States); Abdallah, Rita [Ireland Cancer Center, CASE Comprehensive Cancer Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH (Ireland); Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CASE Comprehensive Cancer Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, CASE Comprehensive Cancer Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  3. Follow-up on The Department of Energys Acquisition and Management of Software Licenses

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Follow-up Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - December 2001 Follow-up Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - December 2001 December 2001 Follow-up Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health Services Division This report summarizes the results of a follow-up evaluation to an occupational medicine program review that was performed at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health Services Division in September 1998. The follow-up review

  4. DOE-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE logo Last update 30 April 2015. The following links are provided through DOE, and are useful to learn more about the Energy Frontier Research Centers program at BES (including...

  5. CPV Cell Characterization Following One-Year Exposure in Golden, Colorado: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2014-08-01

    A CPV module containing 30 III-V multijunction cells was operated on?sun for one year in Golden, Colorado. Each cell was characterized prior to and following exposure. A module power degradation of 10% was observed and found to be a result as an overall decrease in cell short circuit current and the presence of at least one shunted cell. A positive correlation between initial shunt current and an increase in shunt current following exposure was also found. Cell exfoliation was also observed and found to be coincident with the presence of water and/or charring of the cell package due to an off-sun event.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Social Media

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Social Media Modeling and Simulation Join the Conversation Sandia operates official accounts on several social media networks as a means to engage in conversations about our work, update followers about the latest Labs news, share employment opportunities, and support the open government principles of transparency, participation and collaboration. Connect with us on the following networks: Facebook logo Facebook facebook.com/ SandiaLabs Google Plus logo Google+ plus.google.com/ +SandiaGov/

  7. A Methodology to Analyze the Impact of 30-Minute Wind Scheduling on Load-Following Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Makarov, Yuri V.; Samaan, Nader A.; Kujala, Ben

    2014-12-24

    This paper proposes a new and systematic approach to investigating the impact of wind transfer between balancing authorities (BAs) with half-hour scheduling on load following requirements, which was traditionally scheduled on an hourly basis. The analysis is conducted for a few BAs in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. that are described as source BAs (sending renewables) and sink BAs (receiving renewables). The main hypothesis is that if the source BA could schedule interchange for wind on a half-hourly basis, it would make the schedule follow its net load more closely. The scheduling change in the source BA is matched by adding the corresponding component to the net load in the sink BA. The load-following requirements are calculated as: (a) by the difference between the net load and modified schedule in the source BA, and (b) the difference between modified net load and unchanged hourly schedule in the sink BA. Results are presented as hourly upward and downward load following requirements in the source and sink BA, and compared with the results obtained with all generators scheduled on an hourly basis. Thus, the proposed method can effectively help utilities better understand the impact of 30-minute scheduling and make better business decisions.

  8. Analysis of solids remaining following chemical cleaning in tank 6F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, Michael R.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Missimer, David M.; Summer, Michael E.; Fink, Samuel D.

    2010-02-05

    Following chemical cleaning, a solid sample was collected and submitted to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. SRNL analyzed this sample by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the composition of the solids remaining in Tank 6F and to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process.

  9. Zirconium Catalyst Follows a Low Energy Pathway for Carbon-Nitrogen Bond

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation | The Ames Laboratory Zirconium Catalyst Follows a Low Energy Pathway for Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Formation Chemists have synthesized a highly selective and highly efficient zirconium catalyst that makes new carbon-nitrogen bonds by adding a nitrogen-hydrogen bond to a carbon-carbon double bond. Nitrogen-containing chemicals are important as agrichemicals, pharmaceuticals, and specialty chemicals. These zirconium catalysts are expected to show greater tolerance to other functionality

  10. Zirconium Catalyst Follows a Low Energy Pathway for Carbon-Nitrogen Bond

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation | The Ames Laboratory Zirconium Catalyst Follows a Low Energy Pathway for Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Formation Chemists have synthesized a highly selective and highly efficient zirconium catalyst that makes new carbon-nitrogen bonds by adding a nitrogen-hydrogen bond to a carbon-carbon double bond. Nitrogen-containing chemicals are important as agrichemicals, pharmaceuticals, and specialty chemicals. These zirconium catalysts are expected to show greater tolerance to other functionality

  11. A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    August 2012 A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about this report may be directed to Alice

  12. The following comments are provided on behalf of Ingersoll Rand, Residential Sol

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    following comments are provided on behalf of Ingersoll Rand, Residential Solutions, manufacturer of Trane and American Standard residential air conditioners, heat pumps, furnaces and accessories therefore. --- Ingersoll Rand appreciates the opportunity to comment on the Department of Energy's request for information on "Reducing Regulatory Burden" in the spirit of Executive Order 13563 ---- It is ironic that the response interval for the RFI on reducing regulatory burden overlaps the

  13. Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Significant backlogs existed in each of the three types of tests Surveillance Testing conducted in the Surveillance Testing Program---laboratory tests, flight tests, and component tests---as of September 30? 2005. Laboratory tests are conducted on weapons' non-nuclear systems to detect defects due to handling, aging, manufacturing, or design. Flight tests involve dropping or

  14. NNSA Awards Kansas City National Security Campus Follow-on Management &

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Operating Contract to Honeywell FM&T | National Nuclear Security Administration Awards Kansas City National Security Campus Follow-on Management & Operating Contract to Honeywell FM&T July 10, 2015 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced the award to Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, LLC, to be the management and operating contractor for the National Security Campus (NSC) in Kansas City, Missouri. "Our

  15. Following a Structural Phase Transition in Real Time with Atomic Spatial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resolution Following a Structural Phase Transition in Real Time with Atmic Spatial Resolution Constructing atomic scale mechanisms for chemical, biological, and physical transformations of matter represents a critical goal for numerous scientific and technological challenges that face modern society. The natural length and time scale for atomic dynamics dictate that the scientific tools needed to construct these mechanisms possess Ångström (Å) spatial resolution with femtosecond (fs)

  16. Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using an In

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Technique - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research March 18, 2015, Research Highlights Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using an In Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Technique (a) NMR spectra as a function of time during charge-discharge. Peaks 1 to 4 reflect change of concentrations of different polysulfide species. Peaks 5 to 6 reflect the formation of microstructures on Li anodes. (b) Formation of a thick SEI layer

  17. Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Antibody 'bar code' system Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project Researchers have collaborated to craft a request that could fundamentally alter how the antibodies used in research are identified. February 4, 2015 Researchers from around the world want to fundamentally alter how antibodies used in research are identified, a project potentially on the scale of the now-completed Human Genome Project. (Image: Public Domain, Wikipedia) Researchers

  18. ChemCam follows the 'Yellowknife Road' to Martian wet area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Yellowknife Road' to martian wet area ChemCam follows the 'Yellowknife Road' to martian wet area Researchers have tracked a trail of minerals that point to the prior presence of water at the Curiosity rover site on Mars. January 15, 2013 The Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover recently took this photo of the Martian landscape looking toward Mount Sharp while on its way toward Yellowknife Bay-an area where researchers have found minerals indicating the past presence of water. (NASA Photo)

  19. West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

  20. Dispersal Limitations on Fish Community Recovery Following Long-term Water Quality Remediation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Jett, Robert T.; Ryon, Michael G.; Gregory, Scott M.; Stratton, Sally H.; Peterson, Mark J.

    2016-02-22

    Holistic restoration approaches, such as water quality remediation, are likely to meet conservation objectives because they are typically implemented at watershed scales, as opposed to individual stream reaches. However, habitat fragmentation may impose constraints on the ecological effectiveness of holistic restoration strategies by limiting colonization following remediation. We questioned the importance of dispersal limitations to fish community recovery following long-term water quality remediation and species reintroductions across the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). Long-term (26 years) responses in fish species richness and biomass to water quality remediation were evaluated in light of habitat fragmentation andmore » population isolation from instream barriers, which varied in their passage potential. In addition, ordination techniques were used to determine the relative importance of habitat connectivity and water quality, in explaining variation fish communities relative to environmental fluctuations, i.e. streamflow. Ecological recovery (changes in richness) at each site was negatively related to barrier index, a measure of community isolation by barriers relative to stream distance. Following species reintroductions, dispersal by fish species was consistently in the downstream direction and upstream passage above barriers was non-existent. The importance of barrier index in explaining variation in fish communities was stronger during higher flow conditions, but decreased over time an indication of increasing community stability and loss of seasonal migrants. Compared to habitat fragmentation, existing water quality concerns (i.e., outfalls, point source discharges) were unrelated to ecological recovery, but explained relatively high variation in community dynamics. Our results suggest that habitat fragmentation limited the ecological effectiveness of intensive water quality remediation efforts and fish reintroduction efforts by impeding recolonization at isolated stream reaches.« less

  1. Pregnancy Following Uterine Artery Embolization with Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles for Patients with Uterine Fibroid or Adenomyosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Man Deuk Kim, Nahk Keun; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Mee Hwa

    2005-06-15

    Purpose:To determine whether uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles affects fertility in women desiring future pregnancy.Methods:Of 288 patients managed with UFE with PVA particles for uterine myoma or adenomyosis between 1998 and 2001, 94 patients were enrolled in this study. The age range of participants was 20-40 years. The data were collected through review of medical records and telephone interviews. Mean duration of follow-up duration was 35 months (range 22-60 months). Patients using contraception and single women were excluded, and the chance of infertility caused by possible spousal infertility or other factors was disregarded. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed in all patients before and after UFE, and the size of PVA particles used was 255-700 {mu}m.Results:Among 94 patients who underwent UFE with PVA, 74 were on contraceptives, 6 had been single until the point of interview, and 8 were lost to follow-up. Of the remaining 6 patients who desired future pregnancy, 5 (83%) succeeded in becoming pregnant (1 patient became pregnant twice). Of a total of 8 pregnancies, 6 were planned pregnancies and 2 occurred after contraception failed. Five deliveries were vaginal, and 2 were by elective cesarean. Artificial abortion was performed in 1 case of unplanned pregnancy. There was 1 case of premature rupture of membrane (PROM) followed by preterm labor and delivery of an infant who was small-for-gestational-age. After UFE, mean volume reduction rates of the uterus and fibroid were 36.6% (range 0 to 62.6%) and 69.3% (range 36.3% to 93.3%), respectively.Conclusion:Although the absolute number of cases was small, UFE with PVA particles ultimately did not affect fertility in the women who underwent the procedure.

  2. Early Cognitive Outcomes Following Proton Radiation in Pediatric Patients With Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Kuhlthau, Karen A.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a longitudinal study, cognitive outcome in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT) for central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients receiving PRT for medulloblastoma (38.3%), gliomas (18.3%), craniopharyngioma (15.0%), ependymoma (11.7%), and other CNS tumors (16.7%) were administered age-appropriate measures of cognitive abilities at or near PRT initiation (baseline) and afterward (follow-up). Patients were aged ≥6 years at baseline to ensure consistency in neurocognitive measures. Results: Mean age was 12.3 years at baseline; mean follow-up interval was 2.5 years. Treatment included prior surgical resection (76.7%) and chemotherapy (61.7%). Proton radiation therapy included craniospinal irradiation (46.7%) and partial brain radiation (53.3%). At baseline, mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ was 104.6; means of all 4 Index scores were also in the average range. At follow-up, no significant change was observed in mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning/Organization, or Working Memory. However, Processing Speed scores declined significantly (mean 5.2 points), with a significantly greater decline for subjects aged <12 years at baseline and those with the highest baseline scores. Cognitive outcome was not significantly related to gender, extent of radiation, radiation dose, tumor location, histology, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy, or history of surgical resection. Conclusions: Early cognitive outcomes after PRT for pediatric CNS tumors are encouraging, compared with published outcomes from photon radiation therapy.

  3. The hydrogenation of Dy{sub 5}Pd{sub 2} followed by in situ methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohlmann, H.; Talik, E.; Hansen, T.C.

    2012-03-15

    The hydrogenation behavior of the intermetallic compound Dy{sub 5}Pd{sub 2} was investigated by means of ex situ X-ray powder diffraction, in situ neutron powder diffraction and in situ differential scanning calorimetry. The structural model of Dy{sub 5}Pd{sub 2} with a palladium atom at the 32(e) position x, x, x (x Almost-Equal-To 0.22, 7/8 occupation) and a dysprosium atom at almost the same location (x Almost-Equal-To 0.18, 1/8 occupation) is confirmed. Upon heating the latter approaches x(Pd) and at T=399 K both positional parameters are indistinguishable. Dy{sub 5}Pd{sub 2} does not incorporate hydrogen (deuterium) into its crystal structure, however, starting at T=495 K reacts with hydrogen to non stoichiometric dysprosium dideuteride, DyD{sub 2+x}, following a parabolic rate law. In situ differential scanning calorimetry at various hydrogen pressures up to 2.5 MPa shows strongly exothermic signals, whose temperature onset depend on the gas pressure, corresponding to the formation of a mainly ionic hydride (DyH{sub 2+x}). - Graphical abstract: The hydrogenation of Dy5Pd2 is being followed by in situ neutron diffraction. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dy5Pd2 does not form a ternary hydride upon hydrogenation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dy5Pd2 decomposes to binary hydrides of dysprosium and palladium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At T{>=}399 K Dy3 and Pd in the crystal structure of Dy5Pd2 share the same position. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of DyD2+x at T=495 K and p(D2)=2.5 MPa follows a parabolic rate law.

  4. ARPA-E Projects Receive more than $1.25 Billion in Private Follow-on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding for Transformational Energy Technologies: DOE Looks to Mission Innovation to Further Energy R&D as ARPA-E Technologies Continue to Demonstrate Technical and Commercial Impact | Department of Energy ARPA-E Projects Receive more than $1.25 Billion in Private Follow-on Funding for Transformational Energy Technologies: DOE Looks to Mission Innovation to Further Energy R&D as ARPA-E Technologies Continue to Demonstrate Technical and Commercial Impact ARPA-E Projects Receive more

  5. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

  6. Ecosystem Controls on C & N Sequestration Following Afforestation of Agricultural Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.A. Paul, S.J. Morris, R.T. Conant

    2013-03-05

    In our project, we proposed to continue analysis of our available soil samples and data, and to develop new studies to answer the following objectives: Objective 1) Broaden field based studies of ecosystem C and N compartments to enhance current understanding of C and N sequestration and dynamics. Objective 2) Improve our understanding of mechanism controlling C and N stabilization and dynamics. Objective 3) Investigate the interrelated role of soil temperature and organism type and activity as controlling mechanism in SOC dynamics and sequestration.

  7. Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Activities, OAS-M-06-09 | Department of Energy on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery Activities, OAS-M-06-09 Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery Activities, OAS-M-06-09 The mission of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Off-site Recovery Project (OSRP) is to recover unwanted radioactive sealed sources (sources) held in the piblic sector. thereby reducing the threat of the sources being used in radiological dispersal

  8. Laser scattered images observed from carbon plasma stagnation and following molecular formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, K.; Shibata, R.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Sunahara, A.

    2014-06-16

    Two carbon targets were irradiated to create plasma plumes to collide at right angle with two UV laser pulses each other at 10?J/cm{sup 2}/pulse. The collision results in carbon plasma stagnation. Laser scattered imaging indicates that the carbon large molecular formation takes place much later in time after the laser irradiation and stagnation. Compared with the temporal history of electron density (n{sub e}), ion density (n{sub i}), and plasma self-emission dominated by carbon Swan band, it is estimated that the carbon large molecular formation has been initiated with the ion collision followed by the C{sub 2} formation.

  9. Preparation of membranes using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Kevin C.; Letts, Stephan A.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Morse, Jeffrey C.; Buckley, Steven R.; Fischer, Larry E.; Wilson, Keith B.

    2010-07-13

    A system of fabricating a composite membrane from a membrane substrate using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization. A first monomer and a second monomer are directed into a mixing chamber in a deposition chamber. The first monomer and the second monomer are mixed in the mixing chamber providing a mixed first monomer and second monomer. The mixed first monomer and second monomer are solvent-less vapor deposited onto the membrane substrate in the deposition chamber. The membrane substrate and the mixed first monomer and second monomer are heated to produce in-situ polymerization and provide the composite membrane.

  10. Preparation of membranes using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Kevin C.; Letts, Stephan A.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Morse, Jeffrey C.; Buckley, Steven R.; Fischer, Larry E.; Wilson, Keith B.

    2012-01-24

    A system of fabricating a composite membrane from a membrane substrate using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization. A first monomer and a second monomer are directed into a mixing chamber in a deposition chamber. The first monomer and the second monomer are mixed in the mixing chamber providing a mixed first monomer and second monomer. The mixed first monomer and second monomer are solvent-less vapor deposited onto the membrane substrate in the deposition chamber. The membrane substrate and the mixed first monomer and second monomer are heated to produce in-situ polymerization and provide the composite membrane.

  11. Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Kantor, Rose S.; Thomas, Brian C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-03-01

    We explored the impact of the starting community composition and structure on ecosystem response to perturbations using organic carbon amendment experiments. Subsurface sediment was partitioned into flow-through columns, and the microbial communities were initially stimulated in situ by addition of acetate as a carbon and electron donor source. This drove community richness and evenness down, and pushed the system into a new biogeochemical state characterized by iron reduction. Reconstructed near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated a concomitant enrichment of Desulfuromonadales, Comamonadaceae and Bacteroidetes lineages. After 10 to 12 days, acetate was exchange for lactate in a subset of columns. Following the clear onset of sulfate reduction (35 days after acetate-amendment), acetate was substituted for lactate in additional columns. Acetatestimulated communities differed markedly during each biogeochemical regime and at each lactate-switch. Regardless, however, of when communities were switched to lactate, they followed comparable trajectories with respect to composition and structure, with convergence evident one week after each switch, and marked after one month of lactate amendment. During sulfate reduction all treatments were enriched in Firmicutes and a number of species likely involved in sulfate reduction (notably Desulfobulbus, Desulfosporosinus, Desulfitobacterium and Desulfotomaculum). Lactate treatments were distinguished by substantially lower relative abundances of Desulfotomaculum and Bacteroidetes, and enrichments of Psychrosinus and Clostridiales species. Results imply that the structure of the starting community was not significant in controlling organism selection in community succession.

