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1

Diamond Bar, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar, California: Energy Resources Bar, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0286226°, -117.8103367° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0286226,"lon":-117.8103367,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Diamond and Related Materials 8 (1999) 13881392 www.elsevier.com/locate/diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the hot-filament diamond CVD gas-phase environment: direct comparison with experimental measurements R diamond reactor. These simulations have been compared to data measured using an in-situ molecular beam atoms, was found to be very important since it controlled the whole gas-phase chemistry. Comparison

Bristol, University of

3

diamond pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the various steps through, which a diamond passes from production to marketing not including the end consumer. Also called diamond chain , pipeline ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Diamond Nanophotonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The burgeoning field of nanophotonics has grown to be a major research area, primarily because of the ability to control and manipulate single quantum systems (emitters) and single photons on demand. For many years studying nanophotonic phenomena was limited to traditional semiconductors (including silicon and GaAs) and experiments were carried out predominantly at cryogenic temperatures. In the last decade, however, diamond has emerged as a new contender to study photonic phenomena at the nanoscale. Offering plethora of quantum emitters that are optically active at room temperature and ambient conditions, diamond has been exploited to demonstrate super-resolution microscopy and realize entanglement, Purcell enhancement and other quantum and classical nanophotonic effects. Elucidating the importance of diamond as a material, this review will highlight the recent achievements in the field of diamond nanophotonics, and convey a roadmap for future experiments and technological advancements.

Igor Aharonovich; Elke Neu

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Diamond Nanophotonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The burgeoning field of nanophotonics has grown to be a major research area, primarily because of the ability to control and manipulate single quantum systems (emitters) and single photons on demand. For many years studying nanophotonic phenomena was limited to traditional semiconductors (including silicon and GaAs) and experiments were carried out predominantly at cryogenic temperatures. In the last decade, however, diamond has emerged as a new contender to study photonic phenomena at the nanoscale. Offering plethora of quantum emitters that are optically active at room temperature and ambient conditions, diamond has been exploited to demonstrate super-resolution microscopy and realize entanglement, Purcell enhancement and other quantum and classical nanophotonic effects. Elucidating the importance of diamond as a material, this review will highlight the recent achievements in the field of diamond nanophotonics, and convey a roadmap for future experiments and technological advancements.

Aharonovich, Igor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Oppenheimer Diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an uncut, light yellow, octahedral diamond crystal of 253.70 cts, found in 1964 in Dutoitspan Mine, South Africa. It was owned by Harry Winston and presented to Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, in...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Diamond fiber field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Barred Owl Hooting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barred Owl Hooting Barred Owl Hooting Name: ray Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: have barred owls ever been known to hoot during the daylight hours? Replies: I spent two years researching barred and horned owls when I was a graduate student and these owls are often found to call during daylight hours. I found both species fairly active at about 3pm and sometimes as late as 10am. The fledglings may be active anytime day and night. Parents are most vocal in the spring when trying to locate young and in the pre-nesting season during January-March. However, the barred owl is most active during the night and many times the calling is dependent upon the time of year [breeding season of November through April is more active for adults in particular]. Yearlings can make calls, noise anytime during the day.

9

Effective placement of detectors at diamond interchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most signalized interchanges in Texas are tight urban diamond interchanges of freeways having one-way frontage roads. At these interchanges, traffic actuated control with improper location of detectors may result in inefficient traffic operations...

Prabhakar, Dayakar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

L-Bar.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County approximately 47 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 10 miles north of Laguna Pueblo. The disposal site is located on part of the former L-Bar ranch and is about 4 miles east-southeast of the village of Seboyeta. The site was previously owned and operated by SOHIO Western Mining Company . Mining and milling at L-Bar began in 1977 and continued until 1981, when the mine closed because of economic conditions of the uranium industry. About 2.1 million tons of ore was processed at the mill. The milling operation created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. Tailings and liquid wastes were pumped in slurry form into an onsite tailings impoundment for disposal. All aboveground structures, including the mine and

11

Bunker Bar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

traitor. But in China's new market economy, a traitor's bunker can be repurposed as a military-themed bar with a war room, portraits of Lin and Mao and a funky entrance fashioned out of a partial plane fuselage. The Cultural Revolution is something a lot...

