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Sample records for logan sholar signature

  1. Signature

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jeffrey Logan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeffrey Logan Photo of Jeffrey Logan Jeffrey Logan is the group manager for the Market and Policy Impact Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Senior Energy Analyst (Group Manager) On staff since November 2008 Phone number: 303-384-7474 E-mail: jeffrey.logan@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Clean energy policy analysis Carbon mitigation Energy security Chinese energy policy and markets Primary research interests Clean energy and carbon markets Renewable energy policy Linkages

  3. Jonathan Logan | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Ian McNulty) Jonathan Logan Telephone 630.252.4874 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail jmlogan

  4. Logan Daum > Analyst - DC Energy > Center Alumni > The Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Logan Daum Analyst - DC Energy lrd56@cornell.edu Formerly a graduate student with the Fennie Group, Logan joined DC Energy in June of 2013...

  5. City of Logan, Utah (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logan, Utah (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Logan Place: Utah Phone Number: (435) 716-9090 Website: www.loganutah.orgLP Outage Hotline: (435) 716-9090...

  6. Logan County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West Virginia Holden, West Virginia Logan, West Virginia Mallory, West Virginia Man, West Virginia Mitchell Heights, West Virginia Mount Gay-Shamrock, West Virginia...

  7. Logan County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Illinois Middletown, Illinois Mount Pulaski, Illinois New Holland, Illinois San Jose, Illinois Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLoganCounty,Illinois...

  8. Signature of Edward Bruce Held Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature

  9. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature

  10. Logan County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in Arkansas. Its FIPS County Code is 083. It is classified as...

  11. Logan County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 141. It is classified as...

  12. Logan County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 091. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  13. Logan County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in North Dakota. Its FIPS County Code is 047. It is classified as...

  14. Logan County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in Nebraska. Its FIPS County Code is 113. It is classified as...

  15. Logan County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in Oklahoma. Its FIPS County Code is 083. It is classified as...

  16. Logan County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in Colorado. Its FIPS County Code is 075. It is classified as...

  17. Original Signatures on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signatures on File

  18. Original Signatures on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Original Signatures on File

  19. EA-1812: Haxtun Wind Energy Project, Logan and Phillips County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding through the Community Renewable Energy Deployment Program to Phillips County for design, permitting, and construction of an approximately 30-megawatt wind energy project, known as Haxtun Wind Project, within Phillips and Logan counties in northeastern Colorado. The proposed project consists of 18 wind turbines that would interconnect to the Highline Electric Cooperative equipment inside Western Area Power Administration's Haxtun substation just south of the Town of Haxtun.

  20. Signature on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signature on File Signature on File 5/29/08

  1. Signature of Charles Spencer Signature of Charles Spencer Signature of Charles Spencer

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Spencer Signature of Charles Spencer Signature of Charles Spencer Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Willie Wilson Signature of Willie Wilson Signature of Willie Wilson Signature of Jill Albaugh

  2. Signature of Dennis Donati Signature of Dennis Donati Signature of Doug Dearolph

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Doug Dearolph Signature of Doug Dearolph Signature of John Temple Signature of John Temple Signature of Carol Elliott Signature of Carol Elliott

  3. Signature of George Miller Signature of George Miller Signature of Alice Williams

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    George Miller Signature of George Miller Signature of Alice Williams Signature of Alice Williams Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson

  4. Signature of Penrose Albright Signature of Penrose Albright

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Penrose Albright Signature of Penrose Albright Signature of Penrose Albright Signature of Penrose Albright Signature of Kimberly A Davis Signature of Kimberly A Davis Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson

  5. Signature of Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole

  6. Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J. Dearolph Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J. Dearolph Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J. Dearolph Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J. Dearolph Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J.

  7. Signature of Darby Dietrich Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Darby Dietrich Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Steven Lawrence

  8. Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of James Eanes Signature of James Eanes Signature of James Eanes Signature of JoAnn Wright

  9. Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Steven Lawrence Signature of Darby Dietrich Signature of Darby Dietrich

  10. Signature of Dennis Donati Signature of Dennis Donati Signature of Douglas Dearolph

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Douglas Dearolph Signature of Douglas Dearolph Signature of Douglas Dearolph

  11. Signature of Edward B. Held Signature of Edward B. Held Signature of Edward B. Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B. Held Signature of Edward B. Held Signature of Edward B. Held Signature of Edward B.

  12. Signature of Edward Held Signature of Edward Held Signature of Edward Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Held Signature of Edward Held Signature of Edward Held Signature of Edward

  13. Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer

  14. Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Geoffrey Beausoleil Signature of Geoffrey Beausoleil Signature of James Eanes Signature of James Eanes Signature of JoAnn Wright

  15. Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Patty Wagner Signature of Jerry McDowell Signature of Jerry McDowell Signature of Kimberly Davis Signature of Kimberly Davis Signature of Kimberly Sawyer Signature of Kimberly Sawyer Signature of Richard Sena Signature of Richard Sena

  16. Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L....

  17. Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark

  18. Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Ralph B Tennants II

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mark Holecek Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Ralph B Tennants II Signature of Ralph B Tennants II

  19. Science of Signatures - Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Science of Signatures - Past Programs Science of Signatures Program Science of Signatures - Past Programs Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860...

  20. Science of Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science of Signatures Science of Signatures (SoS) The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. Contacts Pillar Champion Nancy Sauer Email Pillar Contact Gene Peterson Email Science of Signatures (SoS) Overview In its broadest and simplest sense, a "signature" is any information that is unique, recognizable, and useful. A handwritten mark as a means of demonstrating authenticity is a familiar example, as is the pattern variation

  1. Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Geoffrey L. BeausoleilSignature of Geoffrey L. Beausoleil Signature of Geoffrey L. BeausoleilSignature of Geoffrey L. Beausoleil Signature of Geoffrey L.

  2. 2014 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email 2014 Science of Signatures Program Agenda 2014 Projects and Teams 2014 Science of Signatures Speakers and Presentations LDRD Penta Chart Template ER Proposal Template...

  3. 2015 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science of Signatures Program Agenda (PDF) 2015 Projects and Teams 2015 Science of Signatures Speakers and Presentations LDRD Penta Chart Template (PDF) ER Proposal Template (PDF)...

  4. Meteor signature interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Meteor signatures contain information about the constituents of space debris and present potential false alarms to early warnings systems. Better models could both extract the maximum scientific information possible and reduce their danger. Accurate predictions can be produced by models of modest complexity, which can be inverted to predict the sizes, compositions, and trajectories of object from their signatures for most objects of interest and concern.

  5. Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Steven Erhart

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of John Woolery Signature of John Woolery 2 Performance Evaluation Plan (PEP) Pantex Plant Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC Contract No. DE-AC54-00AL66620 October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2012 A. Pursuant to the terms and conditions of the Contract, this Performance Evaluation Plan (PEP) sets forth the criteria upon which the Contractor's performance of work under the contract will

  6. Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly Davis Lebak Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly Davis Lebak Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly Davis Lebak Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly Davis Lebak Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly

  7. Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Steven J. LawrenceSignature of Steven J. Lawrence

  8. Help:Signatures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    articles. Default signature options There are three default options. Four tildes are standard (full signature). Typing three tildes results in a username-only signature...

  9. Signature of Bret E Knapp Signature of Kimberly Davis-Lebak

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Bret E Knapp Signature of Kimberly Davis-Lebak Signature of Homer Williamson

  10. Original Signature On File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signature On File Department of Energy Carl sbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 8822 1 June 10, 2009 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of CBFO Final Audit Report A-09-12 , Los Alamos National Laboratory Central Characterization Project TRU Waste Characterization and Certification Dear Mr. Zappe: Enclosed is the Carlsbad Field Office

  11. Original Signature on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Original Signature on File Page8 of 8 M. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES 1. The owner/operator must maintain an adequately trained onsite RCRA emergency coordinator to direct emergency procedures which could resultfrom fires, explosions or releases of PCB containing waste at the Facility. The owner/operator must submitthe name and qualifications of the emergency coordinator within sixty (60) daysof the effective dateof this approval. 2. The owner/operator must maintain in good working orderany equipment

  12. Science of Signatures Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Signatures Advanced Studies Institute Application Form Do not use MAC Preview tool to edit this form as it corrupts the data. Application deadline is February 21, 2016 5:00 PM (US Mountain Standard) A complete application package includes: * This Application Form * Cover Letter - 1 page cover letter describing your describing your interest in participating as an Advanced Studies Scholar and of your professional goals. * CV (resume) * One (1) Letter of Recommendation from a Reference Applicant

  13. Knowledge Signatures for Information Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Judi; Cowell, Andrew J.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Mark A.

    2003-10-25

    This paper introduces the notion of a knowledge signature: a concise, ontologically-driven representation of the semantic characteristics of data. Knowledge signatures provide programmatic access to data semantics while allowing comparisons to be made across different types of data such as text, images or video, enabling efficient, automated information integration. Through observation, which determines the degree of association between data and ontological concepts, and refinement, which uses the axioms and structure of the domain ontology to place the signature more accurately within the context of the domain, knowledge signatures can be created. A comparison of such signatures for two different pieces of data results in a measure of their semantic separation. This paper discusses the definition of knowledge signatures along with the design and prototype implementation of a knowledge signature generator.

  14. Signature CERN-URSS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  15. 2015 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Projects and Teams 2015 Science of Signatures Speakers and Presentations LDRD Penta Chart TemplateER Proposal Template RELATED LINKS Apply Here Solicitation Flyer...

  16. The Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Science of Signatures Program Application Process How to Apply Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818...

  17. Science of Signatures - Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science of Signatures - Past Programs Science of Signatures Program View program resources from previous years. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email 2014 2015 RELATED LINKS Staff Publications UCSD Engineering

  18. Temperature effects on airgun signatures (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Temperature effects on airgun signatures Experiments in an 850 liter water tank were performed in order to study temperature effects on airgun signatures, and to...

  19. Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time dynamics on the ... Title: Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time dynamics on ...

  20. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Promoting and supporting high-quality, cutting-edge science in...

  1. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    2014-09-30

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of the secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.

  2. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report provides details on a technique to describe molecules on a computer, called Signature, as well as the computer-aided molecule design algorithm built around Signature. Two applications are provided of the CAMD algorithm with Signature. The first describes the design of green solvents based on data in the GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Solvent Selection Guide. The second provides novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor ligands with some optimally predicted properties. In addition to using the CAMD algorithm with Signature, it is demonstrated how to employ Signature in a high-throughput screening study. Here, after classifying both active and inactive inhibitors for the protein Factor XIa using Signature, the model developed is used to screen a large, publicly-available database called PubChem for the most active compounds.

  3. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  4. National Nanotechnology Initiative's Signature Initiative Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanotechnology Initiative National Nanotechnology Initiative's Signature Initiative Sustainable Nanomanufacturing: Creating the Industries of the Future Dr. Robert Pohanka Director ...

  5. Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signature techniques directly tie to the science that was developed during that time. The body of scientific knowledge that grew from these origins is foundational today to our...

  6. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  7. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark; Gosnell, Tom B.; Ham, Cheryl; Perkins, Dwight; Wong, James

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  8. Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office Manager's ...

  9. Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing, Training, and ... Testing, Training, and Signature Devices Y-12 manufactures specialized uranium testing, training, and signature devices to support the nuclear detection...

  10. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  11. Manhattan Project Signature Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manhattan Project » Manhattan Project Signature Facilities Manhattan Project Signature Facilities The "Gadget" device fully assembled atop the 100-foot firing tower, shortly before the Trinity test. July 15, 1945. The "Gadget" device fully assembled atop the 100-foot firing tower, shortly before the Trinity test. July 15, 1945. New! Manhattan Project National Historical Park New! K-25 Virtual Museum The Department of Energy, in the mid-1990s, developed a list of eight

  12. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  13. Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory Projects that involve signatures are taking place in every corner of the Laboratory. Top. One of the world's most powerful computers, Cielo is a Cray Computing system and a project of ACES, the New Mexico Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale, a joint project of Sandia and Los Alamos na- tional laboratories. Cielo is the next-generation capability-class platform for the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, and it allows signa- ture modeling

  14. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  15. LoganEnergy Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation specializes in planning, designing, developing, and implementing fuel cell commercialization strategies. The company is an authorized representative of the UTC...

  16. A Methodology for Calculating Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Marc Louis; Wilcox, Trevor; Bathke, Charles G.; James, Michael R.

    2015-05-01

    A rigorous formalism is presented for calculating radiation signatures from both Special Nuclear Material (SNM) as well as radiological sources. The use of MCNP6 in conjunction with CINDER/ORIGEN is described to allow for the determination of both neutron and photon leakages from objects of interest. In addition, a description of the use of MCNP6 to properly model the background neutron and photon sources is also presented. Examinations of the physics issues encountered in the modeling are investigated so as to allow for guidance in the user discerning the relevant physics to incorporate into general radiation signature calculations. Furthermore, examples are provided to assist in delineating the pertinent physics that must be accounted for. Finally, examples of detector modeling utilizing MCNP are provided along with a discussion on the generation of Receiver Operating Curves, which are the suggested means by which to determine detectability radiation signatures emanating from objects.

  17. Energy Signatures: a proposed new design tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1986-04-01

    Energy Signatures is a proposed new technique for aiding a designer in selecting and sizing passive solar elements on a building. Hourly heat flux profiles for each candidate design element are determined. These profiles are then matched to the hourly energy requirement of the space accounting for weather conditions, internal heat profiles of the space, and the mass characteristics of the building. Simulation analysis techniques are used to determine the Energy Signatures, the load profiles, and check the final result. Least-squares techniques are used to determine the optimum mix of strategies. Examples are given to illustrate development of the method up to the present. Future directions and possibilities are outlined.

  18. Padlock and RCA signature predication software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-10-24

    This software predicts DNA signatures compatible with padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA) platforms. Specifically, the software takes a multiple sequence alignment, generates a consensus of conserved bases, and from these conserved regions selects forward and reverse primers that are immediately adjacent to one another, which is the desired orientation for assays such as padlock probes and RCA.

  19. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Signature Identification Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-03-17

    This is an extendable open-source Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) signature design program called LAVA (LAMP Assay Versatile Analysis). LAVA was created in response to limitations of existing LAMP signature programs.

  20. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Samuel, Todd J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Tucker, Brian J.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Skorpik, James R.; Reid, Larry D.; Munley, John T.; Pappas, Richard A.; Wright, Bob W.; Panetta, Paul D.; Thompson, Jason S.

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  1. Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing, Training, and ... Testing, Training, and Signature Devices Y-12 manufactures specialized uranium testing, training, and signature devices to support the nuclear detection community. As part of our national security mission, and in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we are producing unique test objects for passive gamma ray signature analysis. Y-12 is fabricating new Highly Enriched Uranium Equivalent Radiological Signature Training Devices, tools that use an innovative

  2. Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chicago Office | Department of Energy Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office PDF icon Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National

  3. Energy Signatures: A passive solar design tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Lekov, A.B.

    1987-12-01

    Energy signatures is a new technique for aiding a designer in selecting and sizing passive solar elements in a building. Hourly heat flux profiles for each candidate design element are determined. These profiles are then matched to the hourly energy requirement of the space accounting for weather conditions, internal heat profiles of the space, and the mass characteristics of the building. Simulation analysis techniques are used to determine the energy signatures and the building load profile, and to check the final result. Least-squares techniques are used to determine the optimum mix of strategies. Examples are given to illustrate development of the method up to the present time. In addition, future directions and possibilities are outlined. 5 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for large-scale, highly-efficient efforts to identify and verify infection-specific host NA signatures in human populations.

  5. Chameleon dark energy models with characteristic signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gannouji, Radouane; Moraes, Bruno; Polarski, David; Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A.; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-12-15

    In chameleon dark energy models, local gravity constraints tend to rule out parameters in which observable cosmological signatures can be found. We study viable chameleon potentials consistent with a number of recent observational and experimental bounds. A novel chameleon field potential, motivated by f(R) gravity, is constructed where observable cosmological signatures are present both at the background evolution and in the growth rate of the perturbations. We study the evolution of matter density perturbations on low redshifts for this potential and show that the growth index today {gamma}{sub 0} can have significant dispersion on scales relevant for large scale structures. The values of {gamma}{sub 0} can be even smaller than 0.2 with large variations of {gamma} on very low redshifts for the model parameters constrained by local gravity tests. This gives a possibility to clearly distinguish these chameleon models from the {Lambda}-cold-dark-matter ({Lambda}CDM) model in future high-precision observations.

  6. Automated defect spatial signature analysis for semiconductor manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for performing automated defect spatial signature alysis on a data set representing defect coordinates and wafer processing information includes categorizing data from the data set into a plurality of high level categories, classifying the categorized data contained in each high level category into user-labeled signature events, and correlating the categorized, classified signature events to a present or incipient anomalous process condition.

  7. (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    field theory of inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete shift symmetry in the effective field theory of ...

  8. Auroral Signatures of Ballooning Mode Near Substorm Onset: Open...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Onset: Open Geospace General Circulation Model Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Auroral Signatures of Ballooning Mode Near Substorm Onset: Open Geospace ...

  9. A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S.; Poyé, A.; Yagi, M.; Garbet, X.; Sen, A.

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

  10. Extracellular Signatures as Indicators of Processing Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-09

    As described in other chapters within this volume, many aspects of microbial cells vary with culture conditions and therefore can potentially be analyzed as forensic signatures of growth conditions. In addition to changes or variations in components of the microbes themselves, extracellular materials indicative of production processes may remain associated with the final bacterial product. It is well recognized that even with considerable effort to make pure products such as fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals, trace impurities from components or synthesis steps associated with production processes can be detected in the final product. These impurities can be used as indicators of production source or methods, such as to help connect drugs of abuse to supply chains. Extracellular residue associated with microbial cells could similarly help to characterize production processes. For successful growth of microorganisms on culture media there must be an available source of carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphate and sulfur, trace metals, water and vitamins. The pH, temperature, and a supply of oxygen or other gases must also be appropriate for a given organism for successful culture. The sources of these components and the range in temperature, pH and other variables has adapted over the years with currently a wide range of possible combinations of media components, recipes and parameters to choose from for a given organism. Because of this wide variability in components, mixtures of components, and other parameters, there is the potential for differentiation of cultured organisms based on changes in culture conditions. The challenge remains how to narrow the field of potential combinations and be able to attribute variations in the final bacterial product and extracellular signatures associated with the final product to information about the culture conditions or recipe used in the production of that product.

  11. Starry messages: Searching for signatures of interstellar archaeology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archaeological artifacts such as Dyson spheres or Kardashev civilizations is an interesting alternative to conventional SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the original civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archaeology or sometimes cosmic archaeology. The detection of intelligence elsewhere in the Universe with interstellar archaeology or SETI would have broad implications for science. For example, the constraints of the anthropic principle would have to be loosened if a different type of intelligence was discovered elsewhere. A variety of interstellar archaeology signatures are discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping with isotopes of nuclear wastes, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is introduced in the discussion of galactic signatures. These potential interstellar archaeological signatures are classified using the Kardashev scale. A modified Drake equation is used to evaluate the relative challenges of finding various sources. With few exceptions interstellar archaeological signatures are clouded and beyond current technological capabilities. However SETI for so-called cultural transmissions and planetary atmosphere signatures are within reach.

  12. Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using...

  13. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES OF HYPERACCRETING COLLAPSAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Harikae, Seiji

    2012-08-20

    By performing two-dimensional special relativistic (SR) magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we study possible signatures of gravitational waves (GWs) in the context of the collapsar model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts. In our SR simulations, the central black hole is treated as an absorbing boundary. By doing so, we focus on the GWs generated by asphericities in neutrino emission and matter motions in the vicinity of the hyperaccreting disks. We compute nine models by adding initial angular momenta and magnetic fields parametrically to a precollapse core of a 35 M{sub Sun} progenitor star. As for the microphysics, a realistic equation of state is employed and the neutrino cooling is taken into account via a multi-flavor neutrino leakage scheme. To accurately estimate GWs produced by anisotropic neutrino emission, we perform a ray-tracing analysis in general relativity by a post-processing procedure. By employing a stress formula that includes contributions from both magnetic fields and SR corrections, we also study the effects of magnetic fields on the gravitational waveforms. We find that the GW amplitudes from anisotropic neutrino emission show a monotonic increase with time, whose amplitudes are much larger than those from matter motions of the accreting material. We show that the increasing trend of the neutrino GWs stems from the excess of neutrino emission in the direction near parallel to the spin axis illuminated from the hyperaccreting disks. We point out that a recently proposed future space-based interferometer like Fabry-Perot-type DECIGO would permit the detection of these GW signals within Almost-Equal-To 100 Mpc.

  14. Event identification by acoustic signature recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many events of interest to the security commnnity produce acoustic emissions that are, in principle, identifiable as to cause. Some obvious examples are gunshots, breaking glass, takeoffs and landings of small aircraft, vehicular engine noises, footsteps (high frequencies when on gravel, very low frequencies. when on soil), and voices (whispers to shouts). We are investigating wavelet-based methods to extract unique features of such events for classification and identification. We also discuss methods of classification and pattern recognition specifically tailored for acoustic signatures obtained by wavelet analysis. The paper is divided into three parts: completed work, work in progress, and future applications. The completed phase has led to the successful recognition of aircraft types on landing and takeoff. Both small aircraft (twin-engine turboprop) and large (commercial airliners) were included in the study. The project considered the design of a small, field-deployable, inexpensive device. The techniques developed during the aircraft identification phase were then adapted to a multispectral electromagnetic interference monitoring device now deployed in a nuclear power plant. This is a general-purpose wavelet analysis engine, spanning 14 octaves, and can be adapted for other specific tasks. Work in progress is focused on applying the methods previously developed to speaker identification. Some of the problems to be overcome include recognition of sounds as voice patterns and as distinct from possible background noises (e.g., music), as well as identification of the speaker from a short-duration voice sample. A generalization of the completed work and the work in progress is a device capable of classifying any number of acoustic events-particularly quasi-stationary events such as engine noises and voices and singular events such as gunshots and breaking glass. We will show examples of both kinds of events and discuss their recognition likelihood.

  15. Motor current signature analysis method for diagnosing motor operated devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D.; Eissenberg, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A motor current noise signature analysis method and apparatus for remotely monitoring the operating characteristics of an electric motor-operated device such as a motor-operated valve. Frequency domain signal analysis techniques are applied to a conditioned motor current signal to distinctly identify various operating parameters of the motor driven device from the motor current signature. The signature may be recorded and compared with subsequent signatures to detect operating abnormalities and degradation of the device. This diagnostic method does not require special equipment to be installed on the motor-operated device, and the current sensing may be performed at remote control locations, e.g., where the motor-operated devices are used in accessible or hostile environments.

  16. Methyl-CpG island-associated genome signature tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J

    2014-05-20

    Disclosed is a method for analyzing the organismic complexity of a sample through analysis of the nucleic acid in the sample. In the disclosed method, through a series of steps, including digestion with a type II restriction enzyme, ligation of capture adapters and linkers and digestion with a type IIS restriction enzyme, genome signature tags are produced. The sequences of a statistically significant number of the signature tags are determined and the sequences are used to identify and quantify the organisms in the sample. Various embodiments of the invention described herein include methods for using single point genome signature tags to analyze the related families present in a sample, methods for analyzing sequences associated with hyper- and hypo-methylated CpG islands, methods for visualizing organismic complexity change in a sampling location over time and methods for generating the genome signature tag profile of a sample of fragmented DNA.

  17. Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dynamics on the incident energy axis of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time dynamics on the incident energy axis of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time dynamics on the incident energy axis of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering Authors: Wray, L. Andrew ; Huang, Shih-Wen ; Xia,

  18. Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in the earth

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in the earth Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in the earth × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in

  19. Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. No abstract prepared. Authors: Nelson, Thomas Robert ; Urayama, Junji

  20. Intrusion Detecting Using Secure Signatures - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Intrusion Detecting Using Secure Signatures DOE Grant Recipients Idaho National Laboratory Contact GRANT About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary U.S. patent 8,850,583 issued on an invention from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) entitled, "Intrusion Detecting Using Secure Signatures ", which will reduce cyber security risks to our nation's energy infrastructure. The patent describes a novel

  1. Uranium-233 Signatures (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Uranium-233 Signatures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uranium-233 Signatures Authors: Worrall, Louise G [1] ; McElroy, Robert Dennis [1] ; Krichinsky, Alan M [1] ; Cleveland, Steven L [1] ; Croft, Stephen [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2014-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1154847 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 55th Annual

  2. Auroral Signatures of Ballooning Mode Near Substorm Onset: Open Geospace

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    General Circulation Model Simulations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Auroral Signatures of Ballooning Mode Near Substorm Onset: Open Geospace General Circulation Model Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Auroral Signatures of Ballooning Mode Near Substorm Onset: Open Geospace General Circulation Model Simulations Authors: Raeder, J ; Zhu, P ; Ge, Y ; Siscoe, G Publication Date: 2012-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1211702 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:

  3. Built-in-test by signature inspection (bitsi)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergeson, Gary C.; Morneau, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A system and method for fault detection for electronic circuits. A stimulus generator sends a signal to the input of the circuit under test. Signature inspection logic compares the resultant signal from test nodes on the circuit to an expected signal. If the signals do not match, the signature inspection logic sends a signal to the control logic for indication of fault detection in the circuit. A data input multiplexer between the test nodes of the circuit under test and the signature inspection logic can provide for identification of the specific node at fault by the signature inspection logic. Control logic responsive to the signature inspection logic conveys information about fault detection for use in determining the condition of the circuit. When used in conjunction with a system test controller, the built-in test by signature inspection system and method can be used to poll a plurality of circuits automatically and continuous for faults and record the results of such polling in the system test controller.

  4. Relative Infrared (IR) and Terahertz (THz) Signatures of Common Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Atkinson, David A.

    2006-11-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has recently recorded the infrared (IR) and far-infrared (sometimes called the terahertz, THz) spectral signatures of four common explosives, in the condensed phase. The signatures of RDX, PETN, TNT and Tetryl were recorded both in the infrared and the THz domains, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Samples consisted of thin films and were made by depositing and subsequent evaporation of an acetone-explosive mixture. The complete spectrum spanned the range from 4,000 to 8 cm-1 at 2.0 cm-1 spectral resolution. Preliminary results in the infrared agree with those of previous workers, while the THz signatures are one order of magnitude weaker than the strongest IR bands.

  5. Exoatmospheric intercept - A gold mine for signature and impact data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katechis, J.C.; Caldwell, J.M. Teledyne Brown Engineering, Huntsville, AL )

    1992-03-01

    Exoatmospheric intercepts of ballistic missile reentry vehicles (RVs) by ground launched interceptors performed in the framework of the Ground Based Interceptor (GBI) Project are discussed. GBI comprises the functional technology validation (FTV) flight tests and a series of GBI Dem/Val flight tests. A variety of sensors including the interceptor itself (prior to impact), a fly-along observer package, two different types of aircraft, and radars provided both broad spectrum of data and backup capabilities. The target signature data across the electromagnetic spectrum were derived from preimpact data which can be used for validation of various signature generation codes. Impact signatures and characterization of the debris clouds were obtained from the postimpact data and can be used in terms of RV lethality, kill assessment, and space debris interaction.

  6. On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Authors: Kocevski, ...

  7. R-Axion: A New LHC Physics Signature Involving Muon Pairs (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: R-Axion: A New LHC Physics Signature Involving Muon Pairs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: R-Axion: A New LHC Physics Signature Involving Muon Pairs In a class ...

  8. Logan County Coop Power & Light | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County-Electric-Cooperative Outage Hotline: 937.592.4781 Outage Map: ebill.loganrec.comomsoutageM References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861...

  9. Logan View Public Schools Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Northwestern High School Wind Project

  10. EA-1611: Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared an EA in 2009 to assess the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Colorado Highlands Wind Project to Western’s transmission system. The EA analyzed a proposal for 60 wind turbine generators with a total output nameplate capacity of 90 megawatts (MW). Western prepared a supplemental EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed expansion of the project by 11 wind turbine generators that would add approximately 20 MW. Additional information is available on the Western Area Power Administration webpage for this project.