  12. Prediction of number of breached rods following a LBLOCA of Candu plants using a BEPU approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Y. S.; Kim, K.; Seul, K. W.; Woo, S. W.; Han, B. S.

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive doses following design basis accidents (DBA) have been important safety criteria of Candu nuclear power plant and they have been predicted in terms of the number of breached fuel rods. To support the licensing review on this concern, an analysis of LBLOCA has been conducted by using the BEPU method of KINS, KINS-REM. Number of Breached Rods (NBR) following a LBLOCA was predicted at 95 percentile probabilistic upper level in 95 percentile confidence level. Peak Cladding Temperatures (PCT) of the 84 bundles in the core pass 4 were calculated from the 124 MARS code runs in which the uncertainties of 10 major parameters including fuel thermal conductivity and break flow model were implemented. The fuel rod breaching criteria, PCT>1477 K, was used to determine the NBR 95/95. From the calculation, the predicted NBR 95/95 was 1591 rods and the calculated maximum NBR was lower than 2000 rods. Through the further improvements in feedback of the channel power behavior to thermalhydraulic calculation and in channel group modeling, NBR in more reliable level can be expected. (authors)

  13. CONSTRAINING GAMMA-RAY BURST EMISSION PHYSICS WITH EXTENSIVE EARLY-TIME, MULTIBAND FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cucchiara, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Morgan, A.; Perley, D. A.; Li, W.; Butler, N. R.; Filippenko, A. V.; Melandri, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Smith, R. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Steele, I. A.; Hora, J. L.; Da Silva, R. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Worseck, G.; Fumagalli, M.; Cobb, B.; and others

    2011-12-20

    Understanding the origin and diversity of emission processes responsible for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remains a pressing challenge. While prompt and contemporaneous panchromatic observations have the potential to test predictions of the internal-external shock model, extensive multiband imaging has been conducted for only a few GRBs. We present rich, early-time, multiband data sets for two Swift events, GRB 110205A and GRB 110213A. The former shows optical emission since the early stages of the prompt phase, followed by the steep rising in flux up to {approx}1000 s after the burst (t{sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} = -6.13 {+-} 0.75). We discuss this feature in the context of the reverse-shock scenario and interpret the following single power-law decay as being forward-shock dominated. Polarization measurements, obtained with the RINGO2 instrument mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, also provide hints on the nature of the emitting ejecta. The latter event, instead, displays a very peculiar optical to near-infrared light curve, with two achromatic peaks. In this case, while the first peak is probably due to the onset of the afterglow, we interpret the second peak to be produced by newly injected material, signifying a late-time activity of the central engine.

  14. Health status of young children with cancer following discontinuation of therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastore, G.; Zurlo, M.G.; Acquaviva, A.; Calculli, G.; Castello, M.; Ceci, A.; Di Tullio, M.L.; Gandus, S.; Macchia, P.; Di Montezemolo, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports late effects and health status of 198 children who had cancer or leukemia diagnosed under 2 years of age and their therapies electively withdrawn. This series (92 neuroblastoma (NBL), 57 Wilms' tumor (WT), 46 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 3 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) was followed for 1-12 years after discontinuation of therapy. Thirty-three children were diagnosed before 1973, 92 between 1973 and 1977, and 73 after 1977 in 16 Italian Pediatric Oncology Centers. As of December 1983, 176 children were reported to be alive and without evidence of primary cancer by physicians responsible for their care. One child died from a second primary tumor, two from late recurrences of the primary cancer, and three from other causes; eight were alive with evidence of primary cancer; and eight were lost to follow-up. Kyphoscoliosis was found in 22 children and other musculoskeletal anomalies in 8. Neurological sequelae were observed in 8 of 35 children with ALL treated with radiotherapy (RT) and intrathecal methotrexate. All but one were in continuous complete remission when they developed seizures (three cases), leukoencephalopathy (three cases), or intracerebral calcifications (two cases). One child had cardiomyopathy and subsequently died from cardiac failure: he had received doxorubicin (400 mg/m2) and mediastinal RT (13 Gy) for NBL. Growth impairments were observed in children with NBL and WT.

  15. Using high temperature baghouses to enhance desulfurization following economizer sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G.; Keener, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    In order to explore the potential of using high temperature baghouses to enhance SO{sub 2} removal following upstream sorbent injection, an integrated two-stage reactor system has been built. It consists of an injection stage and a filtration stage. Distinct from one-stage fixed-bed reactors, sorbent particles in this system are initially converted under controlled injection conditions before entering the filtration reactor chamber. By the aid of the system, several unique features regarding the gas-solid reactions in the baghouse after economizer zone sorbent injection have been revealed. Results have shown that the appropriate usage of a high temperature baghouse may substantially enhance the performance of the process. The further SO{sub 2} removal in the baghouse is comprehensively affected by both the conditions in the injection zone and those in the baghouse.

  16. DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed tank--1.6 gallons; (c) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--1.6 gallons; (d) Contactor drain tank--0.40 gallons; (e) Strip effluent hold tank--0.33 gallons; (f) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--0.37 gallons; (g) Strip effluent decanter--0.14 gallons; (h) Solvent hold tank--0.30 gallon; and (i) Corrugated piping between contactors--16-21 mL. (5) After the initial vessel draining, flushing the vessels with 100 gallons of water using a spray nozzle that produces complete vessel coverage and draining the flush water reduces the source term by the following amounts: (i) Salt solution receipt tank--63X; (ii) Salt solution feed tank--63X; (iii) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--63X; (iv) Contactor drain tank--250X; (v) Strip effluent hold tank--300X; (vi) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--270X; (vii) Strip effluent decanter--710X; (viii) Solvent hold tank--330X. Understand that these estimates of film thickness are based on laboratory testing and fluid mechanics theory. The calculations assume drainage occurs by film flow. Much of the data used to develop the models came from tests with very ''clean'' fluids. Impurities in the fluids and contaminants on the vessels walls could increase liquid holdup. The application of film thickness models and source term reduction calculations should be considered along with operational conditions and H-Tank Farm/Liquid Waste operating experience. These calculations exclude the PVV/HVAC duct work and piping, as well as other areas that area outside the scope of this report.

  17. SLUDGE BATCH 4 FOLLOW-UP QUALIFICATION STUDIES TO EVALUATE HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Cj Bannochie, C

    2007-08-23

    Follow-up testing was conducted to better understand the excessive hydrogen generation seen in the initial Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) simulation in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. This effort included both radioactive and simulant work. The initial SB4 qualification test produced 0.59 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SRAT, which was just below the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lbs/hr, and the test produced over 0.5 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SME cycle on two separate occasions, which were over the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lbs/hr.

  18. Following the dynamics of matter with femtosecond precision using the X-ray streaking method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    David, C.; Karvinen, P.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Vartiainen, I.; Milne, C. J.; Mozzanica, A.; Kayser, Y.; Diaz, A.; Mohacsi, I.; et al

    2015-01-06

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) can produce extremely intense and very short pulses, down to below 10 femtoseconds (fs). Among the key applications are ultrafast time-resolved studies of dynamics of matter by observing responses to fast excitation pulses in a pump-probe manner. Detectors with sufficient time resolution for observing these processes are not available. Therefore, such experiments typically measure a sample's full dynamics by repeating multiple pump-probe cycles at different delay times. This conventional method assumes that the sample returns to an identical or very similar state after each cycle. Here we describe a novel approach that can provide amore » time trace of responses following a single excitation pulse, jitter-free, with fs timing precision. We demonstrate, in an X-ray diffraction experiment, how it can be applied to the investigation of ultrafast irreversible processes.« less

  19. Following the dynamics of matter with femtosecond precision using the X-ray streaking method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, C.; Karvinen, P.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Vartiainen, I.; Milne, C. J.; Mozzanica, A.; Kayser, Y.; Diaz, A.; Mohacsi, I.; Carini, G. A.; Herrmann, S.; Färm, E.; Ritala, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Robert, A.

    2015-01-06

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) can produce extremely intense and very short pulses, down to below 10 femtoseconds (fs). Among the key applications are ultrafast time-resolved studies of dynamics of matter by observing responses to fast excitation pulses in a pump-probe manner. Detectors with sufficient time resolution for observing these processes are not available. Therefore, such experiments typically measure a sample's full dynamics by repeating multiple pump-probe cycles at different delay times. This conventional method assumes that the sample returns to an identical or very similar state after each cycle. Here we describe a novel approach that can provide a time trace of responses following a single excitation pulse, jitter-free, with fs timing precision. We demonstrate, in an X-ray diffraction experiment, how it can be applied to the investigation of ultrafast irreversible processes.

  20. Dispersion of CNG following a high-pressure release. Final report, February 1995-March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaumer, R.L.; Raj, P.K.

    1996-05-01

    The research described in the report was designed to evaluate the adequacy of the current convention concerning safeguards against CNG-related fires in transit buildings where CNG powered buses are fueled, stored, or maintained. The convention embraces the belief that precautions need to be taken only at or near the ceiling of the buildings. It is based on the premise that, since CNG is primarily methane and methane is approximately one-half the density of air at ambient temperature and pressure, any natural gas released would immediately rise to the ceiling as a buoyant plume. The experiments described here tested theoretical predictions that challenge this premise. During the tests, infrared imaging was used to track the movement of CNG following release from a high-pressure source close to the floor.

  1. In-Well Sediment Incubators to Evaluate Microbial Community Stability and Dynamics following Bioimmobilization of Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Brett R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Gan, M.; Resch, Charles T.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Smithgall, A. N.; Pfiffner, S.; Freifeld, Barry M.; White, D. C.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-09-23

    An in-situ incubation device (ISI) was developed in order to investigate the stability and dynamics of sediment associated microbial communities to prevailing subsurface oxidizing or reducing conditions. Here we describe the use of these devices at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site. During the 7 month deployment oxidized Rifle aquifer background sediments (RABS) were deployed in previously biostimulated wells under iron reducing conditions, cell densities of known iron reducing bacteria including Geobacteraceae increased significantly showing the microbial community response to local subsurface conditions. PLFA profiles of RABS following in situ deployment were strikingly similar to those of adjacent sediment cores suggesting ISI results could be extrapolated to the native material of the test plots. Results for ISI deployed reduced sediments showed only slight changes in community composition and pointed toward the ability of the ISIs to monitor microbial community stability and response to subsurface conditions.

  2. Random Forests to Predict Rectal Toxicity Following Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ospina, Juan D.; Zhu, Jian; Chira, Ciprian; Bossi, Alberto; Delobel, Jean B.; Beckendorf, Véronique; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Correa, Juan C.; and others

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To propose a random forest normal tissue complication probability (RF-NTCP) model to predict late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiation therapy, and to compare its performance to that of classic NTCP models. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were collected from 261 patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer with at least 5 years of follow-up. The series was split 1000 times into training and validation cohorts. A RF was trained to predict the risk of 5-year overall rectal toxicity and bleeding. Parameters of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model were identified and a logistic regression model was fit. The performance of all the models was assessed by computing the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The 5-year grade ≥2 overall rectal toxicity and grade ≥1 and grade ≥2 rectal bleeding rates were 16%, 25%, and 10%, respectively. Predictive capabilities were obtained using the RF-NTCP model for all 3 toxicity endpoints, including both the training and validation cohorts. The age and use of anticoagulants were found to be predictors of rectal bleeding. The AUC for RF-NTCP ranged from 0.66 to 0.76, depending on the toxicity endpoint. The AUC values for the LKB-NTCP were statistically significantly inferior, ranging from 0.62 to 0.69. Conclusions: The RF-NTCP model may be a useful new tool in predicting late rectal toxicity, including variables other than DVH, and thus appears as a strong competitor to classic NTCP models.

  3. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  4. Exclusive Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Nonmetastatic Inflammatory Breast Cancer: 20 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourgier, Celine; Pessoa, Eduardo Lima; Dunant, Ariane; Heymann, Steve; Spielmann, Marc; Uzan, Catherine; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Arriagada, Rodrigo; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2012-02-01

    Background: Locoregional treatment of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is crucial because local relapses may be highly symptomatic and are commonly associated with distant metastasis. With a median follow-up of 20 years, we report here the long-term results of a monocentric clinical trial combining primary chemotherapy (CT) with a schedule of anthracycline-based CT and an alternating split-course of radiotherapy (RT Asterisk-Operator CT) without mastectomy. Methods and Materials: From September 1983 to December 1989, 124 women with nonmetastatic IBC (T4d M0) were treated with three cycles of primary AVCMF chemotherapy (anthracycline, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and then an alternating RT Asterisk-Operator CT schedule followed by three cycles of FAC. Hormonal therapy was systematically administered: ovarian irradiation (12 Gy in four fractions) or tamoxifen 20 mg daily. Results: Local control was achieved in 82% of patients. The 10- and 20-year local relapse rates were 26% and 33%, respectively, but only 10% of locally controlled cases were not associated with concurrent distant metastasis. The 10- and 20-year overall survival rates were 39% and 19%, respectively. Severe fibrosis occurred in 54% of patients, grade 3 brachial plexus neuropathy in 4%, grade 2 pneumonitis in 9%. Grade 1, 2 and 3 cardiac toxicity was observed in 3.8%, 3.8% and 1.2% of cases respectively. Conclusions: This combined regimen allowed good long-term local control without surgery. Survival rates were similar to those obtained with conventional regimens (primary chemotherapy, total mastectomy, and adjuvant radiotherapy). Since IBC continues to be an entity with a dismal prognosis, this approach, safely combining preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy and systemic treatments, should be reassessed when suitable targeted agents are available.

  5. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutronmore » irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.« less

  6. Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant May 2011 June 2014 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Independent Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction

  7. Lung autophagic response following exposure of mice to whole body irradiation, with and without amifostine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zois, Christos E.; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Kainulainen, Heikki; Botaitis, Sotirios; Torvinen, Sira; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Sivridis, Efthimios; Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} We investigated the effect 6 Gy of WBI on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. {yields} Irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. {yields} The membrane bound LC3A-II protein levels increased in the cytosolic fraction (not in the pellet), contrasting the patterns noted after starvation-induced autophagy. {yields} Administration of amifostine, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings, suggesting protection of the normal autophagic function. -- Abstract: Purpose: The effect of ionizing irradiation on the autophagic response of normal tissues is largely unexplored. Abnormal autophagic function may interfere the protein quality control leading to cell degeneration and dysfunction. This study investigates its effect on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. Methods and materials: Mice were exposed to 6 Gy of whole body {gamma}-radiation and sacrificed at various time points. The expression of MAP1LC3A/LC3A/Atg8, beclin-1, p62/sequestosome-1 and of the Bnip3 proteins was analyzed. Results: Following irradiation, the LC3A-I and LC3A-II protein levels increased significantly at 72 h and 7 days. Strikingly, LC3A-II protein was increased (5.6-fold at 7 days; p < 0.001) only in the cytosolic fraction, but remained unchanged in the membrane fraction. The p62 protein, was significantly increased in both supernatant and pellet fraction (p < 0.001), suggesting an autophagosome turnover deregulation. These findings contrast the patterns of starvation-induced autophagy up-regulation. Beclin-1 levels remained unchanged. The Bnip3 protein was significantly increased at 8 h, but it sharply decreased at 72 h (p < 0.05). Administration of amifostine (200 mg/kg), 30 min before irradiation, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings on blots, suggesting restoration of the normal autophagic function. The LC3A and Beclin1 mRNA levels significantly declined following irradiation (p < 0.01), whereas Bnip3 levels increased. Conclusions: It is suggested that irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. Whether this is due to defective maturation or to aberrant degradation of the autophagosomes requires further investigation.

  8. Risk management of undesirable substances in feed following updated risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verstraete, Frans

    2013-08-01

    Directive 2002/32/EC of 7 May 2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council on undesirable substances in animal feed is the framework for the EU action on undesirable substances in feed. This framework Directive provides: ?that products intended for animal feed may enter for use in the Union from third countries, be put into circulation and/or used in the Union only if they are sound, genuine and of merchantable quality and therefore when correctly used do not represent any danger to human health, animal health or to the environment or could adversely affect livestock production. ?that in order to protect animal and public health and the environment, maximum levels for specific undesirable substances shall be established where necessary. ?for mandatory consultation of a scientific body (EFSA) for all provisions which may have an effect upon public health or animal health or on the environment. ?that products intended for animal feed containing levels of an undesirable substance that exceed the established maximum level may not be mixed for dilution purposes with the same, or other, products intended for animal feed and may not be used for the production of compound feed. Based on the provisions and principles laid down in this framework Directive, maximum levels for a whole range of undesirable substances have been established at EU level. During the discussions in view of the adoption of Directive 2002/32/EC, the European Commission made the commitment to review all existing provisions on undesirable substances on the basis of updated scientific risk assessments. Following requests of the European Commission, the Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has completed a series of 30 risk assessments undertaken over the last 5 years on undesirable substances in animal feed reviewing the possible risks for animal and human health due to the presence of these substances in animal feed. EU legislation on undesirable substances has undergone recently several changes to take account of these most recent scientific opinions. Furthermore EFSA has assessed the risks for public and animal health following the unavoidable carry-over of coccidiostats into non target feed. Maximum levels for the unavoidable carry-over have been established for the non-target feed and the food of animal origin from non-target animal species.