Hacker, Randi; Greene, Megan

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

13

CURRICULUM VITAE Howard J. Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

______________________ CURRICULUM VITAE FOR Howard J. Diamond ______________________ NOAA.diamond@noaa.gov or hjdiamond45@gmail.com #12;Curriculum Vitae Mr. Howard Jeffrey Diamond NOAA/National Climatic Data Center

14

Diamond films: Historical perspective  

SciTech Connect

This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

Messier, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Diamond Energy Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Place Melbourne, Australia Zip 3124 Product Victoria based clean energy project developer. Coordinates -37.817532°, 144.967148° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-37.817532,"lon":144.967148,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

The diamonds of South Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diamonds in South Australia occur in kimberlites at Eurelia (Orroroo), and in placer deposits, which include the Springfield Basin and the historic Echunga goldfield. To identify the kimberlitic and mantle sources of the placer diamonds, and to determine any possible connections between the placer diamonds and the diamonds from the Eurelia kimberlites, we examined the physical and compositional characteristics, and the mineral inclusion content of 122 diamonds from the Springfield Basin and 43 diamonds from kimberlites at Eurelia. Additional morphological data for three Echunga diamonds are also given. Most of the diamonds from the Springfield Basin are similar to the diamonds from Eurelia with respect to their crystal shapes, surface textures, and colors. The diamond populations from both areas are characterized by a high abundance of low-nitrogen (Basin diamonds are similar to the Eurelia diamonds with ?13C values in the range ?20.0 to ?2.5, and a mode at ?6.5. Ferropericlase inclusions in two diamonds from the Springfield Basin are consistent with ferropericlase-bearing mineral inclusion assemblages found in the Eurelia diamonds and indicate that part of the diamond population from both areas is of sublithospheric origin. One diamond from the Springfield Basin contained an inclusion of lherzolitic garnet. The overall similarities between the Springfield Basin and Eurelia diamonds indicates that the bulk of the Springfield Basin diamonds are derived from kimberlitic sources that are similar (or identical) to those at Eurelia. However, three diamonds from the Springfield Basin are markedly distinct. These have well-developed crystal shapes, large sizes, yellow body colorations, and brown irradiation spots. The brown irradiation spots and abrasion textures provide evidence that these diamonds are much older than the other diamonds in the Springfield Basin, and that they are derived from distal kimberlitic sources. The diamonds are most likely derived from Permian glacigene sediments and may ultimately be sourced from kimberlites on the East Antarctic craton. Abrasion textures and brown irradiation spots are also present on diamonds from Echunga. This provides a link to the three old Springfield Basin diamonds and other alluvial diamonds in Eastern Australia, and suggests that Permian glaciations caused a widespread distribution of diamonds over large parts of southern Australia, which at that time was part of the supercontinent Gondwana.

Ralf Tappert; John Foden; Thomas Stachel; Karlis Muehlenbachs; Michelle Tappert; Kevin Wills

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Diamond nanobeam waveguide optomechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optomechanical devices sensitively transduce and actuate motion of nanomechanical structures using light, and are central to many recent fundamental studies and technological advances. Single--crystal diamond promises to improve the performance of optomechanical devices, while also providing opportunities to interface nanomechanics with diamond color center spins and related quantum technologies. Here we demonstrate measurement of diamond nanobeam resonators with a sensitivity of 9.5 fm/Hz^0.5 and bandwidth >120 nm through dissipative waveguide--optomechanical coupling. Nanobeams are fabricated from bulk single--crystal diamond using a scalable quasi--isotropic oxygen plasma undercut etching process, and support mechanical resonances with quality factor of 2.5 x 10^5 at room temperature, and 7.2 x 10^5 in cryogenic conditions (5K). Mechanical self--oscillations, resulting from interplay between optomechanical coupling and the photothermal response of nanobeams in a buckled state, are observed with amplitude e...

Khanaliloo, Behzad; Hryciw, Aaron C; Lake, David P; Kaviani, Hamidreza; Barclay, Paul E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Amorphous diamond films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

Falabella, S.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide...