  11. Logan County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.9504774, -101.1617356 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  12. Experiments Provide First Direct Signatures of a Topological Insulator - a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Phase of Quantum Matter Experiments Provide First Direct Signatures of a Topological Insulator - a New Phase of Quantum Matter It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gap and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of quantum matter called a topological insulator [1,2]. This exotic phase of matter is a subject of intense research because it is predicted to give rise to dissipationless spin currents [3], quantum entanglements and novel macroscopic behavior

  13. Signature candidate of quantum chaos far from the semiclassical regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shang-Bin, E-mail: shbli@ustc.edu.cn; Xu, Zhengyuan [School of Information Science and Technology, and Optical Wireless Communication and Network Center, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)] [School of Information Science and Technology, and Optical Wireless Communication and Network Center, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-03-15

    We numerically investigated the entanglement product in the simplest coupled kicked top model with the spin j?=?1. Different from the dynamical pattern of entanglement in the semiclassical regime, two similar initial states may have discordant entanglement oscillations. A candidate of the quantum signature of this classical chaotic system was proposed. The potential antimonotonic relation between the rank correlation coefficient qualifying the concordant of two entanglement evolutions and the stationary entanglement was preliminarily revealed.

  14. Signatures of quantum chaos in Wigner and Husimi representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.B.; Feit, M.D. (Physics Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States) Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis/Livermore, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1993-06-01

    In this paper, we study the quantum manifestations of classical chaos in phase space using Wigner and Husimi distribution functions. We test the claim that Husimi represents the correspondence better than Wigner does. The results show the claim is valid. We also use a quantum dissipation scheme empirically for classically damped motions often characterized by strange attractors. We believe quantum resemblance to classical distributions can be regarded as signatures of quantum chaos in phase space.

  15. A mutational signature in gastric cancer suggests therapeutic strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Siu, Hoi Cheong; Leung, Suet Yi; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-10-29

    Targeting defects in the DNA repair machinery of neoplastic cells, for example, those due to inactivating BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations, has been used for developing new therapies in certain types of breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Recently, a mutational signature was associated with failure of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination based on its high mutational burden in samples harbouring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In pancreatic cancer, all responders to platinum therapy exhibit this mutational signature including a sample that lacked any defects in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Here, we examine 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 types of cancer and demonstrate that, in addition to breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, gastric cancer is another cancer type that exhibits this mutational signature. Furthermore, our results suggest that 7–12% of gastric cancers have defective double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination and may benefit from either platinum therapy or PARP inhibitors.

  16. A mutational signature in gastric cancer suggests therapeutic strategies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Siu, Hoi Cheong; Leung, Suet Yi; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-10-29

    Targeting defects in the DNA repair machinery of neoplastic cells, for example, those due to inactivating BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations, has been used for developing new therapies in certain types of breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Recently, a mutational signature was associated with failure of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination based on its high mutational burden in samples harbouring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In pancreatic cancer, all responders to platinum therapy exhibit this mutational signature including a sample that lacked any defects in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Here, we examine 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 types of cancer andmore » demonstrate that, in addition to breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, gastric cancer is another cancer type that exhibits this mutational signature. Furthermore, our results suggest that 7–12% of gastric cancers have defective double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination and may benefit from either platinum therapy or PARP inhibitors.« less

  17. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and imagination of many LANL staff and managers and resulted in a strategy which focuses on our strengths while recognizing that the science of signatures is dynamic. This report highlights the interdependence between SoS, advances in materials science, and advances in information technology. The intent is that SoS shape and inform Los Alamos investments in nuclear forensics, nuclear diagnostics, climate, space, energy, and biosurveillence; the areas of leadership that you will read about in this strategy document. The Science of Signatures is still a relatively new strategic direction for the Laboratory. The primary purpose of this document is tell Laboratory staff how SoS is being managed and give them a chance to get involved. A second important purpose is to inform the Department of Energy and our customers of our capability growth in this important scientific area. Questions concerning the SoS strategy and input to it are welcomed and may be directed to any member of the SoS Leadership Council or to the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Science Directorate Office.

  18. Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex of Photosynthesis Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving Complex of Photosynthesis Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the

  19. Fractal fidelity as a signature of quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, Franco [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Montangero, Simone [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    We analyze the fidelity of a quantum simulation and we show that it displays fractal fluctuations if and only if the simulated dynamics is chaotic. This analysis allows us to investigate a given simulated dynamics without any prior knowledge. In the case of integrable dynamics, the appearance of fidelity fractal fluctuations is a signal of a highly corrupted simulation. We conjecture that fidelity fractal fluctuations are a signature of the appearance of quantum chaos. Our analysis can be realized already by a few-qubit quantum processor.

  20. The signature of single-degenerate accretion-induced collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2014-10-10

    The accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of a white dwarf to a neutron star has long been suggested as a natural theoretical outcome in stellar evolution, but there has never been a direct detection of such an event. This is not surprising since the small amount of radioactive nickel synthesized (?10{sup 3} M {sub ?}) implies a relatively dim optical transient. Here we argue that a particularly strong signature of an AIC would occur for an oxygen-neon-magnesium (ONeMg) white dwarf accreting from a star that is experiencing Roche-lobe overflow as it becomes a red giant. In such cases, the ?10{sup 50} erg explosion from the AIC collides with and shock-heats the surface of the extended companion, creating an X-ray flash lasting ?1 hr followed by an optical signature that peaks at an absolute magnitude of ? 16 to 18 and lasts for a few days to a week. These events would be especially striking in old stellar environments where hydrogen-rich supernova-like transients would not normally be expected. Although the rate of such events is not currently known, we describe observing strategies that could be utilized with high cadence surveys that should either detect these events or place strong constraints on their rates.

  1. Domain-Specific Languages for Composing Signature Discovery Workflows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Ferosh; Gray, Jeff; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan; Baker, Nathan A.

    2012-10-23

    Domain-agnostic signature discovery entails investigation across multiple scientific disciplines. The breadth and cross-disciplinary nature of this work requires that existing executables be integrated with new capabilities into workflows, representing a wide range of user tasks. An algorithm may be written in multiple programming languages for various hardware platforms, and so workflow composition requires integrating executables from any number of remote hosts. This raises an engineering issue on how to generate web service wrappers for these heterogeneous executables and to compose them into a scientific workflow environment (e.g., Taverna). In this paper, we introduce two simple Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) to automate these processes. Our Service Description Language (SDL) describes key elements of a signature discovery service and automatically generates its implementation code. The Workflow Description Language (WDL) describes the pipeline of services and generates deployable artifacts for the Taverna workflow management system. We demonstrate our approach with a real-world workflow composed of services wrapping remote executables.

  2. Condition monitoring of machinery using motor current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryter, R.C.; Haynes, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a powerful monitoring tool for motor-driven equipment that provides a nonintrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment, including altered conditions in the process ''downstream'' of the motor-driven equipment. It was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the effects of aging and service wear systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. These motor current variations are carried by the electrical cables processes as desired. Motor current signatures, obtained in both time and over time to provide early indication of degradation. Successful applications of MCSA technology (patent applied for) include not only motor-operated valves but also pumps of various designs, blowers, and air conditioning systems. Examples are presented briefly, and speculation regarding the applicability of MCSA to a broader range of equipment monitoring and production line testing is also given. 1 ref., 13 figs.

  3. On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Authors: Kocevski, Daniel ; KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Petrosian, Vahe ; Stanford U., Space Sci. ...

  4. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 2. Cosmological and astrophysical signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Andrew J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2014-12-18

    Cosmic strings can arise in hidden sector models with a spontaneously broken Abelian symmetry group. We have studied the couplings of the Standard Model fields to these so-called dark strings in the companion paper. Here we survey the cosmological and astrophysical observables that could be associated with the presence of dark strings in our universe with an emphasis on low-scale models, perhaps TeV. Specifically, we consider constraints from nucleosynthesis and CMB spectral distortions, and we calculate the predicted fluxes of diffuse gamma ray cascade photons and cosmic rays. For strings as light as TeV, we find that the predicted level of these signatures is well below the sensitivity of the current experiments, and therefore low scale cosmic strings in hidden sectors remain unconstrained. Heavier strings with a mass scale in the range 10{sup 13} GeV to 10{sup 15} GeV are at tension with nucleosynthesis constraints.

  5. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 2. Cosmological and astrophysical signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Andrew J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay E-mail: tvachasp@asu.edu

    2014-12-01

    Cosmic strings can arise in hidden sector models with a spontaneously broken Abelian symmetry group. We have studied the couplings of the Standard Model fields to these so-called dark strings in the companion paper. Here we survey the cosmological and astrophysical observables that could be associated with the presence of dark strings in our universe with an emphasis on low-scale models, perhaps TeV . Specifically, we consider constraints from nucleosynthesis and CMB spectral distortions, and we calculate the predicted fluxes of diffuse gamma ray cascade photons and cosmic rays. For strings as light as TeV, we find that the predicted level of these signatures is well below the sensitivity of the current experiments, and therefore low scale cosmic strings in hidden sectors remain unconstrained. Heavier strings with a mass scale in the range 10{sup 13} GeV to 10{sup 15} GeV are at tension with nucleosynthesis constraints.

  6. Signature Product Code for Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-25

    The SigProdV1.0 software consists of four programs which together allow the prediction of protein-protein interactions using only amino acid sequences and experimental data. The software is based on the use of tensor products of amino acid trimers coupled with classifiers known as support vector machines. Essentially the program looks for amino acid trimer pairs which occur more frequently in protein pairs which are known to interact. These trimer pairs are then used to make predictionsmore » about unknown protein pairs. A detailed description of the method can be found in the paper: S. Martin, D. Roe, J.L. Faulon. "Predicting protein-protein interactions using signature products," Bioinformatics, available online from Advance Access, Aug. 19, 2004.« less

  7. Signature of the Fragmentation of a Color Flux Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-10-07

    The production of quark-antiquark pairs along a color flux tube precedes the fragmentation of the tube. Because of the local conservation of momentum and charge, the production of a $q$-$\\bar q$ pair will lead to correlations of adjacently produced mesons (mostly pions). Adjacently produced pions however can be signalled by the their rapidity difference $\\Delta y$ falling within the window of $|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$, on account of the space-time-rapidity ordering of produced pions in a flux tube fragmentation. Therefore, the local conservation of momentum will lead to a suppression of azimuthal two-pion correlation $dN/(d\\Delta \\phi\\, d\\Delta y)$ on the near side at $(\\Delta \\phi, \\Delta y) \\sim 0$, but an enhanced azimuthal correlation on the back-to-back, away side at $(\\Delta \\phi$$\\sim$$ \\pi,\\Delta y$$\\sim$0). Similarly, in a flux tube fragmentation, the local conservation of charge will forbid the production of like charge pions within $|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$, but there is no such prohibition for $|\\Delta y| >1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$. These properties may be used as the signature for the fragmentation of a color flux tube.

  8. Solving Inverse Detection Problems Using Passive Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.; Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Vaquer, Pablo A.

    2012-08-15

    The ability to reconstruct an unknown radioactive object based on its passive gamma-ray and neutron signatures is very important in homeland security applications. Often in the analysis of unknown radioactive objects, for simplicity or speed or because there is no other information, they are modeled as spherically symmetric regardless of their actual geometry. In these presentation we discuss the accuracy and implications of this approximation for decay gamma rays and for neutron-induced gamma rays. We discuss an extension of spherical raytracing (for uncollided fluxes) that allows it to be used when the exterior shielding is flat or cylindrical. We revisit some early results in boundary perturbation theory, showing that the Roussopolos estimate is the correct one to use when the quantity of interest is the flux or leakage on the boundary. We apply boundary perturbation theory to problems in which spherically symmetric systems are perturbed in asymmetric nonspherical ways. We apply mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithms to object reconstructions. We present a benchmark test set that may be used to quantitatively evaluate inverse detection methods.

  9. EINSTEIN'S SIGNATURE IN COSMOLOGICAL LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruni, Marco; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Wands, David

    2014-10-10

    We show how the nonlinearity of general relativity generates a characteristic nonGaussian signal in cosmological large-scale structure that we calculate at all perturbative orders in a large-scale limit. Newtonian gravity and general relativity provide complementary theoretical frameworks for modeling large-scale structure in ?CDM cosmology; a relativistic approach is essential to determine initial conditions, which can then be used in Newtonian simulations studying the nonlinear evolution of the matter density. Most inflationary models in the very early universe predict an almost Gaussian distribution for the primordial metric perturbation, ?. However, we argue that it is the Ricci curvature of comoving-orthogonal spatial hypersurfaces, R, that drives structure formation at large scales. We show how the nonlinear relation between the spatial curvature, R, and the metric perturbation, ?, translates into a specific nonGaussian contribution to the initial comoving matter density that we calculate for the simple case of an initially Gaussian ?. Our analysis shows the nonlinear signature of Einstein's gravity in large-scale structure.

  10. Signature of the Fragmentation of a Color Flux Tube

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-10-07

    The production of quark-antiquark pairs along a color flux tube precedes the fragmentation of the tube. Because of the local conservation of momentum and charge, the production of amore » $q$-$$\\bar q$$ pair will lead to correlations of adjacently produced mesons (mostly pions). Adjacently produced pions however can be signalled by the their rapidity difference $$\\Delta y$$ falling within the window of $$|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$, on account of the space-time-rapidity ordering of produced pions in a flux tube fragmentation. Therefore, the local conservation of momentum will lead to a suppression of azimuthal two-pion correlation $$dN/(d\\Delta \\phi\\, d\\Delta y)$$ on the near side at $$(\\Delta \\phi, \\Delta y) \\sim 0$$, but an enhanced azimuthal correlation on the back-to-back, away side at $$(\\Delta \\phi$$$$\\sim$$$$ \\pi,\\Delta y$$$$\\sim$$0). Similarly, in a flux tube fragmentation, the local conservation of charge will forbid the production of like charge pions within $$|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$, but there is no such prohibition for $$|\\Delta y| >1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$. These properties may be used as the signature for the fragmentation of a color flux tube.« less

  11. Signatures of Planck corrections in a spiralling axion inflation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2015-05-08

    The minimal sub-Planckian axion inflation model accounts for a large scalar-to-tensor ratio via a spiralling trajectory in the field space of a complex field Φ. Here we consider how the predictions of the model are modified by Planck scale-suppressed corrections. In the absence of Planck corrections the model is equivalent to a ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation model. Planck corrections become important when the dimensionless coupling ξ of |Φ|{sup 2} to the topological charge density of the strongly-coupled gauge sector FF{sup ~} satisfies ξ∼1. For values of |Φ| which allow the Planck corrections to be understood via an expansion in powers of |Φ|{sup 2}/M{sub Pl}{sup 2}, we show that their effect is to produce a significant modification of the tensor-to-scalar ratio from its ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation value without strongly modifying the spectral index. In addition, to leading order in |Φ|{sup 2}/M{sub Pl}{sup 2}, the Planck modifications of n{sub s} and r satisfy a consistency relation, Δn{sub s}=−Δr/16. Observation of these modifications and their correlation would allow the model to be distinguished from a simple ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation model and would also provide a signature for the influence of leading-order Planck corrections.

  12. Faraday signature of magnetic helicity from reduced depolarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Stepanov, Rodion

    2014-05-10

    Using one-dimensional models, we show that a helical magnetic field with an appropriate sign of helicity can compensate the Faraday depolarization resulting from the superposition of Faraday-rotated polarization planes from a spatially extended source. For radio emission from a helical magnetic field, the polarization as a function of the square of the wavelength becomes asymmetric with respect to zero. Mathematically speaking, the resulting emission occurs then either at observable or at unobservable (imaginary) wavelengths. We demonstrate that rotation measure (RM) synthesis allows for the reconstruction of the underlying Faraday dispersion function in the former case, but not in the latter. The presence of positive magnetic helicity can thus be detected by observing positive RM in highly polarized regions in the sky and negative RM in weakly polarized regions. Conversely, negative magnetic helicity can be detected by observing negative RM in highly polarized regions and positive RM in weakly polarized regions. The simultaneous presence of two magnetic constituents with opposite signs of helicity is shown to possess signatures that can be quantified through polarization peaks at specific wavelengths and the gradient of the phase of the Faraday dispersion function. Similar polarization peaks can tentatively also be identified for the bi-helical magnetic fields that are generated self-consistently by a dynamo from helically forced turbulence, even though the magnetic energy spectrum is then continuous. Finally, we discuss the possibility of detecting magnetic fields with helical and non-helical properties in external galaxies using the Square Kilometre Array.

  13. Large-scale BAO signatures of the smallest galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalal, Neal; Pen, Ue-Li; Seljak, Uros E-mail: pen@cita.utoronto.ca

    2010-11-01

    Recent work has shown that at high redshift, the relative velocity between dark matter and baryonic gas is typically supersonic. This relative velocity suppresses the formation of the earliest baryonic structures like minihalos, and the suppression is modulated on large scales. This effect imprints a characteristic shape in the clustering power spectrum of the earliest structures, with significant power on ∼ 100 Mpc scales featuring highly pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations. The amplitude of these oscillations is orders of magnitude larger at z ∼ 20 than previously expected. This characteristic signature can allow us to distinguish the effects of minihalos on intergalactic gas at times preceding and during reionization. We illustrate this effect with the example of 21 cm emission and absorption from redshifts during and before reionization. This effect can potentially allow us to probe physics on kpc scales using observations on 100 Mpc scales. We present sensitivity forecasts for FAST and Arecibo. Depending on parameters, this enhanced structure may be detectable by Arecibo at z ∼ 15−20, and with appropriate instrumentation FAST could measure the BAO power spectrum with high precision. In principle, this effect could also pose a serious challenge for efforts to constrain dark energy using observations of the BAO feature at low redshift.

  14. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph; Bryan, Sarah; Gaibler, Volker; Haas, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ? 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  15. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2013-01-25

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  16. Observational characteristics of coronal mass ejections without low-coronal signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Huys, E.; Seaton, D. B.; Berghmans, D.; Poedts, S.

    2014-11-01

    Solar eruptions are usually associated with a variety of phenomena occurring in the low corona before, during, and after the onset of eruption. Though easily visible in coronagraph observations, so-called stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) do not obviously exhibit any of these low-coronal signatures. The presence or absence of distinct low-coronal signatures can be linked to different theoretical models to establish the mechanisms by which the eruption is initiated and driven. In this study, 40 CMEs without low-coronal signatures occurring in 2012 are identified. Their observational and kinematic properties are analyzed and compared to those of regular CMEs. Solar eruptions without clear on-disk or low-coronal signatures can lead to unexpected space weather impacts, since many early warning signs for significant space weather activity are not present in these events. A better understanding of their initiation mechanism(s) will considerably improve the ability to predict such space weather events.

  17. (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation We apply the Effective Field Theory of Inflation to study the case where the continuous shift symmetry of the Goldstone boson {pi} is

  18. Missing energy signatures of dark matter at the LHC (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Missing energy signatures of dark matter at the LHC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Missing energy signatures of dark matter at the LHC Authors: Fox, Patrick J. ; Harnik, Roni ; Kopp, Joachim ; Tsai, Yuhsin Publication Date: 2012-03-30 OSTI Identifier: 1098622 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998 Publisher: American Physical Society

  19. (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation We apply the Effective Field Theory of Inflation to study the case where the continuous shift symmetry of the Goldstone

  20. (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete shift symmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the effective field theory of inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete shift symmetry in the effective field theory of inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete shift symmetry in the effective field theory of inflation We apply the Effective Field Theory of Inflation to study the case where the continuous shift symmetry of the Goldstone boson π is

  1. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J.; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F. Mark Kao, L.; Jim Proctor, S.; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D.; Lord, Peter G.; McMillian, Michael K.

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development.

  2. Development of Asset Fault Signatures for Prognostic and Health Management in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Randall Bickford; Richard Rusaw

    2014-06-01

    Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using the Electric Power Research Institute’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. The FW-PHM Suite is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The FW-PHM Suite has four main modules: Diagnostic Advisor, Asset Fault Signature (AFS) Database, Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and Remaining Useful Life Database. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures to assess the health status of generator step-up generators and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. At the most basic level, fault signatures are comprised of an asset type, a fault type, and a set of one or more fault features (symptoms) that are indicative of the specified fault. The AFS Database is populated with asset fault signatures via a content development exercise that is based on the results of intensive technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The developed fault signatures capture this knowledge and implement it in a standardized approach, thereby streamlining the diagnostic and prognostic process. This will support the automation of proactive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  3. Signatures of spin and charge energy scales in the local moment and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    specific heat of the half-filled two-dimensional Hubbard model (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Signatures of spin and charge energy scales in the local moment and specific heat of the half-filled two-dimensional Hubbard model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Signatures of spin and charge energy scales in the local moment and specific heat of the half-filled two-dimensional Hubbard model Local moment formation driven by the on-site repulsion U is one of the most fundamental

  4. Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this

  5. ON THE LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ON THE LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES We examine the effects of time dilation on the temporal profiles of gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses. By using prescriptions for the shape and evolution of prompt gamma-ray spectra, we can generate a simulated population of single-pulsed GRBs at a variety of redshifts and observe how

  6. Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Authors: Reimer, Olaf ; /Innsbruck U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park Publication Date: 2013-06-20 OSTI Identifier: 1084282 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15629 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: PoS

  7. On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Authors: Kocevski, Daniel ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Petrosian, Vahe ; /Stanford U., Space Sci. Astrophys. Ctr. Publication Date: 2013-02-28 OSTI Identifier: 1074191 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15382 arXiv:1110.6175 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515

  8. On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information

  9. Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borglin, Sharon; Geller, Jil; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry; Mason, Olivia

    2010-05-17

    Pure cultures, including Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanococcus maripaludus, were combined with model oil samples and oil/diesel mixtures to optimize extraction techniques of signature lipids from oil in support of investigation of microbial communities in oil deposit samples targets for microbial enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Several techniques were evaluated, including standard phospholipid extraction, ether linked lipid for Archaeal bacterial detection, and high pressure extractiontechniques. Recovery of lipids ranged from 50-80percent as compared to extraction of the pure culture. Extraction efficiency was evaluated by the use of internal standards. Field samples will also be tested for recovery of signature lipids with optimized extraction techniques.

  10. Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional Chiral

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    p-Wave Superconductor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional Chiral p-Wave Superconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional Chiral p-Wave Superconductor A class of topological excitations--the odd-winding number vortices--in a spinless 2D chiral p-wave (p{sub x}+ip{sub y}) superconductor traps Majorana fermion states in the vortex cores. For a dilute gas of

  11. Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium X-ray diffraction measurements of cerium in the vicinity of the isostructural {gamma}-{alpha} transition have been performed with high precision and accuracy from room temperature to almost 800 K. The disputed location of the critical point has been found to occur at 1.5 {+-} 0.1 GPa and 480 {+-} 10 K. The data is

  12. Thermal Signatures of the Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Thermal Signatures of the Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Signatures of the Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium Authors: Lipp, M.J. ; Jackson, D. ; Cynn, H. ; Aracne, C. ; Evans, W.J. ; McMahan, A.K. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (LLNL) Publication Date: 2008-10-24 OSTI Identifier: 1006892 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Phys. Rev. Lett.; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 10,

  13. Signatures for Right-Handed Neutrinos at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huitu, Katri; Rai, Santosh Kumar; Khalil, Shaaban; Okada, Hiroshi

    2008-10-31

    We explore possible signatures for right-handed neutrinos in a TeV scale B-L extension of the standard model at the Large Hadron Collider. The studied four lepton signal has a tiny standard model background. We find the signal experimentally accessible at the LHC for the considered parameter regions.

  14. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorie M. Dilley

    2011-03-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Open or recently closed fractures would be more susceptible to enhancing the permeability of the system. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will assist in fracture stimulation site selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures (Moore, Morrow et al. 1987), and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. These fluid inclusions are faithful records of pore fluid chemistry. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. This report presents the results of the project to determine fracture locations by the chemical signatures from gas analysis of fluid inclusions. With this project we hope to test our assumptions that gas chemistry can distinguish if the fractures are open and bearing production fluids or represent prior active fractures and whether there are chemical signs of open fracture systems in the wall rock above the fracture. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method developed for the geothermal industry which applies the mass quantification of fluid inclusion gas data from drill cuttings and applying known gas ratios and compositions to determine depth profiles of fluid barriers in a modern geothermal system (Dilley, 2009; Dilley et al., 2005; Norman et al., 2005). Identifying key gas signatures associated with fractures for isolating geothermal fluid production is the latest advancement in the application of FIS to geothermal systems (Dilley and Norman, 2005; Dilley and Norman, 2007). Our hypothesis is that peaks in FIS data are related to location of fractures. Previous work (DOE Grant DE-FG36-06GO16057) has indicated differences in the chemical signature of fluid inclusions between open and closed fractures as well as differences in the chemical signature of open fractures between geothermal systems. Our hypothesis is that open fracture systems can be identified by their FIS chemical signature; that there are differences based on the mineral assemblages and geology of the system; and that there are chemical precursors in the wall rock above open, large fractures. Specific goals for this project are: (1) To build on the preliminary results which indicate that there are differences in the FIS signatures between open and closed fractures by identifying which chemical species indicate open fractures in both active geothermal systems and in hot, dry rock; (2) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the geology of the fields; (3) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the mineral assemblages in the fracture; and (4) To determine if there are specific chemical signatures in the wall rock above open, large fractures. This method promises to lower the cost of geothermal energy production in several ways. Knowledge of productive fractures in the boreholes will allow engineers to optimize well production. This information can aid in well testing decisions, well completion strategies, and in resource calculations. It will assist in determining the areas for future fracture enhancement. This will develop into one of the techniques in the 'tool bag' for creating and managing Enhanced Geothermal Systems.

  15. Signatures and Methods for the Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders at Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Mace, Emily K.; Misner, Alex C.; Shaver, Mark W.

    2010-08-08

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Such a station would use sensors that can be operated in an unattended mode at an industrial facility: medium-resolution scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy (e.g., NaI(Tl)) and moderated He-3 neutron detectors. This sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures beyond the traditional 185-keV emission from U-235: neutrons produced from F-19(α,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U 234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 8 MeV) induced by neutrons interacting in the steel cylinder. This paper describes a study of these non-traditional signatures for the purposes of cylinder enrichment verification. The signatures and the radiation sensors designed to collect them are described, as are proof-of-principle cylinder measurements and analyses. Key sources of systematic uncertainty in the non-traditional signatures are discussed, and the potential benefits of utilizing these non-traditional signatures, in concert with an automated form of the traditional 185-keV-based assay, are discussed.

  16. Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimmer, Bernhard; Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion; Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ? The isotopic signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates is linked to the reactivity of MSW. ? Isotopic signatures of leachates depend on aerobic/anaerobic conditions in landfills. ? In situ aeration of landfills can be monitored by isotope analysis in leachate. ? The isotopic analysis of leachates can be used for assessing the stability of MSW. ? ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates helps to define the duration of landfill aftercare. - Abstract: Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of ?{sup 13}C, ?{sup 2}H and ?{sup 18}O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25 year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the ?{sup 13}C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (?{sup 13}C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of ?20 to ?25. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in ?{sup 13}C-DIC up to values of +10 and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW. During aeration of a landfill the aerobic degradation of the remaining organic matter caused a decrease to a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of about ?20. Therefore carbon isotope analysis in leachates and groundwater can be used for tracing the oxidationreduction status of MSW landfills. Our results indicate that monitoring of stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates over a longer time period (e.g. during in situ aeration) is a powerful and cost-effective tool for characterising the biodegradability and stability of the organic matter in landfilled municipal solid waste and can be used for monitoring the progress of in situ aeration.

  17. Empirical signatures of quantum phase transitions and universal properties of critical point descriptions and dynamical symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casten, R. F.; Bonatsos, Dennis; McCutchan, E. A.

    2009-01-28

    Recently, a new signature for quantum phase transitional regions has been discussed. This signature, based on degeneracies of yrast and intrinsic excitations, can distinguish first and second order phase transitions, and is valid not only at or near the analytic critical points described by X(5) and E(5), but along the phase transitional line connecting them as well. In addition, a study of a number of recent analytic solutions to the Bohr Hamiltonian and of the dynamical symmetries of the IBA Hamiltonian has revealed a set of extremely simple and general analytic formulas that describe the energies of 0{sup +} states. For the case of flat-bottomed geometrical potentials, the formula depends solely on the number of relevant dimensions. For the IBA (large boson number limit) a single formula describes all three dynamical symmetries.