  9. Failure analysis of beryllium tile assembles following high heat flux testing for the ITER program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. C. Odegard, Jr.; C. H. Cadden; N. Y. C. Yang

    2000-05-01

    The following document describes the processing, testing and post-test analysis of two Be-Cu assemblies that have successfully met the heat load requirements for the first wall and dome sections for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) fusion reactor. Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology investigation aimed at diffusion bonding or brazing a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Judicious selection of materials and coatings for these assemblies was essential to eliminate or minimize interactions with the highly reactive beryllium armor material. A thin titanium layer was used as a diffusion barrier to isolate the copper heat sink from the beryllium armor. To reduce residual stresses produced by differences in the expansion coefficients between the beryllium and copper, a compliant layer of aluminum or aluminum-beryllium (AlBeMet-150) was used. Aluminum was chosen because it does not chemically react with, and exhibits limited volubility in, beryllium. Two bonding processes were used to produce the assemblies. The primary process was a diffusion bonding technique. In this case, undesirable metallurgical reactions were minimized by keeping the materials in a solid state throughout the fabrication cycle. The other process employed an aluminum-silicon layer as a brazing filler material. In both cases, a hot isostatic press (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with vacuum-canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and provide sufficient pressure on the assemblies for full metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. The two final assemblies were subjected to a suite of tests including: tensile tests and electron and optical metallography. Finally, high heat flux testing was conducted at the electron beam testing system (EBTS) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. Here, test mockups were fabricated and subjected to normal heat loads to 10 MW/m{sup 2} (3 Hz) and abnormal heat loads to 250 MJ/m{sup 2} (0.5s) to determine their performance under simulated fusion reactor conditions for first wall components. Both assemblies survived the normal heat loads with no visual damage. Optical and electron microscopy were used to evaluate the extent of the damage at the interfaces following the VDE simulations.

  10. A Perspective on Long-Term Recovery Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 12075

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.

    2012-07-01

    The tragic events at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station began occurring on March 11, 2011, following Japan's unprecedented earthquake and tsunami. The subsequent loss of external power and on-site cooling capacity severely compromised the plant's safety systems, and subsequently, led to core melt in the affected reactors and damage to spent nuclear fuel in the storage pools. Together with hydrogen explosions, this resulted in a substantial release of radioactive material to the environment (mostly Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137), prompting an extensive evacuation effort. The latest release estimate places the event at the highest severity level (Level 7) on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the same as the Chernobyl accident of 1986. As the utility owner endeavored to stabilize the damaged facility, environmental contamination continued to propagate and affect every aspect of daily life in the affected region of Japan. Elevated levels of radioactivity (mostly dominated by Cs-137 with the passage of time) were found in soil, drinking water, vegetation, produce, seafood, and other foodstuffs. An estimated 80,000 to 90,000 people were evacuated; more evacuations are being contemplated months after the accident, and a vast amount of land has become contaminated. Early actions were taken to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated food and drinking water, followed by later actions to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated beef, mushrooms, and seafood. As the event continues to evolve toward stabilization, the long-term recovery effort needs to commence - a process that doubtless will involve rather complex decision-making interactions between various stakeholders. Key issues that may be encountered and considered in such a process include (1) socio-political factors, (2) local economic considerations, (3) land use options, (4) remediation approaches, (5) decontamination methods, (6) radioactive waste management, (7) cleanup levels and options, and (8) government policies, among others. This paper offers a perspective on this likely long and arduous journey toward establishing a 'new normal' that will ultimately take shape. Toward this end, it is important to evaluate the 'optimization' process advocated by the international community in achieving long-term recovery from this particularly fateful event in Fukushima. In the process, experience and lessons learned from past events will be fully evaluated and considered. (author)

  11. Berkeley Lab Joins DOE's New HPC4Manufacturing Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At the 2015 ACME summit: From left, Horst Simon (LBNL), Trish Damkroger (LLNL), John Turner (ORNL), Peg Folta (LLNL), David Skinner (LBNL), Dona Crawford (LLNL), Jeff Roberts...

  12. Immunocompetence of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Against Listonella anguillarum Following Dietary Exposure to Aroclor (R) 1254

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, David B.; Palm, Roger C.; Skillman, Ann D. ); Godtfredsen, Kathy

    2003-02-01

    Controlled laboratory challenges with pathogenic Listonella (formerly Vibrio) anguillarum bacteria were used to examine potential effects of dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on the growth and immunocompetence of juvenile Puget Sound (WA, USA) Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha). Salmon were fed four levels of the PCB congener mixture Aroclort 1254 for 28 d to bracket likely exposure to PCBs in the lower Duwamish waterway near Seattle, Washington, USA. Fish were transferred to five replicate tanks per dose, exposed to L. anguillarum, and monitored for 14 d. Half the PCB-dosed fish were vaccinated against L. anguillarum, and specific immunity was allowed to develop in this group for three weeks prior to challenge. All mortalities following challenge were individually sampled for bacteria to identify the cause of death. The data indicate that dietary PCB exposure, even at relatively high levels, did not have a significant effect on growth, innate disease resistance, or acquired immunity to L. anguillarum. The controlled laboratory experiments in this study suggest that the immune system of Chinook salmon is not sensitive to orally delivered PCBs at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  13. Large Hybrid Energy Systems for Making Low CO2 Load-Following Power and Synthetic Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cherry; Richard D. Boardman; Steven Aumeier

    2012-02-01

    Hybrid energy systems using nuclear heat sources can economically produce load-following electrical power by exploiting the surplus generation capacity available at night or seasonally to make synthetic fuel. Vehicle fuel is the only current energy use large enough to absorb all the energy capacity that might be diverted from the power industry, and its ease of storage obviates problems with discontinuous synfuel production. The potential benefits and challenges of synfuels integration are illustrated by the production of methanol from natural gas (as a source of carbon) using steam from a light water nuclear power reactor which is assumed to be available in accord with a year's worth of power demand data. Methanol's synthesis process is easily adapted to using 300 C heat from a light water reactor and this simple compound can be further processed into gasoline, biodiesel, or dimethyl ether, fuels which can be used with the current vehicle fleet. A supplemental feed to the methanol process of natural gas (for energy) allows operation at constant full rate when the nuclear heat is being used to produce electrical power. The higher capital costs of such a system are offset by a lower cost of heat and power production from a large base load type of plant and by reduced costs associated with much lower CO2 emissions. Other less tangible economic benefits of this and similar hybrid systems include better use of natural resource for fuels and greater energy services security from the domestic production of vehicle fuel.

  14. Dopant profile modeling by rare event enhanced domain-following molecular dynamics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beardmore, Keith M.; Jensen, Niels G.

    2002-01-01

    A computer-implemented molecular dynamics-based process simulates a distribution of ions implanted in a semiconductor substrate. The properties of the semiconductor substrate and ion dose to be simulated are first initialized, including an initial set of splitting depths that contain an equal number of virtual ions implanted in each substrate volume determined by the splitting depths. A first ion with selected velocity is input onto an impact position of the substrate that defines a first domain for the first ion during a first timestep, where the first domain includes only those atoms of the substrate that exert a force on the ion. A first position and velocity of the first ion is determined after the first timestep and a second domain of the first ion is formed at the first position. The first ion is split into first and second virtual ions if the first ion has passed through a splitting interval. The process then follows each virtual ion until all of the virtual ions have come to rest. A new ion is input to the surface and the process repeats until all of the ion dose has been input. The resulting ion rest positions form the simulated implant distribution.

  15. The Prince William Sound herring fishery following the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hose, J.E.; Brown, E.; Marty, G.D.; McGurk, M.D.; Norcross, B.L.; Short, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Exxon Valdez oil (EVO) spill of 1989 occurred a few weeks before herring spawned in Prince William Sound (PWS), AK. An estimated 40% to 50% of the egg biomass sustained exposure during early development, and the majority of pelagic larvae were collected within the oil trajectory path. Sublethal effects observed at hatch (morphologic defects and genetic damage) were related to ambient EVO concentrations. Reduced survival rates, decreased growth, genetic damage and histopathological changes were measured in pelagic larvae from oiled areas. However, because the 1989 year class is one of the smallest cohorts now in PWS, population effects are difficult to assess. From 1990 to 1992, population abundance and reproductive potential remained high. When the 1989 year class was fully recruited (1993--1994), the spawning population decreased by 50% to 75% of the expected abundance. Many of the surviving fish were infected with viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) and failed to spawn. Proposed causes for the VHS epizootic include previous oil exposure, density-dependent effects following the 1989 fishery closure, and reduced food availability from 1990 to 1994.

  16. DESAlert: Enabling real-time transient follow-up with Dark Energy Survey data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poci, A.

    2015-04-12

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is currently undertaking an observational program imaging 1/4 of the southern hemisphere sky with unprecedented photometric accuracy. In the process of observing millions of faint stars and galaxies to constrain the parameters of the dark energy equation of state, the DES will obtain pre-discovery images of the regions surrounding an estimated 100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) over five years. Once GRBs are detected by, e.g., the Swift satellite, the DES data will be extremely useful for follow-up observations by the transient astronomy community. We describe a recently-commissioned suite of software that listens continuously for automated notices of GRB activity, collates useful information from archival DES data, and promulgates relevant data products back to the community in near-real-time. Of particular importance are the opportunities that DES data provide for relative photometry of GRBs or their afterglows, as well as for identifying key characteristics (e.g., photometric redshifts) of potential GRB host galaxies. We provide the functional details of the DESAlert software as it presently operates, as well as the data products that it produces, and we show sample results from the application of DESAlert to several previously-detected GRBs.

  17. Decontamination and Management of Human Remains Following Incidents of Hazardous Chemical Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauschild, Veronique; Watson, Annetta Paule; Bock, Robert Eldon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide specific procedural guidance and resources for identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of compounds that may contaminate human remains resulting from chemical attack or release. Design: A detailed technical, policy, and regulatory review is summarized. Setting: Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present. Settings would include sites of transportation accidents, natural disasters, terrorist or military operations, mortuary affairs or medical examiner processing and decontamination points, and similar. Patients, Participants: While recommended procedures have not been validated with actual human remains, guidance has been developed from data characterizing controlled experiments with fabrics, materiel, and laboratory animals. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presentation of logic and specific procedures for remains management, protection and decontamination of mortuary affairs personnel, as well as decision criteria for determining when remains are sufficiently decontaminated so as to pose no chemical health hazard. Results: Established procedures and existing equipment/materiel available for decontamination and verification provide appropriate and reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from remains. Extensive characterization of issues related to remains decontamination indicates that supra-lethal concentrations of liquid chemical warfare agent VX may prove difficult to decontaminate and verify in a timely fashion. Specialized personnel can and should be called upon to assist with monitoring necessary to clear decontaminated remains for transport and processing. Conclusions: Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for remains processing and transport to the decedent s family and the continental United States can be followed.

  18. A rigorous treatment of a follow-the-leader traffic model with traffic lights present

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argall, Brenna; Cheleshkin, Eugene; Greenberg, J.M.; Hinde, Colin; Lin, Pei-Jen

    2003-07-16

    Traffic flow on a unidirectional roadway in the presence of traffic lights is modeled. Individual car responses to green, yellow, and red lights are postulated and these result in rules governing the acceleration and deceleration of individual cars. The essence of the model is that only specific cars are directly affected by the lights. The other cars behave according to simple follow-the-leader rules which limit their speed by the spacing between it and the car directly ahead. The model has a number of desirable properties; namely cars do not run red lights, cars do not smash into one another, and cars exhibit no velocity reversals. In a situation with multiple lights operating in-phase we get, after an initial startup period, a constant number of cars through each light during any green-yellow period. Moreover, this flux is less by one or two cars per period than the flux obtained in discretized versions of the idealized Lighthill, Whitham, Richards model which allows for infinite accelerations.

  19. Snag characteristics and dynamics following natural and artificially induced mortality in a managed loblolly pine forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarnoch, Stanley J.; Vukovich, Mark A.; Kilgo, John C.; Blake, John I.

    2013-06-10

    A 14-year study of snag characteristics was established in 41- to 44-year old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands in southeastern USA. During the initial 5.5 years, no stand manipulation or unusually high-mortality events occurred. Afterwards, three treatments were applied consisting of trees thinned and removed, trees felled and not removed, and artificial creation of snags produced by girdling and herbicide injection. The thinned treatments were designed to maintain the same live canopy density as the snag-created treatment, disregarding snags that remained standing.We monitored snag height, diameter, density, volume, and bark percentage; the number of cavities was monitored in natural snags only. During the first 5.5 years, recruitment and loss rates were stable, resulting in a stable snag population. Large snags (?25 cm diameter) were common, but subcanopy small snags (10 to <25 cm diameter) dominated numerically. Large natural snags survived (90% quantile) significantly longer (6.09.4 years) than smaller snags (4.46.9 years). Large artificial snags persisted the longest (11.8 years). Cavities in natural snags developed within 3 years following tree death. The mean number of cavities per snag was five times greater in large versus small snags and large snags were more likely to have multiple cavities, emphasizing the importance of mature pine stands for cavity-dependent wildlife species.

  20. Sedimentation pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH blowout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Gregg R.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Schwing, Patrick T.; Romero, Isabel; Moore, Christopher; Reichart, Gert -Jan; Jilbert, Tom; Chanton, Jeff P.; Hastings, David W.; Overholt, Will A.; Marks, Kala P.; Kostka, Joel E.; Holmes, Charles W.; Hollander, David; Chin, Wei -Chun

    2015-07-14

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess 234Th depths, which indicates a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation), suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4–5 month period. In addition, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess 234Th depths, accumulation rates, and 234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.

  1. Petroleum prices and profits in the 90 days following the invasion of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    For the third in the past 20 years the world has experienced an interruption in the flow of oil from the Persian Gulf. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and shut down of Kuwait oil production capacity followed by the United Nations boycott of Iraqi oil removed 8 percent of the world's oil supply. The result was a sharp increase in the process of crude oil and petroleum products. These events raised numerous questions about the performance of energy markets and energy firms. This report supplies a first answer for some of those questions. At the time this report was prepared the invasion has been in effect for 90 days. Not all the data is available to fully answer every question. Some issues can only be completely resolved after more time has passed in which the invasion and its effects have had an opportunity to be fully assimilated. This report was specifically requested by W. Henson Moore, Deputy Secretary of Energy as a way of supplying the American public with what could be said about the current situation. Rumors abound and mixconceptions have proliferated. This report strives to give a proper perspective on some of the more vexing issues which the invasion produced. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has addressed many questions in this report. By the way of summary these are the 10 most most frequently asked questions and EIA's quick answers. The page references tell the reader where to look in the report for further explanation. These are not the only issues addressed and EIA hopes that readers will be able to satisfy their curiosity about their own questions within the pages of this report.

  2. Sex-based differences in gene expression in hippocampus following postnatal lead exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.S. Anderson, D.W.; Sonnenahalli, H.; Vadigepalli, R.

    2011-10-15

    The influence of sex as an effect modifier of childhood lead poisoning has received little systematic attention. Considering the paucity of information available concerning the interactive effects of lead and sex on the brain, the current study examined the interactive effects of lead and sex on gene expression patterns in the hippocampus, a structure involved in learning and memory. Male or female rats were fed either 1500 ppm lead-containing chow or control chow for 30 days beginning at weaning.Blood lead levels were 26.7 {+-} 2.1 {mu}g/dl and 27.1 {+-} 1.7 {mu}g/dl for females and males, respectively. The expression of 175 unique genes was differentially regulated between control male and female rats. A total of 167 unique genes were differentially expressed in response to lead in either males or females. Lead exposure had a significant effect without a significant difference between male and female responses in 77 of these genes. In another set of 71 genes, there were significant differences in male vs. female response. A third set of 30 genes was differentially expressed in opposite directions in males vs. females, with the majority of genes expressed at a lower level in females than in males. Highly differentially expressed genes in males and females following lead exposure were associated with diverse biological pathways and functions. These results show that a brief exposure to lead produced significant changes in expression of a variety of genes in the hippocampus and that the response of the brain to a given lead exposure may vary depending on sex. - Highlights: > Postnatal lead exposure has a significant effect on hippocampal gene expression patterns. > At least one set of genes was affected in opposite directions in males and females. > Differentially expressed genes were associated with diverse biological pathways.

  3. Mitigation Measures Following a Loss-of-Residual-Heat-Removal Event During Shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seul, Kwang Won; Bang, Young Seok; Kim, Hho Jung

    2000-10-15

    The transient following a loss-of-residual-heat-removal event during shutdown was analyzed to determine the containment closure time (CCT) to prevent uncontrolled release of fission products and the gravity-injection path and rate (GIPR) for effective core cooling using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code. The plant conditions of Yonggwang Units 3 and 4, a pressurized water reactor (PWR) of 2815-MW(thermal) power in Korea, were reviewed, and possible event sequences were identified. From the CCT analysis for the five cases of typical plant configurations, it was estimated for the earliest CCT to be 40 min after the event in a case with a large cold-leg opening and emptied steam generators (SGs). However, the case with water-filled SGs significantly delayed the CCT through the heat removal to the secondary side. From the GIPR analysis for the six possible gravity-injection paths from the refueling water storage tank (RWST), the case with the injection point and opening on the other leg side was estimated to be the most suitable path to avoid core boiling. In addition, from the sensitivity study, it was evaluated for the plant to be capable of providing the core cooling for the long-term transient if nominal RWST water is available. As a result, these analysis methods and results will provide useful information in understanding the plant behavior and preparing the mitigation measures after the event, especially for Combustion Engineering-type PWR plants. However, to directly apply the analysis results to the emergency procedure for such an event, additional case studies are needed for a wide range of operating conditions such as reactor coolant inventory, RWST water temperature, and core decay heat rate.

  4. Compensatory Feeding Following a Predator Removal Program : Detection and Mechanisms, 1982-1996 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, James H.

    2002-02-28

    Predator removal is one of the oldest management tools in existence, with evidence that ancient Greeks used a bounty reward for wolves over 3,000 years ago (Anonymous 1964). Efforts to control predators on fish have been documented in scientific journals for at least 60 years (Eschmeyer 1937; Lagler 1939; Foerster and Ricker 1941; Smith and Swingle 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959), and has likely been attempted for much longer. Complete eradication of a target species from a body of water has rarely been the objective of predator removal programs, which instead have attempted to eliminate predators from specific areas, to reduce the density or standing stock of predators, or to kill the largest individuals in the population (Meronek et al. 1996). In evaluating management programs that remove only part of a predator population, the compensatory response(s) of the remaining predators must be considered. Some potential compensatory responses by remaining individuals include increased reproductive output, increased growth rate, or increased consumption of certain prey species (Jude et al. 1987). If compensation by predators that remain in the system following a removal effort occurs, it may reduce the effectiveness of the predator control program. Northern pike-minnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis (formerly called northern squawfish) consume juvenile salmon in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs in British Columbia, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and California. Northern pikeminnow have been estimated to consume about 11% of all juvenile salmon that migrate through John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River (Rieman et al. 1991). Modeling studies suggested that removal of 20% of the northern pikeminnow population in John Day Reservoir would result in a 50% decrease in predation-related mortality of juvenile salmon migrating through this reach (Beamesderfer et al. 1991). Since the early 1940's, other programs have been implemented to remove northern pikeminnow, with hopes of improving the survival of juvenile salmon (Ricker 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959).