20

Diamond-graphite field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Diamond Walnut Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walnut Biomass Facility Walnut Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Walnut Biomass Facility Facility Diamond Walnut Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Diamond Willow Extension | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Extension Extension Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Extension Facility Diamond Willow Extension Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.281621°, -104.271355° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.281621,"lon":-104.271355,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

Lueking, Angela (State College, PA); Gutierrez, Humberto (State College, PA); Narayanan, Deepa (Redmond, WA); Burgess Clifford, Caroline E. (State College, PA); Jain, Puja (King Of Prussia, PA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

24

Black Diamond Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Diamond Power Co Black Diamond Power Co Place West Virginia Utility Id 1764 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1200/kWh Commercial: $0.0685/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Black Diamond Power Co (West Virginia). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

25

DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

2005-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

Diamond turning of glass  

SciTech Connect

A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Association Section on Environment Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name American Bar Association Section on Environment Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60610 Product The Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources is the premier forum for lawyers working in areas related to environment law, natural resources law, and energy law. References American Bar Association Section on Environment[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Bar Association Section on Environment is a company located in Chicago, Illinois . References ↑ "American Bar Association Section on Environment" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Bar_Association_Section_on_Environment&oldid=342108

28

High efficiency diamond solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Diamond Trilogy: Superplumes, Supercontinents, and Supernovae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the fourth most abundant element in the solar system after hydrogen, helium, and oxygen...explosions, other diamonds bear witness to solar system formation, and diamonds from our...the implications of diamond for Earth and solar system processes. Diamond Synthesis The many...

Stephen E. Haggerty

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

Acoustical effect of progressive undercutting of percussive aluminum bars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Standard vibraphone bars consist of aluminum beams which are traditionally tuned with an arched undercut for the purpose of aligning the musical overtones harmonically. The acoustical effect of various progressions of undercuts on aluminum bars was studied using both an aluminum bar and a finite element computer model. The spectral signature of the aluminum bar was examined with a spectrum analyzer and the corresponding eigenmodes were imaged with an electronic speckle pattern interferometer. These methods were used to analyze the changes in natural frequencies of the bar as matter was removed from various locations. Additionally the aural character of each cut was captured with an audio recording and the fundamental tone was normalized over all recordings to make possible a subjective comparison of the timbral differences of differently cut bars.

Eric M. Laukkanen; Randy Worland

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Infrared refractive index of diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The refractive index of natural Type IIa diamond is reported for the spectral region 2.5-25 m. The data have been fitted to a Herzberger-type dispersion formula with a quality of...

Edwards, David F; Ochoa, Ellen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Amorphous-diamond electron emitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fabrication of amorphous diamond films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

Falabella, S.

1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Method of Dehalogenation using Diamonds  

SciTech Connect

A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications  

SciTech Connect

Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

Rainer Wallny

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications  

SciTech Connect

Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

Harris Kagan; K.K. Gan; Richard Kass

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

COBE's Galactic Bar and Disk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of the bar and old stellar disk of the Galaxy has been derived from the survey of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) of the Cosmic Background Explorer at wavelengths of 1.25, 2.2, 3.5, and 4.9 microns. It agrees very well with the data, except in directions in which the near- infrared optical depth is high. Among the conclusions drawn from the model: The Sun is located approximately 16.5 pc above the midpoint of the Galactic plane. The disk has an outer edge four kpc from the Sun, and is warped like the HI layer. It has a central hole roughly the diameter of the inner edge of the "three-kiloparsec" molecular cloud ring, and within that hole lies a bright, strong, "early-type" bar, tilted approximately 14 degrees from the Sun-Galactic center line. The model has 47 free parameters. The model is discussed in detail and contour plots and images of the residuals presented.

H. T. Freudenreich

1997-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

Calculations of Phosphorous Electronic Levels in Diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper is dedicated to the simulation of phosphorus entering into diamond and its influence upon the vacancy in diamond, using the theory of shallow donor states and the tight-binding theory (TBT).

Valentine V. Tokiy; Diana L. Savina

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Most Real Bars are Not Made by the Bar Instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Having once thought that we understood how some galaxies were barred and had difficulty accounting for the absence of bars in others, it now seems that we have the opposite problem. Most real galaxies have centres dense enough to inhibit bar formation, even if they have massive discs. This is also true for barred galaxies, which therefore could not have acquired their bars as a result of a self-excited, global instability. There is a hint from the morphology of galaxies in the Hubble Deep Fields that the growth of bars might be a slow or secular process. Here I discuss possible mechanisms that could form bars long after the disc is assembled.