  18. Domain-Specific Languages For Developing and Deploying Signature Discovery Workflows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Ferosh; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan; Gray, Jeff

    2013-12-02

    Domain-agnostic Signature Discovery entails scientific investigation across multiple domains through the re-use of existing algorithms into workflows. The existing algorithms may be written in any programming language for various hardware architectures (e.g., desktops, commodity clusters, and specialized parallel hardware platforms). This raises an engineering issue in generating Web services for heterogeneous algorithms so that they can be composed into a scientific workflow environment (e.g., Taverna). In this paper, we present our software tool that defines two simple Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) to automate these processes: SDL and WDL. Our Service Description Language (SDL) describes key elements of a signature discovery algorithm and generates the service code. The Workflow Description Language (WDL) describes the pipeline of services and generates deployable artifacts for the Taverna workflow management system. We demonstrate our tool with a landscape classification example that is represented by BLAST workflows composed of services that wrap original scripts.

  19. Genomic Sequence or Signature Tags (GSTs) from the Genome Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K.

    Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs) are the products of a method we have developed for identifying and quantitatively analyzing genomic DNAs. The DNA is initially fragmented with a type II restriction enzyme. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing a recognition site for MmeI, a type IIS restriction enzyme, is then used to release 21-bp tags from fixed positions in the DNA relative to the sites recognized by the fragmenting enzyme. These tags are PCR-amplified, purified, concatenated and then cloned and sequenced. The tag sequences and abundances are used to create a high resolution GST sequence profile of the genomic DNA. [Quoted from Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs): A System for Profiling Genomic DNA, Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K., Revised 9/13/2002

  20. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  1. UCRGJC-119213 PREPRINT Signatures of Testing: On-Site. Inspection Technologies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    e n UCRGJC-119213 PREPRINT Signatures of Testing: On-Site. Inspection Technologies J.J. Zucca, C. Carrigan, P. Goldstein, S.P. Jarpe, J. Sweeney, W.L. Pickles Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory B. Wright Los Alamos National Laboratory This was repared for submittal to the North 1 tlantic Treaty Organization Advanced Study Institute Meeting Alvor, Algarue, Portugal Janua y 23-Februa y 2,1995 Tanuarv 1995 This isa preprintof apaper intended forpublication ina journalorproceedings. Since

  2. Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional Chiral p-Wave Superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Sumanta; Zhang Chuanwei; Das Sarma, S.; Nayak, Chetan; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2008-01-18

    A class of topological excitations--the odd-winding number vortices--in a spinless 2D chiral p-wave (p{sub x}+ip{sub y}) superconductor traps Majorana fermion states in the vortex cores. For a dilute gas of such vortices, the lowest energy fermionic eigenstates are intrinsically nonlocal. We predict two testable signatures of this unusual quantum nonlocality in quasiparticle tunneling experiments. We discuss why the associated teleportationlike phenomenon does not imply the violation of causality.

  3. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey

    2012-12-12

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  4. Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded Arcing Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded Arcing Signatures Jay Johnson 1 and Jack Kang 2 1 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA 2 Sensata Technologies, Attleboro, MA, USA ABSTRACT Abstract - The 2011 National Electrical Code® Article 690.11 requires photovoltaic systems on or penetrating a building to include a DC arc-fault protection device. In order to satisfy this requirement, new Arc-Fault Detectors (AFDs) are being developed by multiple

  5. Angular Signatures of Dark Matter in the Diffuse Gamma Ray Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    Dark matter annihilating in our Galaxy's halo and elsewhere in the universe is expected to generate a diffuse flux of gamma rays, potentially observable with next generation satellite-based experiments, such as GLAST. In this article, we study the signatures of dark matter in the angular distribution of this radiation. Pertaining to the extragalactic contribution, we discuss the effect of the motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmological rest frame, and anisotropies due to the structure of our local universe. For the gamma ray flux from dark matter in our own Galactic halo, we discuss the effects of the offset position of the solar system, the Compton-Getting effect, the asphericity of the Milky Way halo, and the signatures of nearby substructure. We explore the prospects for the detection of these features by the GLAST satellite and find that, if {approx} 10% or more of the diffuse gamma ray background observed by EGRET is the result of dark matter annihilations, then GLAST should be sensitive to anisotropies down to the 0.1% level. Such precision would be sufficient to detect many, if not all, of the signatures discussed in this paper.

  6. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W.

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial 235U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, …, 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for 134Cs/137Cs 134Cs/154Eu, and 154Eu/137Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial 235U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the FA models serve as source materials for the pre- and postelectrorefining models to be reported in Parts 2 and 3.

  7. Security analysis of boolean algebra based on Zhang-Wang digital signature scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jinbin

    2014-10-06

    In 2005, Zhang and Wang proposed an improvement signature scheme without using one-way hash function and message redundancy. In this paper, we show that this scheme exits potential safety concerns through the analysis of boolean algebra, such as bitwise exclusive-or, and point out that mapping is not one to one between assembly instructions and machine code actually by means of the analysis of the result of the assembly program segment, and which possibly causes safety problems unknown to the software.

  8. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  9. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the optical emission produced thereby is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  10. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-15

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives. 4 figs.

  11. Microsoft Word - 01-3199 Rev 6 Final w_o signature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP 01-3199 Recertification Project Plan Revision 6 February 2013 This document supersedes DOE/WIPP 01-3199, Revision 5. U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office 2 Recertification Project Plan Revision 6 February 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office //signature on file// 02/14/2013 Jose R. Franco / Date Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Recertification Project Plan DOE/WIPP 01-3199, Rev. 6 3 This document has been submitted as required to: U.S. Department of Energy Office of

  12. An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Category: Aerosols Continuing observations of aerosol and cloud optical property have been made using MFRSR and MWR at the ARM SGP site since

  13. B. Grant Logan, 1980 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration B&W Y-12 donates $75,000 to Emory Valley Center Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - 4:01pm B&W Y-12 President and General Manager Chuck Spencer, pictured at left, and B&W Y-12 Senior Vice President and Deputy General Manager for Projects Jim Haynes present a $75,000 donation to Emory Valley Center President Jennifer Enderson. The funds will go toward the center's capital campaign to construct a much-needed facility for the developmentally challenged of East Tennessee.

  14. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouzé, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; et al

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1more » amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factor–specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.« less

  15. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  16. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouz, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clment; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R.; Llovet, Josep M.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1 amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factorspecific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.

  17. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouzé, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R.; Llovet, Josep M.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1 amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factor–specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.

  18. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kimball, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Dunbar, R.

    2015-12-04

    Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near constant temperature, salinity and pH, and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly-substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzedmorein CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as ?47 values. We analyzed ?47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp.) and calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae) deep-sea corals, and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured ?47 values were compared to in situ temperatures and the relationship between ?47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationship between ?47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate "clumped" isotope calibration data as they show that distinct ?47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite, although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect that crystals may attain nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures only under conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological "vital-effect" influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological "vital" effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on ?47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.less

  19. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Preprocessing Freeware on Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Data for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Fraga, Carlos G.

    2014-07-07

    Preprocessing software is crucial for the discovery of chemical signatures in metabolomics, chemical forensics, and other signature-focused disciplines that involve analyzing large data sets from chemical instruments. Here, four freely available and published preprocessing tools known as metAlign, MZmine, SpectConnect, and XCMS were evaluated for impurity profiling using nominal mass GC/MS data and accurate mass LC/MS data. Both data sets were previously collected from the analysis of replicate samples from multiple stocks of a nerve-agent precursor. Each of the four tools had their parameters set for the untargeted detection of chromatographic peaks from impurities present in the stocks. The peak table generated by each preprocessing tool was analyzed to determine the number of impurity components detected in all replicate samples per stock. A cumulative set of impurity components was then generated using all available peak tables and used as a reference to calculate the percent of component detections for each tool, in which 100% indicated the detection of every component. For the nominal mass GC/MS data, metAlign performed the best followed by MZmine, SpectConnect, and XCMS with detection percentages of 83, 60, 47, and 42%, respectively. For the accurate mass LC/MS data, the order was metAlign, XCMS, and MZmine with detection percentages of 80, 45, and 35%, respectively. SpectConnect did not function for the accurate mass LC/MS data. Larger detection percentages were obtained by combining the top performer with at least one of the other tools such as 96% by combining metAlign with MZmine for the GC/MS data and 93% by combining metAlign with XCMS for the LC/MS data. In terms of quantitative performance, the reported peak intensities had average absolute biases of 41, 4.4, 1.3 and 1.3% for SpectConnect, metAlign, XCMS, and MZmine, respectively, for the GC/MS data. For the LC/MS data, the average absolute biases were 22, 4.5, and 3.1% for metAlign, MZmine, and XCMS, respectively. In summary, metAlign performed the best in terms of peak discovery; however, more than one preprocessing tool should be considered to avoid missing potential chemical signatures.

  1. Portable microfluidic raman system for rapid, label-free early disease signature detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meiye; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Hatch, Anson

    2015-09-01

    In the early stages of infection, patients develop non-specific or no symptoms at all. While waiting for identification of the infectious agent, precious window of opportunity for early intervention is lost. The standard diagnostics require affinity reagents and sufficient pathogen titers to reach the limit of detection. In the event of a disease outbreak, triaging the at-risk population rapidly and reliably for quarantine and countermeasure is more important than the identification of the pathogen by name. To expand Sandia's portfolio of Biological threat management capabilities, we will utilize Raman spectrometry to analyze immune subsets in whole blood to rapidly distinguish infected from non-infected, and bacterial from viral infection, for the purpose of triage during an emergency outbreak. The goal of this one year LDRD is to determine whether Raman spectroscopy can provide label-free detection of early disease signatures, and define a miniaturized Raman detection system meeting requirements for low- resource settings.

  2. Spin ice: magnetic excitations without monopole signatures using muon spin rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunsiger, Sarah [Technical University, Munich, Germany; Aczel, Adam A. [McMaster University; Arguello, Carlos [Columbia University; Dabkowska, H. A. [McMaster University; Dabkowski, A [McMaster University; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL; Goko, Tatsuo [Columbia University; Javanparast, B [University of Waterloo, Canada; Lin, T [University of Waterloo, Canada; Ning, F. L. [McMaster University; Noad, H. M. [McMaster University; Singh, David J [ORNL; Williams, T.J. [McMaster University; Uemura, Yasutomo J. [Columbia University; Gingras, M.P.J. [University of Waterloo, Canada; Luke, Graeme M. [McMaster University

    2011-01-01

    Theory predicts the low temperature magnetic excitations in spin ices consist of deconfined magnetic charges, or monopoles. A recent transverse-field (TF) muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) experiment [S.T. Bramwell et al., Nature (London) 461 956 (2009)] reports results claiming to be consistent with the temperature and magnetic field dependence anticipated for monopole nucleation - the so-called second Wien effect. We demonstrate via a new series of {mu}SR experiments in Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} that such an effect is not observable in a TF {mu}SR experiment. Rather, as found in many highly frustrated magnetic materials, we observe spin fluctuations which become temperature independent at low temperatures, behavior which dominates over any possible signature of thermally nucleated monopole excitations.

  3. The 21 cm signature of shock heated and diffuse cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernndez, Oscar F.; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2012-07-01

    The analysis of the 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes is extended in several ways. First we consider the constraints on G? from the absorption signal of shock heated wakes laid down much later than matter radiation equality. Secondly we analyze the signal of diffuse wake, that is those wakes in which there is a baryon overdensity but which have not shock heated. Finally we compare the size of these signals to the expected thermal noise per pixel which dominates over the background cosmic gas brightness temperature and find that the cosmic string signal will exceed the thermal noise of an individual pixel in the Square Kilometre Array for string tensions G? > 2.5 10{sup ?8}.

  4. Chaos concepts as diagnostic tools for assessing rotating machinery vibration signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, M.L.; Loparo, K.A.

    1996-06-01

    Chaos content in measured vibration signals is of some practical importance in rotordynamical systems. Of particular interest is the relationship between the occurrence of determinsite chaos and the diagnosis of mechanical failures in rotating machinery. Two nonlinear rotordynamical systems were studied using simulation and various forms of subharmonic, quasiperiodic and chaotic vibrations were observed. Different routes into and out of chaos show important signs for wear assessment and failure prediction. Experimental test facilities are currently under development and the next steps involve experimental verification of the simulation results and the development of signal processing techniques for extracting the dynamical features of the vibration signatures from measured time series data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. CYCLIC THERMAL SIGNATURE IN A GLOBAL MHD SIMULATION OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Charbonneau, Paul; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2013-11-10

    Global magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the solar convection zone have recently achieved cyclic large-scale axisymmetric magnetic fields undergoing polarity reversals on a decadal time scale. In this Letter, we show that these simulations also display a thermal convective luminosity that varies in-phase with the magnetic cycle, and trace this modulation to deep-seated magnetically mediated changes in convective flow patterns. Within the context of the ongoing debate on the physical origin of the observed 11 yr variations in total solar irradiance, such a signature supports the thesis according to which all, or part, of the variations on decadal time scales and longer could be attributed to a global modulation of the Sun's internal thermal structure by magnetic activity.

  6. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K., E-mail: sklai@coll.phy.ncu.edu.tw [Complex Liquids Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Central University, Chungli 320 Taiwan (China); Molecular Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Cheong, S. A. [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with ? helix and ? hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein folding dynamics.

  7. OBSERVABLE SIGNATURES OF PLANET ACCRETION IN RED GIANT STARS. I. RAPID ROTATION AND LIGHT ELEMENT REPLENISHMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Majewski, Steven R. E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu E-mail: cunha@noao.edu

    2012-10-01

    The orbital angular momentum of a close-orbiting giant planet can be sufficiently large that, if transferred to the envelope of the host star during the red giant branch (RGB) evolution, it can spin-up the star's rotation to unusually large speeds. This spin-up mechanism is one possible explanation for the rapid rotators detected among the population of generally slow-rotating red giant stars. These rapid rotators thus comprise a unique stellar sample suitable for searching for signatures of planet accretion in the form of unusual stellar abundances due to the dissemination of the accreted planet in the stellar envelope. In this study, we look for signatures of replenishment in the Li abundances and (to a lesser extent) {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C, which are both normally lowered during RGB evolution. Accurate abundances were measured from high signal-to-noise echelle spectra for samples of both slow and rapid rotator red giant stars. We find that the rapid rotators are on average enriched in lithium compared to the slow rotators, but both groups of stars have identical distributions of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C within our measurement precision. Both of these abundance results are consistent with the accretion of planets of only a few Jupiter masses. We also explore alternative scenarios for understanding the most Li-rich stars in our sample-particularly Li regeneration during various stages of stellar evolution. Finally, we find that our stellar samples show non-standard abundances even at early RGB stages, suggesting that initial protostellar Li abundances and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C may be more variable than originally thought.

  8. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, Veerabhadra R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present a case study on 16 October 2011 to show the first observational evidence of the influence of short period gravity waves in aerosol transport during daytime over the central Himalayan region. The Doppler lidar data has been utilized to address the daytime boundary layer evolution and related aerosol dynamics over the site. Mixing layer height is estimated by wavelet covariance transform method and found to be ~ 0.7 km, AGL. Aerosol optical depth observations during daytime revealed an asymmetry showing clear enhancement during afternoon hours as compared to forenoon. Interestingly, Fourier and wavelet analysis of vertical velocity and attenuated backscatter showed similar 50-90 min short period gravity wave signatures during afternoon hours. Moreover, our observations showed that gravity waves are dominant within the boundary layer implying that the daytime boundary layer dynamics is playing a vital role in transporting the aerosols from surface to the top of the boundary layer. Similar modulations are also evident in surface parameters like temperature, relative humidity and wind speed indicating these waves are associated with the dynamical aspects over Himalayan region. Finally, time evolution of range-23 height indicator snapshots during daytime showed strong upward velocities especially during afternoon hours implying that convective processes through short period gravity waves plays a significant role in transporting aerosols from the nearby valley region to boundary layer top over the site. These observations also establish the importance of wave induced daytime convective boundary layer dynamics in the lower Himalayan region.

  9. High Throughput Ambient Mass Spectrometric Approach to Species Identification and Classification from Chemical Fingerprint Signatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Musah, Rabi A.; Espinoza, Edgard O.; Cody, Robert B.; Lesiak, Ashton D.; Christensen, Earl D.; Moore, Hannah E.; Maleknia, Simin; Drijhout, Falko P.

    2015-07-09

    A high throughput method for species identification and classification through chemometric processing of direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry-derived fingerprint signatures has been developed. The method entails introduction of samples to the open air space between the DART ion source and the mass spectrometer inlet, with the entire observed mass spectral fingerprint subjected to unsupervised hierarchical clustering processing. Moreover, a range of both polar and non-polar chemotypes are instantaneously detected. The result is identification and species level classification based on the entire DART-MS spectrum. In this paper, we illustrate how the method can be used to: (1) distinguishmore » between endangered woods regulated by the Convention for the International Trade of Endangered Flora and Fauna (CITES) treaty; (2) assess the origin and by extension the properties of biodiesel feedstocks; (3) determine insect species from analysis of puparial casings; (4) distinguish between psychoactive plants products; and (5) differentiate between Eucalyptus species. An advantage of the hierarchical clustering approach to processing of the DART-MS derived fingerprint is that it shows both similarities and differences between species based on their chemotypes. Furthermore, full knowledge of the identities of the constituents contained within the small molecule profile of analyzed samples is not required.« less

  10. STATISTICAL STUDY OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS WITH AND WITHOUT DISTINCT LOW CORONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, S.; Attrill, G. D. R.; Golub, L.; Lin, J.

    2010-10-10

    Taking advantage of the two viewpoints of the STEREO spacecraft, we present a statistical study of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with and without distinct low coronal signatures (LCSs) from 2009 January 1 to August 31. During this period, the lines of sight from STEREO A and B are almost perpendicular and nearly a quarter of the Sun was observed by both. We identified 34 CMEs that originated from around this area and find that (1) about 1 out of 3 CMEs that were studied during 8 months of solar minimum activity are stealth CMEs; a CME is stealth if no distinct LCS (such as coronal dimming, coronal wave, filament eruption, flare, post-eruptive arcade) can be found on the disk. (2) The speeds of the stealth CMEs without LCSs are typically below 300 km s{sup -1}. Comparing with the slow CMEs with LCSs, the stealth CMEs did not show any clear differences in their velocity and acceleration evolution. (3) The source regions of the stealth CMEs are usually located in the quiet Sun rather than active regions. Detailed study indicates that more than half of the stealth CMEs in this paper showed some faint change of the coronal structures (likely parts of flux ropes) when they could be observed over the solar limb before or during the CME evolution. Finally, we note that space weather detection systems based on LCSs totally independent of coronagraph data may fail to detect a significant proportion of CMEs.

  11. Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

    1997-08-01

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

  12. SIGNATURE OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION IN SUN-AS-A-STAR Ca II K MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertello, L.; Pietarila, A.; Pevtsov, A. A. E-mail: apietarila@nso.edu

    2012-12-10

    The characterization of solar surface differential rotation (SDR) from disk-integrated chromospheric measurements has important implications for the study of differential rotation and dynamo processes in other stars. Some chromospheric lines, such as Ca II K, are very sensitive to the presence of activity on the disk and are an ideal choice for investigating SDR in Sun-as-a-star observations. Past studies indicate that when the activity is low, the determination of Sun's differential rotation from integrated-sunlight measurements becomes uncertain. However, our study shows that using the proper technique, SDR can be detected from these type of measurements even during periods of extended solar minima. This paper describes results from the analysis of the temporal variations of Ca II K line profiles observed by the Integrated Sunlight Spectrometer during the declining phase of Cycle 23 and the rising phase of Cycle 24, and discusses the signature of SDR in the power spectra computed from time series of parameters derived from these profiles. The methodology described is quite general, and could be applied to photometric time series of other main-sequence stars for detecting differential rotation.

  13. ON THE POLARIMETRIC SIGNATURE OF EMERGING MAGNETIC LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viticchie, B.

    2012-03-10

    The abundance of Stokes V profiles dominated by one lobe at the locations of emergence of {Omega}-shaped magnetic loops is evaluated. The emergence events were found in Hinode Solar Optical Telescope/spectro-polarimeter time sequences of quiet-Sun regions. Such a study has the aim of confirming a prediction based on the basic geometrical and physical properties of emerging magnetic loops: Stokes V profiles dominated by one lobe are possibly the main polarimetric signature of these structures. In agreement with this prediction, 47% of the Stokes V profiles analyzed have an amplitude asymmetry |{delta}a| > 0.3, while in the quiet Sun the abundance is of about 30%. This excess with respect to the quiet Sun is found consistently for any value of the threshold on the amplitude asymmetry. Such a result proves the goodness of the physical scenarios so far proposed for the interpretation of loop emergence events and may prompt the use of Stokes V profiles dominated by one lobe as a new proxy for their identification in observations with a good spectral sampling.

  14. Cosmological signatures of tilted isocurvature perturbations: reionization and 21cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Silk, Joseph E-mail: hiroyuki.tashiro@asu.edu E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-03-01

    We investigate cosmological signatures of uncorrelated isocurvature perturbations whose power spectrum is blue-tilted with spectral index 2?

  15. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-10-27

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ∼10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.

  16. High Throughput Ambient Mass Spectrometric Approach to Species Identification and Classification from Chemical Fingerprint Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musah, Rabi A.; Espinoza, Edgard O.; Cody, Robert B.; Lesiak, Ashton D.; Christensen, Earl D.; Moore, Hannah E.; Maleknia, Simin; Drijhout, Falko P.

    2015-07-09

    A high throughput method for species identification and classification through chemometric processing of direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry-derived fingerprint signatures has been developed. The method entails introduction of samples to the open air space between the DART ion source and the mass spectrometer inlet, with the entire observed mass spectral fingerprint subjected to unsupervised hierarchical clustering processing. Moreover, a range of both polar and non-polar chemotypes are instantaneously detected. The result is identification and species level classification based on the entire DART-MS spectrum. In this paper, we illustrate how the method can be used to: (1) distinguish between endangered woods regulated by the Convention for the International Trade of Endangered Flora and Fauna (CITES) treaty; (2) assess the origin and by extension the properties of biodiesel feedstocks; (3) determine insect species from analysis of puparial casings; (4) distinguish between psychoactive plants products; and (5) differentiate between Eucalyptus species. An advantage of the hierarchical clustering approach to processing of the DART-MS derived fingerprint is that it shows both similarities and differences between species based on their chemotypes. Furthermore, full knowledge of the identities of the constituents contained within the small molecule profile of analyzed samples is not required.

  17. Surface Signature Characterization at SPE through Ground-Proximal Methods: Methodology Change and Technical Justification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.

    2015-09-09

    A portion of LANL’s FY15 SPE objectives includes initial ground-based or ground-proximal investigations at the SPE Phase 2 site. The area of interest is the U2ez location in Yucca Flat. This collection serves as a baseline for discrimination of surface features and acquisition of topographic signatures prior to any development or pre-shot activities associated with SPE Phase 2. Our team originally intended to perform our field investigations using previously vetted ground-based (GB) LIDAR methodologies. However, the extended proposed time frame of the GB LIDAR data collection, and associated data processing time and delivery date, were unacceptable. After technical consultation and careful literature research, LANL identified an alternative methodology to achieve our technical objectives and fully support critical model parameterization. Very-low-altitude unmanned aerial systems (UAS) photogrammetry appeared to satisfy our objectives in lieu of GB LIDAR. The SPE Phase 2 baseline collection was used as a test of this UAS photogrammetric methodology.

  18. PHOTOSPHERIC SIGNATURES OF GRANULAR-SCALE FLUX EMERGENCE AND CANCELLATION AT THE PENUMBRAL BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Abramenko, Valentyna; Ahn, Kwangsu; Cao Wenda; Goode, Philip

    2011-10-20

    We studied flux emergence events of sub-granular scale in a solar active region. The New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory made it possible to clearly observe the photospheric signature of flux emergence with very high spatial (0.''11 at 7057 A) and temporal (15 s) resolution. From TiO observations with the pixel scale of 0.''0375, we found several elongated granule-like features (GLFs) stretching from the penumbral filaments of a sunspot at a relatively high speed of over 4 km s{sup -1}. After a slender arched darkening appeared at the tip of a penumbral filament, a bright point (BP) developed and quickly moved away from the filament, forming and stretching a GLF. The size of a GLF was approximately 0.''5 wide and 3'' long. The moving BP encountered nearby structures after several minutes of stretching, and the well-defined elongated shape of the GLF faded away. Magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and NST/InfraRed Imaging Magnetograph revealed that those GLFs are photospheric indicators of small-scale flux emergence, and their disappearance is related to magnetic cancellation. From two well-observed events, we describe detailed development of the sub-structures of GLFs and different cancellation processes that each of the two GLFs underwent.

  19. Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

    2009-10-29

    This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

  20. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Lake, Joe E

    2012-01-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  1. SIGNATURES OF ILLICIT NUCLEAR PROCUREMENT NETWORKS: AN OVERVIEW OF PRELIMINARY APPROACHES AND RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, Jennifer B.; Erikson, Luke E.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Best, Daniel M.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Chikkagoudar, Satish

    2014-05-12

    The illicit trafficking of strategic nuclear commodities (defined here as the goods needed for a covert nuclear program excluding special nuclear materials) poses a significant challenge to the international nuclear nonproliferation community. Export control regulations, both domestically and internationally, seek to inhibit the spread of strategic nuclear commodities by restricting their sale to parties that may use them for nefarious purposes. However, export controls alone are not sufficient for preventing the illicit transfer of strategic nuclear goods. There are two major pitfalls to relying solely on export control regulations for the deterrence of proliferation of strategic goods. First, export control enforcement today relies heavily on the honesty and willingness of participants to adhere to the legal framework already in place. Secondly, current practices focus on the evaluation of single records which allow for the necessary goods to be purchased separately and hidden within the thousands of legitimate commerce transactions that occur each day, disregarding strategic information regarding several purchases. Our research presents two preliminary data-centric approaches for investigating procurement networks of strategic nuclear commodities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been putting significant effort into nonproliferation activities as an institution, both in terms of the classical nuclear material focused approach and in the examination of other strategic goods necessary to implement a nuclear program. In particular, the PNNL Signature Discovery Initiative (SDI) has codified several scientific methodologies for the detection, characterization, and prediction of signatures that are indicative of a phenomenon of interest. The methodologies and tools developed under SDI have already been applied successfully to problems in bio-forensics, cyber security and power grid balancing efforts and they have now made the nonproliferation of strategic goods into a challenge problem for testing their methodology and tools. As a first step towards the detection and characterization of illicit procurement networks, our research examines procurement networks as defined by a system of entities (people or companies) that enter into transactions of specific items with one another. Once we have defined such networks, we are interested in answering questions about the behavior and characterization of such networks. The questions we wish to answer regarding procurement networks are, first, Can we detect networks within large, noisy datasets? and second, To what extent can we compare multiple networks and identify their similarities? As procurement networks can be naturally viewed as a graph, we have employed several graph analytic tools to aid in these tasks. In particular, Graphscape, an SDI tool, uses a novel method to approximate edit distance, a graph distance measure based on the number of changes needed to transform one graph into another, in order to measure how similar two given graphs are to each other. Given a set of graphs where vertices represent companies and edges represent a shipment from company A to company B, we can calculate an all-for-all comparison of graphs. In this way, we are able to determine which graphs are most similar, and which require more changes to transform one into the other. The set of graphs to be compared can be further specialized to provide more insight, e.g., using different time periods to explore events in a company life cycle.

  2. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. Housekeeping genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.

  3. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.

  4. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesismore » of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.« less

  5. Searching for chemical signatures of multiple stellar populations in the old, massive open cluster NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Sneden, Christopher [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, C1400, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gratton, Raffaele G.; Lucatello, Sara [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bernath, Peter F. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, 4541 Hampton Boulevard, Norfolk, VA 23529-0126 (United States); Brooke, James S. A.; Ram, Ram S., E-mail: angela.bragaglia@oabo.inaf.it, E-mail: eugenio.carretta@oabo.inaf.it, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: raffaele.gratton@oapd.inaf.it, E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.it, E-mail: pbernath@odu.edu, E-mail: jsabrooke@gmail.com, E-mail: rr662@york.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-20

    Galactic open and globular clusters (OCs, GCs) appear to inhabit separate regions of the age-mass plane. However, the transition between them is not easily defined because there is some overlap between high-mass, old OCs and low-mass, young GCs. We are exploring the possibility of a clear-cut separation between OCs and GCs using an abundance feature that has been found so far only in GCs: (anti)correlations between light elements. Among the coupled abundance trends, the Na-O anticorrelation is the most widely studied. These anticorrelations are the signature of self-enrichment, i.e., of a formation mechanism that implies multiple generations of stars. Here we concentrate on the old, massive, metal-rich OC NGC 6791. We analyzed archival Keck/HIRES spectra of 15 NGC 6791 main-sequence turnoff and evolved stars, concentrating on the derivation of C, N, O, and Na abundances. We also used WIYN/Hydra spectra of 21 evolved stars (one is in common). Given the spectral complexity of the very metal-rich NGC 6791 stars, we employed spectrum synthesis to measure most of the abundances. We confirmed the cluster super-solar metallicity and abundances of Ca and Ni that have been derived in past studies. More importantly, we did not detect any significant star-to-star abundance dispersion in C, N, O, and Na. Based on the absence of a clear Na-O anticorrelation, NGC 6791 can still be considered a true OC, hosting a single generation of stars and not a low-mass GC.