  5. Sedimentation pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH blowout

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brooks, Gregg R.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Schwing, Patrick T.; Romero, Isabel; Moore, Christopher; Reichart, Gert -Jan; Jilbert, Tom; Chanton, Jeff P.; Hastings, David W.; Overholt, Will A.; et al

    2015-07-14

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess 234Th depths, which indicatesmore » a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation), suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4–5 month period. In addition, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess 234Th depths, accumulation rates, and 234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.« less

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Large Renal Angiomyolipoma: Median-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, S. M. Anderson, C. J.; Patel, U.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To study the feasibility of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of large angiomyolipomas (AMLs) using saline-cooled electrodes. Materials and Methods. Institutional Review Board approval for the study was received. Four patients (all female, age range 33-67 years) with large AMLs (maximal axis 6.1-32.4 cm) not suitable for embolotherapy or surgery consented to a trial of RFA. Procedures were performed under computerized tomographic guidance using 14G saline-infused electrodes. Two ablations (diameter 4-7 cm) were undertaken in each patient. Variables studied were technical success, treatment safety, alteration of tumor consistency, tumor size, effect on renal function, and medium-term freedom from haemorrhage. Results. All four patients underwent successful RFA without any intraprocedural complications. There has been no haemorrhage, or new renal specific symptom, during a minimum 48-month period, and normal renal function has been normal. On follow-up radiological imaging, the tumors have become fattier with involution of the soft-tissue elements (soft tissue-to-total tumor ratio decreased mean [range] of 0.26 [0.14-0.48] to 0.17 [0.04-0.34] U; p = 0.04 [paired Student t test]). Further evidence of treatment effect was the development of a capsule around the ablation zone, but there was no change in overall tumor volume (mean [range] 1,120 [118-2,845] to 1150 [90-3,013] ml; p = 1 [paired Student t test]). Conclusion. RFA of large AMLs is technically feasible using saline-infused electrodes. The soft-tissue elements decreased in volume; the tumors become fattier; and there has been no renal haemorrhage during a 48-month period.

  7. Early recovery of a Hawaiian lowland rainforest following clearcutting at Kalapana on the Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    The recovery of lowland rainforest vegetation on the Island of Hawaii was evaluated 2 years after clearcutting. Rainforest quality was assessed with regeneration success associated with the environmental changes. Sixty-three percent of the 57 vascular species in the forest were native to the Hawaiian rainforest. Phanerophytes were the most important life form. The presence of Psidium cattleianum and other alien species demonstrated disturbances had occurred in selected areas prior to the clearcutting. Two years after clearcutting (1987), only 24% of the 101 species coming into the clearcut area were native. The shrubs, micro- and nano-phanerophyte, were the dominant life forms, represented by Pipturus albidus, a native rainforest shrub or tree, and four non-native shrub species. Metrosideros polymorpha, the dominant tree in the native forest, was successfully regenerating from seed across the clear-cut area. The forest seedbank analysis also demonstrated that Metrosideros, along with the seeds of important exotic species colonizing the clearcut area were presented in the forest soils. The forest and clearcut species had a high rate of correlation with the elevation gradient. The underlying lava flows strong influenced past and present vegetation associations. In the clearcut area, the degree of compaction and distance from the forest were critical factors determining the composition of recovering vegetation. The microclimate variables of soils, significantly altered due to the effects of clearcutting, and competition from weeds probably lead to poor germination and growth of native rainforest species. This native forest is not pristine, but unique in stature, in complex of cohort stands, and in position on the landscape. It is extremely prone to species composition shift following perturbation, due to the presence of the weed seedbank in the forest seedbank as demonstrated in the dominance of these species across the clearcut area.

  8. New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical

  9. Follow-up Inspection on Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National Laboratory, INS-O-13-04

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Follow-up Inspection on Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National Laboratory INS-O-13-04 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 18, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING MANAGER, LOS ALAMOS FIELD OFFICE, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Follow-up Inspection on Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National

  10. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Letourneau, Daniel; Yu, Eugene; Cho, B.C. John; Lee, Young K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. Methods and Materials: From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (P<.01). No radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or cases of myelopathy were observed. Conclusion: A second course of spine SBRT, most often with 30 Gy in 4 fractions, for spinal metastases that failed initial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option.

  11. Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

  12. Implementation of the Port Hope Area Initiative Biophysical and Socioeconomic Environmental Assessment Follow-up Programs - 13209

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baba, Nina; Friedmann, Karyn; Groulx, Charles

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Initiative (PHAI) involves the cleanup of historic low-level radioactive waste in various locations throughout the communities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, as well as the construction of two engineered aboveground mounds for safe long-term management. The PHAI is comprised of two major projects - the Port Hope Project and the Port Granby Project. An Environmental Assessment (EA) was undertaken for each project and as a result EA Follow-up Programs were developed and are being implemented addressing both biophysical and socioeconomic aspects. This paper provides insight on elements of the EA Follow-up Program development, and its implementation. (authors)

  13. Rising Above the Water: New Orleans Implements Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Practices Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes the technical assistance that the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory, provided to New Orleans, Louisiana, which helped the city incorporate energy efficiency into its rebuilding efforts for K-12 schools and homes following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. NREL also provided support and analysis on energy policy efforts.

  14. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel® Xeon Phi(tm), Intel® Xeon® Processor are tradema

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Threading Workshop TCG Micro SSG DPD NERSC, March 2015 © 2015 Intel Corporation Outline 2 Part 1 § Introduction § Review of hardware & parallel programming models § NERSC NECAP § Principles of High Performance Parallel Programming (HPPP) § EMGeo: basic § EMGeo: intermediate Part 2 § Know MIC and programming model § Multi-level parallelism: Nested OpenMP Part 3 § PARSEC § EMGeo: advanced § Conclusions © 2015 Intel Corporation About the

  15. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel® Xeon Phi(tm), Intel® Xeon® Processor are tradema

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploiting multi-level parallelism in HPC applications Jeongnim Kim & TCG Micro March, 2015 © 2015 Intel Corporation Node Configuration / Compilers / Runtime 2 Endeavor† cluster § CPU: 2-socket/14 cores/56 threads - Processor: Intel® Xeon® processor E5-2697 V3 @ 2.60GHz (14 cores) with Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology 4 - Memory: 64GB § Coprocessor: Intel® Xeon Phi(tm) coprocessor 7120P - 61 cores @ 1.238 GHz, 4-way Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology, Memory: 15872 MB -

  16. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel® Xeon Phi(tm), Intel® Xeon® Processor are tradema

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PARSEC and EMGeo TCG Micro SSG DPD NERSC Threading Workshop, March 2015 © 2015 Intel Corporation PARSEC: except for Dev2 2 © 2015 Intel Corporation Know PARSEC 3 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PARSEC PARSEC is a package designed to perform electronic structure calculations of solids and molecules using density functional theory (DFT). The acronym stands for Pseudopotential Algorithm for Real-Space Electronic Calculations. It solves the Kohn- Sham equations in real space, without the use of

  17. RAPID, MACHINE-LEARNED RESOURCE ALLOCATION: APPLICATION TO HIGH-REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, A. N.; Richards, Joseph W.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Long, James; Broderick, Tamara, E-mail: amorgan@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3860 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    As the number of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here, we present our Random Forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z ) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation-based on the available telescope time-of whether the event warrants additional follow-up resources. We train RATE GRB-z using a set consisting of 135 Swift bursts with known redshifts, only 18 of which are z > 4. Cross-validated performance metrics on these training data suggest that {approx}56% of high-z bursts can be captured from following up the top 20% of the ranked candidates, and {approx}84% of high-z bursts are identified after following up the top {approx}40% of candidates. We further use the method to rank 200 + Swift bursts with unknown redshifts according to their likelihood of being high-z.

  18. Galleries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Systems facebook icon Facebook google plus icon Google+ twitter icon Twitter Home News & Publications Galleries Galleries n logo NERSC Logos NERSC logos are available...

  19. Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Function - Open Positions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open Positions No open positions currently Penn State North Carolina State UVA Oak Ridge Lab Logo MIT logo URI Logo Department of Energy...

  20. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Download Links Template for monthly DOE highlights (pptx) LMI-EFRC Slide Template (pptx) LMI-EFRC Logo (Logo 300dpi | Logo 2.5 inch 300dpi)...

  1. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Highlights Archive Scientific Advisory Committee Meeting, LANL, July 18-19, 2011 Partnerships Los Alamos National Lab Logo University of Illinois Logo MIT logo...

  2. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record of the Follow-up Review of Engineeing Configuration Management Processes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- June 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operational Awareness Record of the Follow-up Review of Engineering Configuration Management Processes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  3. ARM: Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR), replaces mmcrcal and mmcrmoments datastreams following C-40 processor upgrade of 2003.09.09

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR), replaces mmcrcal and mmcrmoments datastreams following C-40 processor upgrade of 2003.09.09

  4. Update Direct-Strike Lightning Environment for Stockpile-to-Target Sequence: Supplement LLNL Subcontract #B568621 Lightning Protection at the Yucca Mountain Waste Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uman, M A

    2008-10-09

    The University of Florida has surveyed all relevant publications reporting lightning damage to metals, metals which could be used as components of storage containers for nuclear waste materials. We show that even the most severe lightning could not penetrate the stainless steel thicknesses proposed for nuclear waste storage casks.

  5. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  6. AUDIT REPORT Follow-up on Nuclear Safety: Safety Basis and Quality Assurance at the Los Alamos National

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Safety: Safety Basis and Quality Assurance at the Los Alamos National Laboratory DOE/IG-0941 July 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 16, 2015 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report: "Follow-up on Nuclear Safety: Safety Basis and Quality Assurance at the Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND A primary

  7. Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicle automation is a promising petroleum reduction technology, and platooning systems for heavy-duty vehicles are likely to be a frst step towards acceptance of vehicle automation. These systems may employ existing technologies such as radar or laser range fnders, global positioning system (GPS), dedicated vehicle-to-vehicle communications (V2V), and braking and engine torque authority to enable vehicles to follow safely in close proximity with the goal of reducing fuel consumption, traffc

  8. Follow-up Review of Control and Accountability of Emergency Communication Network Equipment, INS-L-12-01

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Control and Accountability of Emergency Communication Network Equipment INS-L-12-01 December 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 21, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR EMERGENCY OPERATIONS FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Follow-up Review of Control and Accountability of Emergency Communication Network Equipment" BACKGROUND The Department of

  9. Role of OH radicals in the formation of oxygen molecules following vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of amorphous solid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Masaaki; Yabushita, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2010-09-14

    Photodesorption of O{sub 2}(X {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup -}) and O{sub 2}(a {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}) from amorphous solid water at 90 K has been studied following photoexcitation within the first absorption band at 157 nm. Time-of-flight and rotational spectra of O{sub 2} reveal the translational and internal energy distributions, from which production mechanisms are deduced. Exothermic and endothermic reactions of OH+O({sup 3}P) are proposed as plausible formation mechanisms for O{sub 2}(X {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup -} and a {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}). To examine the contribution of the O({sup 3}P)+O({sup 3}P) recombination reaction to the O{sub 2} formation following 157 nm photolysis of amorphous solid water, O{sub 2} products following 193 nm photodissociation of SO{sub 2} adsorbed on amorphous solid water were also investigated.

  10. QBR Follow Ups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OTHER REVENUE SOURCES 1,159,346 SRVCSFPS LOSSINT EXCHARCRFT 143,159 324,676 TOWNSEND-GARRISON TRANSMISSION 12,420,730 TRANSMISSIONS SHARE OF IRRIGATION PP 381,997 ...

  11. Follow that mercury!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linero, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    The article discusses one technology option for avoiding release of mercury captured by power plant pollution control equipment in order to render it usable in concrete. This is the use of selective catalytic reduction for NOx control and lime spray dryer absorbers (SDA) for SO{sub 2} control prior to particulate collection by fabric filters. In this scenario all mercury removed is trapped in the fabric filter baghouse. The US EPA did not establish mercury emission limits for existing cement plants in the latest regulation 40 CFR 63, Subpart LLL (December 2006) and was sued by the Portland Cement Association because of the Hg limits established for new kilns and by several states and environmental groups for the lack of limits on existing ones. A full version of this article is available on www.acaa-usa.org/AshatWork.htm. 2 figs.

  12. QBR Follow Ups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    servers, InfoSphere(tm) software, cyber security, architect of interoperable transactive signal system - Netezza: highly parallel data storage appliance located in demonstration's...

  13. IBM Blue Gene Architecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How to use Open|SpeedShop to Analyze the Performance of Parallel Codes. Donald Frederick LLNL LLNL---PRES---508651 Performance Analysis is becoming more important ± Complex architectures ± Complex applications ± Mapping applications onto architectures Often hard to know where to start ± Which experiments to run first? ± How to plan follow---on experiments? ± What kind of problems can be explored? ± How to interpret the data? How to use OSS to Analyze the Performance of Parallel Codes? 2

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

  15. Semiautomatic segmentation and follow-up of multicomponent low-grade tumors in longitudinal brain MRI studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weizman, Lior; Sira, Liat Ben; Joskowicz, Leo; Rubin, Daniel L.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Constantini, Shlomi; Shofty, Ben; Bashat, Dafna Ben

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Tracking the progression of low grade tumors (LGTs) is a challenging task, due to their slow growth rate and associated complex internal tumor components, such as heterogeneous enhancement, hemorrhage, and cysts. In this paper, the authors show a semiautomatic method to reliably track the volume of LGTs and the evolution of their internal components in longitudinal MRI scans. Methods: The authors' method utilizes a spatiotemporal evolution modeling of the tumor and its internal components. Tumor components gray level parameters are estimated from the follow-up scan itself, obviating temporal normalization of gray levels. The tumor delineation procedure effectively incorporates internal classification of the baseline scan in the time-series as prior data to segment and classify a series of follow-up scans. The authors applied their method to 40 MRI scans of ten patients, acquired at two different institutions. Two types of LGTs were included: Optic pathway gliomas and thalamic astrocytomas. For each scan, a “gold standard” was obtained manually by experienced radiologists. The method is evaluated versus the gold standard with three measures: gross total volume error, total surface distance, and reliability of tracking tumor components evolution. Results: Compared to the gold standard the authors' method exhibits a mean Dice similarity volumetric measure of 86.58% and a mean surface distance error of 0.25 mm. In terms of its reliability in tracking the evolution of the internal components, the method exhibits strong positive correlation with the gold standard. Conclusions: The authors' method provides accurate and repeatable delineation of the tumor and its internal components, which is essential for therapy assessment of LGTs. Reliable tracking of internal tumor components over time is novel and potentially will be useful to streamline and improve follow-up of brain tumors, with indolent growth and behavior.

  16. Valvular Abnormalities Detected by Echocardiography in 5-Year Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, Helena J. van der; Caron, Huib N.; Kremer, Leontien C.; Dalen, Elvira C. van

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of valvular abnormalities after radiation therapy involving the heart region and/or treatment with anthracyclines and to identify associated risk factors in a large cohort of 5-year childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of all 626 eligible 5-year CCS diagnosed with childhood cancer in the Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center between 1966 and 1996 and treated with radiation therapy involving the heart region and/or anthracyclines. We determined the presence of valvular abnormalities according to echocardiograms. Physical radiation dose was converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Using multivariable logistic regression analyses, we examined the associations between cancer treatment and valvular abnormalities. Results: We identified 225 mainly mild echocardiographic valvular abnormalities in 169 of 545 CCS (31%) with a cardiac assessment (median follow-up time, 14.9years [range, 5.1-36.8years]; median attained age 22.0years [range, 7.0-49.7years]). Twenty-four CCS (4.4%) had 31 moderate or higher-graded abnormalities. Most common abnormalities were tricuspid valve disorders (n=119; 21.8%) and mitral valve disorders (n=73; 13.4%). The risk of valvular abnormalities was associated with increasing radiation dose (using EQD{sub 2}) involving the heart region (odds ratio 1.33 per 10Gy) and the presence of congenital heart disease (odds ratio 3.43). We found no statistically significant evidence that anthracyclines increase the risk. Conclusions: Almost one-third of CCS treated with potentially cardiotoxic therapy had 1 or more asymptomatic, mostly mild valvular abnormalities after a median follow-up of nearly 15years. The most important risk factors are higher EQD{sub 2} to the heart region and congenital heart disease. Studies with longer follow-up are necessary to investigate the clinical course of asymptomatic valvular abnormalities in CCS.

  17. Segregation At Stacking Faults Within The ?' Phase Of Two Ni-base Superalloys Following Intermediate Temperature Creep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, G. B.; Shi, R.; Genc, Arda; Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Rae, C.M. F.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art energy dispersive spectroscopy, it has been established for the first time that there exists significant compositional variation (enrichment of Co and Cr and deficiency of Ni and Al) associated with superlattice intrinsic stacking faults created in the ordered ?' precipitates following intermediate temperature deformation of two commercial superalloys. The results indicate that long range diffusion of these elements is intimately involved in the precipitate shearing process and is therefore closely linked to the time-dependent deformation of the alloys.

  18. Review of 1953-2003 ORAU Follow-Up Studies on Science Education Programs: Impacts on Participants' Education and Careers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities

    2006-06-01

    Through sponsorship of science education programs for undergraduates and graduates, such as research participation programs and fellowships, the Department of Energy (DOE) encouraged the development of adequate numbers of qualified science and engineering (S&E) personnel to meet its current and future research and development (R&D) needs. This retrospective study summarizes impacts of selected programs on these participants. The summary data are from follow-up studies conducted from 1953 through 2003 by Oak Ridge Associated Universities and its predecessor, the Oak Ridge Institute for Nuclear Studies (ORINS).