J. A. Sellwood

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

BaBar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Kollaboration gebaut. Er dient dazu, Paare von elektrisch neutralen B und anti-B Mesonen zu erzeugen. Das neutrale B enthält ein anti-b Quark und ein d Quark, während das neutrale anti-B ein b Quark und ein anti-d Quark enthält. Die Teilchenstrahlen werden so eingestellt, dass bei ihrer Kollision gerade die richtige Menge an Energie frei wird, um diese zwei Mesonen zu erzeugen. Weil Elektronen und Positronen mit verschiedenen Energien umlaufen, werden die so entstandenen B und anti-B Mesonen mit grosser Geschwindigkeit in derselben Richtung laufen. Dabei bewegen sie sich in gleicher Richtung wie die schneller laufenden Elektronen. Das macht es möglich, ihre Lebensdauer durch die Wegstrecke, die sie bis zu ihrem

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Neutron Bombardment of Counting Diamonds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

21 February 1956 research-article Neutron Bombardment of Counting Diamonds A. H...Examination was also made of the effect of neutron bombardment on pulse-height distribution...additional charge traps produced by the neutrons. The layered crystal texture disclosed...

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Laser diagnostics of CVD diamond film growth  

SciTech Connect

Diamond has one of hte most exciting combinations of properties known.{sup 1} It is the hardest material known, has extremely high thermal conductivity, wide optical transparency, and a durability that is unmatched by other substances. The scarcity and high cost of natural diamond has precluded its use in many potential applications that would benefit from this unique combination of properties. Over the last two decades, the technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond at low pressure has been developed, providing the technology to produce thin and thick film coatings on a variety of materials as well as freestanding films and plates of diamond. High optical clarity diamond plates grown by the CVD method are now available in diameters that exceed that of the largest natural diamond ever found. Products spanning from diamond coated machine t{sq_bullet}oling to semiconducting diamond-based electronics have been developed using this technology. Recent estimates suggest that the global market for chemical vapor deposited diamond and diamond-like carbon films will reach {dollar_sign}1 billion by 2000.

Feigerle, C.S.; Shaw, R.W.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Black Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.3087121°, -122.0031691° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.3087121,"lon":-122.0031691,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Generation of diamond wire sliced wafer surface based on the distribution of diamond grits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diamond wire sawing is one of the abrasive machining processes. The cutting tool is a tiny steel wire coated with a large number of diamond grits. Although wire saw is widely used for slicing hard and brittle ...

Chunhui Chung; Le Van Nhat

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

EA-1795: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA EA-1795: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA April 1, 2011 EA-1795: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee to Diamond...

46

Bar Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the various mechanisms for creating bars in rotating stellar disks, and conclude that the swing-amplified feed-back loop, which produces rapidly tumbling bars, remains the most probable. The bar continues to evolve after its formation in a number of ways; here I discuss what appears to be inevitable thickening normal to the plane, continued spiral activity in the outer disk and also underscore the increasingly important problem presented by angular momentum loss to the halo. Finally, I examine possible means, excluding interaction, by which bars in galaxies could be destroyed.

J A Sellwood

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Epitaxial growth of europium monoxide on diamond  

SciTech Connect

We report the epitaxial integration of phase-pure EuO on both single-crystal diamond and on epitaxial diamond films grown on silicon utilizing reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. The epitaxial orientation relationship is (001) EuO ? (001) diamond and [110] EuO ?[100] diamond. The EuO layer is nominally unstrained and ferromagnetic with a transition temperature of 68 2 K and a saturation magnetization of 5.5 0.1 Bohr magnetons per europium ion on the single-crystal diamond, and a transition temperature of 67 2 K and a saturation magnetization of 2.1 0.1 Bohr magnetons per europium ion on the epitaxial diamond film.

Melville, A.; Heeg, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Mairoser, T.; Schmehl, A. [Zentrum fr elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universitt Augsburg, Universittsstrae 1, 86159 Augsburg (Germany)] [Zentrum fr elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universitt Augsburg, Universittsstrae 1, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Fischer, M.; Gsell, S.; Schreck, M. [Institut fr Physik, Universitt Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)] [Institut fr Physik, Universitt Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Awschalom, D. D. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Hollnder, B.; Schubert, J. [Peter Grnberg Institute, PGI9-IT, JARA-FIT, Research Centre Jlich, D-52425 Jlich (Germany)] [Peter Grnberg Institute, PGI9-IT, JARA-FIT, Research Centre Jlich, D-52425 Jlich (Germany); Schlom, D. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Diamond turning machine controller implementation  

SciTech Connect

The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers  

SciTech Connect

Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Sandia National Laboratories: Diamond Plates Create Nanostructures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Not Chemistry More Efficient Fuel Cells under Development by Engineers More California Gas Stations Can Provide Hydrogen than Previously Thought, Sandia Study Says Diamond...