  6. Using hyperspectral plant signatures for CO2 leak detection during the 2008 ZERT CO2 sequestration field experiment in Bozeman, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Male, E.J.; Pickles, W.L.; Silver, E.A.; Hoffmann, G.D.; Lewicki, J.; Apple, M.; Repasky, K.; Burton, E.A.

    2009-11-01

    Hyperspectral plant signatures can be used as a short-term, as well as long-term (100-yr timescale) monitoring technique to verify that CO2 sequestration fields have not been compromised. An influx of CO2 gas into the soil can stress vegetation, which causes changes in the visible to nearinfrared reflectance spectral signature of the vegetation. For 29 days, beginning on July 9th, 2008, pure carbon dioxide gas was released through a 100-meter long horizontal injection well, at a flow rate of 300 kg/day. Spectral signatures were recorded almost daily from an unmown patch of plants over the injection with a ''FieldSpec Pro'' spectrometer by Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc. Measurements were taken both inside and outside of the CO2 leak zone to normalize observations for other environmental factors affecting the plants.

  7. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  8. Gamma-Ray Signatures for State-Of-Health Analysis and Monitoring of Widely-Arrayed Radiation Portal Monitor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Angel, Linda K.; Wright, Ingrid H.; Eslinger, Melany A.; Pospical, A. Jill; Ellis, John E.

    2008-05-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has deployed a large array of radiation portal monitors for the Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border Protection. These portal monitors scan incoming vehicles crossing the U.S. border and shipping containers leaving international ports for radioactive material via gamma-ray and neutron detection. Data produced and captured by these systems are recorded for every vehicle related to radiation signature, sensor/system status, and local background, as well as a host of other variables. Within the Radiation Portal Monitor Project at PNNL, state-of-health observation and analysis for the whole RPM system using these data to determine functionality and performance is being developed. (PIET-43741-TM-492)

  9. Looking for Auger signatures in III-nitride light emitters: A full-band Monte Carlo perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertazzi, Francesco Goano, Michele; Zhou, Xiangyu; Calciati, Marco; Ghione, Giovanni; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-02-09

    Recent experiments of electron emission spectroscopy (EES) on III-nitride light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have shown a correlation between droop onset and hot electron emission at the cesiated surface of the LED p-cap. The observed hot electrons have been interpreted as a direct signature of Auger recombination in the LED active region, as highly energetic Auger-excited electrons would be collected in long-lived satellite valleys of the conduction band so that they would not decay on their journey to the surface across the highly doped p-contact layer. We discuss this interpretation by using a full-band Monte Carlo model based on first-principles electronic structure and lattice dynamics calculations. The results of our analysis suggest that Auger-excited electrons cannot be unambiguously detected in the LED structures used in the EES experiments. Additional experimental and simulative work are necessary to unravel the complex physics of GaN cesiated surfaces.

  10. Experimental observation of signature changes in bulk soil electrical conductivity in response to engineered surface CO2 leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou X.; Wielopolski L.; Lakkaraju, V. R.; Apple, M.; Dobeck, L. M.; Gullickson, K.; Shaw, J. A.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L. H.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental observations of signature changes of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC) due to CO{sub 2} leakage were carried out at a field site at Bozeman, Montana, to investigate the change of soil geophysical properties in response to possible leakage of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The dynamic evolution of bulk soil EC was measured during an engineered surface leakage of CO{sub 2} through in situ continuous monitoring of bulk soil EC, soil moisture, soil temperature, rainfall rate, and soil CO{sub 2} concentration to investigate the response of soil bulk EC signature to CO{sub 2} leakage. Observations show that: (1) high soil CO{sub 2} concentration due to CO{sub 2} leakage enhances the dependence of bulk soil EC on soil moisture. The bulk soil EC is a linear multivariate function of soil moisture and soil temperature, the coefficient for soil moisture increased from 2.111 dS for the non-leaking phase to 4.589 dS for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase; and the coefficient for temperature increased from 0.003 dS/C for the non-leaking phase to 0.008 dS/C for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase. The dependence of bulk soil EC on soil temperature is generally weak, but leaked CO{sub 2} enhances the dependence, (2) after the CO{sub 2} release, the relationship between soil bulk EC and soil CO{sub 2} concentration observes three distinct CO{sub 2} decay modes. Rainfall events result in sudden changes of soil moisture and are believed to be the driving forcing for these decay modes, and (3) within each mode, increasing soil CO{sub 2} concentration results in higher bulk soil EC. Comparing the first 2 decay modes, it is found that the dependence of soil EC on soil CO{sub 2} concentration is weaker for the first decay mode than the second decay mode.

  11. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded ?-sheet structure. The 1 ?s NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup ?1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 20002800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic studies of peptides and proteins.

  12. Indirect and direct signatures of Higgs portal decaying vector dark matter for positron excess in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seungwon; Ko, P.; Park, Wan-Il; Tang, Yong E-mail: pko@kias.re.kr E-mail: ytang@kias.re.kr

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the indirect signatures of the Higgs portal U(1){sub X} vector dark matter (VDM) X{sub ?} from both its pair annihilation and decay. The VDM is stable at renormalizable level by Z{sub 2} symmetry, and thermalized by Higgs-portal interactions. It can also decay by some nonrenormalizable operators with very long lifetime at cosmological time scale. If dim-6 operators for VDM decays are suppressed by 10{sup 16} GeV scale, the lifetime of VDM with mass ? 2 TeV is just right for explaining the positron excess in cosmic ray observed by PAMELA and AMS02 Collaborations. The VDM decaying into ?{sup +}?{sup ?} can fit the data, evading various constraints on cosmic rays. We give one UV-complete model as an example. This scenario for Higgs portal decaying VDM with mass around ? 2 TeV can be tested by DM direct search at XENON1T, and also at the future colliders by measuring the Higgs self-couplings.

  13. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ``ideal system,`` could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  14. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ideal system,'' could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  15. Supernovae with two peaks in the optical light curve and the signature of progenitors with low-mass extended envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Piro, Anthony L. [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Early observations of supernova light curves are powerful tools for shedding light on the pre-explosion structures of their progenitors and their mass-loss histories just prior to explosion. Some core-collapse supernovae that are detected during the first days after the explosion prominently show two peaks in the optical bands, including the R and I bands, where the first peak appears to be powered by the cooling of shocked surface material and the second peak is clearly powered by radioactive decay. Such light curves have been explored in detail theoretically for SN 1993J and 2011dh, where it was found that they may be explained by progenitors with extended, low-mass envelopes. Here, we generalize these results. We first explore whether any double-peaked light curve of this type can be generated by a progenitor with a 'standard' density profile, such as a red supergiant or a Wolf-Rayet star. We show that a standard progenitor (1) cannot produce a double-peaked light curve in the R and I bands and (2) cannot exhibit a fast drop in the bolometric luminosity as is seen after the first peak. We then explore the signature of a progenitor with a compact core surrounded by extended, low-mass material. This may be a hydrostatic low-mass envelope or material ejected just prior to the explosion. We show that it naturally produces both of these features. We use this result to provide simple formulae to estimate (1) the mass of the extended material from the time of the first peak, (2) the extended material radius from the luminosity of the first peak, and (3) an upper limit on the core radius from the luminosity minimum between the two peaks.

  16. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  17. Search for Excited or Exotic Electron Production Using the Dielectron + Photon Signature at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerberich, Heather Kay; /Duke U.

    2004-07-01

    The author presents a search for excited or exotic electrons decaying to an electron and a photon with high transverse momentum. An oppositely charged electron is produced in association with the excited electron, yielding a final state dielectron + photon signature. The discovery of excited electrons would be a first indication of lepton compositeness. They use {approx} 202 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during March 2001 through September 2003. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. Upper limits are set on the experimental cross-section {sigma}({bar p}p {yields} ee* {yields} ee{gamma}) at the 95% confidence level in a contact-interaction model and a gauge-mediated interaction model. Limits are also presented as exclusion regions in the parameter space of the excited electron mass (M{sub e*}) and the compositeness energy scale ({Lambda}). In the contact-interaction model, for which there are no previously published limits, they find M{sub e*} < 906 GeV is excluded for M{sub e*} = {Lambda}. In the gauge-mediated model, the exclusion region in the M{sub e*} versus the phenomenological coupling f/{Lambda} parameter space is extended to M{sub e*} < 430 GeV for f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}. In comparison, other experiments have excluded M{sub e*} < 280 GeV for f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}.

  18. Original Signature On File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    audit report, please contact CBFO Quality Assurance Director, Ava L. Holland , at (575) 234-7423 . Enclosure CBFO:QA:DSM:KBS :091545:UFC 2300.00 Sincerely, David C. Moody Manager...

  19. Science of Signatures Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Recommendation from a Reference Applicant Information: Name (Last, First, MI) Citizenship* Best Contact Phone Number Email Address University enrolled in Advisor Name...

  20. Signature ESO-CERN

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le Prof.Gregory parle du commencement de la collaboration entre directoires et gens de l'organisation; d'autres personnalités prennent la parole

  1. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively.

  2. Signature-Dependent Electromagnetic Transition Rates in the {pi}h{sub 11/2} Rotational Sequence of {sub 73}{sup 167}Ta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Chapman; K.-M. Spohr; M.B. Smith; R.A. Bark; G.J. Campbell; G.B. Hagemann; N. Keeley; D.J. Middleton; H. Ryde; P.O. Tjom

    1999-12-31

    Excited states in {sup 167}Ta, populated in the {sup 141}Pr({sup 30}Si, 4n){sup 167}Ta reaction, have been studied using the NORDBALL Ge detector array. For the {pi}h{sub 11/2}[514]{sub 2}{sup 9}{sup -} decay sequence, strong signature-dependent effects in the transition quadrupole moment ratio, Q{sub 1}(I {yields} I - 1)/Q{sub 2}(I {yields} I - 2), have been observed over the spin range {sub 2}{sup 21}{<=}I{<=}{sub 2}{sup 39} which encompasses a BC neutron alignment. This is interpreted as strong evidence for departure from axial symmetry.

  3. Signature-dependent electromagnetic transition rates in the {pi}h{sub 11/2} rotational sequence of {sub 73}{sup 167}Ta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R.; Spohr, K.-M.; Smith, M. B.; Campbell, G. J.; Middleton, D. J.; Bark, R. A.; Ryde, H.; Hagemann, G. B.; Keeley, N.; Tjoem, P. O.

    1999-11-16

    Excited states in {sup 167}Ta, populated in the {sup 141}Pr({sup 30}Si,4n){sup 167}Ta reaction, have been studied using the NORDBALL Ge detector array. For the {pi}h{sub 11/2}[514]9/2{sup -} decay sequence, strong signature-dependent effects in the transition quadrupole moment ratio, Q{sub 1}(I{yields}I-1)/Q{sub 2}(I{yields}I-2), have been observed over the spin range 21/2{<=}I{<=}39/2 which encompasses a BC neutron alignment. This is interpreted as strong evidence for departure from axial symmetry.

  4. Gamma/neutron analysis for SNM signatures at high-data rates(greater than 107 cps) for single-pulse active interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman L.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.

    2011-04-26

    We are developing a high data gamma/neutron spectrometer suitable for active interrogation of special nuclear materials (SNM) activated by a single burst from an intense source. We have tested the system at Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Mercury pulsed-power facility at distances approaching 10 meters from a depleted uranium (DU) target. We have found that the gamma-ray field in the target room 'disappears' 10 milliseconds after the x-ray flash, and that gamma ray spectroscopy will then be dominated by isomeric states/beta decay of fission products. When a polyethylene moderator is added to the DU target, a time-dependent signature of the DU is produced by thermalized neutrons. We observe this signature in gamma-spectra measured consecutively in the 0.1-1.0 ms time range. These spectra contain the Compton edge line (2.2 MeV) from capture in hydrogen, and a continuous high energy gamma-spectrum from capture or fission in minority constituents of the DU.

  5. Search for photonic signatures of gauge-mediated supersymmetry in 8 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. 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G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-01

    A search is presented for photonic signatures motivated by generalized models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. This search makes use of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, and explores models dominated by both strong and electroweak production of supersymmetric partner states. Four experimental signatures incorporating an isolated photon and significant missing transverse momentum are explored. These signatures include events with an additional photon, lepton, b-quark jet, or jet activity not associated with any specific underlying quark flavor. No significant excess of events is observed above the Standard Model prediction and model-dependent 95% confidence-level exclusion limits are set.

  6. Search for New Physics with a Dijet plus Missing Transverse Energy Signature in p-pbar Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    We present results of a signature-based search for new physics using a dijet plus missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) data sample collected in 2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe no significant event excess with respect to the standard model prediction and extract a 95% C.L. upper limit on the cross section times acceptance for a potential contribution from a non-standard model process. Based on this limit the mass of a potential first or second generation scalar leptoquark is constrained to be above 187 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Environmenta...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University of Wisconsin at Madison Logan, Bruce E.(Bruce E.Logan).- Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pennsylvania State University Go back to Individual ...

  8. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Mathematics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University of Texas at Arlington Logan, Bruce E.(Bruce E.Logan).- Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pennsylvania State University Long, Marshall B. ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Hoang, Andre (1) Kanemura, Shinya (1) List, Jenny (1) Logan, Heather E. (1) Nomerotski, ... Andre ; Kanemura, Shinya ; List, Jenny ; Logan, Heather E. ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Grojean, Christophe (1) Hoang, Andre (1) Kim, Hyungdo (1) Logan, Heather E. (1) Murayama, ... Andre ; Kanemura, Shinya ; List, Jenny ; Logan, Heather E. ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hoang, Andre (1) Kanemura, Shinya (1) List, Jenny (1) Logan, Heather E. (1) Nomerotski, ... Andre ; Kanemura, Shinya ; List, Jenny ; Logan, Heather E. ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; ...

  12. Quantitative understanding of Forbush decrease drivers based on shock-only and CME-only models using global signature of February 14, 1978 event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghav, Anil; Lotekar, Ajay; Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Yadav, Virendra E-mail: ankushbhaskar@gmail.com E-mail: vicharegeeta@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We have studied the Forbush decrease (FD) event that occurred on February 14, 1978 using 43 neutron monitor observatories to understand the global signature of FD. We have studied rigidity dependence of shock amplitude and total FD amplitude. We have found almost the same power law index for both shock phase amplitude and total FD amplitude. Local time variation of shock phase amplitude and maximum depression time of FD have been investigated which indicate possible effect of shock/CME orientation. We have analyzed rigidity dependence of time constants of two phase recovery. Time constants of slow component of recovery phase show rigidity dependence and imply possible effect of diffusion. Solar wind speed was observed to be well correlated with slow component of FD recovery phase. This indicates solar wind speed as possible driver of recovery phase. To investigate the contribution of interplanetary drivers, shock and CME in FD, we have used shock-only and CME-only models. We have applied these models separately to shock phase and main phase amplitudes respectively. This confirms presently accepted physical scenario that the first step of FD is due to propagating shock barrier and second step is due to flux rope of CME/magnetic cloud.

  13. Signature of Edward Bruce Held Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  14. THE CHEMICAL SIGNATURE OF A RELIC STAR CLUSTER IN THE SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY-IMPLICATIONS FOR NEAR-FIELD COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlsson, Torgny; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Freeman, Ken C.; Silk, Joe

    2012-11-10

    We present tentative evidence for the existence of a dissolved star cluster at [Fe/H] = -2.7 in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We use the technique of chemical tagging to identify stars that are highly clustered in a multi-dimensional chemical abundance space (C-space). In a sample of six stars, three, possibly four, stars are identified as potential cluster stars. The initial stellar mass of the parent cluster is estimated from two independent observations to be M{sub *,init}=1.9{sup +1.5}{sub -0.9}(1.6{sup +1.2}{sub -0.8}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, assuming a Salpeter (Kroupa) initial mass function. If corroborated by follow-up spectroscopy, this star cluster is the most metal-poor system identified to date. Chemical signatures of remnant clusters in dwarf galaxies like Sextans provide us with a very powerful probe to the high-redshift universe. From available observational data, we argue that the average star cluster mass in the majority of the newly discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies was notably lower than it is in the Galaxy today and possibly lower than in the more luminous, classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Furthermore, the mean cumulative metallicity function of the dwarf spheroidals falls below that of the ultra-faints, which increases with increasing metallicity as predicted from our stochastic chemical evolution model. These two findings, together with a possible difference in the ([Mg/Fe]) ratio suggest that the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy population, or a significant fraction thereof, and the dwarf spheroidal population were formed in different environments and would thus be distinct in origin.

  15. The Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Science of Battery Degradation. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Science of Battery Degradation. This report documents work that was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, Science of Battery Degradation. The focus of this work was on the creation of new experimental and theoretical approaches to understand atomistic mechanisms of degradation in battery electrodes that result in loss of electrical energy storage capacity. Several unique

  16. 2015 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic documentaries. Patrick Brewick Patrick Brewick earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 2009 and his Ph.D. from the Department of...

  17. Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  18. Signature of Christopher Gentile Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Therese LeBlanc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Tennant

  19. Signature of Christopher Gentile Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Therese LeBlanc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B Tennant II

  20. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  1. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  2. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  3. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  4. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian; Mehta, Chaitanya; Collins, Price; Lish, Matthew; Cady, Brian; Lollar, Victor; de Wet, Dane; Bayram, Duygu

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on plant parameters and the pump electrical signatures. Additionally, the reactor simulation is being used to generate normal operation data and data with instrumentation faults and process anomalies. A frequency controller was interfaced with the motor power supply in order to vary the electrical supply frequency. The experimental flow control loop was used to generate operational data under varying motor performance characteristics. Coolant leakage events were simulated by varying the bypass loop flow rate. The accuracy of motor power calculation was improved by incorporating the power factor, computed from motor current and voltage in each phase of the induction motor.- A variety of experimental runs were made for steady-state and transient pump operating conditions. Process, vibration, and electrical signatures were measured using a submersible pump with variable supply frequency. High correlation was seen between motor current and pump discharge pressure signal; similar high correlation was exhibited between pump motor power and flow rate. Wide-band analysis indicated high coherence (in the frequency domain) between motor current and vibration signals. - Wide-band operational data from a PWR were acquired from AMS Corporation and used to develop time-series models, and to estimate signal spectrum and sensor time constant. All the data were from different pressure transmitters in the system, including primary and secondary loops. These signals were pre-processed using the wavelet transform for filtering both low-frequency and high-frequency bands. This technique of signal pre-processing provides minimum distortion of the data, and results in a more optimal estimation of time constants of plant sensors using time-series modeling techniques.

  5. Determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer quantum dots via spectral analysis of optical signature of the Aharanov-Bohm excitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Haojie; Dhomkar, Siddharth; Roy, Bidisha; Kuskovsky, Igor L.; Shuvayev, Vladimir; Deligiannakis, Vasilios; Tamargo, Maria C.; Ludwig, Jonathan; Smirnov, Dmitry; Wang, Alice

    2014-10-28

    For submonolayer quantum dot (QD) based photonic devices, size and density of QDs are critical parameters, the probing of which requires indirect methods. We report the determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer QDs, based on spectral analysis of the optical signature of Aharanov-Bohm (AB) excitons, complemented by photoluminescence studies, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, and numerical calculations. Numerical calculations are employed to determine the AB transition magnetic field as a function of the type-II QD radius. The study of four samples grown with different tellurium fluxes shows that the lateral size of QDs increases by just 50%, even though tellurium concentration increases 25-fold. Detailed spectral analysis of the emission of the AB exciton shows that the QD radii take on only certain values due to vertical correlation and the stacked nature of the QDs.

  6. Snapshots of Proton Accommodation at a Microscopic Water Surface: Understanding the Vibrational Spectral Signatures of the Charge Defect in Cryogenically Cooled H+(H2O)n=2 28 Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A.; Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-07-09

    In this Article, we review the role of gas-phase, size-selected protonated water clusters, H+(H2O)n, in the analysis of the microscopic mechanics responsible for the behavior of the excess proton in bulk water. We extend upon previous studies of the smaller, two-dimensional sheet-like structures to larger (n?10) assemblies with three-dimensional cage morphologies which better mimic the bulk environment. Indeed, clusters in which a complete second solvation shell forms around a surface-embedded hydronium ion yield vibrational spectra where the signatures of the proton defect display strikingly similar positions and breadth to those observed in dilute acids. We investigate effects of the local structure and intermolecular interactions on the large red shifts observed in the proton vibrational signature upon cluster growth using various theoretical methods. We show that, in addition to sizeable anharmonic couplings, the position of the excess proton vibration can be traced to large increases in the electric field exerted on the embedded hydronium ion upon formation of the first and second solvation shells. MAJ acknowledges support from the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02- 06ER15800 as well as the facilities and staff of the Yale University Faculty of Arts and Sciences High Performance Computing Center, and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CNS 08-21132 that partially funded acquisition of the facilities. SMK and SSX acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  7. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widlak, Piotr; Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna; Pietrowska, Monika; Polanska, Joanna; Marczak, Łukasz; Miszczyk, Leszek; Składowski, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation affects the proteome of irradiated cells and tissue, yet data concerning changes induced during radiation therapy (RT) in human blood are fragmentary and inconclusive. We aimed to identify features of serum proteome and associated processes involved in response to partial body irradiation during cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and 20 patients with prostate cancer received definitive intensity modulated RT. Blood samples were collected before RT, just after RT, and 1 month after the end of RT. Complete serum proteome was analyzed in individual samples, using a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach which allowed identification of approximately 450 proteins. Approximately 100 unique proteins were quantified in all samples after exclusion of immunoglobulins, and statistical significance of differences among consecutive samples was assessed. Processes associated with quantified proteins and their functional interactions were predicted using gene ontology tools. Results: RT-induced changes were marked in the HNSCC patient group: 22 upregulated and 33 downregulated proteins were detected in post-RT sera. Most of the changes reversed during follow-up, yet levels of some proteins remained affected 1 month after the end of RT. RT-upregulated proteins were associated with acute phase, inflammatory response, and complement activation. RT-downregulated proteins were associated with transport and metabolism of lipids (plasma apolipoproteins) and blood coagulation. RT-induced changes were much weaker in prostate cancer patients, which corresponded to differences in acute radiation toxicity observed in both groups. Nevertheless, general patterns of RT-induced sera proteome changes were similar in both of the groups of cancer patients. Conclusions: In this pilot study, we proposed to identify a molecular signature of radiation response, based on specific features of serum proteome. The signature included upregulation of factors involved in acute or inflammatory response but also downregulation of plasma apolipoproteins and factors involved in blood coagulation.

  8. CX-005580: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sidney to Sterling Transmission Line Structure Replacement, Logan County, ColoradoCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 12/22/2010Location(s): Logan County, ColoradoOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  9. EA-1611-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado DOE's Western Area Power Administration issued a final supplemental...

  10. The Search for VH $\\bf\\to$ VWW Standard Model \\\\ Higgs Production in the Trilepton Signature\\\\ with $\\bf5.9\\fb$ of Data from $\\bf\\ppbar$ Collisions \\\\ at $\\bf\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nett, Jason Michael; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-01

    We present here the search for Standard Model VH {yields} VWW {yields} lll + E{sub T} (missing energy due to neutrinos) production, where V is a W or Z weak vector boson, which uses up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This analysis has recently added to the CDF high-mass Higgs group three new signal topologies characterized by a tri-lepton signature, which are chosen to isolate the VH {yields} VWW associated production signals in the three-lepton signature. As such, we define three new regions for a WH analysis, a ZH 1-jet analysis, and a ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis with which we expect to contribute an additional {approx} 5.8% (for m{sub H} = 165 GeV) acceptance to the current H {yields} WW dilepton analysis. The ZH trilepton regions are defined by events passing a Z-boson selection: events having at least one lepton pairing (among three possible pairings) with opposite sign, same flavor, and a dilepton invariant mass within [76.0, 106.0] GeV - a {+-} 15 GeV window around the Z-boson mass. The WH trilepton region is then defined as the set of trilepton events that are complement to those chosen by the Z-boson selection. These three new event topologies make a substantial contribution to the H {yields} WW group result. As a measure of the sensitivity of this search, we compute the median expected limit on the at 95% confidence level ('C.L.') on the production cross section (effectively the rate of production) for a Standard Model Higgs boson and report the result as a ratio to the theoretical production cross section. An observed limit ratio of one or less at a given mass would rule out the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson at that mass with 95% confidence. At m{sub H} = 165 GeV, the WH analysis expected limits reach 7.2 times the standard model cross section; the ZH 1-jet analysis is set at 29 times the expected standard model cross section; the ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis is set at 9.9 times the expected standard model cross section; and the combined trilepton analysis is set at 4.9 times the expected standard model cross section. We announce that the combination of this trilepton VH {yields} VWW Higgs boson search and the previous CDF dilepton H {yields} WW search achieves an expected median limit of 1.00 at 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. The expected median limit of 1.00 indicates we anticipate a 50% probability of ruling out the existence of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first time a single hadron collider experiment has achieved sensitivity to the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson. We do not see evidence for a significant signal of Higgs bosons in the data and place observed limits on the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of 165 GeV/c{sup 2} at 1.08 times Standard Model production cross section.

  11. W$${'}$$ signatures with odd Higgs particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Peterson, Andrea D.

    2014-08-13

    We point out that W' bosons may decay predominantly into Higgs particles associated with their broken gauge symmetry. We demonstrate this in a renormalizable model where the W' and W couplings to fermions differ only by an overall normalization. This "meta-sequential" W' boson decays into a scalar pair, with the charged one subsequently decaying into a W boson and a neutral scalar. These scalars are odd under a parity of the Higgs sector, which consists of a complex bidoublet and a doublet. Finally, the W' and Z' bosons have the same mass and branching fractions into scalars, and may showmore » up at the LHC in final states involving one or two electroweak bosons and missing transverse energy.« less

  12. W${'}$ signatures with odd Higgs particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Peterson, Andrea D.

    2014-08-13

    We point out that W' bosons may decay predominantly into Higgs particles associated with their broken gauge symmetry. We demonstrate this in a renormalizable model where the W' and W couplings to fermions differ only by an overall normalization. This "meta-sequential" W' boson decays into a scalar pair, with the charged one subsequently decaying into a W boson and a neutral scalar. These scalars are odd under a parity of the Higgs sector, which consists of a complex bidoublet and a doublet. Finally, the W' and Z' bosons have the same mass and branching fractions into scalars, and may show up at the LHC in final states involving one or two electroweak bosons and missing transverse energy.

  13. Contaminant signature at Los Alamos firing sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.; Irvine, J.

    1996-01-01

    During a dynamic weapons test, a weapons component is either explosively detonated or impacted against a target in the open air environment. This results in both the production of a wide size range of depleted uranium particles as well as particle scattering over a considerable distance away from the firing pad. The explosive detonation process which creates aerial distribution over a watershed distinguishes this contaminant transport problem from others where the source term is spatially discrete. Investigations of this contamination began in 1983 with collection of onsite soils, sediments, and rock samples to establish uranium concentrations. The samples were analyzed for total uranium to evaluate the magnitude of transport of uranium away from firing sites by airborne and surface water runoff mechanisms. This data was then used to define a firing site.

  14. Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... shaped laser pulse. Biological: A technique using ribosome simulations is allowing researchers to look for new antibiotics. Climate: Microtopography simulations of surface and ...

  15. Oxidation of carbynes: Signatures in infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinquanta, E. E-mail: p.rudolf@rug.nl; Manini, N.; Caramella, L.; Onida, G.; Ravagnan, L.; Milani, P.; Rudolf, P. E-mail: p.rudolf@rug.nl

    2014-06-28

    We report and solidly interpret the infrared spectrum of both pristine and oxidized carbynes embedded in a pure-carbon matrix. The spectra probe separately the effects of oxidation on sp- and on sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon, and provide information on the stability of the different structures in an oxidizing atmosphere. The final products are mostly short end-oxidized carbynes anchored with a double bond to sp{sup 2} fragments, plus an oxidized sp{sup 2} amorphous matrix. Our results have important implications for the realization of carbyne-based nano-electronics devices and highlight the active participation of carbynes in astrochemical reactions where they act as carbon source for the promotion of more complex organic species.