  19. The radiation induced chemistry of uranyl cation in aqueous carbonate bicarbonate solutions as followed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Snow, Lanee A.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Cho, Herman M.; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-05-01

    Alpha radiation induced formation of hydrogen peroxide in carbonate ?bicarbonate media was followed by 13C NMR using dissolved [233UO2(13CO3)3]4- as the alpha source (Dalpha= 12.1 Gy/hr). Between the pH region between 5.9 and 11.6 hydrogen peroxide causes a varied speciation of the uranyl carbonates that is a function of the uranium, carbonate and the hydrogen peroxide concentrations. It is shown that the speciation of the peroxy carbonates (or other species) formed in solution by titration with hydrogen peroxide are common to those formed by hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis. The radiolysis experiment was carried out above pH = 9.96 to minimize the loss of 13CO2 over a 2800 hr period. Radiolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide was followed by formation of a uranyl peroxy carbonate complex and complex formation accelerated for about 1200 hours. Complex formation was observed to terminate at a concentration between 1x10-4 and 5x10-4 M. It is assumed that either a steady state H2O2 production rate was established in solution or that some limiting feature of the experiment was responsible for slowing the yield of product.

  20. Intrathymic radioresistant stem cells follow an IL-2/IL-2R pathway during thymic regeneration after sublethal irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuniga-Pfluecker, J.C.K.; Kruisbeek, A.M. )

    1990-05-15

    Sublethally irradiated mice undergo thymic regeneration which follows a phenotypic pattern of events similar to that observed during normal fetal development. Thymic regeneration after irradiation is the product of a limited pool of intrathymic radioresistant stem cells undergoing simultaneous differentiation. We show that in this model of T cell development, thymic regeneration follows a pathway in which the IL-2R is transiently expressed on CD4-/CD8- cells. IL-2R expression occurred during the exponential growth period of thymic regeneration, and IL-2R blocking prevented this explosive growth. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the IL-2R blockade affected primarily the development of the immature CD3-/CD4-/CD8- (triple negative) cells and their ability to generate CD3+/CD4+/CD8+ or CD3+/CD4+/CD8- and CD3+/CD4-/CD8+ thymocytes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that blocking of the IL-2R resulted in an arrest in proliferation and differentiation by intrathymic radioresistant stem cells, indicating that the IL-2/IL-2R pathway is necessary for the expansion of immature triple negative T cells.

  1. How Clean is Safe? Improving the Effectiveness of Decontamination of Structures and People Following Chemical and Biological Incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt , B.M.

    2003-04-03

    This report describes a U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Chemical and Biological National Security Program project that sought to establish what is known about decontamination of structures, objects, and people following an exposure to chemical or biological materials. Specifically we sought to identify the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the factors determining when people were (or were not) decontaminated, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  2. Opportunities for high aspect ratio micro-electro-magnetic-mechanical systems (HAR-MEMMS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, S.

    1993-10-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Opportunities for HAR-MEMMS at LBL; Industrial Needs and Opportunities; Deep Etch X-ray Lithography; MEMS Activities at BSAC; DNA Amplification with Microfabricated Reaction Chamber; Electrochemistry Research at LBL; MEMS Activities at LLNL; Space Microsensors and Microinstruments; The Advanced Light Source; Institute for Micromaching; IBM MEMS Interests; and Technology Transfer Opportunities at LBL.

  3. Interim PET After Two ABVD Cycles in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Outcomes Following the Continuation of Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simontacchi, Gabriele; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Buglione, Michela; Saieva, Calogero; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Livi, Lorenzo; Iotti, Cinzia; Botto, Barbara; Vaggelli, Luca; Re, Alessandro; Merli, Francesco; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: This multicenter retrospective study was designed to evaluate the prognostic role of interim fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (i-FDG-PET) in a cohort of patients affected with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated initially with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy, and to assess the role of chemotherapy continuation plus radiation therapy for i-FDG-PET-positive patients. Methods and Materials: Data from 257 patients were retrieved from 4 hematology and radiation oncology departments. Inclusion criteria were stage I to IIAB HL, “intention-to-treat” AVBD plus radiation therapy, and FDG-PET at diagnosis and after the first 2 ABVD cycles. All i-FDG-PET scans underwent blinded local review by using the Deauville 5-point scoring system; patients were stratified as negative or positive using 2 Deauville score cutoff values, ≥3 or ≥4. Results: Median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 9-163 months); 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) for the whole cohort were 97.5% and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 95.6%. After i-FDG-PET revision, 43 of 257 patients (16.7%) had a positive i-FDG-PET (Deauville scores: 3-5). Five-year PFS rates for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients were 98.1% and 83.7%, respectively, if using a Deauville score cutoff of 3, and 97.7% and 78.6%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.0001). Five-year OS for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients was 98.5% and 93.0%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 3, and 98.6% and 89.3%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.029 and P=.002). At univariate regression analysis, i-FDG-PET positivity was associated with worse OS and PFS. At multivariate analysis, performed only for PFS, i-FDG-PET positivity confirmed its negative impact (P=.002). Conclusions: i-FDG-PET is prognostic for PFS and OS in early-stage HL patients treated with combined modality therapy; the continuation of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy is able to obtain durable, complete remission in most i-FDG-PET-positive patients.

  4. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of Bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Seryak, Liesel M.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2015-09-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 ?g d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analytical methods employed and is related to [4].

  5. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  6. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of Bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Seryak, Liesel M.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2015-09-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analyticalmore » methods employed and is related to [4].« less

  7. Characterization of the role of Fhit in maintenance of genomic integrity following low dose radiation, in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ya Wang

    2010-05-31

    The major goal of this study is to determine the effects of the Fhit pathway on low dose ({le} 0.1 Gy) ionizing radiation (IR)-induced genetic instability. Reduction of Fhit protein expression is observed in most solid tumors particularly in those tumors resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. Therefore, characterization of the role of the Fhit-dependent pathway in preventing low dose IR-induced genetic instability will provide useful parameters for evaluating the low dose IR-induced risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. We pursued 3 specific aims to study our hypothesis that the Fhit-dependent pathways maintain genomic integrity through adjusting checkpoint response and repair genes expression following low dose IR. Aim 1: Determine whether Fhit interaction with RPA is necessary for Fhit to affect the cellular response to low dose IR. We combined the approaches of in vitro (GST pull-down and site-directed mutagenesis) and in vivo (observing the co-localization and immunoprecipitation of Fhit and RPA in Fhit knock out mouse cells transfected with mutant Fhit which has lost ability to interact with RPA in vitro). Aim 2: Determine the role of genes whose expression is affected by Fhit in low dose irradiated cells. We analyzed the distinct signature of gene expression in low dose irradiated Fhit-/- cells compared with Fhit+/+ cells by combining microarray, gene transfection and siRNA approaches. Aim 3: Determine the role of Fhit in genetic susceptibility to low dose IR in vivo. We compared the gene mutation frequency and the fragile site stability in the cells isolated from the Fhit+/+ and Fhit-/- mice at 1.5 years following low dose IR. These results determine the role of the Fhit-dependent pathway in maintaining genomic integrity in vitro and in vivo, which provide a basis for choosing surrogate markers in the Fhit-dependent pathway to evaluate low dose IR-induced risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  8. Characterization of the role of Fhit in maintenance of genomic integrity following low dose radiation, in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ya

    2010-05-14

    The major goal of this study is to determine the effects of the Fhit pathway on low dose (< 0.1 Gy) ionizing radiation (IR)-induced genetic instability. Reduction of Fhit protein expression is observed in most solid tumors particularly in those tumors resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. Therefore, characterization of the role of the Fhit-dependent pathway in preventing low dose IR-induced genetic instability will provide useful parameters for evaluating the low dose IR-induced risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. We pursued 3 specific aims to study our hypothesis that the Fhit-dependent pathways maintain genomic integrity through adjusting checkpoint response and repair genes expression following low dose IR. Aim 1: Determine whether Fhit interaction with RPA is necessary for Fhit to affect the cellular response to low dose IR. We combined the approaches of in vitro (GST pull-down and site-directed mutagenesis) and in vivo (observing the co-localization and immunoprecipitation of Fhit and RPA in Fhit knock out mouse cells transfected with mutant Fhit which has lost ability to interact with RPA in vitro). Aim 2: Determine the role of genes whose expression is affected by Fhit in low dose irradiated cells. We analyzed the distinct signature of gene expression in low dose irradiated Fhit-/- cells compared with Fhit+/+ cells by combining microarray, gene transfection and siRNA approaches. Aim 3: Determine the role of Fhit in genetic susceptibility to low dose IR in vivo. We compared the gene mutation frequency and the fragile site stability in the cells isolated from the Fhit+/+ and Fhit-/- mice at 1.5 years following low dose IR. These results determine the role of the Fhit-dependent pathway in maintaining genomic integrity in vitro and in vivo, which provide a basis for choosing surrogate markers in the Fhit-dependent pathway to evaluate low dose IR-induced risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  9. Decline of radionuclides in the nearshore environment following nuclear reactor closure: A U.K. case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cundy, A.B.; Croudace, I.W.; Warwick, P.E.; Bains, M.E.D.

    1999-09-01

    Radioactive discharges from nuclear facilities are frequently made into the marine environment and their fate during and after cessation of discharges is a matter of interest and concern. This study examines the decline of the radionuclides {sup 60} and {sup 65}Zn along the southern UK. coast, over the per 1988--1998, following the closure of the steam-generating heavy water (SGHW) reactor at AEA Winfrith, Dorset, UK. {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn (and other activation products such as {sup 63}Ni and {sup 55}Fe) were widely dispersed in the marine environment off the central south coast of England, due to authorized releases from AEA Winfrith. Significant interaction occurred with clay-rich sediments and biota. A general exponential decline in {sup 60}Co activities (and in {sup 65}Zn activity) is found in intertidal mudflat sediments, seaweed and marine fauna in different areas along the south coast following closure of the reactor in 1990. Effective half-lives are determined which vary from 1 to 4 years in surface sediments ({sup 60}Co only), 1--4 years in seaweed and 0.5--2.5 years in crustaceans, bivalves and molluscs. Physical mixing and bioturbation largely control the rate at which {sup 60}Co declines in surface sediments. Both {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn show a relatively slow rate of decline in seaweed and in marine fauna, showing that even after the virtual cessation of discharge from nuclear facilities, contamination of these organisms may persist for a number of years, albeit at reduced activities. Reasons for this persistence are likely to include absorption of radionuclides from sediment, and release and recycling of radionuclides via breakdown of contaminated organic material.

  10. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumueller, Stephan Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 {+-} 7.5 years, range 51-88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  11. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Surgery Followed by Local Brain Radiotherapy and Surgery Followed by Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Single Brain Metastasis: Single-Center Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Ohno, Makoto; Sumi, Minako; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Kayama, Takamasa; Shibui, Soichiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Data comparing the clinical outcomes of local brain radiotherapy (LBRT) and whole brain RT (WBRT) in patients with a single brain metastasis after tumor removal are limited. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare the patterns of treatment failure, cause of death, progression-free survival, median survival time, and Karnofsky performance status for long-term survivors among patients who underwent surgery followed by either LBRT or WBRT between 1990 and 2008 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Results: A total of 130 consecutive patients were identified. The median progression-free survival period among the patients who received postoperative LBRT (n = 64) and WBRT (n = 66) was 9.7 and 11.5 months, respectively (p = .75). The local recurrence rates (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 12.1%) and intracranial new metastasis rate (LBRT, 42.2% vs. WBRT, 33.3%) were similar in each arm. The incidence of leptomeningeal metastasis was also equivalent (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 10.6%). The median survival time for the LBRT and WBRT patients was 13.9 and 16.7 months, respectively (p = .88). A neurologic cause of death was noted in 35.6% of the patients in the LBRT group and 36.7% of the WBRT group (p = .99). The Karnofsky performance status at 2 years was comparable between the two groups. Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of LBRT and WBRT were similar. A prospective evaluation is warranted.

  12. TH-C-18A-09: Exam and Patient Parameters Affecting the DNA Damage Response Following CT Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgart, S; Adibi, A; Bostani, M; Ruehm, S; Enzmann, D; McNitt-Gray, M; Iwamoto, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To identify exam and patient parameters affecting the biological response to CT studies using in vivo and ex vivo blood samples. Methods: Blood samples were collected under IRB approval from 16 patients undergoing clinically-indicated CT exams. Blood was procured prior to, immediately after and 30minutes following irradiation. A sample of preexam blood was placed on the patient within the exam region for ex vivo analysis. Whole blood samples were fixed immediately following collection and stained for ?H2AX to assess DNA damage response (DDR). Median fluorescence of treated samples was compared to non-irradiated control samples for each patient. Patients were characterized by observed biological kinetic response: (a) fast phosphorylation increased by 2minutes and fell by 30minutes, (b) slow phosphorylation continued to increase to 30minutes and (c) none little change was observed or irradiated samples fell below controls. Total dose values were normalized to exam time for an averaged dose-rate in dose/sec for each exam. Relationships between patient biological responses and patient and exam parameters were investigated. Results: A clearer dose response at 30minutes is observed for young patients (<61yoa; R2>0.5) compared to old patients (>61yoa; R{sup 2}<0.11). Fast responding patients were significantly younger than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Unlike in vivo samples, age did not significantly affect the patient response ex vivo. Additionally, fast responding patients received exams with significantly smaller dose-rate than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: Age is a significant factor in the biological response suggesting that DDR may be more rapid in a younger population and slower as the population ages. Lack of an agerelated response ex vivo suggests a systemic response to radiation not present when irradiated outside the body. Dose-rate affects the biological response suggesting that patient response may be related to scan timing and dose delivery within an exam protocol. All authors receive(d) funding from a Master Research Agreement from Siemens Healthcare with UCLA Radiological Sciences.

  13. Analysis of Flow Cytometry DNA Damage Response Protein Activation Kinetics Following X-rays and High Energy Iron Nuclei Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Universities Space Research Association; Chappell, Lori J.; Whalen, Mary K.; Gurai, Sheena; Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janice M.

    2010-12-15

    We developed a mathematical method to analyze flow cytometry data to describe the kinetics of {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 phosphorylations ensuing various qualities of low dose radiation in normal human fibroblast cells. Previously reported flow cytometry kinetic results for these DSB repair phospho-proteins revealed that distributions of intensity were highly skewed, severely limiting the detection of differences in the very low dose range. Distributional analysis reveals significant differences between control and low dose samples when distributions are compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Radiation quality differences are found in the distribution shapes and when a nonlinear model is used to relate dose and time to the decay of the mean ratio of phosphoprotein intensities of irradiated samples to controls. We analyzed cell cycle phase and radiation quality dependent characteristic repair times and residual phospho-protein levels with these methods. Characteristic repair times for {gamma}H2AX were higher following Fe nuclei as compared to X-rays in G1 cells (4.5 {+-} 0.46 h vs 3.26 {+-} 0.76 h, respectively), and in S/G2 cells (5.51 {+-} 2.94 h vs 2.87 {+-} 0.45 h, respectively). The RBE in G1 cells for Fe nuclei relative to X-rays for {gamma}H2AX was 2.05 {+-} 0.61 and 5.02 {+-} 3.47, at 2 h and 24-h postirradiation, respectively. For pATF2, a saturation effect is observed with reduced expression at high doses, especially for Fe nuclei, with much slower characteristic repair times (>7 h) compared to X-rays. RBEs for pATF2 were 0.66 {+-} 0.13 and 1.66 {+-} 0.46 at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. Significant differences in {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 levels comparing irradiated samples to control were noted even at the lowest dose analyzed (0.05 Gy) using these methods of analysis. These results reveal that mathematical models can be applied to flow cytometry data to uncover important and subtle differences following exposure to various qualities of low dose radiation.

  14. Time-Resolved Imaging of Material Response Following Laser-Induced Breakdown in the Bulk and Surface of Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, R N; Negres, R A; DeMange, P; Demos, S G

    2010-02-04

    Optical components within high energy laser systems are susceptible to laser-induced material modification when the breakdown threshold is exceeded or damage is initiated by pre-existing impurities or defects. These modifications are the result of exposure to extreme conditions involving the generation of high temperatures and pressures and occur on a volumetric scale of the order of a few cubic microns. The response of the material following localized energy deposition, including the timeline of events and the individual processes involved during this timeline, is still largely unknown. In this work, we investigate the events taking place during the entire timeline in both bulk and surface damage in fused silica using a set of time-resolved microscopy systems. These microscope systems offer up to 1 micron spatial resolution when imaging static or dynamic effects, allowing for imaging of the entire process with adequate temporal and spatial resolution. These systems incorporate various pump-probe geometries designed to optimize the sensitivity for detecting individual aspects of the process such as the propagation of shock waves, near-surface material motion, the speed of ejecta, and material transformations. The experimental results indicate that the material response can be separated into distinct phases, some terminating within a few tens of nanoseconds but some extending up to about 100 microseconds. Overall the results demonstrate that the final characteristics of the modified region depend on the material response to the energy deposition and not on the laser parameters.

  15. Outrunning major weight gain: a prospective study of 8,340consistent runners during 7 years of follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2006-01-06

    Background: Body weight increases with aging. Short-term,longitudinal exercise training studies suggest that increasing exerciseproduces acute weight loss, but it is not clear if the maintenance oflong-term, vigorous exercise attenuates age-related weight gain inproportion to the exercise dose. Methods: Prospective study of 6,119 maleand 2,221 female runners whose running distance changed less than 5 km/wkbetween their baseline and follow-up survey 7 years later. Results: Onaverage, men who ran modest (0-24 km/wk), intermediate (24-48 km/wk) orprolonged distances (>_48 km/wk) all gained weight throughage 64,however, those who ran ?48 km/wk had one-half the average annual weightgain of those who ran<24 km/wk. Age-related weight gain, and itsreduction by running, were both greater in younger than older men. Incontrast, men s gain in waist circumference with age, and its reductionby running, were the same in older and younger men. Women increased theirbody weight and waist and hip circumferences over time, regardless ofage, which was also reduced in proportion to running distance. In bothsexes, running did not attenuate weight gain uniformly, but ratherdisproportionately prevented more extreme increases. Conclusion: Men andwomen who remain vigorously active gain less weight as they age and thereduction is in proportion to the exercise dose.