52

Probing New Physics with $q^2$ distributions in $\\bar{B} \\to D^{(*)} ?\\bar?$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experimental results for the ratios of the branching fractions of the decays $\\bar{B} \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar\

Yasuhito Sakaki; Minoru Tanaka; Andrey Tayduganov; Ryoutaro Watanabe

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

Energy Harvesting Diamond Channel with Energy Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Harvesting Diamond Channel with Energy Cooperation Berk Gurakan Sennur Ulukus Department@umd.edu Abstract--We consider the energy harvesting diamond channel, where the source and two relays harvest energy the option of wirelessly transferring some of its energy to the relays via energy cooperation. We find

Ulukus, Sennur

54

Fracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty Ctystallume, 3506 Bassett Street, Santa Clara, California 1995) The fracture behavior of synthetic diamond has been investigated using indentation methods and by the tensile testing of pre-notched fracture-mechanics type samples. Specifically, the fracture toughness

Ritchie, Robert

55

Diamond as an inert substrate of graphene  

SciTech Connect

Interaction between graphene and semiconducting diamond substrate has been examined with large-scale density functional theory calculations. Clean and hydrogenated diamond (100) and (111) surfaces have been studied. It turns out that weak van der Waals interactions dominate for graphene on all these surfaces. High carrier mobility of graphene is almost not affected, except for a negligible energy gap opening at the Dirac point. No charge transfer between graphene and diamond (100) surfaces is detected, while different charge-transfer complexes are formed between graphene and diamond (111) surfaces, inducing either p-type or n-type doping on graphene. Therefore, diamond can be used as an excellent substrate of graphene, which almost keeps its electronic structures at the same time providing the flexibility of charge doping.

Hu Wei; Li Zhenyu; Yang Jinlong [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Observation of $?_{c}$ decay into $?^{+}\\bar?^{-}$ and $?^{-}\\bar?^{+}$ final states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a data sample of $2.25\\times10^{8}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector, we present the first observation of the decays of $\\eta_{c}$ mesons to $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$. The branching fractions are measured to be $(2.11\\pm0.28_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.18_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.50_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ and $(0.89\\pm0.16_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.08_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.21_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ for $\\eta_{c} \\to \\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$, respectively. These branching fractions provide important information on the helicity selection rule in charmonium-decay processes.

The BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; F. Coccetti; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; C. Q. Feng; R. B. Ferroli; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; C. Motzko; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. Z. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; Z. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Internet Iso-bar: A Scalable Overlay Distance Monitoring Yan Chen, and Randy H. Katz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. Internet Iso-bar is easy to implement and use, and has good scalability and small communicationInternet Iso-bar: A Scalable Overlay Distance Monitoring System Yan Chen, and Randy H. Katz-to-peer overlay routing and location. However, there is a lack of such scalable system with small over- head, good

Chen, Yan

58

4e-condensation in a fully frustrated Josephson junction diamond chain  

SciTech Connect

Fully frustrated one-dimensional diamond Josephson chains have been shown [B. Doucot and J. Vidal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 227005 (2002)] to possess a remarkable property: The superfluid phase occurs through the condensation of pairs of Cooper pairs. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we analyze quantitatively the insulator to 4e-superfluid transition. We determine the location of the critical point and discuss the behavior of the phase-phase correlators. For comparison, we also present the case of a diamond chain at zero and 1/3 frustration where the standard 2e-condensation is observed.

Rizzi, Matteo [NEST CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Cataudella, Vittorio [COHERENTIA CNR-INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit Federico II, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Fazio, Rosario [NEST CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), via Beirut 2-4, I-34014, Trieste (Italy)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Galaxy Formation, Bars and QSOs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model that accounts for the brief flaring of QSOs in the early stages of galaxy formation is proposed. I argue that a bar must develop early in the life of nearly every galaxy and that gas to create and fuel the QSO is driven into the center of the galaxy by the bar. The QSO lifetime, and the mass of its central engine, are also controlled by large-scale dynamics, since the fuel supply is shut off after a short period by the development of an inner Lindblad resonance. This resonance causes the gas inflow along the bar to stall at a distance of a few hundred parsecs from the center. The ILR develops as a result of previous inflow, making quasar activity self-limiting. The bars are weakened and can be destroyed by the central mass concentration formed in this way.