  16. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SEMEDX imaging suggests that the electrical properties result from the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. The CaCO3 forms an insulating film on ZVImagnetite surfaces, ...

  17. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trends in the future. Cover feature (jpg) Feature article Student opportunities SAGE sage logo Space Weather Summer School Student Programs Documents Climate Brochure (pdf)...

  18. Infra-red signature neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

  19. Signature_Page_2015_m0594.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. Manhattan Project Signature Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks, the only surviving World War II-era elctromagnetic isotope separations equipment in the world, still stand, complete with operator panels and telephone ...

  1. The Space-based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: Small Satellite Constellations: Strength in Numbers, Logan, UT, United ...

  2. Peetz Table Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Status In Service Owner Caithness Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Logan County CO Coordinates 40.954, -103.143 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Technical Sessions F. J. Barnes W. Porch and D. Cooper Los Alamos...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K. E. Kunkel Illinois State Water Survey Champaign, IL L. Hipps Utah State University Logan, UT The lower boundary of the GCM (general circulation model) modeling domain, the...

  4. Chestnut Flats Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In Service Owner EnXco Developer Gamesa Energy Energy Purchaser Delmarva Power Location Logan Township PA Coordinates 40.357314, -78.594482 Show Map Loading map......

  5. Pickaway County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohio Circleville, Ohio Commercial Point, Ohio Darbyville, Ohio Harrisburg, Ohio Logan Elm Village, Ohio New Holland, Ohio Orient, Ohio South Bloomfield, Ohio Tarlton, Ohio...

  6. EA-1611-S1: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project, Logan County, Colorado DOE's Western Area Power Administration issued a Finding of No Significant Impact for the proposed expansion of Colorado Highlands Wind Project,...

  7. Rail Splitter Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer Horizon Location Tazewell and Logan Counties IL Coordinates 40.309398, -89.396195 Show Map Loading map......

  8. EIS-0246-SA-36: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent...

  9. Appalachian Advanced Energy Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Appalachian Advanced Energy Association Address: 4 E. Hunter St. Place: Logan, Ohio Zip: 43138 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Phone Number:...

  10. Articles about Education Outreach | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. ...

  11. EA-1812: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1812: Draft Environmental Assessment Haxtun Wind Energy Project, Logan and Phillips ... Renewable Energy Deployment Program to Phillips County for design, permitting, and ...

  12. EA-1812: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1812: Final Environmental Assessment Haxtun Wind Energy Project, Logan and Phillips ... Renewable Energy Deployment Program to Phillips County for design, permitting, and ...

  13. Colorado Energy Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: Colorado Energy Office Address: 1580 Logan Street, Suite 100 Place: Denver, CO Zip: 80203 Website: www.colorado.govenergy Coordinates:...

  14. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contributors David Mascarenas Logan Ott Aaron Curis Sara Brambilla Amy Larson Steve Brumby Charles Farrar Portions of this work were supported by the Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

  15. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Resource Relation: Conference: 12th Annual American Institute of Aeronautics and AstronauticsUtah State University Conference on Small Satellite, Logan, UT, August 31-September 3, ...

  16. Identification of multi-modal plasma responses to applied magnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Identification of multi-modal plasma responses to applied magnetic perturbations using the plasma reluctance Authors: Logan, Nikolas C. 1 ; Paz-Soldan, Carlos 2 ; Park, ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tim ; Fujii, Keisuke ; Gao, Yuanning ; Hoang, Andre ; Kanemura, Shinya ; List, Jenny ; Logan, Heather E. ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; Perelstein, Maxim ; et al Full Text Available ...

  18. EA-1812: Final Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to address changes in the design and operating parameters of the NECO (formerly Haxtun) Wind Farm Project ("original proposed project") in Logan and Phillips Counties, Colorado. ...

  19. SANDIA REPORT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... properties) Arora, Hauser, and Roulston, IEEE Trans, on Electron Devices ED-29(2), p. 292 (February 1982). (Silicon transport properties) Aspnes, Kelso, Logan, and Bhat, J. Appl. ...

  20. Boardman to Hemingway | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transmission Environmental Analysis Type EIS Applicant Idaho Power Co Consultant Logan Simpson Design Geothermal Area Project Location Project Phase NA Techniques Time Frame...

  1. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects. Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this...

  2. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and V. B. Wickwar Center for Atmospheric and Space Sciences Utah State University Logan, Utah Abstract We report the successful development of a tunable narrow line laser...

  3. Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 EA-1812: Finding of No Significant Impact Haxtun Wind Energy Project, Logan and Phillips Counties, CO January 20, 2012 EA-1812: Final Environmental Assessment Haxtun Wind...

  4. Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 EA-1812: Draft Environmental Assessment Haxtun Wind Energy Project, Logan and Phillips Counties, Colorado October 20, 2011 EA-1665: Final Environmental Assessment and...

  5. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Baer, Howard; Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Fowlkes_2014_CNMS_StaffScienceHighlight...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Aerospace Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322; 4 Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco (CIFICEN-CONICET), Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de...

  7. EIS-0284: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Emission Boiler System Proof-of-Concept Project, Construction and Operation of a 91–Megawatt Electric Power Plant, Elkhart, Logan County, Illinois

  8. Hocking County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Association Places in Hocking County, Ohio Buchtel, Ohio Laurelville, Ohio Logan, Ohio Murray City, Ohio Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHockingCounty,Ohio...

  9. Consent Order EA-2005-01

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20585 July 28, 2005 Mr. T. E. Logan, President Bechtel Hanford, Inc. 3070 George Washington Way Richland, WA 99352 Consent Order 2005-01 Subject: Consent Order Incorporating ...

  10. Determining sand-body geometries for waterflood reservoirs: Examples from Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreisa, R.D.; Pinero, E. )

    1987-02-01

    Waterflood projects require an accurate knowledge of reservoir geometry and well-to-well continuity. However, sandstones with thin, multiple-pay zones can be extremely difficult to correlate with confidence. Two case studies of Pennsylvanian sandstones in Oklahoma illustrate how a model for the depositional history of such reservoirs can be an effective tool for determining reservoir continuity. In contrast, correlation criteria such as similar wireline log signatures and relative sand-body thicknesses are not reliable in many situations. In Southwest Logan field (Beaver County), 5 to 15-ft thick reservoir sands formed as shallow marine sand ridges. Their dimensions were approximated from height-to-width ratios of modern sand ridges. Then the reservoir sands were mapped using wireline logs and core data. Individual reservoir sands were approximately 1-2 km wide and stacked en echelon vertically. Thus, a line-drive waterflood pattern oriented parallel to the axes of the ridges is recommended. Tatums field (Carter County) consists of 5 to 50-ft thick sandstones deposited in various deltaic environments. Distributary channel sands have good continuity downdip, but are narrow and lenticular across depositional strike. Crevasse splay and other bay-fill sands were deposited marginal to the channels and are extremely discontinuous. This depositional model can be used to improve flood patterns for these sands, leading to improved sweep efficiency. In both examples, for effective mapping, the depositional facies models have been used to register reservoir quality and wireline log signatures.

  11. Finite formation time of hadrons: the QGP signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, S. M.

    2012-07-15

    In order to investigate the possible emergence of guark-gluon plasma, it is necessary to understand the properties of multiparticle production mechanisms in a more simple case than in relativistic collisions of heavy ions. The purpose of this article is to discuss some problems of the role of zone formation effectwhich are under active investigation nowadays. The formation length of hadron from particle-nucleus collision is derived and compared with those from relativistic ion collisions.

  12. Microsoft Word - finalMOU-4-signature1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in place for the Tank Closure Environmental Impact Statement (TC-EIS) effective March 25, 2003. ... V. PROCEDURES ECOLOGY Ecology will notify the DOE document manager of any ...

  13. Microsoft Word - TQP 1 31 Final w signatures.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Los Alamos Site Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration January 10-13, 2011 This page ...

  14. Chicago Office Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Charging Up with the Electric Drive Transportation Association Charging Up with the Electric Drive Transportation Association May 20, 2014 - 4:51pm Addthis Test Drive 1 of 5 Test Drive Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Reuben Sarkar drives a Chevrolet Spark EV during the Electric Drive Transportation Association conference in Indianapolis, Indiana on May 20, 2014. The conference brings together industry leaders who are advancing electric vehicle technologies and

  15. Microsoft Word - LBL-ISM-2013 Signature-31July2013 ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-AC02-05CH11231 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory PUB-3140 Integrated Safety Management System Description Revision 8 i July 2013 Integrated Safety* Management...

  16. Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Proposed for publication in Optics Express. Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country ...

  17. Microsoft Word - Final Report with Greg Electronic Signature

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA for approval was consistent with DEAR 970.5227-3, Conflicts of Interest-Technology Transfer, since the specific language of the approval request stated "In accordance with...

  18. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ross David 1 ; Riggs, Scott C. 1 ; Ramshaw, Brad 2 ; Liang, Ruixing 2 ; Hardy, Walter N. 2 ; Bonn, Doug A. 2 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

  19. (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We find that in the regime of validity of the effective theory, the oscillatory signal contained in the n-point correlation functions, with n > 2, is smaller than the one contained ...

  20. Microsoft Word - IN COOP Spc-Ltr Report electronic signature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy and other executive branch agencies on ... key intelligence functions during a continuity ... of IN's plans for Test, Training and Exercises, ...

  1. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is ...

  2. Microsoft Word - 11-0434 _signature on file_ _2_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solids waste and S5000 debris waste. The audit team also evaluated, for initial certification, activities related to the real-time radiography Unit 4 to characterize the...

  3. Microsoft Word - 11-0607 _signature on file_ _2_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    debris waste. In addition, the audit report contains the results of the initial certification audit for Summary Category Group S3000 homogeneous solid waste. The audit team...

  4. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that extends from room temperature to the superconducting transition. Although polarized neutron scattering studies hint at magnetic order associated with the pseudogap, there is...

  5. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy signatures of the glass transition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, K. L. .M.; Myers, J. A.; Fuller, F.; Tekavec, P. F.; Ogilvie, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of solvation dynamics. Using a pump–probe geometry with a pulse shaper [ Optics Express 15 (2007), 16681-16689; Optics Express 16 (2008), 17420-17428], we present temperature dependent 2D spectra of laser dyes dissolved in glass-forming solvents. At low waiting times, the system has not yet relaxed, resulting in a spectrum that is elongated along the diagonal. At longer times, the system loses its memory of the initial excitation frequency, and the 2D spectrum rounds out. As the temperature is lowered, the time scale of this relaxation grows, and the elongation persists for longermore » waiting times. This can be measured in the ratio of the diagonal width to the anti-diagonal width; the behavior of this ratio is representative of the frequency–frequency correlation function [ Optics Letters 31 (2006), 3354–3356]. Near the glass transition temperature, the relaxation behavior changes. Understanding this change is important for interpreting temperature-dependent dynamics of biological systems.« less

  6. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  7. Microsoft Word - 11-0656 _signature on file_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RU:MAG:11-0656:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 17, 2011 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste...

  8. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ring motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics that may link proton transfer to ring compliance.

  9. Microsoft Word - 2007 NESHAP Final with Signature page.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... According to 40 CFR 61.93 (b)(4)(ii) (CFR, 2002), no credit was taken for pollution control equipment in determining air emissions. The emissions for NESHAP reporting are listed in ...

  10. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES IN BLACK HOLE FORMING CORE COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerd-Durn, Pablo; DeBrye, Nicolas; Aloy, Miguel A.; Font, Jos A.; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). By analyzing the spectrogram of our simulations we are able to identify the frequencies associated with the presence of g-modes and with the SASI motions at the PNS surface. We note that the gravitational waves emitted reach large enough amplitudes to be detected with third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope within a Virgo Cluster volume at rates ? 0.1yr{sup 1}.

  11. CLOUD BASE SIGNATURE IN TRANSMISSION SPECTRA OF EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vahidinia, Sanaz; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Marley, Mark; Fortney, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    We present an analytical model for the transmission spectrum of a transiting exoplanet, showing that a cloud base can produce an observable inflection point in the spectrum. The wavelength and magnitude of the inflection can be used to break the degeneracy between the atmospheric pressure and the abundance of the main cloud material, however, the abundance still depends on cloud particle size. An observed inflection also provides a specific point on the atmospheric P-T profile, giving us a ''thermometer'' to directly validate or rule out postulated cloud species. We apply the model to the transit spectrum of HD 189733b.

  12. Signatures of a companion star in type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Keiichi; Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-10-10

    Although type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used as precise cosmological distance indicators, their progenitor systems remain unresolved. One of the key questions is whether there is a nondegenerate companion star at the time of a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf. In this paper, we investigate whether an interaction between the SN ejecta and the companion star may result in observable footprints around the maximum brightness and thereafter, by performing multidimensional radiation transfer simulations based on hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction. We find that such systems result in variations in various observational characteristics due to different viewing directions, and the predicted behaviors (redder and fainter for the companion direction) are the opposite of what were suggested by the previous study. The variations are generally modest and within observed scatters. However, the model predicts trends between some observables different from those observationally derived, so a large sample of SNe Ia with small calibration errors may be used to constrain the existence of such a companion star. The variations in different colors in optical band passes can be mimicked by external extinctions, so such an effect could be a source of scatter in the peak luminosity and derived distance. After the peak, hydrogen-rich materials expelled from the companion will manifest themselves in hydrogen lines, but Hα is extremely difficult to identify. Alternatively, we find that P{sub β} in postmaximum near-infrared spectra can potentially provide a powerful diagnostic.

  13. Signatures of initial state modifications on bispectrum statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meerburg, P Daniel; Schaar, Jan Pieter van der; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano E-mail: j.p.vanderschaar@uva.nl

    2009-05-15

    Modifications of the initial-state of the inflaton field can induce a departure from Gaussianity and leave a testable imprint on the higher order correlations of the CMB and large scale structures in the Universe. We focus on the bispectrum statistics of the primordial curvature perturbation and its projection on the CMB. For a canonical single-field action the three-point correlator enhancement is localized, maximizing in the collinear limit, corresponding to enfolded or squashed triangles in comoving momentum space. We show that the available local and equilateral template are very insensitive to this localized enhancement and do not generate noteworthy constraints on initial-state modifications. On the other hand, when considering the addition of a dimension 8 higher order derivative term, we find a dominant rapidly oscillating contribution, which had previously been overlooked and whose significantly enhanced amplitude is independent of the triangle under consideration. Nevertheless, the oscillatory nature of (the sign of) the correlation function implies the signal is nearly orthogonal to currently available observational templates, strongly reducing the sensitivity to the enhancement. Constraints on departures from the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum state can be derived, but also depend on the next-to-leading terms. We emphasize that the construction and application of especially adapted templates could lead to CMB bispectrum constraints on modified initial states already competing with those derived from the power spectrum.

  14. Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10 K. The data is well fit by the Kondo volume collapse model plus a quasiharmonic representation of the phonons. The resultant free energy is validated against data for the ...

  15. Microsoft Word - eMST report - for signature.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2-00193 Revision 0 Testing and Characterization of Engineered Forms of Monosodium Titanate (MST) K. M. L. Taylor-Pashow C. A. Nash D. T. Hobbs May 2012 Savannah River National...

  16. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. G. Lasscock; J. Hedditch; Derek Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; James Zanotti

    2005-02-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark, with minimal quark content uudd{bar s}, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large 20{sup 3} x 40 lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of increasing attraction between baryon constituents for increasing quark mass is not observed for spin-1/2 pentaquark states. We conclude that evidence supporting the existence of a spin-1/2 pentaquark resonance does not exist in quenched QCD.

  17. Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and reagent delivery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 98 ... PUMPING; STORAGE; TARGETS; TESTING; VALVES; VERIFICATION; VISCOSITY; WEAPONS ...

  18. Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and reagent delivery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 98 ... PUMPING; STORAGE; TARGETS; TESTING; VALVES; VERIFICATION; VISCOSITY; WEAPONS ...

  19. Experimental study of viscosity effects on air-gun signatures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In computer modeling of air guns the theory is often based on the assumption of an ideal freely oscillating spherical air bubble in an ideal fluid. Theoretical and experimental ...

  20. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  1. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ringmore » motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics that may link proton transfer to ring compliance.« less

  2. Freeze-In dark matter with displaced signatures at colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Co, Raymond T.; D’Eramo, Francesco; Hall, Lawrence J.; Pappadopulo, Duccio

    2015-12-11

    Dark matter, X, may be generated by new physics at the TeV scale during an early matter-dominated (MD) era that ends at temperature T{sub R}≪ TeV. Compared to the conventional radiation-dominated (RD) results, yields from both Freeze-Out and Freeze-In processes are greatly suppressed by dilution from entropy production, making Freeze-Out less plausible while allowing successful Freeze-In with a much larger coupling strength. Freeze-In is typically dominated by the decay of a particle B of the thermal bath, B→X. For a large fraction of the relevant cosmological parameter space, the decay rate required to produce the observed dark matter abundance leads to displaced signals at LHC and future colliders, for any m{sub X} in the range keV

  3. Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    20742 (United States) Microsoft Station Q, CNSI Building, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93108 (United States) (United States) Department of Physics, ...

  4. Signatures in flowing fluid electric conductivity logs (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    including analysis of natural regional flowin the permeable layer. A numerical model simulates flow and transport inthe wellbore during flowing FEC logging, and fracture ...

  5. Microsoft Word - Alcoa Contract 12-09-09 blackline signature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be deemed unreasonable for BPA to require credit security from an assignee with a Moody's credit rating below "A", or the equivalent if rated by another credit rating agency. No...

  6. Measuring and Understanding the Energy Use Signatures of a Bank...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These meters monitored the consumption of all interior and exterior lighting, receptacle loads, service water heating, and the HVAC rooftop unit at a 5-minute sampling interval ...

  7. Microsoft Word - 11-0434 _signature on file_ _2_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    434:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 February 1, 2011 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Audit Report for the Savannah River Site Central Characterization Project Recertification Audit A-11-01 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the audit report for the Carlsbad Field Office

  8. Microsoft Word - 11-0607 _signature on file_ _2_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KBS:11-0607:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 June 20, 2011 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of Audit Report for the Hanford Site Central Characterization Project Recertification Audit A-11-10 Dear Mr. Kieling: Enclosed is the Audit Report for the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO)

  9. Microsoft Word - 11-0656 _signature on file_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RU:MAG:11-0656:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 17, 2011 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for CBFO Audit A-11-13 of the INL/CCP Analytical Laboratories Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Audit A-11-13 of the processes

  10. Microsoft Word - 13-2308 (WORD FORMAT) Signature on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    308:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 December 9, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr. Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for Recertification Audit A-14-01 of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO)

  11. Transport signatures of quantum critically in Cr at high pressure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaramillo, R.; Feng, Y.; Wang, J.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2010-08-03

    The elemental antiferromagnet Cr at high pressure presents a new type of naked quantum critical point that is free of disorder and symmetry-breaking fields. Here we measure magnetotransport in fine detail around the critical pressure, P{sub c} {approx} 10 GPa, in a diamond anvil cell and reveal the role of quantum critical fluctuations at the phase transition. As the magnetism disappears and T {yields} 0, the magntotransport scaling converges to a non-mean-field form that illustrates the reconstruction of the magnetic Fermi surface, and is distinct from the critical scaling measured in chemically disordered Cr:V under pressure. The breakdown of itinerant antiferromagnetism only comes clearly into view in the clean limit, establishing disorder as a relevant variable at a quantum phase transition.

  12. A DYNAMICAL SIGNATURE OF MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richer, Harvey B.; Heyl, Jeremy; Anderson, Jay; Kalirai, Jason S.; Shara, Michael M.; Dotter, Aaron; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Rich, R. Michael E-mail: heyl@phas.ubc.ca E-mail: jkalarai@stsci.edu E-mail: aaron.dotter@gmail.com E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu

    2013-07-01

    Based on the width of its main sequence, and an actual observed split when viewed through particular filters, it is widely accepted that 47 Tucanae contains multiple stellar populations. In this contribution, we divide the main sequence of 47 Tuc into four color groups, which presumably represent stars of various chemical compositions. The kinematic properties of each of these groups are explored via proper motions, and a strong signal emerges of differing proper-motion anisotropies with differing main-sequence color; the bluest main-sequence stars exhibit the largest proper-motion anisotropy which becomes undetectable for the reddest stars. In addition, the bluest stars are also the most centrally concentrated. A similar analysis for Small Magellanic Cloud stars, which are located in the background of 47 Tuc on our frames, yields none of the anisotropy exhibited by the 47 Tuc stars. We discuss implications of these results for possible formation scenarios of the various populations.

  13. 10 Questions for a Signature Scientist: Nathan Baker

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out how he’s working to advance the innovative application of data analytics and algorithms to real-world challenges, ranging from smart grids and bioforensics to nuclear non-proliferation and medical treatments.

  14. Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Department of Geophysics

    2008-06-30

    Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

  15. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Nortek Signature55 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Current Meter Nortek Aquadopp Profiler MIDAS WTR Wave and Tide Recorder TRDI Sentinel V ... further results Directional Spectra (Wave) (6) Nortek Acoustic Wave and Current...

  16. Microsoft Word - 2007 NESHAP Final with Signature page.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007 By Ronald W. ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007 iii EXECUTIVE ...

  17. Experimental signatures of localization in Langmuir wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D.; Bezzerides, B.

    1988-01-01

    Features in certain laser-plasma and ionospheric experiments are identified with the basic properties of Langmuir wave turbulence. Also, a model of caviton nucleation is presented which leads to certain novel scaling predictions. 12 refs., 19 figs.

  18. Merger signatures in the galaxy cluster A98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paterno-Mahler, R.; Blanton, E. L.; Randall, S. W.; Bulbul, E.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.; Johnson, R. E. E-mail: eblanton@bu.edu E-mail: ebulbul@head.cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: cjones@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: rjohnson@gettysburg.edu

    2014-08-20

    We present results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of Abell 98 (A98), a galaxy cluster with three major components: a relatively bright subcluster to the north (A98N), a disturbed subcluster to the south (A98S), and a fainter subcluster to the far south (A98SS). We find evidence for surface brightness and temperature asymmetries in A98N consistent with a shock-heated region to the south, which could be created by an early stage merger between A98N and A98S. Deeper observations are required to confirm this result. We also find that A98S has an asymmetric core temperature structure, likely due to a separate ongoing merger. Evidence for this is also seen in optical data. A98S hosts a wide-angle tail radio source powered by a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). We find evidence for a cavity in the intracluster medium that has been evacuated by one of the radio lobes, suggesting that AGN feedback is operating in this system. Examples of cavities in non-cool core clusters are relatively rare. The three subclusters lie along a line in projection, suggesting the presence of a large-scale filament. We observe emission along the filament between A98N and A98S, and a surface brightness profile shows emission consistent with the overlap of the subcluster extended gas halos. We find the temperature of this region is consistent with the temperature of the gas at similar radii outside this bridge region. Lastly, we examine the cluster dynamics using optical data. We conclude A98N and A98S are likely bound to one another with a 67% probability, while A98S and A98SS are not bound at a high level of significance.

  19. Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    geochemists, geomicrobiologists, and environmental microbiologists conducting multidisciplinary research with potential impact on biogeophysics in order to define the current ...

  20. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, R. M. da; Domnguez, D.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  1. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Shehter, Arkady 1 ; Migliori, Albert 1 ; Betts, Jonathan B. 1 ; Balakirev, Fedor F. 1 ; McDonald, Ross David 1 ; Riggs, Scott C. 1 ; Ramshaw, Brad 2 ; Liang, ...

  2. Multiclass cancer diagnosis using tumor gene expression signatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramaswamy, S.; Tamayo, P.; Rifkin, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Yeang, C. -H.; Angelo, M.; Ladd, C.; Reich, M.; Latulippe, E.; Mesirov, J. P.; et al

    2001-12-11

    The optimal treatment of patients with cancer depends on establishing accurate diagnoses by using a complex combination of clinical and histopathological data. In some instances, this task is difficult or impossible because of atypical clinical presentation or histopathology. To determine whether the diagnosis of multiple common adult malignancies could be achieved purely by molecular classification, we subjected 218 tumor samples, spanning 14 common tumor types, and 90 normal tissue samples to oligonucleotide microarray gene expression analysis. The expression levels of 16,063 genes and expressed sequence tags were used to evaluate the accuracy of a multiclass classifier based on a supportmore » vector machine algorithm. Overall classification accuracy was 78%, far exceeding the accuracy of random classification (9%). Poorly differentiated cancers resulted in low-confidence predictions and could not be accurately classified according to their tissue of origin, indicating that they are molecularly distinct entities with dramatically different gene expression patterns compared with their well differentiated counterparts. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of accurate, multiclass molecular cancer classification and suggest a strategy for future clinical implementation of molecular cancer diagnostics.« less

  3. ITC Symposium

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ITC Role in U.S. Fuel Cell Projects ITC Role in U.S. Fuel Cell Projects This presentation by Samuel Logan of Logan Energy was given at a meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee in February 2009. It was posted on this Web site with permission from the author. PDF icon mt_logan_htac_presentation.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2010 State and Regional Initiatives Informational Call and Meeting Series Relaunch Federal Sector

  4. ITC Role in U.S. Fuel Cell Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITC Role in U.S. Fuel Cell Projects ITC Role in U.S. Fuel Cell Projects This presentation by Samuel Logan of Logan Energy was given at a meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee in February 2009. It was posted on this Web site with permission from the author. PDF icon mt_logan_htac_presentation.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2010 State and Regional Initiatives Informational Call and Meeting Series Relaunch Federal Sector

  5. 188795.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of...

  6. BPA-2014-01924-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Harkonen, P.Eng. Consulting Specialist, Power Systems NORDMIN ENGINEERING LTD. 160 Logan Avenue Thunder Bay, ON, CANADA P7A 6R1 Phone: (807) 683-4858 Fax: (807) 344-0404 ww W...

  7. BPA-2014-01924-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nordmin Engineering Ltd. Attn: Harold Harkonen, P. Eng., Consulting Specialist 160 Logan Avenue Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada P7A6R1 Mr. Harkonen: We have received your request...

  8. Adairville, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Adairville is a city in Logan County, Kentucky. It falls under Kentucky's 1st congressional district.12...

  9. NREL: Energy Analysis - Eric Lantz

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M.; Zinaman, O.; James, T.; Porro, G.; Hand, M.; Mai, T.; Logan, J.; Heeter, J.; Bird, L. (2014). Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment. 32 pp.; NREL...

  10. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alice Koniges 1,a , Wangyi Liu 1 , John Barnard 2 , Alex Friedman 2 , Grant Logan 1 , ... and LLNL acknowledge UC Lab Fees Research Grant 09-LR-04-116741-BERA. This work is ...

  11. ARM - AGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and Chemical Properties using AMF-China and AERONET Data T. Logan; B. Xi; X. Dong; Z. Li 1:40 ... Mass Flux Parameterizations of Fair-Weather Cumuli B.A. Albrecht; P. Kollias ...

  12. Organization Amount Volunteer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Nichols, B etsy --- 1 00 Hilltopper B asketball A cademy 1550 Carver, R endell --- 2 50 Harris, R obert --- 5 00 Logan, T arah --- 2 50 Peterson, D onald ( Pete) --- 5 00...

  13. CX-005114: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fleming Substation Transformer Replacement, Fleming, Logan County, ColoradoCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 12/20/2010Location(s): Fleming, ColoradoOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  14. Diversifying Project Portfolios for Utility Energy Service Contracts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Contracts Contacts for Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts FEMP Contacts Tracy Logan U.S. Department of Energy 202-431-7601 See all UESC contacts Publications UESC Guide ...

  15. TID-4500, UC-4 Chemistry Lawpenoe R

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... We would like to thank Mark Wilkins M . Jepson, and Suzette Logan in data reduction. and Seymour S a c k f o r t h e i r overall guid- ance and particularly f o r their support ...

  16. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Utility Energy Service Contracts Contacts for Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts FEMP Contacts Tracy Logan U.S. Department of Energy 202-431-7601 See all UESC contacts

  17. Best Practices for Getting the Best Value from Federal Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contracts Contacts for Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts FEMP Contacts Tracy Logan U.S. Department of Energy 202-431-7601 See all UESC contacts Publications UESC Guide ...