  16. Changes in the composition of the human fecal microbiome following bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khoruts, A.; Dicksved, J.; Jansson, J.K.; Sadowsky, M.J.

    2009-08-15

    CDAD is the major known cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhea and colitis, and the disease is thought to result from persistent disruption of commensal gut microbiota. Bacteriotherapy by way of fecal transplantation can be used to treat recurrent CDAD and is thought to re-establish the normal colonic microflora. However, limitations of conventional microbiologic techniques have until recently precluded testing of this idea. In this study we used T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches to characterize the bacterial composition of the colonic microflora in a patient suffering from recurrent CDAD, before and after treatment by fecal transplantation from a healthy donor. While the patient's residual colonic microbiota, prior to therapy, was deficient in members of the bacterial divisions-Firmicutes and Bacteriodetes, transplantation had a dramatic impact on the composition of the patient's gut microbiota. By 14 days post transplantation, the fecal bacterial composition of the recipient was highly similar to the donor and was dominated by Bacteroides spp. strains and an uncharacterized butyrate producing bacterium. The change in bacterial composition was accompanied by resolution of the patient's symptoms. The striking similarity of the recipient's and donor's intestinal microbiota following bacteriotherapy suggests that the donor's bacteria quickly occupied their requisite niches, resulting in restoration of both the structure and function of the microbial communities present.

  17. Guidance for the Implementation and Follow-up of Identified Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Covered Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document provides specific guidance to agencies on the implementation and follow-up of energy and water efficiency measures identified and undertaken per Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) (42 U.S.C. 8253(f)(4) and (5)) This guidance also provides context for how these activities fit into the comprehensive approach to facility energy and water management outlined by the statute and incorporates by reference previous DOE guidance released for Section 432 of EISA and other related documents. 42 U.S.C. 8253(f)(7)(A) specifies that facility energy managers shall certify compliance for each covered facility with the 42 U.S.C. 8253(f)(2)-(5) requirements via a web-based tracking system and make it publicly available. This document also describes the role of the tracking system that has been developed for the collection and reporting of data needed for the demonstration of compliance and progress toward meeting all energy and water efficiency requirements outlined in the statute.

  18. Selenium Preferentially Accumulates in the Eye Lens Following Embryonic Exposure: A Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhury, Sanjukta; Thomas, Jith; Sylvain, Nicole J.; Ponomarenko, Olena; Gordon, Robert A.; Heald, Steve M.; Janz, David M.; Krone, Patrick H.; Coulthard, Ian; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2015-02-17

    Maternal transfer of elevated selenium (Se) to offspring is an important route of Se exposure for fish in the natural environment. However, there is a lack of information on the tissue specific spatial distribution and speciation of Se in the early developmental stages of fish, which provide important information about Se toxicokinetics. The effect of maternal transfer of Se was studied by feeding adult zebrafish a Se-elevated or a control diet followed by collection of larvae from both groups. Novel confocal synchrotron-based techniques were used to investigate Se within intact preserved larvae. Confocal X-ray fluorescence imaging was used to compare Se distributions within specific planes of an intact larva from each of the two groups. The elevated Se treatment showed substantially higher Se levels than the control; Se preferentially accumulated to highest levels in the eye lens, with lower levels in the retina, yolk and other tissues. Confocal X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to determine that the speciation of Se within the eye lens of the intact larva was a selenomethionine-like species. Preferential accumulation of Se in the eye lens may suggest a direct cause-and-effect relationship between exposure to elevated Se and Se-induced ocular impairments reported previously. This study illustrates the effectiveness of confocal X-ray fluorescence methods for investigating trace element distribution and speciation in intact biological specimens

  19. Facile fabrication of rutile monolayer films consisting of well crystalline nanorods by following an IL-assisted hydrothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng Peng; Liu Xiaodi; Sun, Chuansheng; Ma Jianmin; Zheng Wenjun

    2009-05-15

    In this study, rutile films consisting of rectangular nanorods were facilely deposited on glass substrates from strongly acid solution of TiCl{sub 4}. The highly ordered array of nanorods was realized in presence of ionic liquid (IL) of [Bmim]Br by following a hydrothermal process. In this process, Degussa P25 nanoparticles served as seeds that were pre-deposited on the substrates to facilitate the array of rutile nanorods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectrum were used to characterize the obtained nanorod films. The measurements showed that the nanorods were rectangular with width of 100-200 nm and length of more than 1 {mu}m, and grew up typically along c-axis to form the arrays against the substrate. The presence of IL was found vital for the formation of rutile nanorods, and the suitable molar ratio of [Bmim]Br to TiCl{sub 4} ranged from 500:1 to 1500:1. The excessive [Bmim]Br may hinder the precipitation of rutile particles. - Graphical abstract: The rutile film consisting of rectangular nanorods is successfully deposited on glass substrate in presence of ionic liquid (IL) of [Bmim]Br. The nanorods were rectangular with width of 100-200 nm and length of more than 1 {mu}m, which grew up typically along c-axis to form the arrays against the substrate.

  20. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jee Suk; Park, Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Doo Ho; Suh, Chang-Ok; Huh, Seung Jae

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  1. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

  2. Investigations on optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident in a VVER-1000 pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Kliem, S.

    2012-07-01

    The reactor safety issues are of primary importance for preserving the health of the population and ensuring no release of radioactivity and fission products into the environment. A part of the nuclear research focuses on improvement of the safety of existing nuclear power plants. Studies, research and efforts are a continuing process at improving the safety and reliability of existing and newly developed nuclear power plants at prevention of a core melt accident. Station blackout (loss of AC power supply) is one of the dominant accidents taken into consideration at performing accident analysis. In case of multiple failures of safety systems it leads to a severe accident. To prevent an accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences, accident management measures must be performed. The present paper outlines possibilities for application and optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident. Assessed is the behaviour of the nuclear power plant during a station blackout accident without accident management measures and with application of primary/secondary side oriented accident management measures. Discussed are the possibilities for operators ' intervention and the influence of the performed accident management measures on the course of the accident. Special attention has been paid to the effectiveness of the passive feeding and physical phenomena having an influence on the system behaviour. The performed simulations show that the effectiveness of the secondary side feeding procedure can be limited due to an early evaporation or flashing effects in the feed water system. The analyzed cases show that the effectiveness of the accident management measures strongly depends on the initiation criteria applied for depressurization of the reactor coolant system. (authors)

  3. Gene expression profiles in the cerebellum and hippocampus following exposure to a neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254: Developmental effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royland, Joyce E.; Wu, Jinfang; Zawia, Nasser H.; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2008-09-01

    The developmental consequences of exposure to the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been widely studied, making PCBs a unique model to understand issues related to environmental mixture of persistent chemicals. PCB exposure in humans adversely affects neurocognitive development, causes psychomotor difficulties, and contributes to attention deficits in children, all of which seem to be associated with altered patterns of neuronal connectivity. In the present study, we examined gene expression profiles in the rat nervous system following PCB developmental exposure. Pregnant rats (Long-Evans) were dosed perinatally with 0 or 6 mg/kg/day of Aroclor 1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21. Gene expression in cerebellum and hippocampus from PND7 and PND14 animals was analyzed with an emphasis on developmental aspects. Changes in gene expression ({>=} 1.5 fold) in control animals identified normal developmental changes. These basal levels of expression were compared to data from Aroclor 1254-treated animals to determine the impact of gestational PCB exposure on developmental parameters. The results indicate that the expression of a number of developmental genes related to cell cycle, synaptic function, cell maintenance, and neurogenesis is significantly altered from PND7 to PND14. Aroclor 1254 treatment appears to dampen the overall growth-related gene expression levels in both regions with the effect being more pronounced in the cerebellum. Functional analysis suggests that Aroclor 1254 delays maturation of the developing nervous system, with the consequences dependent on the ontological state of the brain area and the functional role of the individual gene. Such changes may underlie learning and memory deficits observed in PCB exposed animals and humans.

  4. Urinary Symptom Flare in 712 {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy Patients: Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, Mira; Miller, Stacy; Moravan, Veronika; Pickles, Tom; Liu, Mitchell; Spadinger, Ingrid; Lapointe, Vincent; Morris, W. James

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To describe the late transient worsening of urinary symptoms ('urinary symptom flare') in 712 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients, associated predictive factors, association with rectal and urinary toxicity, and the development of erectile dysfunction. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent implantation between 1998 and 2003 (median follow-up, 57 months). International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity, and erectile function data were prospectively collected. Flare was defined as an increase in IPSS of >=5 and of >=8 points greater than the post-treatment nadir. The relationships between the occurrence of flare and the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were examined. The Cox proportional hazards method was used to test individual variables and the multivariate models. Results: The incidence of flare was 52% and 30% using the flare definition of an IPSS of >=5 and >=8 points greater than the postimplant nadir, respectively. Of the patients with symptoms, 65% had resolution of their symptoms within 6 months and 91% within 1 year. Flares most commonly occurred 16-24 months after implantation. On multivariate analysis, a greater baseline IPSS and greater maximal postimplant IPSS were the predictors of flare, regardless of the flare definition used. Androgen suppression was a predictor for fewer flares (IPSS >=5). Diabetes and prostate edema predicted for more frequent flares (IPSS >=8). Patients with flare had a greater incidence of RTOG Grade 3 urinary toxicity and RTOG Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity. No association was found between erectile dysfunction and the occurrence of flare. Conclusion: Urinary symptom flare is a common, transient phenomenon after prostate brachytherapy. A greater baseline IPSS and maximal postimplant IPSS were the strongest predictive factors. Flare was associated with a greater incidence of late RTOG Grade 3 urinary toxicity and greater rate of late RTOG Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity.

  5. WE-D-BRE-03: Late Toxicity Following Photon Or Proton Radiotherapy in Patients with Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munbodh, R; Ding, X; Yin, L; Anamalayil, S; Dorsey, J; Lustig, R; Alonso-Basanta, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To identify indicators of Late Grade 3 (LG3) toxicity, late vision and hearing changes in patients treated for primary brain tumors with photon (XRT) or proton radiotherapy (PRT). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 102 patients who received brain XRT or PRT to doses of 54 or 59.6 Gy in daily fractions of 1.8–2 Gy. Of the 80 patients (34 XRT, 39 PRT and 7 both modalities) reviewed for indicators of LG3 toxicity, 25 developed LG3 toxicity 90 to 500 days after radiotherapy completion. 55 patients had less than LG3 toxicity > 500 days after treatment. In that time, late vision and hearing changes were seen in 44 of 75 and 25 of 78 patients, respectively. The correlation between late toxicity and prescription dose, planning target volume (PTV) size, and doses to the brainstem, brain, optic chiasm, optic nerves, eyes and cochlea was evaluated. A two-tailed Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used for the statistical analysis for XRT, PRT and all patients combined. Results: Exceeding the 54 Gy-5% dose-volume brainstem constraint, but not the optic structure constraints, was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with late vision changes in all three groups. Exceeding maximum and mean cochlear doses of 45 and 30 Gy, respectively, was a significant indicator of hearing changes (p < 0.05) in PRT patients and all patients combined. In a sub-group of 52 patients in whom the brain was contoured, the absolute brain volume receiving ≤ 50 Gy and > 60 Gy was significantly larger in patients with LG3 toxicity for all patients combined (p < 0.05). Prescription dose, brainstem dose and PTV volume were not correlated to LG3 toxicity. Conclusion: Our results indicate the importance of minimizing the brain volume irradiated, and brainstem and cochlea doses to reduce the risk of late toxicities following brain radiotherapy.

  6. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Bryan, Tom W.; Hetue, Jackson D.; Lake, Katherine A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Williams, Paul H.; et al

    2015-03-15

    Background: Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [¹⁸F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modelingmore » of fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. Results: After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [¹⁸F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.« less

  7. Model-reference adaptive control applied to load-following of a space-nuclear power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.; Parlos, A.G.; New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM . Inst. for Space Nuclear Power Studies; Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear power systems are presently being investigated as an alternative for both commercial and military space power systems because of their projected longevity of 7 to 10 years, their mass advantage over other space power sources at powers above approximately 25 kW{sub e}, and their ability to operate without direct illumination from the sun. These space-nuclear power systems are being designed to supply from tens of kilowatts to multimegawatts of power for continuous operation of seven years and more. Space-nuclear power systems designs that meet these requirements will not be available for refueling or maintenance during their lifetime. To ensure that the space-nuclear power system will operate safely and will respond in a predictable and desired manner, the design of the system's controller must account for changes in the system parameters over its lifetime. This paper applies model-reference adaptive control to an increase in the power demand by the load. A model-reference adaptive controller will force the actual space-nuclear power system to follow the predictable and desired response of a reference model, despite changes in the actual system's operating parameters. Included in this paper are the model-reference adaptive control algorithm, the description of the computer simulation of a space-nuclear power system and the reference model, and results that demonstrate the application of model-reference adaptive control to a change in the load power demand. The results demonstrate that model-reference adaptive control can ensure the transient response of the system despite differences between the design of the system and the as-built system as well as for variations in the systems parameters. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Reactivation of AKT signaling following treatment of cancer cells with PI3K inhibitors attenuates their antitumor effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dufour, Marc; Dormond-Meuwly, Anne; Pythoud, Catherine; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: PI3K inhibitors inhibit AKT only transiently. Re-activation of AKT limits the anti-cancer effect of PI3K inhibitors. The results suggest to combine PI3K and AKT inhibitors in cancer therapy. -- Abstract: Targeting the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is a promising approach in cancer therapy. In particular, PI3K blockade leads to the inhibition of AKT, a major downstream effector responsible for the oncogenic activity of PI3K. However, we report here that small molecule inhibitors of PI3K only transiently block AKT signaling. Indeed, treatment of cancer cells with PI3K inhibitors results in a rapid inhibition of AKT phosphorylation and signaling which is followed by the reactivation of AKT signaling after 48 h as observed by Western blot. Reactivation of AKT signaling occurs despite effective inhibition of PI3K activity by PI3K inhibitors. In addition, wortmannin, a broad range PI3K inhibitor, did not block AKT reactivation suggesting that AKT signals independently of PI3K. In a therapeutical perspective, combining AKT and PI3K inhibitors exhibit stronger anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects compared to AKT or PI3K inhibitors alone. Similarly, in a tumor xenograft mouse model, concomitant PI3K and AKT blockade results in stronger anti-cancer activity compared with either blockade alone. This study shows that PI3K inhibitors only transiently inhibit AKT which limits their antitumor activities. It also provides the proof of concept to combine PI3K inhibitors with AKT inhibitors in cancer therapy.

  9. Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

    2005-07-01

    The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to higher order biological effects, e.g. toxicity, lesions, reproductive failure.

  10. Results of Neoadjuvant Short-Course Radiation Therapy Followed by Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for T1-T2 N0 Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arezzo, Alberto; Arolfo, Simone; Allaix, Marco Ettore; Munoz, Fernando; Cassoni, Paola; Monagheddu, Chiara; Ricardi, Umberto; Ciccone, Giovannino; Morino, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the short-term outcomes of neoadjuvant short-course radiation therapy (SCRT) followed by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) for T1-T2 N0 extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Recent studies suggest that neoadjuvant radiation therapy followed by TEM is safe and has results similar to those with abdominal rectal resection for the treatment of extraperitoneal early rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We planned a prospective pilot study including 25 consecutive patients with extraperitoneal T1-T2 N0 M0 rectal adenocarcinoma undergoing SCRT followed by TEM 4 to 10 weeks later (SCRT-TEM). Safety, efficacy, and acceptability of this treatment modality were compared with historical groups of patients with similar rectal cancer stage and treated with long-course radiation therapy (LCRT) followed by TEM (LCRT-TEM), TEM alone, or laparoscopic rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) at our institution. Results: The study was interrupted after 14 patients underwent SCRT of 25 Gy in 5 fractions followed by TEM. Median time between SCRT and TEM was 7 weeks (range: 4-10 weeks). Although no preoperative complications occurred, rectal suture dehiscence was observed in 7 patients (50%) at 4 weeks follow-up, associated with an enterocutaneous fistula in the sacral area in 2 cases. One patient required a colostomy. Quality of life at 1-month follow-up, according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 survey score, was significantly worse in SCRT-TEM patients than in LCRT-TEM patients (P=.0277) or TEM patients (P=.0004), whereas no differences were observed with TME patients (P=.604). At a median follow-up of 10 months (range: 6-26 months), we observed 1 (7%) local recurrence at 6 months that was treated with abdominoperineal resection. Conclusions: SCRT followed by TEM for T1-T2 N0 rectal cancer is burdened by a high rate of painful dehiscence of the suture line and enterocutaneous fistula, compared to TEM alone and TEM following LCRT, which forced us to stop the study.

  11. MO-F-16A-04: Case Study: Estimation of Peak Skin Dose Following a Physician Reported “High Dose” Case and Sentinel Event Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supanich, M; Chu, J; Wehmeyer, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work offers as a teaching example a reported high dose fluoroscopy case and the workflow the institution followed to self-report a radiation overdose sentinel event to the Joint Commission. Methods: Following the completion of a clinical case in a hybrid OR room with a reported air kerma of >18 Gy at the Interventional Reference Point (IRP) the physicians involved in the case referred study to the institution's Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) for review. The RSC assigned a Diagnostic Medical Physicist (DMP) to estimate the patient's Peak Skin Dose (PSD) and analyze the case. Following the DMP's analysis and estimate of a PSD of >15 Gy the institution's adverse event committee was convened to discuss the case and to self-report the case as a radiation overdose sentinel event to the Joint Commission. The committee assigned a subgroup to perform the root cause analysis and develop institutional responses to the event. Results: The self-reporting of the sentinel event and the associated root cause analysis resulted in several institutional action items that are designed to improve process and safety. A formal reporting and analysis mechanism was adopted to review fluoroscopy cases with air kerma greater than 6 Gy at the IRP. An improved and formalized radiation safety training program for physicians using fluoroscopy equipment was implemented. Additionally efforts already under way to monitor radiation exposure in the Radiology department were expanded to include all fluoroscopy equipment capable of automated dose reporting. Conclusion: The adverse event review process and the root cause analysis following the self-reporting of the sentinel event resulted in policies and procedures that are expected to improve the quality and safe usage of fluoroscopy throughout the institution.