J. A. Sellwood

1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Japan may lower investment bars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japan may lower investment bars ... But Minister of International Trade and Industry Takeo Miki did indicate that his ministry is studying the feasibility of easing restrictions on foreign investments, industry by industry. ...

1966-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

No Holds Barred Issue 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOPPING "An Uncrossable Bridge" by Rosamund Clifford (Kung Fu: The Legend Continues) 150 ART Caren Parnes - Cover Suzan Lovett - Plate between 54/55 EDITORIAL I'm bringing three issues of "No Holds Barred" out almost simultaneously - just like last... HOPPING "An Uncrossable Bridge" by Rosamund Clifford (Kung Fu: The Legend Continues) 150 ART Caren Parnes - Cover Suzan Lovett - Plate between 54/55 EDITORIAL I'm bringing three issues of "No Holds Barred" out almost simultaneously - just like last...

Multiple Contributors

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

No Holds Barred Issue 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vice") 135 "Under Night's Calumny, Love Endures" by Rachel Duncan ("Man From UNCLE") 136 ? Coverby Caren Fames - All otherart by Cat EDITORIAL (Such as it is...!) Welcome to the first issue of NO HOLDS BARRED! Ihave quite \\ a variety of fandoms... Vice") 135 "Under Night's Calumny, Love Endures" by Rachel Duncan ("Man From UNCLE") 136 ? Coverby Caren Fames - All otherart by Cat EDITORIAL (Such as it is...!) Welcome to the first issue of NO HOLDS BARRED! Ihave quite \\ a variety of fandoms...

Multiple Contributors

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nano-fabricated solid immersion lenses registered to single emitters in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a technique for fabricating micro- and nano-structures incorporating fluorescent defects in diamond with a positional accuracy in the hundreds of nanometers. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy and focused ion beam (FIB) etching we first locate a suitable defect with respect to registration marks on the diamond surface and then etch a structure using these coordinates. We demonstrate the technique here by etching an 8 micron diameter hemisphere positioned such that a single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy defect lies at its origin. This type of structure increases the photon collection efficiency by removing refraction and aberration losses at the diamond-air interface. We make a direct comparison of the fluorescence photon count rate before and after fabrication and observe an 8-fold increase due to the presence of the hemisphere.

L. Marseglia; J. P. Hadden; A. C. Stanley-Clarke; J. P. Harrison; B. Patton; Y. -L. D. Ho; B. Naydenov; F. Jelezko; J. Meijer; P. R. Dolan; J. M. Smith; J. G. Rarity; J. L. O'Brien

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

Gruen, Dieter M.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

65

Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Facility Diamond Willow Wind (08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.268046°, -104.201742° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.268046,"lon":-104.201742,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

67

Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind (07) Wind Farm Wind (07) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm Facility Diamond Willow Wind (07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.274903°, -104.183013° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.274903,"lon":-104.183013,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

Status and perspectives for $\\bar PANDA$ at FAIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is an international accelerator facility which will use antiprotons and ions to perform research in the fields of nuclear, hadron and particle physics, atomic and anti-matter physics, high density plasma physics and applications in condensed matter physics, biology and the bio-medical sciences. It is located at Darmstadt (Germany) and it is under construction. Among all projects in development at FAIR in this moment, this report focuses on the $\\bar PANDA$ experiment (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt). Some topics from the Charm and Charmonium physics program of the $\\bar PANDA$ experiment will be highlighted, where $\\bar PANDA$ is expected to provide first measurements and original contributions, such as the measurement of the width of very narrow states and the measurements of high spin particles, nowaday undetected. The technique to measure the width of these very narrow states will be presented, and a general overview of the machine is provided.