  18. Resources for Implementing Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Energy Service Contract Case Studies Contacts for Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts FEMP Contacts Tracy Logan U.S. Department of Energy 202-431-7601 See all UESC contacts

  19. Microbial Fuel Cell Technologies—MxCs: Can They Scale?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Bruce Logan, Penn State University, during the "Technological State of the Art" panel at the Hydrogen, Hydrocarbons, and Bioproduct Precursors from Wastewaters Workshop held March 18–19, 2015.

  20. rfc:gen | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I believe continuing RHIC program is vital for the future science in this country. Logan RIce, 20121130 12:52 CST I am an undergraduate who participated in nuclear physics...

  1. December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept. of Psychiatry; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) (1995) 160 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies ...

  2. March 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept. of Psychiatry; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) (1995) 206 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies ...

  3. September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept. of Psychiatry; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) (1995) 168 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies ...

  4. The rotary zone thermal cycler: A low-power system enabling automated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (United States) Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Rockville, MD (United States) Sequoia Tek Corp., Logan, UT (United States)...

  5. Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 EA-1812: Finding of No Significant Impact Haxtun Wind Energy Project, Logan and Phillips Counties, CO January 3, 2012 EA-1606: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Use...

  6. Microbial Fuel Cell Technologies--MxCs: Can They Scale?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... cm Design: Limited by cathode area, so in this example we achieve 10 m 2 m 3 10 cm 100 cm Logan (2012) Chem. Sus. Chem. 22 MFC + AFMBR (Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Membrane Bioreactor...

  7. Appalachian Advanced Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 E Hunter Street Place: Logan, Ohio Zip: 43138 Website: www.ohioaaea.orgAAEAHome.html References: Appalachian Advanced Energy1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  8. Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste Feedstocks Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells Bruce Logan, Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering and Evan Pugh Professor, Pennsylvania State University PDF icon logan_bioenergy_2015.pdf More

  9. Energy-water challenge emerges in Colorado River flows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Efficient Windows Energy-Efficient Windows Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects. Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects. Windows provide our homes with light, warmth, and ventilation, but they can also negatively impact a home's energy efficiency. You can reduce energy

  10. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficient Windows Energy-Efficient Windows Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects. Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects. Windows provide our homes with light, warmth, and ventilation, but they can also negatively impact a home's energy efficiency. You can reduce energy

  11. Consent Order EA-2005-01

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    20585 July 28, 2005 Mr. T. E. Logan, President Bechtel Hanford, Inc. 3070 George Washington Way Richland, WA 99352 Consent Order 2005-01 Subject: Consent Order Incorporating Agreement between U.S. Department of Energy and Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Dear Mr. Logan: The Department of Energy (DOE) has reviewed Bechtel Hanford, Inc.'s (Bechtel Hanford) investigation and supporting documentation associated with two events occurring at the 618-2 Burial Ground in December 2004. These events resulted in

  12. SRS-Tritium FY12 PEP_Redacted.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Douglas Dearolph Signature of Douglas Dearolph Signature of Dennis Donati

  13. Microsoft Word - TOC_Section_J.5_Model.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-1 ATTACHMENT J-5 PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT 82407 Signature on File Signature on File 82407 Signature on File Signature on File Signature on File...

  14. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Nortek Signature 1000/500 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notes, Considerations & Recommendations Data conversion to ASCII and MatLab format. Call for quote and additional information. User Experience No user experiences...

  15. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to identify fracture systems in wells using fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chips.

  16. Signatures of anisotropic sources in the trispectrum of the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Peloso, Marco E-mail: komatsu@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2014-04-01

    Soft limits of N-point correlation functions, in which one wavenumber is much smaller than the others, play a special role in constraining the physics of inflation. Anisotropic sources such as a vector field during inflation generate distinct angular dependence in all these correlators, and introduce a fix privileged direction in our sky. In this paper we focus on the four-point correlator (the trispectrum T). We adopt a parametrization motivated by models in which the inflaton ? is coupled to a vector field through a I{sup 2}(?)F{sup 2} interaction, namely T{sub ?}(k{sub 1},k{sub 2},k{sub 3},k{sub 4})??{sub n}d{sub n}[P{sub n}( k-circumflex {sub 1}? k-circumflex {sub 3})+P{sub n}( k-circumflex {sub 1}? k-circumflex {sub 12})+P{sub n}( k-circumflex {sub 3}? k-circumflex {sub 12})]P{sub ?}(k{sub 1})P{sub ?}(k{sub 3})P{sub ?}(k{sub 12})+(23perm), where P{sub n} denotes the Legendre polynomials. This shape is enhanced when the wavenumbers of the diagonals of the quadrilateral are much smaller than the sides, k{sub i}. The coefficient of the isotropic part, d{sub 0}, is equal to ?{sub NL}/6 discussed in the literature. A I{sup 2}(?)F{sup 2} interaction generates d{sub 2} = 2d{sub 0} which is, in turn, related to the quadrupole modulation parameter of the power spectrum, g{sub *}, as d{sub 2} ? 14|g{sub *}|N{sup 2} with N ? 60. We show that d{sub 0} and d{sub 2} can be equally well-constrained: the expected 68% CL error bars on these coefficients from a cosmic-variance-limited experiment measuring temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background up to ?{sub max} = 2000 are ?d{sub 2} ? 4?d{sub 0} = 105. Therefore, we can reach |g{sub *}| = 10{sup ?3} by measuring the angle-dependent trispectrum. The current upper limit on ?{sub NL} from the Planck temperature maps yields |g{sub *}| < 0.02 (95% CL)

  17. Electrical signature analysis applications for non-intrusive automotive alternator diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, C.W.

    1996-03-01

    Automotive alternators are designed to supply power for automobile engine ignition systems as well as charge the storage battery. This product is used in a large market where consumers are concerned with acoustic noise and vibration that comes from the unit. as well as overall quality and dependability. Alternators and generators in general are used in industries other than automotive, such as transportation and airline industries and in military applications. Their manufacturers are interested in pursuing state-of-the-art methods to achieve higher quality and reduced costs. Preliminary investigations of non-intrusive diagnostic techniques utilizing the inherent voltage signals of alternators have been performed with promising results. These techniques are based on time and frequency domain analyses of specially conditioned signals taken from several alternators under various test conditions. This paper discusses investigations that show correlations of the alternator output voltage to airborne noise production. In addition these signals provide insight into internal magnetic characteristics that relate to design and/or assembly problems.

  18. Magnetic helicity signature produced by cross-field 2D turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markovskii, S. A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2013-06-13

    Hybrid numerical simulations of freely decaying 2D turbulence are presented. The background magnetic field is perpendicular to the simulation plane, which eliminates linear kinetic Alfven waves from the system. The normalized magnetic helicity of the initial large-scale fluctuations is zero, while the normalized cross-helicity is not. As the turbulence evolves, it develops nonzero magnetic helicity at smaller scales, in the proton kinetic range. In the quasi-steady state of evolution, the magnetic helicity spectrum has a peak consistent with the solar wind observations.

  19. National Nanotechnology Initiative's Signature Initiative Sustainable Nanomanufacturing: Creating the Industries of the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by National Nanotechnology Coordination Office held on June 26, 2012

  20. Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

    2012-10-17

    From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

  1. ON THE LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2013-03-10

    We examine the effects of time dilation on the temporal profiles of gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses. By using prescriptions for the shape and evolution of prompt gamma-ray spectra, we can generate a simulated population of single-pulsed GRBs at a variety of redshifts and observe how their light curves would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. We find that the observer frame duration of individual pulses does not increase with redshift as 1 + z, which one would expect from cosmological expansion. This time dilation is masked by an opposite and often stronger effect: with increasing redshift and decreasing signal-to-noise ratio only the brightest portion of the light curve can be detected. The results of our simulation are consistent with the fact that the simple time dilation of GRB light curves has not materialized in either the Swift or Fermi detected GRBs with known redshift. We show that the measured durations and associated E{sub iso} estimates for GRBs detected near the instrument's detection threshold should be considered lower limits to the true values. Furthermore, we conclude that attempts at distinguishing between long and short GRBs, at even moderate redshifts, cannot be done based on a burst's temporal properties alone.

  2. Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson with a Dilepton and Missing Energy Signature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerbaudo, Davide; /Princeton U.

    2011-06-01

    The subject of this thesis is the search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying to a pair of W bosons that in turn decay leptonically, H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {bar {ell}}{nu}{ell}{bar {nu}}. This search is performed considering events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, where two oppositely charged lepton candidates (e{sup +}e{sup -}, e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}, or {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}), and missing transverse energy, have been reconstructed. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, and are tested against the standard model predictions computed for a Higgs boson with mass in the range 115-200 GeV. No excess of events over background is observed, and limits on Standard Model Higgs boson production are determined. An interpretation of these limits within the hypothesis of a fourth-generation extension to the standard model is also given. The overall analysis scheme is the same for the three dilepton pairs being considered (e{sup +}e{sup -}, e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}, or {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}); this thesis, however, describes in detail the study of the dimuon final state.

  3. Uncovering Signatures of Domestication Using Genomic Resequencing and Association Mapping of Common Bean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClean, Phil [North Dakota State University

    2014-03-19

    Phil McClean, North Dakota State University, speaking at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 19, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  4. Comptonization signatures in the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frontera, F.; Farinelli, R.; Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Titarchuk, L. [Dipartimento di Fisicae Scienze della Terra, Universit di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Amati, L.; Landi, R., E-mail: frontera@fe.infn.it [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-20

    We report results of a systematic study of the broadband (2-2000 keV) time-resolved prompt emission spectra of a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with both Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) on board the BeppoSAX satellite and the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The main goal of this paper is to test spectral models of the GRB prompt emission that have recently been proposed. In particular, we test a recent photospheric model proposed, i.e., blackbody plus power law, the addition of a blackbody emission to the Band function in the cases in which this function does not fit the data, and a recent Comptonization model. By considering the few spectra for which the simple Band function does not provide a fully acceptable fit to the data, we find a statistically significant better fit by adding a blackbody to this function only in one case. We confirm earlier results found fitting the BATSE spectra alone with a blackbody plus power law. Instead, when the BATSE GRB spectra are joined to those obtained with WFCs (2-28 keV), this model becomes unacceptable in most time intervals in which we subdivide the GRB light curves. We find instead that the Comptonization model is always acceptable, even in the few cases in which the Band function is inconsistent with the data. We discuss the implications of these results.

  5. New class of supersymmetric signatures in the processes gg{yields}HH', VH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gounaris, G. J.; Layssac, J.; Renard, F. M.

    2009-07-01

    Within the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) and standard model (SM) frameworks, we analyze the 1loop electroweak predictions for the helicity amplitudes describing the 17 processes gg{yields}HH', and the 9 processes gg{yields}VH; where H, H{sup '} denote Higgs or Goldstone bosons, while V=Z, W{sup {+-}}. Concentrating on MSSM, we then investigate how the asymptotic helicity conservation (HCns) property of supersymmetry (SUSY) affects the amplitudes at the LHC energy range and what is the corresponding situation in the SM, where no HCns theorem exists. HCns is subsequently used to construct many relations among the cross sections of the above MSSM processes, depending only on the standard MSSM angles {alpha} and {beta} characterizing the two Higgs doublets. These relations should be asymptotically exact but as the energy decreases toward the LHC range, mass-depending deviations should start appearing. Provided the SUSY scale is not too high, these relations may remain roughly correct, even at the LHC energy range.

  6. Self-similar structure and experimental signatures of suprathermal ion distribution in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagan, Grigory; Svyatskiy, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Huang, C. -K.; McDevitt, C. J.

    2015-09-03

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydrodynamic instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. Thus, the ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT at the National Ignition Facility.

  7. Microsoft Word - Alcoa ROD Master 12 20 blackline signature.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22.1.6. in response to the concerns expressed by WPAG. BPA is confident that it can manage the risks associated with periods following termination of the Block Contract by...

  8. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; Capellini, Giovanni; Niu, Gang; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Xie, Ya -Hong

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  9. EA-1984: Disposition of Five Signature Properties at Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared an environmental assessment of a proposal to tear down four World War II-era historic structures and a portion of one additional World War II-era historic structure at Idaho National Laboratory’s Central Facilities Area where the U.S. Naval Proving Ground was established in 1942. The structures had deteriorated and were no longer used.

  10. Exclusion of cosmic rays in protoplanetary disks. II. Chemical gradients and observational signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; Adams, Fred C.

    2014-10-20

    The chemical properties of protoplanetary disks are especially sensitive to their ionization environment. Sources of molecular gas ionization include cosmic rays (CRs), stellar X-rays, and short-lived radionuclides, each of which varies with location in the disk. This behavior leads to a significant amount of chemical structure, especially in molecular ion abundances, which is imprinted in their submillimeter rotational line emission. Using an observationally motivated disk model, we make predictions for the dependence of chemical abundances on the assumed properties of the ionizing field. We calculate the emergent line intensity for abundant molecular ions and simulate sensitive observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) for a disk at D = 100 pc. The models readily distinguish between high ionization rates (ζ ≳ 10{sup –17} s{sup –1} per H{sub 2}) and below, but it becomes difficult to distinguish between low ionization models when ζ ≲ 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}. We find that H{sub 2}D{sup +} emission is not detectable for sub-interstellar CR rates with ALMA (6h integration), and that N{sub 2}D{sup +} emission may be a more sensitive tracer of midplane ionization. HCO{sup +} traces X-rays and high CR rates (ζ{sub CR} ≳ 10{sup –17} s{sup –1}), and provides a handle on the warm molecular ionization properties where CO is present in the gas. Furthermore, species like HCO{sup +}, which emits from a wide radial region and samples a large gradient in temperature, can exhibit ring-like emission as a consequence of low-lying rotational level de-excitation near the star. This finding highlights a scenario where rings are not necessarily structural or chemical in nature, but simply a result of the underlying line excitation properties.

  11. Tidal disruptions in circumbinary disks. II. Observational signatures in the reverberation spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brem, P.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Cuadra, J.; Komossa, S.

    2014-09-10

    Supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs) with sub-pc separations form in the course of galaxy mergers, if both galaxies harbor massive black holes. Clear observational evidence for them however still eludes us. We propose a novel method of identifying these systems by means of reverberation mapping their circumbinary disk after a tidal disruption event has ionized it. The tidal disruption of a star at the secondary leads to strong asymmetries in the disk response. We model the shape of the velocity-delay maps for various toy disk models and more realistic gas distributions obtained by smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The emissivity of the ionized disk is calculated with Cloudy. We find peculiar asymmetries in the maps for off center ionizing sources that may help us constrain geometrical parameters of a circumbinary disk such as semimajor axis and orbital phase of the secondary, as well as help strengthen the observational evidence for sub-parsec SMBBHs as such.

  12. Microsoft Word - Parts A-J FY 2014 BPA Report - Final for signature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    narrative statement by an appropriate agency official confirming that specific persons or groups of persons attended training on a date certain? x Personnel Actions (e.g.,...

  13. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE DIFFERENCES IN THE 16 CYGNI BINARY SYSTEM: A SIGNATURE OF GAS GIANT PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RamIrez, I.; Roederer, I. U.; Fish, J. R.; Melendez, J.

    2011-10-20

    The atmospheric parameters of the components of the 16 Cygni binary system, in which the secondary has a gas giant planet detected, are measured accurately using high-quality observational data. Abundances relative to solar are obtained for 25 elements with a mean error of {sigma}([X/H]) = 0.023 dex. The fact that 16 Cyg A has about four times more lithium than 16 Cyg B is normal considering the slightly different masses of the stars. The abundance patterns of 16 Cyg A and B, relative to iron, are typical of that observed in most of the so-called solar twin stars, with the exception of the heavy elements (Z > 30), which can, however, be explained by Galactic chemical evolution. Differential (A-B) abundances are measured with even higher precision ({sigma}({Delta}[X/H]) = 0.018 dex, on average). We find that 16 Cyg A is more metal-rich than 16 Cyg B by {Delta}[M/H] = +0.041 {+-} 0.007 dex. On an element-to-element basis, no correlation between the A-B abundance differences and dust condensation temperature (T{sub C}) is detected. Based on these results, we conclude that if the process of planet formation around 16 Cyg B is responsible for the observed abundance pattern, the formation of gas giants produces a constant downward shift in the photospheric abundance of metals, without a T{sub C} correlation. The latter would be produced by the formation of terrestrial planets instead, as suggested by other recent works on precise elemental abundances. Nevertheless, a scenario consistent with these observations requires the convective envelopes of {approx_equal} 1 M{sub sun} stars to reach their present-day sizes about three times quicker than predicted by standard stellar evolution models.

  14. Microsoft Word - DSI_Lookback_DROD_6-08-10_Final _signature_...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    legislative authority should not be readily subordinated to the actions of a wayward or unknowledgeable administrative official"); Portmann v. United States, 674 F.2d...

  15. CHEMICAL SIGNATURE OF A MAJOR MERGER IN THE EARLY FORMATION OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bekki, Kenji [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp

    2009-08-01

    The formation history of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is unraveled based on the results of our new chemical evolution models constructed for the SMC, highlighting the observed anomaly in the age-metallicity relation for star clusters in the SMC. We first propose that evidence of a major merger is imprinted in the age-metallicity relation as a dip in [Fe/H]. Our models predict that the major merger with a mass ratio of 1:1 to 1:4 occurred at {approx}7.5 Gyr ago, with a good reproduction of the abundance distribution function of field stars in the SMC. Furthermore, our models predict a relatively large scatter in [Mg/Fe] for -1.4 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} -1.1 as a reflection of a looping feature resulting from the temporally inverse progress of chemical enrichment, which can be tested against future observational results. Given that the observed velocity dispersion ({approx}30 km s{sup -1}) of the SMC is much smaller than that ({approx}160 km s{sup -1}) of the Galactic halo, our finding strongly implies that the predicted merger event happened in a small group environment that was far from the Galaxy and contained a number of small gas-rich dwarfs comparable to the SMC. This theoretical view is extensively discussed in the framework that considers a connection with the formation history of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  16. CHEMICAL SIGNATURE INDICATING A LACK OF MASSIVE STARS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-08-01

    Growing evidence supports an unusual elemental feature appearing in nearby dwarf galaxies, especially dwarf spheroidals (dSphs), indicating a key process of galaxy evolution that is different from that of the Galaxy. In addition to the well-known deficiency of {alpha}-elements in dSphs, recent observations have clearly shown that s-process elements (Ba) are significantly enhanced relative to Fe, {alpha}-, and r-process elements. This enhancement occurs in some dSphs as well as in the Large Magellanic Cloud, but is unseen in the Galaxy. Here we report that this feature is evidence of the lack of very massive stars ({approx}>25 M{sub sun}) as predicted in the low star formation rate environment. We conclude that the unique elemental feature of dwarf galaxies including a low {alpha}/Fe ratio in some low-metallicity stars is, at least in some part, characterized by a different form of the initial mass function. We present a detailed model for the Fornax dSph galaxy and discuss its complex chemical enrichment history together with the nucleosynthesis site of the light s-process element Y.

  17. Passive Measurement of Organic-Scintillator Neutron Signatures for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennfier L. Dolan; Eric C. Miller; Alexis C. Kaplan; Andreas Enqvist; Marek Flaska; Alice Tomanin; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2012-10-01

    At nuclear facilities, domestically and internationally, most measurement systems used for nuclear materials’ control and accountability rely on He-3 detectors. Due to resource shortages, alternatives to He-3 systems are needed. This paper presents preliminary simulation and experimental efforts to develop a fast-neutron-multiplicity counter based on liquid organic scintillators. This mission also provides the opportunity to broaden the capabilities of such safeguards measurement systems to improve current neutron-multiplicity techniques and expand the scope to encompass advanced nuclear fuels.

  18. Signatures of spin and charge energy scales in the local moment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; HUBBARD MODEL; RESONANCE; SPECIFIC HEAT; SPIN; TEMPERATURE ...

  19. Microsoft Word - OAS-L-13-09 Report with electronic signature

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2007. The Permit requires approval by New Mexico of any planned changes to the permitted ... To achieve the 90 percent goal, EM needed to dispose of approximately 40,000 m of waste, ...

  20. Self-similar structure and experimental signatures of suprathermal ion distribution in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kagan, Grigory; Svyatskiy, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Huang, C. -K.; McDevitt, C. J.

    2015-09-03

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydrodynamic instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. Thus, the ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT atmore » the National Ignition Facility.« less

  1. Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slaughter, Dennis R.; Pohl, Bertram A.; Dougan, Arden D.; Bernstein, Adam; Prussin, Stanley G.; Norman, Eric B.

    2008-04-15

    A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

  2. Microsoft Word - Agreement to amend 1-13-09 electronic signature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about this issue, please call Mark Miller at (503) 230-4003 or Heidi Helwig of the Public Affairs Office at (503) 230-3458. Sincerely, s Allen L. Burns Allen L. Burns,...

  3. Signatures of the molecular potential in the ellipticity of high-order harmonics from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherratt, Paul A. J.; Ramakrishna, S.; Seideman, Tamar

    2011-05-15

    We explore the information content of the polarization of high-order harmonics emitted from aligned molecules driven by a linearly polarized field. The study builds upon our previous work [Ramakrishna et al., Phys. Rev. A 81, 021802(R) (2010)], which illustrated that the phase of the continuum electronic wave function, and hence the underlying molecular potential, is responsible, at least in part, for the ellipticity observed in harmonic spectra. We use a simple model potential and systematically vary the potential parameters to investigate the sense in which, and the degree to which, the shape of the molecular potential is imprinted onto the polarization of the emitted harmonics. Strong ellipticity is observed over a wide range of potential parameters, suggesting that the emission of elliptically polarized harmonics is a general phenomenon, yet qualitatively determined by the molecular properties. The sensitivity of the ellipticity to the model parameters invites the use of ellipticity measurements as a probe of the continuum wave function and the underlying molecular potential.

  4. High redshift signatures in the 21 cm forest due to cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Silk, Joseph E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings induce minihalo formation in the early universe. The resultant minihalos cluster in string wakes and create a ''21 cm forest'' against the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. Such a 21 cm forest can contribute to angular fluctuations of redshifted 21 cm signals integrated along the line of sight. We calculate the root-mean-square amplitude of the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings and show that these fluctuations can dominate signals from minihalos due to primordial density fluctuations at high redshift (z?>10), even if the string tension is below the current upper bound, G? < 1.5 10{sup ?7}. Our results also predict that the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) can potentially detect the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings with G? ? 7.5 10{sup ?8} for the single frequency band case and 4.0 10{sup ?8} for the multi-frequency band case.

  5. Microsoft Word - 13-1301 (WORD FORMAT) Signature on File.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    301:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 12, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Closeout Audit Report for SNL/CCP Audit A-12-15 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit A-12-15 of the Sandia National Laboratories/Central

  6. Microsoft Word - 2010_NESHAP_Draft Final_No Signature.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 June 2011 Work Performed Under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Prepared by: National Security Technologies, LLC P.O. Box 98521 Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8521 DOE/NV/25946--1243 ii This page intentionally left blank National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2010 iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2010 RADIOLOGICAL DOSE TO THE PUBLIC BELOW FEDERAL STANDARD The

  7. Quantum signatures of the self-trapping transition in attractive lattice bosons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Vezzani, A.

    2010-10-15

    We consider the Bose-Hubbard model describing attractive bosonic particles hopping across the sites of a translation-invariant lattice and compare the relevant ground-state properties with those of the corresponding symmetry-breaking semiclassical nonlinear theory. The introduction of a suitable measure allows us to highlight many correspondences between the nonlinear theory and the inherently linear quantum theory, characterized by the well-known self-trapping phenomenon. In particular we demonstrate that the localization properties and bifurcation pattern of the semiclassical ground state can be clearly recognized at the quantum level. Our analysis highlights a finite-number effect.

  8. Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: PoS EPS-HEP2009:010,2009; Conference: Prepared for 2009 Europhysics Conference on ...

  9. System, device, and methods for real-time screening of live cells, biomarkers, and chemical signatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sundaram, S Kamakshi [Richland, WA; Riley, Brian J [West Richland, WA; Weber, Thomas J [Richland, WA; Sacksteder, Colette A [West Richland, WA; Addleman, R Shane [Benton City, WA

    2011-06-07

    An ATR-FTIR device and system are described that defect live-cell responses to stimuli and perturbations in real-time. The system and device can monitor perturbations resulting from exposures to various physical, chemical, and biological materials in real-time, as well as those sustained over a long period of time, including those associated with stimuli having unknown modes-of-action (e.g. nanoparticles). The device and system can also be used to identify specific chemical species or substances that profile cellular responses to these perturbations.

  10. Infrared signature of micro-hydration in the organophosphate sarin: An ab initio study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alam, Todd M.; Pearce, Charles Joseph

    2015-06-28

    The infrared (IR) spectra of micro-hydrated Sarin•(H2O)n clusters containing between one and four explicit waters have been studied using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods. The phosphate group P=O bond vibration region (~1270 to 1290 cm–1) revealed the largest frequency variation with hydration, with a frequency red shift reflecting the direct hydrogen bond formation between the P=O of Sarin and water. Small variations to the P-F stretch (~810 to 815 cm–1) and the C-O-P vibrational modes (~995 to 1004 cm–1) showed that the water interactions with these functional groups were minor, and that the structures of Sarin were notmore » extensively perturbed in the hydrated complexes. Increasing the number of explicit hydration waters produced only small vibrational changes in the lowest free energy complexes. These minor changes were consistent with a single water-phosphate hydrogen bond being the dominant structure, though a second water-phosphate hydrogen bond was observed in some complexes and was identified by an additional red shift of the P=O bond vibration. As a result, the H2O•H2O vibrational modes (~3450 to 3660 cm–1) increased in complexity with higher hydration levels and reflect the extended hydrogen bonding networks formed between the explicit waters in the hydrated Sarin clusters.« less

  11. Identification of metabolic signatures linked to anti-inflammatory effects of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miquel, Sylvie; Leclerc, Marion; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Lenoir, Marion; Raguideau, Sébastien; Hudault, Sylvie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Northen, Trent; Bowen, Benjamin; et al

    2015-04-21

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium identified on the basis of human clinical data. The mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are still unknown. Gnotobiotic mice harboring F. prausnitzii (A2-165) and Escherichia coli (K-12 JM105) were subjected to 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced acute colitis. The inflammatory colitis scores and a gas chromatography-time of flight (GC/TOF) mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profile were monitored in blood, ileum, cecum, colon, and feces in gnotobiotic mice. The potential anti-inflammatory metabolites were tested in vitro. We obtained stable E. coli and F. prausnitzii-diassociated mice in which E. coli primed the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), allowing a durable andmore » stable establishment of F. prausnitzii. The disease activity index, histological scores, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and serum cytokine levels were significantly lower in the presence of F. prausnitzii after TNBS challenge. The protective effect of F. prausnitzii against colitis was correlated to its implantation level and was linked to overrepresented metabolites along the GIT and in serum. Among 983 metabolites in GIT samples and serum, 279 were assigned to known chemical reactions. Some of them, belonging to the ammonia (α-ketoglutarate), osmoprotective (raffinose), and phenolic (including anti-inflammatory shikimic and salicylic acids) pathways, were associated with a protective effect of F. prausnitzii, and the functional link was established in vitro for salicylic acid. We show for the first time that F. prausnitzii is a highly active commensal bacterium involved in reduction of colitis through in vivo modulation of metabolites along the GIT and in the peripheral blood.« less

  12. Microsoft Word - O3 NAAQS AP38 NFR 20150930 Signature Ver.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EPA Administrator, Gina McCarthy, signed the following notice on 10/1/2015, and EPA is submitting it for publication in the Federal Register (FR). While we have taken steps to ensure the accuracy of this Internet version of the rule, it is not the official version of the rule for purposes of compliance. Please refer to the official version in a forthcoming FR publication, which will appear on the Government Printing Office's FDSys website (http://gpo.gov/fdsys/search/home.action) and on

  13. SOURCE SIGNATURES OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PETROLEUM REFINING AND FUEL USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman; Frank E. Huggins; Naresh Shah; Artur Braun; Yuanzhi Chen; J. David Robertson; Joseph Kyger; Adel F. Sarofim; Ronald J. Pugmire; Henk L.C. Meuzelaar; JoAnn Lighty

    2003-07-31

    The molecular structure and microstructure of a suite of fine particulate matter (PM) samples produced by the combustion of residual fuel oil and diesel fuel were investigated by an array of analytical techniques. Some of the more important results are summarized below. Diesel PM (DPM): A small diesel engine test facility was used to generate a suite of diesel PM samples from different fuels under engine load and idle conditions. C XANES, {sup 13}C NMR, XRD, and TGA were in accord that the samples produced under engine load conditions contained more graphitic material than those produced under idle conditions, which contained a larger amount of unburned diesel fuel and lubricating oil. The difference was enhanced by the addition of 5% of oxygenated compounds to the reference fuel. Scanning transmission x-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM) was able to distinguish particulate regions rich in C=C bonds from regions rich in C-H bonds with a resolution of {approx}50 nm. The former are representative of more graphitic regions and the latter of regions rich in unburned fuel and oil. The dominant microstructure observed by SEM and TEM consisted of complex chain-like structures of PM globules {approx}20-100 nm in mean diameter, with a high fractal dimension. High resolution TEM revealed that the graphitic part of the diesel soot consisted of onion-like structures made up of graphene layers. Typically 3-10 graphene layers make up the ''onion rings'', with the layer spacing decreasing as the number of layers increases. ROFA PM: Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) PM has been analyzed by a new approach that combines XAFS spectroscopy with selective leaching procedures. ROFA PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 2.5+} produced in combustion facilities at the U.S. EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRML) were analyzed by XAFS before and after leaching with water, acid (1N HCl), and pentane. Both water and acid leaching removed most of the metal sulfates, which were the dominant phase present for most metals (V, Ni, Zn, etc.). This allowed conclusive identification in the leaching residue of important secondary sulfide and oxide phases, including Ni sulfide, a toxic and carcinogenic phase observed in the leached PM{sub 2.5+} samples. Other significant secondary phases identified included V{sub 2}O{sub 4}, V sulfide, and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  14. WOSMIP II- Workshop on Signatures of Medical and Industrial Isotope Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Murray; Achim, Pascal; Auer, M.; Bell, Randy; Bowyer, Ted W.; Braekers, Damien; Bradley, Ed; Briyatmoko, Budi; Berglund, Helena; Camps, Johan; Carranza, Eduardo C.; Carty, Fitz; DeCaire, Richard; Deconninck, Benoit; DeGeer, Lars E.; Druce, Michael; Friese, Judah I.; Hague, Robert; Hoffman, Ian; Khrustalev, Kirill; Lucas, John C.; Mattassi, G.; Mattila, Aleski; Nava, Elisabetta; Nikkinin, Mika; Papastefanou, Constantin; Piefer, Gregory R.; Quintana, Eduardo; Ross, Ole; Rotty, Michel; Sabzian, Mohammad; Saey, Paul R.; Sameh, A. A.; Safari, M.; Schoppner, Michael; Siebert, Petra; Unger, Klaus K.; Vargas, Albert

    2011-11-01

    Medical and industrial fadioisotopes are fundamental tools used in science, medicine and industry with an ever expanding usage in medical practice where their availability is vital. Very sensitive environmental radionuclide monitoring networks have been developed for nuclear-security-related monitoring [particularly Comprehensive Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) compliance verification] and are now operational.