  12. Single-Center Experience and 1-Year Follow-up Results of 'Sandwich Technique' in the Management of Common Iliac Artery Aneurysms During EVAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Leonini, Sara; Tommasino, Giulio; Muzzi, Luigi; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Neri, Eugenio

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) accompanied by common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms requires a more demanding procedure owing to the difficulties in obtaining an adequate distal landing zone for the stent-graft limb(s), a potential site of endoleak. The 'sandwich technique' is a procedure to increase EVAR feasibility in the setting of adverse or challenging CIA anatomy. Its main advantages include no restrictions in terms of CIA diameter or length or internal iliac artery (IIA) diameter, no need to wait for a specific stent-graft. Our purpose is to describe our single-center experience and one year follow-up results of this new procedure. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to June 2010, the sandwich technique was performed in our institution in 7 patients treated for AAA and unilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 5) or bilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 2). Inclusion criteria were the presence of unilateral or bilateral CIA aneurysm (independently from its diameter), IIA artery measuring up to 9 mm in its maximum diameter, not dilatation of IIA and EIA. Results: The mean follow-up length was 15 months (range: 14-20 months). All stent-implanted iliac branches remained patent on 1 year follow-up and IIA flow was preserved. None of the patients had symptoms of pelvic ischemia. CT scan follow-up showed aneurysm shrinkage in five patients, without any sign of endoleaks in all cases. Conclusions: In selected cases, the 'sandwich technique' showed good outcomes confirming to be a safe and easy to perform way to overcome anatomical constraints and expanding the limits of EVAR.

  13. QBR Follow Ups May 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nominated, but not fully assessed.. Portfolio Curve 1 Portfolio Curve 2 The 4 spare transformers at wind sites, Veg. Mgmt. System, Monroe Line Retermination, and Anaconda score the...

  14. QBR Follow Ups February 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    built into the rate case that allowed wind projects to change their scheduling elections. Since no wind projects elected to do this, the forecast was zeroed out increasing...

  15. QBR Follow Up February 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRAC applicable to FY 2015 rates * Probability of CRAC 4% * Expected value (over all games) of 2015 CRAC revenue 1.6 million * Of times when CRAC triggers, expected value of...

  16. August 2009 QBR Follow Ups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agency Financial Information What are the assumptions behind lower streamflows and dropping prices in the 3 rd Quarter Forecast in comparison to the 2 nd Quarter Forecast? Are...

  17. August 2009 QBR Follow Ups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Control Centers Integrated Curtailment Re-dispatch System (iCRS)- Develop a new production Control Center Network (CCN) system for the Dittmer and Munro dispatchers. This new...

  18. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T.; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L.; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W.; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; et al

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9more » days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.« less

  19. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T.; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L.; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W.; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; Moulder, John E.; Baker, John E.

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9 days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.

  20. Spontaneous Rupture of Superficial Femoral Artery Repaired with Endovascular Stent-Grafting with use of Rendez-Vous Technique, Followed by Delayed Infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio Cannavale, Alessandro; Gazzetti, Marianna; Fantozzi, Cristiano; Taurino, Maurizio; Speziale, Francesco

    2013-02-15

    This is the case of a 72-year-old man with lower limb ischemia due to spontaneous rupture of nonaneurysmal superficial femoral artery that developed into thigh hematoma. After failure of a Fogarty revascularization, an emergency endovascular procedure was performed to restore the arterial continuity. A rendezvous procedure was performed with a double femoral and popliteal approach and two covered stent-grafts were deployed. Patient's clinical conditions immediately improved, but 4 months later the stent-grafts were surgically removed for infection and exteriorization. A femoropopliteal bypass was performed. After 1 year follow-up, the patient is in good clinical condition.

  1. Concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: Results of a phase II study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrdoljak, Eduard . E-mail: eduard.vrdoljak@st.hinet.hr; Prskalo, Tomislav; Omrcen, Tomislav; Situm, Kristina; Boraska, Tihana; Frleta Ilic, Nives; Jankovic, Stjepan; Hamm, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of ifosfamide and cisplatin administered concomitantly with low-dose-rate brachytherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (LASCC). Methods and materials: Forty-four patients with biopsy-proven LASCC were enrolled. FIGO Stages IB2 bulky to IVA were entered into this study. Patients were assigned to receive external radiotherapy (50 Gy in 25 fractions); then ifosfamide 2 g/m{sup 2} plus cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} was applied during two low-dose-rate brachytherapy applications, and 4 cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with the same drug combination were given after completion of radiotherapy. The planned dose to point A was 85 Gy. Results: All patients received both courses of concomitant chemobrachytherapy and at least 1 cycle of consolidation chemotherapy. The average duration of radiation was 45.1 days. The clinical complete response rate was 100%. Grade 3 and 4 leukopenia occurred in 25% and 11% of the cycles, respectively. After a median follow-up of 34 months (range, 20-54 months), the recurrence-free and the overall survival rates were 84% and 91%, respectively. Major delayed local complications occurred in 7 cases (16%). Conclusions: These results indicate that concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin is a feasible combination for patients with LASCC of the cervix uteri. A randomized trial is planned.

  2. Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following chemical terrorist attack: Introduction and key assessment considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Raber, Ellen; Dolislager, Frederick; Hauschild, Veronique; Hall, Dr. Linda; Love, Dr. Adam

    2011-01-01

    In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While restoration timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical terrorist release. What follows is the first of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information, and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. A conceptual site model and human health-based exposure guidelines are developed and reported as an aid to site-specific pre-planning in the current absence of U.S. state or Federal values designated as compound-specific remediation or re-entry concentrations, and to safely expedite facility recovery to full operational status. Chemicals of concern include chemical warfare nerve and vesicant agents and the toxic industrial compounds phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

  3. Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following a chemical terrorist attack: Decision criteria for multipathway exposure routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Dolislager, Frederick; Hall, Dr. Linda; Hauschild, Veronique; Raber, Ellen; Love, Dr. Adam

    2011-01-01

    In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical release. What follows is the second of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. Decision criteria analysis presented here provides first-time, open-literature documentation of multi-pathway, health-based remediation exposure guidelines for selected toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, and agent degradation products for pre-planning application in anticipation of a chemical terrorist attack. Guideline values are provided for inhalation and direct ocular vapor exposure routes as well as percutaneous vapor, surface contact, and ingestion. Target populations include various employees as well as transit passengers. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

  4. Cryogenic systems for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slack, D.S.; Nelson, R.L.; Chronis, W.C.

    1985-08-01

    This paper includes an in-depth discussion of the design, fabrication, and operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Each subsystem discussed to present a basic composite of the entire facility. The following subsystems are included: 500kW nitrogen reliquefier, subcoolers, and distribution system; 15kW helium refrigerator/liquefier and distribution system; helium recovery and storage system; rough vacuum and high vacuum systems.

  5. Office of Inspector General | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FAX: (202) 586-4902 Rickey R. Hass Acting Inspector General More about Rickey Hass Stay Connected Facebook logo Twitter logo Subscribe RSS logo Subscribe to receive the latest...

  6. Guidelines for Correctly Using the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines for Correctly Using the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Name and Logo Guidelines for Correctly Using the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Name and Logo PDF icon ZERH Logo Use ...

  7. ZERH Verifier PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Name and Logo and use the logos, labels and other materials to market and sell your homes. ... DOE will provide participants with access to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home partner logos. ...

  8. ZERH Builder PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Name and Logo and use the logos, labels and other materials to market and sell your homes. ... DOE will provide participants with access to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home partner logos. ...

  9. ZERH Arch Designer PA rev (2)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Name and Logo and use the logos, labels and other materials to market and sell your homes. ... DOE will provide participants with access to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home partner logos. ...

  10. Long-lived frequency shifts observed in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment following microwave irradiation of a nitroxide spin probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Lei; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Moore, Eric W.; Marohn, John A.

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a spin-modulation protocol for force-gradient detection of magnetic resonance that enables the real-time readout of longitudinal magnetization in an electron spin resonance experiment involving fast-relaxing spins. We applied this method to observe a prompt change in longitudinal magnetization following the microwave irradiation of a nitroxide-doped perdeuterated polystyrene film having an electron spin-lattice relaxation time of T{sub 1}{approx}1ms. The protocol allowed us to discover a large, long-lived cantilever frequency shift. Based on its magnitude, lifetime, and field dependence, we tentatively attribute this persistent signal to deuteron spin magnetization created via transfer of polarization from nitroxide spins.

  11. Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

    1994-11-22

    In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved. 1 fig.

  12. Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vijayan, Sivaraman; Wong, Chi F.; Buckley, Leo P.

    1994-01-01

    In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved.

  13. A 2-Stage Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated With Development of Erectile Dysfunction Following Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerns, Sarah L.; Departments of Pathology and Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York ; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson; Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York ; Buckstein, Michael; Shao, Yongzhao; Campbell, Christopher; Rath, Lynda; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lammering, Guido; Hixson, Rosetta; Cesaretti, Jamie; Terk, Mitchell; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with development of erectile dysfunction (ED) among prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A 2-stage genome-wide association study was performed. Patients were split randomly into a stage I discovery cohort (132 cases, 103 controls) and a stage II replication cohort (128 cases, 102 controls). The discovery cohort was genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 genome-wide arrays. The 940 top ranking SNPs selected from the discovery cohort were genotyped in the replication cohort using Illumina iSelect custom SNP arrays. Results: Twelve SNPs identified in the discovery cohort and validated in the replication cohort were associated with development of ED following radiation therapy (Fisher combined P values 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} to 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}). Notably, these 12 SNPs lie in or near genes involved in erectile function or other normal cellular functions (adhesion and signaling) rather than DNA damage repair. In a multivariable model including nongenetic risk factors, the odds ratios for these SNPs ranged from 1.6 to 5.6 in the pooled cohort. There was a striking relationship between the cumulative number of SNP risk alleles an individual possessed and ED status (Sommers' D P value = 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -29}). A 1-allele increase in cumulative SNP score increased the odds for developing ED by a factor of 2.2 (P value = 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -19}). The cumulative SNP score model had a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 75% for prediction of developing ED at the radiation therapy planning stage. Conclusions: This genome-wide association study identified a set of SNPs that are associated with development of ED following radiation therapy. These candidate genetic predictors warrant more definitive validation in an independent cohort.

  14. Ultrasonic Nakagami-parameter characterization of parotid-gland injury following head-and-neck radiotherapy: A feasibility study of late toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Ning; Wang, Yuefeng; Tridandapani, Srini; School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 ; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian; Bruner, Deborah W.; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322; School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The study aims to investigate whether Nakagami parametersestimated from the statistical distribution of the backscattered ultrasound radio-frequency (RF) signalscould provide a means for quantitative characterization of parotid-gland injury resulting from head-and-neck radiotherapy. Methods: A preliminary clinical study was conducted with 12 postradiotherapy patients and 12 healthy volunteers. Each participant underwent one ultrasound study in which ultrasound scans were performed in the longitudinal, i.e., vertical orientation on the bilateral parotids. For the 12 patients, the mean radiation dose to the parotid glands was 37.7 9.5 Gy, and the mean follow-up time was 16.3 4.8 months. All enrolled patients experienced grade 1 or 2 late salivary-gland toxicity (RTOG/EORTC morbidity scale). The normal parotid glands served as the control group. The Nakagami-scaling and Nakagami-shape parameters were computed from the RF data to quantify radiation-induced parotid-gland changes. Results: Significant differences in Nakagami parameters were observed between the normal and postradiotherapy parotid glands. Compared with the control group, the Nakagami-scaling parameter of the postradiotherapy group decreased by 25.8% (p < 0.001), and the Nakagami-shape parameter decreased by 31.3% (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.85 for the Nakagami-scaling parameter and was 0.95 for the Nakagami-shape parameter, which further demonstrated the diagnostic efficiency of the Nakagami parameters. Conclusions: Nakagami parameters could be used to quantitatively measure parotid-gland injury following head-and-neck radiotherapy. Moreover, the clinical feasibility was demonstrated and this study provides meaningful preliminary data for future clinical investigation.

  15. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan ; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 21.3%. Severe (grade ?3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  16. National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Design Standards for the NETL Logo Feburary 2016 The Logo Display of the NETL logo is critical because this symbol represents who we are - it's our signature. Consistent application of the logo is crucial to the success of our identity. As the primary identifier of the National Energy Technology Laboratory, it is essential that the logo's appearance is consistent throughout all of the Laboratory's communications. Over time, consistent and repeated use of the logo will establish a

  17. Hot Electron Diagnostic in a Solid Laser Target by Buried K-Shell Fluorer Technique from Ultra-Intense (3x1020W/cm2,< 500 J) Laser-Plasma Interactions on the Petawatt Laser at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuike, K.; Key, M.H.; Hatchett, S.P.; Snavely, R.A.

    2000-06-29

    Characterization of hot electron production (a conversion efficiency from laser energy into electrons) in ultra intense laser-solid target interaction, using 1.06 {micro}m laser light with an intensity of up to 3 x 10{sup 20}W cm{sup -2} and an on target laser energy of {le}500 J, has been done by observing K{sub {beta}} as well as K{sub {alpha}} emissions from a buried Mo layer in the targets, which are same structure as in the previous 100 TW experiments but done under less laser intensity and energy conditions ({le} 4 x 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2} and {le} 30 J). The conversion efficiency from the laser energy into the energy, carried by hot electrons, has been estimated to be {approx}50%, which are little bit higher than the previous less laser energy ({approx} 20 J) experiments, yet the x-ray emission spectra from the target has change drastically, i.e., gamma flash.

  18. Tables and graphs of electron-interaction cross sections from 10 eV to 100 GeV derived from the LLNL Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), Z = 1--100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, S.T.; Cullen, D.E. ); Seltzer, S.M. , Gaithersburg, MD . Center for Radiation Research)

    1991-11-12

    Energy-dependent evaluated electron interaction cross sections and related parameters are presented for elements H through Fm (Z = 1 to 100). Data are given over the energy range from 10 eV to 100 GeV. Cross sections and average energy deposits are presented in tabulated and graphic form. In addition, ionization cross sections and average energy deposits for each shell are presented in graphic form. This information is derived from the Livermore Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL) as of July, 1991.

  19. Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab masthead U.S. Department of Energy logo Phone Book Jobs Search sun abstract Helios logo Overview Goals & Challenges Publications Research Highlights In the News SERC...

  20. Belarus: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    photovoltaic modules) Reegle logo.png Policy and Regulatory Overview 3 Expression error: Unexpected > operator. SWERA logo.png SWERA View the Solar and Wind Energy Resource...

  1. End-use Breakdown: The Building Energy Modeling Blog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling Blog en EnergyPlus Logo Debuts on Revit Toolbar http:energy.goveerebuildingsarticlesenergyplus-logo-debuts-revit-toolbar

  2. Uptake: The CBI Blog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy.gov EnergyPlus Logo Debuts on Revit Toolbar http:energy.goveerebuildingsarticlesenergyplus-logo-debuts-revit-toolbar

  3. U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 Sponsor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (DOE) word mark, the WINDPOWER logo, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory logo, event ... U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COLLEGIATE WIND COMPETITION 2016 IDENTITY GUIDELINES ...

  4. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991...

  5. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series....

  6. FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Image of the FUPWG logo which displays an illustration of the Liberty Bell. The logo reads ...

  7. BAYESLOC

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002677WKSTN00 Bayesian Mulitple-Event Location https://missions.llnl.gov/nonproliferation/nuclear-explosion

  8. FY2012 Engineering Research & Technology Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Monya

    2014-07-22

    This report documents engineering research and technology performed by LLNL during fiscal year 2012.

  9. TORUSTEST V1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002225MLTPL00 MPI Multicore Torus Communication Benchmark https://asc.llnl.gov/sequoia/benchmarks/

  10. SLURM V2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    001902MLTPL02 Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management https://computing.llnl.gov/linux/slurm/

  11. SAMRAI V3.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    001825MLTPL01 Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure https://computation.llnl.gov/casc/samrai

  12. XBRAID

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003201MLTPL00 Parallel time integration software https://computation.llnl.gov/projects/parallel-time-integrat

  13. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Gambacorta, Antonietta; Gallotta, Valerio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Fagotti, Anna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco; Autorino, Rosa; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6Gy (1.8cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8Gy administered with CBs (0.9cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if>45 pCR were registered (? error = 0.05; ? error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36months (range: 7-85months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very encouraging local control rate, with acceptable toxicity.

  14. Application of External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Infrared Lasers to Nanosecond Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Condensed-Phase Samples Following Pulse Radiolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills, D.C.; Cook, A.R.; Fujita, E.; George, M.W.; Miller, J.R.; Preses, J.M.; Wishart, J.F.

    2010-06-01

    Pulse radiolysis, utilizing short pulses of high-energy electrons from accelerators, is a powerful method for rapidly generating reduced or oxidized species and other free radicals in solution. Combined with fast time-resolved spectroscopic detection (typically in the ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared), it is invaluable for monitoring the reactivity of species subjected to radiolysis on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. However, it is often difficult to identify the transient intermediates definitively due to a lack of structural information in the spectral bands. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy offers the structural specificity necessary for mechanistic investigations but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis experiments. For example, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy has only been applied to a handful of gas-phase studies, limited mainly by several technical challenges. We have exploited recent developments in commercial external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) technology to construct a nanosecond TRIR apparatus that has allowed, for the first time, TRIR spectra to be recorded following pulse radiolysis of condensed-phase samples. Near single-shot sensitivity of DeltaOD <1 x 10(-3) has been achieved, with a response time of <20 ns. Using two continuous-wave EC-QCLs, the current apparatus covers a probe region from 1890-2084 cm(-1), and TRIR spectra are acquired on a point-by-point basis by recording transient absorption decay traces at specific IR wavelengths and combining these to generate spectral time slices. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by monitoring the formation and decay of the one-electron reduced form of the CO(2) reduction catalyst, [Re(I)(bpy)(CO)(3)(CH(3)CN)](+), in acetonitrile with nanosecond time resolution following pulse radiolysis. Characteristic red-shifting of the nu(CO) IR bands confirmed that one-electron reduction of the complex took place. The availability of TRIR detection with high sensitivity opens up a wide range of mechanistic pulse radiolysis investigations that were previously difficult or impossible to perform with transient UV/visible detection.