Elisabetta Prencipe

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Status and perspectives for $\\bar PANDA$ at FAIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is an international accelerator facility which will use antiprotons and ions to perform research in the fields of nuclear, hadron and particle physics, atomic and anti-matter physics, high density plasma physics and applications in condensed matter physics, biology and the bio-medical sciences. It is located at Darmstadt (Germany) and it is under construction. Among all projects in development at FAIR in this moment, this report focuses on the $\\bar PANDA$ experiment (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt). Some topics from the Charm and Charmonium physics program of the $\\bar PANDA$ experiment will be highlighted, where $\\bar PANDA$ is expected to provide first measurements and original contributions, such as the measurement of the width of very narrow states and the measurements of high spin particles, nowaday undetected. The technique to measure the width of these very narrow states will be presented, and a general overview of the machine is provided.

Prencipe, Elisabetta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the $D \\bar D$, $D \\bar D^*$, and $D^* \\bar D^*$, Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a study of the exclusive production of $D \\bar D$, $D \\bar D^*$, and $D^* \\bar D^*$ in initial-state-radiation events, from $e^+ e^-$ annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 $fb^{-1}$ and was recorded by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The $D \\bar D$, $D \\bar D^*$, and $D^* \\bar D^*$ mass spectra show clear evidence of several $\\psi$ resonances. However, there is no evidence for $Y(4260) \\to D \\bar D^*$ or $Y(4260)\\to D^* \\bar D^*$.

The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

71

Diamond switches for high temperature electronics  

SciTech Connect

Diamond switches are well suited for use in high temperature electronics. Laboratory feasibility of diamond switching at 1 kV and 18 A was demonstrated. DC blocking voltages up to 1 kV were demonstrated. A 50 {Omega} load line was switched using a diamond switch, with switch on-state resistivity {approx}7 {Omega}-cm. An electron beam, {approx}150 keV energy, {approx}2 {mu}s full width at half maximum was used to control the 5 mm x 5 mm x 100 {mu}m thick diamond switch. The conduction current temporal history mimics that of the electron beam. These data were taken at room temperature.

Prasad, R.R.; Rondeau, G.; Qi, Niansheng [Alameda Applied Sciences Corp., San Leandro, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electronic Impact of Inclusions in Diamond  

SciTech Connect

X-ray topography data are compared with photodiode responsivity maps to identify potential candidates for electron trapping in high purity, single crystal diamond. X-ray topography data reveal the defects that exist in the diamond material, which are dominated by non-electrically active linear dislocations. However, many diamonds also contain defects configurations (groups of threading dislocations originating from a secondary phase region or inclusion) in the bulk of the wafer which map well to regions of photoconductive gain, indicating that these inclusions are a source of electron trapping which affect the performance of diamond X-ray detectors. It was determined that photoconductive gain is only possible with the combination of an injecting contact and charge trapping in the near surface region. Typical photoconductive gain regions are 0.2 mm across; away from these near-surface inclusions the device yields the expected diode responsivity.

Muller, E.M.; Smedley, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Gaowei, M.; Keister, J.W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dudley, M.; Wu, Q.

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

carbide (SiC) binders. These composites are stable up to 1,200C, but have reduced fracture toughness (6-8 MPam 12 ) due to the brittleness of the SiC and diamond. This...

74

Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Diamond film growth from fullerene precursors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a fullerene vapor, providing a noble gas stream and combining the gas with the fullerene vapor, passing the combined fullerene vapor and noble gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the fullerene and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 10 figs.

Gruen, D.M.; Liu, S.; Krauss, A.R.; Pan, X.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

No Holds Barred Issue 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Cat 50 Art by Marilyn Cole 50-51 WADING THROUGH YEARS by Natasha Barry 51 ACT UP by Nina Boat 62 INDIGO by Baravan 68 Art by Cat 76 Limericks by Emily Ross 77 COVERART by Caren Parnes EDITORIAL Welcome to the second issue of NO HOLDS BARRED... by Cat 50 Art by Marilyn Cole 50-51 WADING THROUGH YEARS by Natasha Barry 51 ACT UP by Nina Boat 62 INDIGO by Baravan 68 Art by Cat 76 Limericks by Emily Ross 77 COVERART by Caren Parnes EDITORIAL Welcome to the second issue of NO HOLDS BARRED...