  15. POLARIZATION STRUCTURE IN THE CORE OF 1803+784: A SIGNATURE OF RECOLLIMATION SHOCKS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cawthorne, T. V.; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.

    2013-07-20

    The extragalactic radio source 1803+784 is a BL Lac object that shows rapid variability and strong linear polarization. Very long baseline interferometry observations reveal that the core possesses a distinctive structure in polarized intensity with two maxima on axis and two minima symmetrically placed on either side. The approximately radial pattern of electric field polarization rods is reminiscent of the results obtained earlier by Cawthorne for conical shocks, but, individually, these do not reproduce the main features of the polarized intensity images. In numerical simulations and experiments, these shocks occur in pairs and help to stabilize jets as they adjust to changes in environment. Here, the polarization resulting from such structures is investigated using an approximate, analytical approach, by making some simple assumptions about the nature of the flow between two such shock waves. For fairly small viewing angles, it is found that a reasonable representation of the core polarization of 1803+784 can be obtained. The similarity between the observed and model polarizations supports the view that the core structure in 1803+784 represents a recollimation shock, and that such shock waves may be responsible for the first disturbance and hence brightening of the quiescent flow in astrophysical jets.

  16. Final report : multicomponent forensic signature development : interactions with common textiles; mustard precursors and simulants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-02-01

    2-Chloroethyl phenyl sulfide (CEPS), a surrogate compound of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, was examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a novel method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. Various multivariate analysis schemes were employed to analyze the data. These methods may be able to discern different sources of CEPS. In addition, CEPS was applied to cotton, nylon, polyester, and silk swatches. These swatches were placed in controlled humidity chambers maintained at 23%, 56%, and 85% relative humidity. At regular intervals, samples were removed from each test swatch, and the samples analyzed using TD/GC-MS. The results were compared across fabric substrate and humidity.

  17. Infrared signature of micro-hydration in the organophosphate sarin: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Todd M.; Pearce, Charles Joseph

    2015-06-28

    The infrared (IR) spectra of micro-hydrated Sarin•(H2O)n clusters containing between one and four explicit waters have been studied using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods. The phosphate group P=O bond vibration region (~1270 to 1290 cm–1) revealed the largest frequency variation with hydration, with a frequency red shift reflecting the direct hydrogen bond formation between the P=O of Sarin and water. Small variations to the P-F stretch (~810 to 815 cm–1) and the C-O-P vibrational modes (~995 to 1004 cm–1) showed that the water interactions with these functional groups were minor, and that the structures of Sarin were not extensively perturbed in the hydrated complexes. Increasing the number of explicit hydration waters produced only small vibrational changes in the lowest free energy complexes. These minor changes were consistent with a single water-phosphate hydrogen bond being the dominant structure, though a second water-phosphate hydrogen bond was observed in some complexes and was identified by an additional red shift of the P=O bond vibration. As a result, the H2O•H2O vibrational modes (~3450 to 3660 cm–1) increased in complexity with higher hydration levels and reflect the extended hydrogen bonding networks formed between the explicit waters in the hydrated Sarin clusters.

  18. ON THE LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We examine the effects of time dilation on the temporal profiles of gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses. By using prescriptions for the shape and evolution of prompt gamma-ray spectra, we ...

  19. Microstructure and nonlinear signatures of yielding in a heterogeneous colloidal gel under large amplitude oscillatory shear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Juntae; Helgeson, Matthew E.; Merger, Dimitri; Wilhelm, Manfred

    2014-09-01

    We investigate yielding in a colloidal gel that forms a heterogeneous structure, consisting of a two-phase bicontinuous network of colloid-rich domains of fractal clusters and colloid-poor domains. Combining large amplitude oscillatory shear measurements with simultaneous small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (rheo-SANS/USANS), we characterize both the nonlinear mechanical processes and strain amplitude-dependent microstructure underlying yielding. We observe a broad, three-stage yielding process that evolves over an order of magnitude in strain amplitude between the onset of nonlinearity and flow. Analyzing the intracycle response as a sequence of physical processes reveals a transition from elastic straining to elastoplastic thinning (which dominates in region I) and eventually yielding (which evolves through region II) and flow (which saturates in region III), and allows quantification of instantaneous nonlinear parameters associated with yielding. These measures exhibit significant strain rate amplitude dependence above a characteristic frequency, which we argue is governed by poroelastic effects. Correlating these results with time-averaged rheo-USANS measurements reveals that the material passes through a cascade of structural breakdown from large to progressively smaller length scales. In region I, compression of the fractal domains leads to the formation of large voids. In regions II and III, cluster-cluster correlations become increasingly homogeneous, suggesting breakage and eventually depercolation of intercluster bonds at the yield point. All significant structural changes occur on the micron-scale, suggesting that large-scale rearrangements of hundreds or thousands of particles, rather than the homogeneous rearrangement of particle-particle bonds, dominate the initial yielding of heterogeneous colloidal gels.

  20. Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Running against hunger Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - 2:15pm Pantex Security Police Officers Byron Logan and Randy Stokes completed their annual Run Against Hunger last week. The two officers ran and biked approximately 50 miles Friday to raise awareness of the problem of hunger in the Texas Panhandle and to raise money for the High Plains Food Bank. On the route, Logan and Stokes stopped talk to the students from Highland Park High School in Amarillo, Texas, about the importance of getting

  1. Identification of metabolic signatures linked to anti-inflammatory effects of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miquel, Sylvie; Leclerc, Marion; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Lenoir, Marion; Raguideau, Sébastien; Hudault, Sylvie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Northen, Trent; Bowen, Benjamin; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Sokol, Harry; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe

    2015-04-21

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium identified on the basis of human clinical data. The mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are still unknown. Gnotobiotic mice harboring F. prausnitzii (A2-165) and Escherichia coli (K-12 JM105) were subjected to 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced acute colitis. The inflammatory colitis scores and a gas chromatography-time of flight (GC/TOF) mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profile were monitored in blood, ileum, cecum, colon, and feces in gnotobiotic mice. The potential anti-inflammatory metabolites were tested in vitro. We obtained stable E. coli and F. prausnitzii-diassociated mice in which E. coli primed the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), allowing a durable and stable establishment of F. prausnitzii. The disease activity index, histological scores, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and serum cytokine levels were significantly lower in the presence of F. prausnitzii after TNBS challenge. The protective effect of F. prausnitzii against colitis was correlated to its implantation level and was linked to overrepresented metabolites along the GIT and in serum. Among 983 metabolites in GIT samples and serum, 279 were assigned to known chemical reactions. Some of them, belonging to the ammonia (α-ketoglutarate), osmoprotective (raffinose), and phenolic (including anti-inflammatory shikimic and salicylic acids) pathways, were associated with a protective effect of F. prausnitzii, and the functional link was established in vitro for salicylic acid. We show for the first time that F. prausnitzii is a highly active commensal bacterium involved in reduction of colitis through in vivo modulation of metabolites along the GIT and in the peripheral blood.

  2. Nano-chemo-mechanical signature of conventional oil-well cement systems: Effects of elevated temperature and curing time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Musso, Simone; James, Simon; Akono, Ange-Therese; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2015-01-15

    With ever more challenging (T,p) environments for cementing applications in oil and gas wells, there is a need to identify the fundamental mechanisms of fracture resistant oil well cements. We report results from a multi-technique investigation of behavior and properties of API class G cement and silica-enriched cement systems subjected to hydrothermal curing from 30 C to 200 C; including electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, electron microscopy, neutron scattering (SANS), and fracture scratch testing. The results provide a new insight into the link between system chemistry, micro-texture and micro-fracture toughness. We suggest that the strong correlation found between chemically modulated specific surface and fracture resistance can explain the drop in fracture properties of neat oil-well cements at elevated temperatures; the fracture property enhancement in silica-rich cement systems, between 110 and 175 C; and the drop in fracture properties of such systems through prolonged curing over 1 year at 200 C.

  3. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; Capellini, Giovanni; Niu, Gang; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Xie, Ya -Hong

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  4. THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE FIRST GALAXIES. II. SPECTRAL SIGNATURES OF LYMAN CONTINUUM LEAKAGE FROM GALAXIES IN THE REIONIZATION EPOCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zackrisson, Erik; Jensen, Hannes; Inoue, Akio K.

    2013-11-01

    The fraction of ionizing photons that escape (f{sub esc}) from z ?> 6 galaxies is an important parameter for assessing the role of these objects in the reionization of the universe, but the opacity of the intergalactic medium precludes a direct measurement of f{sub esc} for individual galaxies at these epochs. We argue that since f{sub esc} regulates the impact of nebular emission on the spectra of galaxies, it should nonetheless be possible to indirectly probe f{sub esc} well into the reionization epoch. As a first step, we demonstrate that by combining measurements of the rest-frame UV slope ? with the equivalent width of the H? emission line, galaxies with very high Lyman continuum escape fractions (f{sub esc} ? 0.5) should be identifiable up to z ? 9 through spectroscopy with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). By targeting strongly lensed galaxies behind low-redshift galaxy clusters, JWST spectra of sufficiently good quality can be obtained for M{sub 1500} ?< 16.0 galaxies at z ? 7 and for M{sub 1500} ?< 17.5 galaxies at z ? 9. Dust-obscured star formation may complicate the analysis, but supporting observations with ALMA or the planned SPICA mission may provide useful constraints on this effect.

  5. Electrical signature analysis to quantify human and animal performance on fitness and therapy equipment such as a treadmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, Daryl F.; Hochanadel, Charles D.; Haynes, Howard D.

    2010-05-18

    The invention is a human and animal performance data acquisition, analysis, and diagnostic system for fitness and therapy devices having an interface box removably disposed on incoming power wiring to a fitness and therapy device, at least one current transducer removably disposed on said interface box for sensing current signals to said fitness and therapy device, and a means for analyzing, displaying, and reporting said current signals to determine human and animal performance on said device using measurable parameters.

  6. Multi-scale Detection of Organic and Inorganic Signatures Provides Insights into Gas Shale Properties and Evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, S.; Horsfield, B; Schultz, H; Schreiber, A; Wirth, R; Thi AnhVu, T; Perssen, F; Konitzer, S; Volk, H; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Organic geochemical analyses, including solvent extraction or pyrolysis, followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, are generally conducted on bulk gas shale samples to evaluate their source and reservoir properties. While organic petrology has been directed at unravelling the matrix composition and textures of these economically important unconventional resources, their spatial variability in chemistry and structure is still poorly documented at the sub-micrometre scale. Here, a combination of techniques including transmission electron microscopy and a synchrotron-based microscopy tool, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, have been used to characterize at a multiple length scale an overmature organic-rich calcareous mudstone from northern Germany. We document multi-scale chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities within the sample, from the millimetre down to the nanometre-scale. From the detection of different types of bitumen and authigenic minerals associated with the organic matter, we show that the multi-scale approach used in this study may provide new insights into gaseous hydrocarbon generation/retention processes occurring within gas shales and may shed new light on their thermal history.

  7. Signatures of a conical intersection in photofragment distributions and absorption spectra: Photodissociation in the Hartley band of ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2014-08-21

    Photodissociation of ozone in the near UV is studied quantum mechanically in two excited electronic states coupled at a conical intersection located outside the Franck-Condon zone. The calculations, performed using recent ab initio PESs, provide an accurate description of the photodissociation dynamics across the Hartley/Huggins absorption bands. The observed photofragment distributions are reproduced in the two electronic dissociation channels. The room temperature absorption spectrum, constructed as a Boltzmann average of many absorption spectra of rotationally excited parent ozone, agrees with experiment in terms of widths and intensities of diffuse structures. The exit channel conical intersection contributes to the coherent broadening of the absorption spectrum and directly affects the product vibrational and translational distributions. The photon energy dependences of these distributions are strikingly different for fragments created along the adiabatic and the diabatic paths through the intersection. They can be used to reverse engineer the most probable geometry of the non-adiabatic transition. The angular distributions, quantified in terms of the anisotropy parameter β, are substantially different in the two channels due to a strong anticorrelation between β and the rotational angular momentum of the fragment O{sub 2}.

  8. THE RADIAL METALLICITY GRADIENTS IN THE MILKY WAY THICK DISK AS FOSSIL SIGNATURES OF A PRIMORDIAL CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curir, A.; Serra, A. L.; Spagna, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Re Fiorentin, P.; Diaferio, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this Letter we examine the evolution of the radial metallicity gradient induced by secular processes, in the disk of an N-body Milky Way-like galaxy. We assign a [Fe/H] value to each particle of the simulation according to an initial, cosmologically motivated, radial chemical distribution and let the disk dynamically evolve for ∼6 Gyr. This direct approach allows us to take into account only the effects of dynamical evolution and to gauge how and to what extent they affect the initial chemical conditions. The initial [Fe/H] distribution increases with R in the inner disk up to R ≈ 10 kpc and decreases for larger R. We find that the initial chemical profile does not undergo major transformations after ∼6 Gyr of dynamical evolution. The final radial chemical gradients predicted by the model in the solar neighborhood are positive and of the same order as those recently observed in the Milky Way thick disk. We conclude that (1) the spatial chemical imprint at the time of disk formation is not washed out by secular dynamical processes and (2) the observed radial gradient may be the dynamical relic of a thick disk originated from a stellar population showing a positive chemical radial gradient in the inner regions.

  9. Metabolite signatures in hydrophilic extracts of mouse lungs exposed to cigarette smoke revealed by 1H NMR metabolomics investigation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Xuan; Feng, Ju; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Mary Y.

    2015-05-12

    Herein, 1H-NMR metabolomics are carried out to evaluate the changes of metabolites in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. It is found that the concentrations of adenosine derivatives (i.e. ATP, ADP and AMP), inosine and uridine are significantly fluctuated in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with those of controls regardless the mouse is obese or regular weight. The decreased ATP, ADP, AMP and elevated inosine predict that the deaminases in charge of adenosine derivatives to inosine derivatives conversion are altered in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. Transcriptional analysis reveals that the concentrations ofmore » adenosine monophosphate deaminase and adenosine deaminase are different in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, confirming the prediction from metabolomics studies. We also found, for the first time, that the ratio of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to phosphocholine (PC) is significantly increased in the lungs of obese mice compared with regular weight mice. The ratio of GPC/PC is further elevated in the lungs of obese group by cigarette smoke exposure. Since GPC/PC ratio is a known biomarker for cancer, these results may suggest that obese group is more susceptible to lung cancer when exposed to cigarette smoke.« less

  10. RADIO SIGNATURES OF CORONAL-MASS-EJECTION-STREAMER INTERACTION AND SOURCE DIAGNOSTICS OF TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Li, G.; Song, H. Q.; Feng, X. S.; Liu Ying

    2012-07-01

    It has been suggested that type II radio bursts are due to energetic electrons accelerated at coronal shocks. Radio observations, however, have poor or no spatial resolutions to pinpoint the exact acceleration locations of these electrons. In this paper, we discuss a promising approach to infer the electron acceleration location by combining radio and white light observations. The key assumption is to relate specific morphological features (e.g., spectral bumps) of the dynamic spectra of type II radio bursts to imaging features (e.g., coronal mass ejection (CME) going into a streamer) along the CME (and its driven shock) propagation. In this study, we examine the CME-streamer interaction for the solar eruption dated on 2003 November 1. The presence of spectral bump in the relevant type II radio burst is identified, which is interpreted as a natural result of the shock-radio-emitting region entering the dense streamer structure. The study is useful for further determinations of the location of type II radio burst and the associated electron acceleration by CME-driven shock.

  11. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P.; Lockman, Felix J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ?55 above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS456 (?, b = 10.4, +11.2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = 235 and +250kms{sup 1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ?900kms{sup 1} and a full opening angle of ?110 (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ?2.5-4.0Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  12. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Matthew; /UC, San Diego

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high {cflx s}. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  13. DOE issues Finding of No Significant Impact on the Disposition of Five Signature Properties at Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that tearing down four World War II-era historic structures and part of another structure at Idaho National Laboratory’s Central Facilities Area that remain from when the area served as the U.S. Naval Proving Ground will not have a significant impact on the environment.

  14. Behavior of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Water Pool Storage

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... No. o f No. o f Copies Copies P. H. Permar John Pomeroy duPont Company, A i ken (ERDA) ... i t y o f Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 S. E. Logan U n i v e r s i t y o f New Mexico A1 ...

  15. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lidar Measurements of Wind, and Cloud and Aerosol Structures Using HARLIE at the WVIOP, September/October 2000 G. Schwemmer National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goodard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland D. Miller Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Greenbelt, Maryland T. D. Wilkerson, and I. Andrus Utah State University Logan, Utah Introduction A new scanning lidar called Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE) (Schwemmer 1998) was deployed on the

  16. March 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information March 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 206 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies

  17. Identification of multi-modal plasma responses to applied magnetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    perturbations using the plasma reluctance (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Identification of multi-modal plasma responses to applied magnetic perturbations using the plasma reluctance Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 3, 2017 Title: Identification of multi-modal plasma responses to applied magnetic perturbations using the plasma reluctance Authors: Logan, Nikolas C. [1] ; Paz-Soldan, Carlos [2] ; Park, Jong-Kyu [1] ; Nazikian, Raffi [1]

  18. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Authors: Baer, Howard ; Barklow, Tim ; Fujii, Keisuke ; Gao, Yuanning ; Hoang, Andre ; Kanemura, Shinya ; List, Jenny ; Logan, Heather E. ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; Perelstein, Maxim ; Peskin, Michael E. ; Poschl, Roman ; Reuter, Jurgen ; Riemann, Sabine ; Savoy-Navarro,

  19. Thomas Jefferson High School takes regional Science Bowl competition at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab for 4th year running | Jefferson Lab takes regional Science Bowl competition at JLab for 4th year running Science Bowl Results: Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology The Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology Science Bowl 2005 team includes (front row, left to right): Coach Sharon Baker, Charlotte Seid, Sam Lederer and Lisa Marrone, and (back row, l. to r.): Matthew Isakowitz and Logan Kearsley. Photos by Steve Gagnon, JLab Science Education Thomas

  20. University of Massachusetts Lowell | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Lowell University of Massachusetts Lowell Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel, Donna DiBattista, Meaghan Riley, Michael Schaefer. Not pictured: Christopher Daly, Erik Anderson. Photo by David Willis. Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf,

  1. The Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy The Collegiate Wind Competition Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams The Collegiate Wind Competition Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams April 25, 2014 - 10:14am Addthis <strong>UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL</strong> Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel,

  2. Federal Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies Contacts | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Projects and Technologies Contacts Federal Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies Contacts For more information about federal renewable energy projects, contact: Contact Organization Specialty Rachel Shepherd 202-586-9209 Federal Energy Management Program Renewable energy program lead Tracy Logan 202-341-7601 Federal Energy Management Program Renewable energy procurement lead Gerald Robinson 510-486-5769 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Renewable energy procurement Doug Dahle

  3. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MBL Aerosol Properties and Their Impact on CCN at the Azores-AMF Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Logan T, B Xi, and X Dong. 2014. "Aerosol properties and their influences on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei at the ARM mobile facility over the Azores." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119(8),

  4. Memorial Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans, the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

  5. SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    812 Supplement Analysis 1 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for NECO (FORMERLY HAXTUN) WIND ENERGY PROJECT LOGAN AND PHILLIPS COUNTIES, COLORADO U. S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Customer Service Region OCTOBER 2013 DOE/EA-1812/SA-1 DOE/EA-1812 Supplement Analysis 2 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis - Market and Policy Impact Analysis Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Market and Policy Impact Analysis The following includes summary bios of staff expertise and interests in analysis related to electric regulation and policy; transportation market, fuels, and policies; economic impact; advanced financial analytic methods; international markets; R&D program benefits assessment; portfolio and risk assessment and green power and renewable energy certificate (REC) markets. Team Lead: Jeffery Logan Administrative Support: Karla LeComte Philipp Beiter Lori Bird

  7. DOE/OR/07-2247&D1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 8 2011 Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Southeast District Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: PPPO-03-1334678-12 REMOVAL ACTION COMPLETION REPORT FOR PHASES I AND II OF THE X-334 TRANSFORMER CLEANING/STORAGE BUILDING AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKETON, OIDO Enclosed for your review and concurrence, please find the Removal Action Completion Report for Phases I and II of the X-334 Transformer Cleaning/Storage Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous

  8. The Collegiate Wind Competition Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams The Collegiate Wind Competition Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams April 25, 2014 - 10:14am Addthis <strong>UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL</strong> Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel, Donna DiBattista, Meaghan Riley,

  9. The Development and On-Road Performance and Durability of the Four-Way

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL</strong> Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel, Donna DiBattista, Meaghan Riley, Michael Schaefer. Not pictured: Christopher Daly, Erik Anderson. Credit: David Willis UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean

  10. September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 168 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability

  11. June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 115 Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy

  12. December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 160 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability

  13. Ms. Maria Galanti

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HAR 2 4 lDII Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Southeast District Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: PPPO-03-1158259-11 CONSTRUCTION COMPLETION REPORT FOR REMOVAL OF THE X-533 SWITCHYARD COMPLEX AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKETON, OHIO The Department of Energy is submitting the enclosed Construction Completion Report for Removal of the X-533 Switchyard Complex at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio (DOEIPPPO/03-0174&D1) to the

  14. Ms. Maria Galanti Site Coordinator

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DEC 23 ZDto PPPO-03-1088949-11 Ohio Environmental Protection Agency 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: REVISED CONSTRUCTION COMPLETION REPORT FOR PHASE I OF THE REMOVAL OF THE X-633 RECIRCULATING COOLING WATER COMPLEX AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKETON, OHIO AND RESPONSES TO COMMENTS The Department of Energy is SUbmitting the enclosed revised Construction Completion Report for Phase I of the Removal of the X-633 ReCirculating Cooling Water Complex at the

  15. Ms. Maria Galanti Site Coordinator

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 0 2015 Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Southeast District Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: PPP0-03-3065331-15 FINAL RECORD OF DECISION FOR THE PROCESS BUILDINGS AND COMPLEX FACILITIES DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING EVALUATION PROJECT AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKETON, OHIO (DOE/PPP0/03-0425&Dl) References: 1. Letter from W. Murphie to M. Galanti, "Record of Decision for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination

  16. EIS-0286: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0284: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Low Emission Boiler System Proof-of-Concept Project, Construction and Operation of a 91-Megawatt Electric Power Plant, Elkhart, Logan County, Illinois PDF icon DOE/EIS-0284, Environmental Protection Agency, Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Low Emission Boiler System

  17. The Formation of Pioneer Plant Projects in Chemical Processing Firms

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams The Collegiate Wind Competition Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams April 25, 2014 - 10:14am Addthis <strong>UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL</strong> Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel, Donna DiBattista, Meaghan Riley,

  18. N

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HAR 2 4 lDII Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Southeast District Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: PPPO-03-1158259-11 CONSTRUCTION COMPLETION REPORT FOR REMOVAL OF THE X-533 SWITCHYARD COMPLEX AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKETON, OHIO The Department of Energy is submitting the enclosed Construction Completion Report for Removal of the X-533 Switchyard Complex at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio (DOEIPPPO/03-0174&D1) to the

  19. SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SUMMIT_REPORT.pdf SUMMIT_REPORT.pdf PDF icon SUMMIT_REPORT.pdf More Documents & Publications Contract and Project Management Improvement (CPMI) Closure Report -- April 2012 Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1200_Ferraro Audit Report: IG-0614

    812 Supplement Analysis 1 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for NECO (FORMERLY HAXTUN) WIND ENERGY PROJECT LOGAN AND PHILLIPS COUNTIES, COLORADO U. S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  20. The mapping and differentiation of biological and environmental elemental signatures in the fossil remains of a 50 million year old bird

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egerton, Victoria M.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Norell, Mark A.; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Sellers, William I.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; van Veelen, Arjen; et al

    2015-01-22

    The preservation of fossils reflects the interplay of inorganic and organic chemical processes, which should be clearly differentiated to make interpretations about the biology of extinct organisms. A new coliiformes bird (mouse bird) from the ~50 million year old Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA) has here been analysed using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy with an attached X-ray energy dispersive system (ESEM-EDS). The concentration and distribution of 16 elements (Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mg, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Ba, Hg) has been mapped for individual points on the sample. S, Cu andmore » Zn map distinctly within visibly preserved feathers and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) shows that S and Cu within the feathers are organically bound in a similar manner to modern feathers. The morphological preservation of the feathers, on both macro- and microscopic scales, is variable throughout the fossil and the differences in the lateral microfacies have resulted in a morphological preservation gradient. This study clearly differentiates endogenous organic remains from those representing exogenous overprinted geochemical precipitates and illustrates the chemical complexity of the overall taphonomic process.« less

  1. The Genomes of the Fungal Plant Pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum Reveal Adaptation to Different Hosts and Lifestyles But Also Signatures of Common Ancestry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; van der Burgt, Ate; Okmen, Bilal; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Beenen, Henriek G.; Chettri, Oranav; Cos, Murray P.; Datema, Erwin; de Vries, Ronald P.; DHillon, Braham; Ganley, Austen R.; Griffiths, Scott A.; Guo, Yanan; Gamelin, Richard C.; Henrissat, Bernard; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Kema, Gert; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lapidus, Alla; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ohm, Robin A.; Owen, Timothy J.; Salamov, Asaf; Schwelm, Arne; Schijlen, Elio; Sun, Hui; van den Burg, Harrold A.; van Burg, Roeland C. H. J.; Zhang, Shuguang; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Collemare, Jerome; Bradshaw, Rosie E.