  15. Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sesko, S.C.; Marchant, M.

    1997-02-24

    Objective was to follow the cognitive and creative processes demonstrated by student research participants as they integrated a developing knowledge of ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, into a personal and idiosyncratic visual, graphical, or multimedia product. The participants, all non-scientists, involved in this process, attended a series of design classes, sponsored by LLNL at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA. As a result of this study, we have become interested in the possibility of similar characteristics between scientists and artists. We have also become interested in the different processes that can be used to teach science to non-scientists, so that they are able to understand and portray scientific information.

  16. Environmental report 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, G.C.; Gallegos, G.M.; Wander, S.M.

    1992-12-31

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a US Department of Energy facility operated by the University of California, serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capability with a special focus on national security. During 1992, the Environmental Protection Department conducted sampling of air, sewage effluent, ground water, surface water, soil, vegetation and foodstuffs, and took measurements of environmental radiation. It performed more than 150,000 analyses of environmental samples. The analytical results are summarized in the chapters that follow, along with evaluations of the impact of radioactive and nonradioactive materials, a discussion of the effects of LLNL operations on the environment, and a summary of the activities undertaken to comply with local, state, and federal environmental laws.

  17. Institutional Research and Development: (Annual report), FY 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strack, B.

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development (IR and D) program was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Director in October 1984. The IR and D program fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology; disciplinary research to create varied, innovative approaches to selected scientific fields; and long-term research in support of the defense and energy missions at LLNL. Each project in the IR and D program was selected after personal interviews by the Director and his delegates and was deemed to show unusual promise. These projects include research in the following fields: chemistry and materials science, computation, earth sciences, engineering, nuclear chemistry, biotechnology, environmental consequences of nuclear war, geophysics and planetary physics, and supercomputer research and development. A separate section of the report is devoted to research projects receiving individual awards.

  18. Gamma radiolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbon, R.E.; Mincher, B.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    This program is the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) component of a joint collarborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this effort is to demonstrate a viable process for breaking down hazardous halogenated organic wastes to simpler, non-hazardous waste using high energy ionizing radiation. The INEL effort focuses on the use of spent reactor fuel gamma radiation sources to decompose complex wastes such as PCBs. At LLNL, halogenated solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene are being studied using accelerator radiation sources. The INEL irradiation experiments concentrated on a single PCB congener so that a limited set of decomposition reactions could be studied. The congener 2,2{prime}, 3,3{prime},4,5{prime},6,6{prime} - octachlorobiphenyl was examined following exposure to various gamma doses at the Advanced Test Reactor (AIR) spent fuel pool. The decomposition rates and products in several solvents are discussed. 3 refs.

  19. Gamma radiolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbon, R.E.; Mincher, B.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    This program is the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) component of a joint collarborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this effort is to demonstrate a viable process for breaking down hazardous halogenated organic wastes to simpler, non-hazardous waste using high energy ionizing radiation. The INEL effort focuses on the use of spent reactor fuel gamma radiation sources to decompose complex wastes such as PCBs. At LLNL, halogenated solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene are being studied using accelerator radiation sources. The INEL irradiation experiments concentrated on a single PCB congener so that a limited set of decomposition reactions could be studied. The congener 2,2{prime}, 3,3{prime},4,5{prime},6,6{prime} - octachlorobiphenyl was examined following exposure to various gamma doses at the Advanced Test Reactor (AIR) spent fuel pool. The decomposition rates and products in several solvents are discussed. 3 refs.

  20. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine (Pinus elliottiivar.densa) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmoretree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.less

  1. Nomogram Prediction of Survival and Recurrence in Patients With Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Changhoon; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Jin Ho; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To develop nomograms for predicting the overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation therapy after curative resection. Methods and Materials: From January 1995 through August 2006, a total of 166 consecutive patients underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression was performed, and this Cox model was used as the basis for the nomograms of OS and RFS. We calculated concordance indices of the constructed nomograms and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Results: The OS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 60.8% and 42.5%, respectively, and the RFS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 52.5% and 38.2%, respectively. The model containing age, sex, tumor location, histologic differentiation, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement was selected for nomograms. The bootstrap-corrected concordance index of the nomogram for OS and RFS was 0.63 and 0.62, respectively, and that of AJCC staging for OS and RFS was 0.50 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions: We developed nomograms that predicted survival and recurrence better than AJCC staging. With caution, clinicians may use these nomograms as an adjunct to or substitute for AJCC staging for predicting an individual's prognosis and offering tailored adjuvant therapy.

  2. Twelve month follow-up report of the conference to promote international sales of US geothermal equipment (CORECT Project): Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.N.

    1988-12-01

    The reverse trade mission ''Conference to Promote International Sales of US Geothermal Equipment'' was organized and managed by the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) in collaboration with the California Energy Commission (CEC). The mission was held in late September/October of 1987 and was well received by the 23 participants from 18 different countries. Approximately $275,000 in immediate sales can be attributed directly to the program and the estimate of potential future sales runs as high as $4,765,000. It was felt by the attendees that the program was well organized and executed and that the caliber of persons invited to attend was optimum. All of the attendees stated that the function was very informative and beneficial and that they would recommend to others that they attend similar functions. In order to be really effective in exporting a company, a country must be highly visible to potential purchasers. Although this function lasted only two weeks it was considered as a prime first step in the development of a strong US geothermal technology export base program. As a part of the effort to maintain this presence the GRC recommends that this function be followed by other similar functions, courses, seminars, and specific field trips. In addition every effort should be made for US government and industry representatives to visit various countries as often as possible. The GRC is working toward developing an international information-dissemination program, which would include the development of courses for geothermal units in foreign countries.

  3. Politics of NATO short-range nuclear modernization 1983-1990: The follow-on-to-Lance missile decisions. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    The follow-on to Lance (FOTL) missile was born in 1983 with a consensual decision by NATO, in the face of a worsening strategic situation, to pursue short-range nuclear force (SNF) modernization. The program continued despite increasing popular and political opposition in Europe. It ended with a May 1990 cancellation decision by the American bureaucracy that reflected converging pressures from the international system, from America's allies, and from the domestic arena. The thesis attempts to answer each question through the use of one of three analytical perspectives: systemic theory, alliance politics, or domestic politics. It concludes that during this time of diminishing threat at the systemic level, domestic-level factors within the German and American milieu became more important. While certain perspectives are better at explaining particular aspects or temporal periods of modernization cases, analysts should not focus on one perspective to the exclusion of others. Unexplained residual variables fall through the filter of each perspective, calling for further study by other approaches.

  4. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii var. densa ) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmore » tree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.« less

  5. A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis of Survival Outcome Following Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With N2 Nodal Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou Bingwen; Xu Yong; Li Tao; Li Wenhui; Tang Bangxian; Zhou Lin; Li Lu; Liu Yongmei; Zhu Jiang; Huang Meijuan; Wang Jin; Ren Li; Gong Youlin; Che Guowei; Liu Lunxu; Hou Mei; Lu You

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the role of postoperative chemoradiotherapy (POCRT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with N2 lymph node involvement. Methods and Materials: This study included 183 patients from four centers in southwest China who underwent radical section of Stage III-N2 NSCLC without any preoperative therapy. One hundred and four were treated with POCRT and 79 with postoperative chemotherapy (POCT) alone. The median radiation dose to clinical target volume (CTV) was 50 Gy (varying between 48 and 54 Gy), whereas the cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy ranged from two to six with a median of four. Results: The median duration of follow-up was 72 months. The 5-year overall survival rate (OS) was 30.5% in the POCRT group, and 14.4% in the POCT group (p = 0.007). The 5-year disease-free survival rate (DFS) was 22.2% in POCRT group and 9.3% in POCT group (p = 0.003). In a multivariate analysis, N1 nodal involvement (N1+/N2+) was associated with significantly worse OS (HR = 1.454, 95% CI, 1.012-2.087, p = 0.043) and DFS (HR = 1.685, 95% CI, 1.196-2.372, p = 0.003). Absence of radiotherapy and treatment with fewer than three cycles of chemotherapy both were poor prognostic factors for both OS and DFS. Conclusions: As compared with chemotherapy alone, adjuvant treatment with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy improves survival in patients with completely resected Stage III-N2 nodal disease in NSCLC. Future study of treatment modality with radiotherapy and chemotherapy is warranted, especially focusing on both N1 and N2 nodal status.

  6. Tumor Shrinkage Assessed by Volumetric MRI in Long-Term Follow-Up After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopp, Christine; Theodorou, Marilena; Poullos, Nektarios; Jacob, Vesna; Astner, Sabrina T.; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of residual or recurrent nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Methods and Materials: We assessed exact tumor volume shrinkage in 16 patients with NFPA after FSRT. All patients had previously undergone surgery. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and median 63 months (range, 28-100 months) after FSRT. MRI was performed as an axial three-dimensional gradient echo T1-weighted sequence at 1.6-mm slice thickness without gap (3D MRI). Results: Mean tumor size of all 16 pituitary adenomas before treatment was 7.4 mL (3.3-18.9 mL). We found shrinkage of the treated pituitary adenoma in all patients. Within a median follow-up of 63 months (28-100 months) an absolute mean volume reduction of 3.8 mL (0.9-12.4 mL) was seen. The mean relative size reduction compared with the volume before radiotherapy was 51% (22%-95%). Shrinkage measured by 3D MRI was greater at longer time intervals after radiotherapy. A strong negative correlation between the initial tumor volume and the absolute volume reduction after FSRT was found. There was no correlation between tumor size reduction and patient age, sex, or number of previous surgeries. Conclusions: By using 3D MRI in all patients undergoing FSRT of an NFPA, tumor shrinkage is detected. Our data demonstrate that volumetric assessment based on 3D MRI adds additional information to routinely used radiological response measurements. After FSRT a mean relative size reduction of 51% can be expected within 5 years.

  7. UMass-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UMass Resources UMass logo The following links provide information about important local (UMass Amherst) campus and departmental offices and resources, including major interdepartmental research centers that pursue work closely akin to research that was initiated or expanded under PHaSE. The last four links go to sites with energy or research news of potential interest to scientists interested in organic electronic materails. Major UMass User Facilities Vice-Chancellor for Research UMass

  8. Better Plants Program Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better Plants Program Partners Better Plants Program Partners Regional distribution of Better Plants partner facilities. Regional distribution of Better Plants partner facilities. Better Plants Logo.jpg DOE recognizes the following companies for their commitment to reducing the energy intensity of their U.S. manufacturing operations by 25% or more within 10 years. These Better Plants Program Partners set ambitious goals, establish energy management plans, and report progress annually to DOE.

  9. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration / Radiological Advisory Team NRAT Logo NNSA's Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA follow-on assets as needed. The NRAT is composed of scientists and technicians who can provide advice or conduct limited operations.

  10. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration / Radiological Advisory Team NRAT Logo NNSA's Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA follow-on assets as needed. The NRAT is composed of scientists and technicians who can provide advice or conduct limited operations.

  11. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Lin, Jun-Zhong; An, Xin; Luo, Jie-Lin; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen as induction, concomitant, and consolidation chemotherapy to the conventional radiation is well tolerated. The strategy is highly effective in terms of pCR and major regression, which warrants further investigation.

  12. Toxicokinetics of α-thujone following intravenous and gavage administration of α-thujone or α- and β-thujone mixture in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waidyanatha, Suramya; Johnson, Jerry D.; Hong, S. Peter; Robinson, Veronica Godfrey; Gibbs, Seth; Graves, Steven W.; Hooth, Michelle J.; Smith, Cynthia S.

    2013-09-01

    Plants containing thujone have widespread use and hence have significant human exposure. α-Thujone caused seizures in rodents following gavage administration. We investigated the toxicokinetics of α-thujone in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice following intravenous and gavage administration of α-thujone or a mixture of α- and β-thujone (which will be referred to as α,β-thujone). Absorption of α-thujone following gavage administration was rapid without any dose-, species-, sex- or test article-related effect. Absolute bioavailability of α-thujone following administration of α-thujone or α,β-thujone was generally higher in rats than in mice. In rats, females had higher bioavailability than males following administration of either test article although a sex difference was not observed in mice. C{sub max} and AUC{sub ∞} increased greater than proportional to the dose in female rats following administration of α-thujone and in male and female mice following administration of α,β-thujone suggesting possible saturation of elimination kinetics with increasing dose. Dose-adjusted AUC{sub ∞} for male and female rats was 5- to 15-fold and 3- to 24-fold higher than mice counterparts following administration of α-thujone and α,β-thujone, respectively (p-value < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Following both intravenous and gavage administration, α-thujone was distributed to the brains of rats and mice with females, in general, having higher brain:plasma ratios than males. These data are in support of the observed toxicity of α-thujone and α,β-thujone where females were more sensitive than males of both species to α-thujone-induced neurotoxicity. In general there was no difference in toxicokinetics between test articles when normalized to α-thujone concentration. - Highlights: • Absorption of α-thujone following gavage administration was rapid in rats and mice. • Rats undergo higher exposure to α-thujone than mice. • α-Thujone brain:plasma ratios were greater than 1 in both rats and mice. • Brain:plasma ratio in females was higher than in males. • These data are in support of the observed neurotoxicity of α-thujone.

  13. Science, technology, and the industrialization of laser-driven processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.I.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Members of the laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) reviewed potential applications of lasers in industry, some of which are: isotope separation; cleanup of radioactive waste; trace impurity removal; selective chemical reactions; photochemical activation or dissociation of gases; control of combustion particulates; crystal and powder chemistry; and laser induced biochemistry. Many of these areas are currently under active study in the community. The investigation at LLNL focused on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium because of the large demand (> 1000 tonnes/year) and high product enrichment price (> $600/kg of product) for material used as fuel in commercial light-water nuclear power reactors. They also believed that once the technology was fully developed and deployed, it could be applied directly to separating many elements economically on an industrial scale. The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program at LLNL has an extensive uranium and plutonium program of >$100 M in FY85 and a minor research program for other elements. This report describes the AVLIS program conducted covering the following topics; candidate elements; separative work units; spectroscopic selectivety; major systems; facilities; integrated process model;multivariable sensitivety studies; world market; and US enrichment enterprise. 23 figs. (AT)

  14. CERES progress report: Phases 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Ambrosiano, J.; Kercher, J.; Penner, J.E.; Emanuel, W.

    1994-05-27

    The CERES project represents a long-term commitment of LLNL`s Global Climate Research Division to the EPA. The goal is to build an Earth System Model (ESM) with the ability in the near future to assist EPA in carrying out its responsibilities in the environmental policy and assessment arena, with particular emphasis on the terrestrial ecosystem components of the Earth system. There are two complementary aspects of the CERES development plan. The first is to provide a computational framework and modeling infrastructure for ESM development. The goal is to create an ``open architecture`` enabling submodels from different research groups studying terrestrial ecosystems to become part of a fully-coupled model of the Earth`s climate system. The second goal is to contribute fundamentally to understanding of the terrestrial component of the Earth system by developing advanced models. During this first phase of the CERES project, these two activities have been somewhat separate; the software engineering and framework building activity having been done in parallel with terrestrial model development. These two activities are merging as the framework becomes more mature, with robust software tools, and with a growing complement of tuned and benchmarked submodels and as the ecosystem models become fully incorporated into the ESM modeling framework. Two appendices contain the following papers: (1) ``Research Recommendations to the EPA in Support of Earth System Modeling Activities,`` LLNL CERES project report; and (2) ``Progress Report on Terrestrial Model Development: Research in Support of the CERES Earth System Modeling Project,`` LLNL CERES project report.

  15. AARP submits the following comments on consumers and smart grid issues in response to the Request for Information (Request or RFI) on smart grid policy and logistical challenges, published by the Department of Energy (DOE) on September 16, 2010

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments to: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges David Certner Legislative Counsel and Legislative Policy Director AARP Government Relations and Advocacy Olivia Wein, Staff Attorney National Consumer Law Center Tyson Slocum, Director Public Citizen's Energy Program November 1, 2010 2 CONSUMER COMMENTERS: AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen submit the following comments on

  16. 2013 4th Quarter Follow Ups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    costs and benefits 14 723-1,057 Incl udes I-5 Corri dor project (440-528) a nd Boardman to Hemi ngway project (250-400) Cancelled, combined with other project(s), deferred...

  17. Press Availability Following Meeting with President Mubarak ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I appreciate very much his good advice and his commitment to the longstanding friendship between the United States and Egypt. As President Bush said last week in Sharm el Sheikh, ...

  18. 2014 IPR Workshop Additional Follow Ups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accounted for 36% of injuries. One of which is a severe fall from a tower. The Safety Perception Survey has been completed. A presentation on the findings will be made to the...

  19. Gazprom follows unique course to privatization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surovtsev, D.

    1996-03-25

    Unlike the oil industry, Russian gas is dominated by an officially sanctioned monopoly--Joint Stock Society (RAO) Gazprom. The company produces, transports, and exports most of the gas in Russia, the world leader in gas reserves. Two major challenges confront Gazprom as it adapts to existence as a private concern. One is financing of a major pipeline to Europe for export of gas produced in fields under development in the Yamal Peninsula. The other is collection of debts owed it by customers, both in and outside of Russia, for past gas deliveries. While it grapples with those challenges and the strains of operating a huge gas production and transportation system, Gazprom also must deal with questions about whether it should continue as a monopoly--questions not likely to be answered until Russia`s political situation is more certain than it is now. This paper reviews Gazprom`s production, processing, gas transportation, and marketing businesses. It describes its financing strategies for construction of new pipelines.

  20. 2012 4th Qtr Follow-ups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    full rights for a total of 40aMW for a revenue forecast of 2.7 million. Actual elections came in at 14-16 aMW and at a lower price the FY 2012 REC revenues came in at...