    2012-05-04

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of the Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum (Cfu) (syn. Passalora fulva) and Dothistroma septosporum (Dse) that are closely related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and hosts. Although both fungi grow extracellularly in close contact with host mesophyll cells, Cfu is a biotroph infecting tomato, while Dse is a hemibiotroph infecting pine. The genomes of these fungi have a similar set of genes (70percent of gene content in both genomes are homologs), but differ significantly in size (Cfu >61.1-Mb; Dse 31.2-Mb), which is mainly due to the difference in repeat content (47.2percent in Cfu versus 3.2percent in Dse). Recent adaptation to different lifestyles and hosts is suggested by diverged sets of genes. Cfu contains an tomatinase gene that we predict might be required for detoxification of tomatine, while this gene is absent in Dse. Many genes encoding secreted proteins are unique to each species and the repeat-rich areas in Cfu are enriched for these species-specific genes. In contrast, conserved genes suggest common host ancestry. Homologs of Cfu effector genes, including Ecp2 and Avr4, are present in Dse and induce a Cf-Ecp2- and Cf-4-mediated hypersensitive response, respectively. Strikingly, genes involved in production of the toxin dothistromin, a likely virulence factor for Dse, are conserved in Cfu, but their expression differs markedly with essentially no expression by Cfu in planta. Likewise, Cfu has a carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalog that is more similar to that of necrotrophs or hemibiotrophs and a larger pectinolytic gene arsenal than Dse, but many of these genes are not expressed in planta or are pseudogenized. Overall, comparison of their genomes suggests that these closely related plant pathogens had a common ancestral host but since adapted to different hosts and lifestyles by a combination of differentiated gene content, pseudogenization, and gene regulation.

  2. The mapping and differentiation of biological and environmental elemental signatures in the fossil remains of a 50 million year old bird

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerton, Victoria M.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Norell, Mark A.; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Sellers, William I.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; van Veelen, Arjen; Anné, Jennifer; van Dongen, Bart; Knoll, Fabien; Manning, Phillip L.

    2015-01-22

    The preservation of fossils reflects the interplay of inorganic and organic chemical processes, which should be clearly differentiated to make interpretations about the biology of extinct organisms. A new coliiformes bird (mouse bird) from the ~50 million year old Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA) has here been analysed using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy with an attached X-ray energy dispersive system (ESEM-EDS). The concentration and distribution of 16 elements (Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mg, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Ba, Hg) has been mapped for individual points on the sample. S, Cu and Zn map distinctly within visibly preserved feathers and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) shows that S and Cu within the feathers are organically bound in a similar manner to modern feathers. The morphological preservation of the feathers, on both macro- and microscopic scales, is variable throughout the fossil and the differences in the lateral microfacies have resulted in a morphological preservation gradient. This study clearly differentiates endogenous organic remains from those representing exogenous overprinted geochemical precipitates and illustrates the chemical complexity of the overall taphonomic process.

  3. Search for low-scale gravity signatures in multi-jet final states with the ATLAS detector at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-07-01

    A search for evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model in final states with multiple high-transverse-momentum jets is performed using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No significant excess of events beyond Standard Model expectations is observed, and upper limits on the visible cross sections for non-Standard Model production of multi-jet final states are set. A wide variety of models for black hole and string ball production and decay are considered, and the upper limit on the cross section times acceptance is as low as 0.16 fb at the 95% confidence level. For these models, excluded regions are also given as function of the main model parameters.

  4. Metabolite signatures in hydrophilic extracts of mouse lungs exposed to cigarette smoke revealed by 1H NMR metabolomics investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Xuan; Feng, Ju; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Mary Y.

    2015-05-12

    Herein, 1H-NMR metabolomics are carried out to evaluate the changes of metabolites in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. It is found that the concentrations of adenosine derivatives (i.e. ATP, ADP and AMP), inosine and uridine are significantly fluctuated in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with those of controls regardless the mouse is obese or regular weight. The decreased ATP, ADP, AMP and elevated inosine predict that the deaminases in charge of adenosine derivatives to inosine derivatives conversion are altered in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. Transcriptional analysis reveals that the concentrations of adenosine monophosphate deaminase and adenosine deaminase are different in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, confirming the prediction from metabolomics studies. We also found, for the first time, that the ratio of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to phosphocholine (PC) is significantly increased in the lungs of obese mice compared with regular weight mice. The ratio of GPC/PC is further elevated in the lungs of obese group by cigarette smoke exposure. Since GPC/PC ratio is a known biomarker for cancer, these results may suggest that obese group is more susceptible to lung cancer when exposed to cigarette smoke.

  5. Impurity Profiling of a Chemical Weapon Precursor for Possible Forensic Signatures by Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Chemometrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoggard, Jamin C.; Wahl, Jon H.; Synovec, Robert E.; Mong, Gary M.; Fraga, Carlos G.

    2010-01-15

    In this work we present the feasibility of using analytical chemical and chemometric methodologies to reveal and exploit the organic impurity profiles from commercial dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) samples to illustrate the type of forensic information that may be obtained from chemical-attack evidence. Using DMMP as a model compound for a toxicant that may be used in a chemical attack, we used comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometric detection (GC GC-TOFMS) to detect and identify trace organic impurities in six samples of commercially acquired DMMP. The GC x GC-TOFMS data were analyzed to produce impurity profiles for all six DMMP samples using 29 analyte impurities. The use of PARAFAC for the mathematical resolution of overlap GC x GC peaks ensured clean spectra for the identification of many of the detected analytes by spectral library matching. The use of statistical pairwise comparison revealed that there were trace impurities that were quantitatively similar and different among five of the six DMMP samples. Two of the DMMP samples were revealed to have identical impurity profiles by this approach. The use of nonnegative matrix factorization proved that there were five distinct DMMP sample types as illustrated by the clustering of the multiple DMMP analyses into 5 distinct clusters in the scores plots. The two indistinguishable DMMP samples were confirmed by their chemical supplier to be from the same bulk source. Sample information from the other chemical suppliers supported that the other five DMMP samples were likely from different bulk sources. These results demonstrate that the matching of synthesized products from the same source is possible using impurity profiling. In addition, the identified impurities common to all six DMMP samples provide strong evidence that basic route information can be obtained from impurity profiles. In addition, impurities that may be unique to the sole bulk manufacturer of DMMP were found in some of the DMMP samples.

  6. Microsoft Word - Class 1 PMN_Change_in_the_DOE_CBFO_Manager_9-30-2015_Rev_11_edited_for_signature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. 0 . Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 o tr o a 2o1s New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Class 1 Permit Modification Notification to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Perm it Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling: Enclosed is the following Class 1 Permit Modification Notification: * Change in the Department of

  7. Analysis of mutational signatures in exomes from B-cell lymphoma cell lines suggest APOBEC3 family members to be involved in the pathogenesis of primary effusion lymphoma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagener, R.; Alexandrov, L. B.; Montesinos-Rongen, M.; Schlesner, M.; Haake, A.; Drexler, H. G.; Richter, J.; Bignell, G. R.; McDermott, U.; Siebert, R.

    2015-02-04

    Here, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare large B-cell neoplasm particularly affecting immunodeficient hosts with an increased incidence in young or middle-aged males infected with the HIV.1 The clinical outcome of patients with PEL is unfavorable with a median survival of <6 months.1 PEL has been closely associated with human herpes virus 8 (HHV8, previously called Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus) infection.1 In some cases a coinfection of HHV8 with the Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) has been described.1 HHV8 encodes various genes homologous to cellular genes that have proliferative and anti-apoptotic functions.2 Although HHV8 is supposed to be a major driver ofmore » PEL, it alone is not sufficient for a full-blown lymphomagenesis.2 PEL usually shows complex karyotypes with many chromosomal aberrations.3 This chromosomal complexity might be driven by the viral infection and lead to genetic alterations cooperating with HHV8 in PEL lymphomagenesis.4« less

  8. Detailed abundances of planet-hosting wide binaries. I. Did planet formation imprint chemical signatures in the atmospheres of HD 20782/81?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack III, Claude E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Schuler, Simon C.; Norris, John

    2014-06-01

    Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise echelle spectra obtained with Magellan/MIKE, we present a detailed chemical abundance analysis of both stars in the planet-hosting wide binary system HD 20782 + HD 20781. Both stars are G dwarfs, and presumably coeval, forming in the same molecular cloud. Therefore we expect that they should possess the same bulk metallicities. Furthermore, both stars also host giant planets on eccentric orbits with pericenters ≲0.2 AU. Here, we investigate if planets with such orbits could lead to the host stars ingesting material, which in turn may leave similar chemical imprints in their atmospheric abundances. We derived abundances of 15 elements spanning a range of condensation temperature, T {sub C} ≈ 40-1660 K. The two stars are found to have a mean element-to-element abundance difference of 0.04 ± 0.07 dex, which is consistent with both stars having identical bulk metallicities. In addition, for both stars, the refractory elements (T {sub C} >900 K) exhibit a positive correlation between abundance (relative to solar) and T {sub C}, with similar slopes of ≈1×10{sup –4} dex K{sup –1}. The measured positive correlations are not perfect; both stars exhibit a scatter of ≈5×10{sup –5} dex K{sup –1} about the mean trend, and certain elements (Na, Al, Sc) are similarly deviant in both stars. These findings are discussed in the context of models for giant planet migration that predict the accretion of H-depleted rocky material by the host star. We show that a simple simulation of a solar-type star accreting material with Earth-like composition predicts a positive—but imperfect—correlation between refractory elemental abundances and T {sub C}. Our measured slopes are consistent with what is predicted for the ingestion of 10-20 Earths by each star in the system. In addition, the specific element-by-element scatter might be used to distinguish between planetary accretion and Galactic chemical evolution scenarios.

  9. Microbial agent detection using near-IR electrophoretic and spectral signatures (MADNESS) for rapid identification in detect-to-warn applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Anthony Lee; Bambha, Ray P.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Fruetel, Julia A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2009-10-01

    Rapid identification of aerosolized biological agents following an alarm by particle triggering systems is needed to enable response actions that save lives and protect assets. Rapid identifiers must achieve species level specificity, as this is required to distinguish disease-causing organisms (e.g., Bacillus anthracis) from benign neighbors (e.g., Bacillus subtilis). We have developed a rapid (1-5 minute), novel identification methodology that sorts intact organisms from each other and particulates using capillary electrophoresis (CE), and detects using near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and scattering. We have successfully demonstrated CE resolution of Bacillus spores and vegetative bacteria at the species level. To achieve sufficient sensitivity for detection needs ({approx}10{sup 4} cfu/mL for bacteria), we have developed fiber-coupled cavity-enhanced absorbance techniques. Using this method, we have demonstrated {approx}two orders of magnitude greater sensitivity than published results for absorbing dyes, and single particle (spore) detection through primarily scattering effects. Results of the integrated CE-NIR system for spore detection are presented.

  10. In search of the X{sub 2}BO and X{sub 2}BS (X = H, F) free radicals: Ab initio studies of their spectroscopic signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2014-12-28

    The F{sub 2}BO free radical is a known, although little studied, species but similar X{sub 2}BY (X = H, D, F; Y = O, S) molecules are largely unknown. High level ab initio methods have been used to predict the molecular structures, vibrational frequencies (in cm{sup −1}), and relative energies of the ground and first two excited electronic states of these free radicals, as an aid to their eventual spectroscopic identification. The chosen theoretical methods and basis sets were tested on F{sub 2}BO and found to give good agreement with the known experimental quantities. In particular, complete basis set extrapolations of coupled-cluster single and doubles with perturbative triple excitations/aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 3, 4, 5) energies gave excellent electronic term values, due to small changes in geometry between states and the lack of significant multireference character in the wavefunctions. The radicals are found to have planar C{sub 2v} geometries in the X{sup ~2}B{sub 2} ground state, the low-lying A{sup ~2}B{sub 1} first excited state, and the higher B{sup ~2}A{sub 1} state. Some of these radicals have very small ground state dipole moments hindering microwave measurements. Infrared studies in matrices or in the gas phase may be possible although the fundamentals of H{sub 2}BO and H{sub 2}BS are quite weak. The most promising method of identifying these species in the gas phase appears to be absorption or laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy through the allowed B{sup ~}-X{sup ~} transitions which occur in the visible-near UV region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The ab initio results have been used to calculate the Franck-Condon profiles of the absorption and emission spectra, and the rotational structure of the B{sup ~}-X{sup ~}0{sub 0}{sup 0} bands has been simulated. The calculated single vibronic level emission spectra provide a unique, readily recognizable fingerprint of each particular radical, facilitating the experimental identification of new X{sub 2}BY species in the gas phase.

  11. THE HERSCHEL FILAMENT: A SIGNATURE OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DRIVERS OF GALAXY EVOLUTION DURING THE ASSEMBLY OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS AT z = 0.9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppin, K. E. K.; Geach, J. E.; Webb, T. M. A.; Faloon, A.; O'Donnell, D.; Yan, R.; Ouellette, N.; Egami, E.; Ellingson, E.; Gilbank, D.; Hicks, A.; Barrientos, L. F.; Yee, H. K. C.; Gladders, M.

    2012-04-20

    We have discovered a 2.5 Mpc (projected) long filament of infrared-bright galaxies connecting two of the three {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} clusters making up the RCS 2319+00 supercluster at z = 0.9. The filament is revealed in a deep Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) map that shows 250-500 {mu}m emission associated with a spectroscopically identified filament of galaxies spanning two X-ray bright cluster cores. We estimate that the total (8-1000 {mu}m) infrared luminosity of the filament is L{sub IR} {approx_equal} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }, which, if due to star formation alone, corresponds to a total SFR {approx_equal} 900 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We are witnessing the scene of the buildup of a >10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} cluster of galaxies, seen prior to the merging of three massive components, each of which already contains a population of red, passive galaxies that formed at z > 2. The infrared filament demonstrates that significant stellar mass assembly is taking place in the moderate density, dynamically active circumcluster environments of the most massive clusters at high redshift, and this activity is concomitant with the hierarchical buildup of large-scale structure.

  12. Kerov's interlacing sequences and random matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bufetov, Alexey

    2013-11-15

    To a N × N real symmetric matrix Kerov assigns a piecewise linear function whose local minima are the eigenvalues of this matrix and whose local maxima are the eigenvalues of its (N − 1) × (N − 1) submatrix. We study the scaling limit of Kerov's piecewise linear functions for Wigner and Wishart matrices. For Wigner matrices the scaling limit is given by the Verhik-Kerov-Logan-Shepp curve which is known from asymptotic representation theory. For Wishart matrices the scaling limit is also explicitly found, and we explain its relation to the Marchenko-Pastur limit spectral law.

  13. Inertial Fusion Driven by Intense Heavy-Ion Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS * W. M. Sharp # , A. Friedman, D. P. Grote, J. J. Barnard, R. H. Cohen, M. A. Dorf, S. M. Lund, L. J. Perkins, M. R. Terry, LLNL, Livermore, CA, USA B. G. Logan, F. M. Bieniosek, A. Faltens, E. Henestroza, J.-Y. Jung, J. W. Kwan, E. P. Lee, S. M. Lidia, P. A. Ni, L. L. Reginato, P. K. Roy, P. A. Seidl, J. H. Takakuwa, J.-L. Vay, W. L. Waldron, LBNL, Berkeley, CA, USA R. C. Davidson, E. P. Gilson, I. D. Kaganovich, H. Qin, E. Startsev, PPPL,

  14. Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    changing land cover (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land cover Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 28, 2017 Title: Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land cover Authors: Logan, K. E. ; Brunsell, N. A. Publication Date: 2015-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1249824 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231 Type: Publisher's Accepted

  15. Joint Facilities User Forum on Data-Intensive Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using the Adaptable I/O System (ADIOS) Joint Facilities User Forum on Data-Intensive Computing June 18, 2014 Norbert Podhorszki Thanks to: H. Abbasi, S. Ahern, C. S. Chang, J. Chen, S. Ethier, B. Geveci, J. Kim, T. Kurc, S. Klasky, J. Logan, Q. Liu, K. Mu, G. Ostrouchov, M. Parashar, D. Pugmire, J. Saltz, N. Samatova, K. Schwan, A. Shoshani, W. Tang, Y. Tian, M. Taufer, W. Xue, M. Wolf + many more Subtle m essage o f t he f orum a genda . . . . . . . . . What i s A DIOS? * ADaptable I /O S ystem

  16. MAY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LOS-/ MAY 12 1980 kc. 3 Mr. D. E. Van Farowe, P.E., Chief Division of Radiological Health Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Health Departiment of Public Health 3500 h. Logan P. 0. Box 3CO35 Lansing, Wichigan 48909 Dear Wr. Farowe: Thank you for your letter in response to our inquiry related to ?iichi?an sites used for nxlear operations by the ltanhattan En9lneer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (IIEDIAEC). The possibility of the Velsicol Chemical Cornoration (former Nichigan

  17. OCCIDENTAL VERTICAL MODIFIED IN SITU PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF OIL FROM OIL SHALE. PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Reid M.

    1980-09-01

    The progress presented in this report covers the period June 1, 1980 through August 31, 1980 under the work scope for.Phase II of the DOE/Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) Cooperative Agreement. The major activities at OOSI 1s Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7, 8 and 8x; completing Mini-Retort (MR) construction; continuing surface facility construction; tracer testing the MR 1 s; conducting Retorts 7 & 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests; setting up and debugging the Sandia B-61 trailer; and preparing the Phase II instrumentation plan.

  18. Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1017 Majestrc Drive, Suite 200 Lexington, Kentucky 4051 3 (85s) 219-4000 MAR 21 \An Ms. Maria Galanti Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Southeast District Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 PPPO-03- t426732-12 Dear Ms. Galanti: FINAL ACTION MEMORANDUM FOR TFIB PLANT SUPPORT BUILDINGS AND S'TRUCTURES AT THE PORTSMOUTI{ GASBOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKETON' OHIO References: l. Letter from V. Adams to M. Galanti, "Draft Action Memorandum for the Plant Sr"rpport Buildings and

  19. Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    '1017 Majestic Drive, Suite 200 Lexington, Kentucky 4051 3 (859) 21e-4000 JUN 3 0 2015 Ms. Maria Galanti Site Coordinator Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Southeast District Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: PPPO-O3-3018616-15 FINAL RECORD OF DECISION FOR THE SITE.WIDE \ryASTE DISPOSITION EVALUATION PROJECT AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT (DOE/PPPO/03-0s 13&D2) References: 1. Letter from W. Murphie to M. Galanti, "Record of Decision for the

  20. March 4, 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information 5 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 134 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) 114

  1. DOE/OR/07-2247&D1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    f 8}.~11 Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Southeast District Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: PPPO-03-1335655-12 REMOVAL ACTION COMPLETION REPORT FOR THE X-I03 AUXILIARY OFFICE BUILDING AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKETON, OHIO Enclosed for your review and concurrence, please find the Removal Action Completion Report for the X-J 03 Auxiliary Office Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio (DOE/PPPOI03-0223&Dl). This

  2. March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information 5 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 134 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) 114

  3. Ms. Maria Galanti Site Coordinator

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ? 5 2011 PPPO-03-1251788-11 Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Southeast District Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: TRANSMITTAL OF Dl CONSTRUCTION COMPLETION REPORT FOR PHASES I AND II OF THE REMOVAL OF THE X-760 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING BUILDING AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKETON, OHIO (DOE/PPPO/03-0196&Dl) Reference: Letter from M. Galanti to J. Bradbume, "Construction Completion Report for Phases I and II ofthe Removal of the X-760 Chemical

  4. C:\\Forms\\DOE F 2100.1.cdr

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EXPLANATION OF PURPOSE FOR WHICH FUNDS WILL BE USED: RECOMMENDED BY: (Signature and Title) CHIEF, ACCOUNTING OPERATIONS BRANCH OR DESIGNEE: (Signature) APPROPRIATIONS AND LIMITED ...

  5. DOE CD-4 Review of the MINERvA Project

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    Assessment Document (with signatures) (pdf) Integrated Safety Management Document (pdf) Burn Test Results (pdf) Project Execution Plan (22207 Version with signatures) (pdf) Other...

  6. C:\\Forms\\DOE F 3220.5.cdr

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Effective date 25a. Contractor: 26. DOE APPROVED SALARY 27. DOE APPROVED EFFECTIVE DATE 25c. Contracting officer (or designee) 25b. Headquarters Signature: Signature: Program...

  7. The origin of unequal bond lengths in the C1B2 state of SO2: Signatures of high-lying potential energy surface crossings in the low-lying vibrational structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    Here the C1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. The asymmetry in the potential energy surface is expressed as a staggering in the energy levels of the v'3 progression. We have recently made the first observation of low-lying levels with odd quanta of v'3, which allows us--in the current work--to characterize the origins of the level staggering. Our work demonstrates the usefulness of low-lying vibrational level structure, where the character of the wavefunctions can be relatively easily understood, to extract information about dynamicallymore » important potential energy surface crossings that occur at much higher energy. The measured staggering pattern is consistent with a vibronic coupling model for the double-minimum, which involves direct coupling to the bound 2 1A1 state and indirect coupling with the repulsive 3 1A1 state. The degree of staggering in the v'3 levels increases with quanta of bending excitation, which is consistent with the approach along the C state potential energy surface to a conical intersection with the 2 1A1 surface at a bond angle of ~145°.« less

  8. Phosphine-stabilised Au{sub 9} clusters interacting with titania and silica surfaces: The first evidence for the density of states signature of the support-immobilised cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, Gunther G. E-mail: vladimir.golovko@canterbury.ac.nz Al Qahtani, Hassan S.; Golovko, Vladimir B. E-mail: vladimir.golovko@canterbury.ac.nz; Alvino, Jason F.; Bennett, Trystan; Wrede, Oliver; Mejia, Sol M.; Metha, Gregory F. E-mail: vladimir.golovko@canterbury.ac.nz; Adnan, Rohul; Gunby, Nathaniel; Anderson, David P.

    2014-07-07

    Chemically made, atomically precise phosphine-stabilized clusters Au{sub 9}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 8}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} were deposited on titania and silica from solutions at various concentrations and the samples heated under vacuum to remove the ligands. Metastable induced electron spectroscopy was used to determine the density of states at the surface, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for analysing the composition of the surface. It was found for the Au{sub 9} cluster deposited on titania that the ligands react with the titania substrate. Based on analysis using the singular value decomposition algorithm, the series of MIE spectra can be described as a linear combination of 3 base spectra that are assigned to the spectra of the substrate, the phosphine ligands on the substrate, and the Au clusters anchored to titania after removal of the ligands. On silica, the Au clusters show significant agglomeration after heat treatment and no interaction of the ligands with the substrate can be identified.

  9. Occidental vertical modified in situ process for the recovery of oil from oil shale. Phase II. Quarterly progress report, September 1, 1980-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The major activities at OOSI's Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7 and 8; blasthole drilling; tracer testing MR4; conducting the start-up and burner tests on MR3; continuing the surface facility construction; and conducting Retorts 7 and 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests. Environmental monitoring continued during the quarter, and the data and analyses are discussed. Sandia National Laboratory and Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) personnel were active in the DOE support of the MR3 burner and start-up tests. In the last section of this report the final oil inventory for Retort 6 production is detailed. The total oil produced by Retort 6 was 55,696 barrels.

  10. The workshop on iterative methods for large scale nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H.F.; Pernice, M.

    1995-12-01

    The aim of the workshop was to bring together researchers working on large scale applications with numerical specialists of various kinds. Applications that were addressed included reactive flows (combustion and other chemically reacting flows, tokamak modeling), porous media flows, cardiac modeling, chemical vapor deposition, image restoration, macromolecular modeling, and population dynamics. Numerical areas included Newton iterative (truncated Newton) methods, Krylov subspace methods, domain decomposition and other preconditioning methods, large scale optimization and optimal control, and parallel implementations and software. This report offers a brief summary of workshop activities and information about the participants. Interested readers are encouraged to look into an online proceedings available at http://www.usi.utah.edu/logan.proceedings. In this, the material offered here is augmented with hypertext abstracts that include links to locations such as speakers` home pages, PostScript copies of talks and papers, cross-references to related talks, and other information about topics addresses at the workshop.

  11. Final report for 105-N Basin sediment disposition task, phase 2 -- samples BOMPC8 and BOMPC9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, R.A.

    1998-02-05

    This document is the final report deliverable for Phase 2 analytical work for the 105-N Basin Sediment Disposition Task. On December 23, 1997, ten samples were received at the 222-S Laboratory as follows: two (2) bottles of potable water, six (6) samples for process control testing and two (2) samples for characterization. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Letter of Instruction for Phase 2 Analytical Work for the 105-N Basin Sediment Disposition Task (Logan and Kessner, 1997) (Attachment 7) and 105-N Basin Sediment Disposition Phase-Two Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) (Smith, 1997). The analytical results are included in Table 1. This document provides the values of X/Qs for the onsite and offsite receptors, taking into account the building wake and the atmospheric stability effects. X/Qs values for the potential fire accident were also calculated. In addition, the unit dose were calculated for the mixtures of isotopes.

  12. SU-E-I-45: Reconstruction of CT Images From Sparsely-Sampled Data Using the Logarithmic Barrier Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and investigate whether the logarithmic barrier (LB) method can result in high-quality reconstructed CT images using sparsely-sampled noisy projection data Methods: The objective function is typically formulated as the sum of the total variation (TV) and a data fidelity (DF) term with a parameter ? that governs the relative weight between them. Finding the optimized value of ? is a critical step for this approach to give satisfactory results. The proposed LB method avoid using ? by constructing the objective function as the sum of the TV and a log function whose augment is the DF term. Newton's method was used to solve the optimization problem. The algorithm was coded in MatLab2013b. Both Shepp-Logan phantom and a patient lung CT image were used for demonstration of the algorithm. Measured data were simulated by calculating the projection data using radon transform. A Poisson noise model was used to account for the simulated detector noise. The iteration stopped when the difference of the current TV and the previous one was less than 1%. Results: Shepp-Logan phantom reconstruction study shows that filtered back-projection (FBP) gives high streak artifacts for 30 and 40 projections. Although visually the streak artifacts are less pronounced for 64 and 90 projections in FBP, the 1D pixel profiles indicate that FBP gives noisier reconstructed pixel values than LB does. A lung image reconstruction is presented. It shows that use of 64 projections gives satisfactory reconstructed image quality with regard to noise suppression and sharp edge preservation. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the logarithmic barrier method can be used to reconstruct CT images from sparsely-amped data. The number of projections around 64 gives a balance between the over-smoothing of the sharp demarcation and noise suppression. Future study may extend to CBCT reconstruction and improvement on computation speed.

  13. Mesozoic stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the Exxon 975-1 well, Georges Bank Basin, U. S. North Atlantic outer continental shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W. . Quissett Labs.)

    1993-03-01

    The Exxon 975--1 well, located in the southeastern part of the Georges Bank Basin, was drilled to a total depth of 4,452 m relative to the Kelly Bushing. The oldest sediments penetrated by the well are Middle Jurassic (Bajocian-Early Bathonian), but unambiguous seismic correlations with the COST G--1 and G--2 wells show that about 6,860 m of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks rest on the Paleozoic basement at the 975--1 wellsite. The Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary in the well is placed at 1,673 m; the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary occurs at 384 m. Limestone is predominant below 3,966 m (Iroquois Formation), and at the intervals 3,810--3,246 m and 1,897--1,654 m (lower and upper tongues of the Abenaki Formation). Siliciclastics of the Mohican, undivided Mic Mac-Mohawk, Missisauga, Logan Canyon, and Dawson Canyon Formations dominate the remainder of the Mesozoic section. The Exxon 975--1 well penetrated updip, more terrestrial lithofacies than the COST G--2, Conoco 145--1, and Mobil 312--1 wells. Salt, anhydrite, dolomite, and the micritic textures of the carbonates in the Iroquois Formation of the Exxon 975--1 well suggest hypersaline restricted marine and supratidal depositional environments. The predominantly nonmarine deltaic siliciclastics of the Mohican, Misaine Shale, and Mic Mac-Mohawk units are thicker in the Exxon 975--1 well, whereas marine carbonates of the Scatarie and Bacarro Limestones are usually thinner than at the downdip (seaward) wellsites. Similarly, the Early Cretaceous Missisauga and Logan Canyon Formations represent lower delta plain (alluvial and swamp) and delta front (beach, bar, and lagoon) facies at the Exxon 975--1 wellsite, whereas correlative downdip facies represent shallow marine to delta front deposition.

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