Multiple Contributors

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

$Qq\\bar Q\\bar q'$ States in Chiral SU(3) Quark Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we study the masses of $Qq\\bar Q\\bar q'$ states with J^{PC}=0^{++}, 1^{++}, 1^{+-} and 2^{++} in the chiral SU(3) quark model, where Q is the heavy quark (c or b) and q (q') is the light quark (u, d or s). According to our numerical results, it is improbable to make the interpretation of $[cn\\bar c\\bar n]_{1^{++}}$ and $[cn\\bar c\\bar n]_{2^{++}}$ (n=u, d) states as X(3872) and Y(3940), respectively. However, it is interesting to find the tetraquarks in the $bq\\bar b\\bar q'$ system.

H. X. Zhang; M. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

78

Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Price, R. Eugene (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

80

The NIR structure of the barred galaxy NGC253 from VISTA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[abridged] We used J and Ks band images acquired with the VISTA telescope as part of the science verification to quantify the structures in the stellar disk of the barred Sc galaxy NGC253. Moving outward from the galaxy center, we find a nuclear ring within the bright 1 kpc diameter nucleus, then a bar, a ring with 2.9 kpc radius. From the Ks image we obtain a new measure of the deprojected length of the bar of 2.5 kpc. The bar's strength, as derived from the curvature of the dust lanes in the J-Ks image, is typical of weak bars. From the deprojected length of the bar, we establish the corotation radius (R_CR=3 kpc) and bar pattern speed (Omega_b = 61.3 km /s kpc), which provides the connection between the high-frequency structures in the disk and the orbital resonances induced by the bar. The nuclear ring is located at the inner Lindblad resonance. The second ring does not have a resonant origin, but it could be a merger remnant or a transient structure formed during an intermediate stage of the bar formatio...

Iodice, E; Rejkuba, M; Neeser, M J; Greggio, L; Gonzalez, O A; Irwin, M; Emerson, J P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Argonne licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies By Joseph Bernstein * By Jared Sagoff * March 4, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The Argonne-developed technology allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400 degrees Celsius. The combination of the Argonne's low-temperature diamond technology with AKHAN's Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor

82

Sparkling Diamonds Reducing High Energy in the Frozen North  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Beers, the undisputed world leader in diamond mining, in a typically proactive approach, completed an energy review at the Snap Lake Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories. What makes the approach unique is that the mine is still under...

Feldman, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Laser annealing of neutron irradiated boron-10 isotope doped diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

10B isotope doped p-type diamond epilayer grown by chemical vapor deposition on (110) oriented type IIa diamond single crystal substrate was subjected to neutron transmutation at a fluence of 2.4...

K. Jagannadham; M. J. Lance; J. E. Butler

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Study of Electron Transport and Amplification in Diamond  

SciTech Connect

As a successful completion of this award, my group has demonstrated world-leading electron gain from diamond for use in a diamond-amplified photocathode. Also, using high-resolution photoemission measurements we were able to uncover exciting new physics of the electron emission mechanisms from hydrogen terminated diamond. Our work, through the continued support of HEP, has resulted in a greater understanding of the diamond material science, including current limits, charge transport modeling, and spatial uniformity.

Muller, Erik M.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baker's Bar M Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Adams, Oregon Coordinates 45.767354°, -118.5624734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

86

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Robinson Bar Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Clayton, Idaho Coordinates 44.2593623°, -114.4017296° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

87

Accepted to Diamond and Related Materials A kinetic model of diamond nucleation and silicon carbide interlayer formation during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted to Diamond and Related Materials A kinetic model of diamond nucleation and silicon carbide Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA Abstract The presence of thin silicon carbide diffusion of carbon atoms into the silicon carbide layer, and the morphology and orientation of the diamond

Dandy, David

88

Hydrogen-doped cubic diamond and the crystal structure of n-diamond Bin Wen a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen-doped cubic diamond and the crystal structure of n-diamond Bin Wen a,b, , Roderick Melnik. In particular, hydrogen concen- tration dependent elastic constants and lattice parameters for the H-doped diamond have been analyzed. Our results indicate that when the hydrogen concentration is less than 19 at

Melnik, Roderick

89

Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downer Grove, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties is disclosed. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display. 3 figs.

Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microsoft Word - DiamondB_Easement_CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2011 16, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to purchase the Diamond B conservation easement. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-800-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there will be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 28N, Range 20W, Sections 28 and 33 in Flathead County, MT

92

A chiral model for bar{q}q and bar{q}bar{q}qq$ mesons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We point out that the spectrum of pseudoscalar and scalar mesons exhibits a cuasi-degenerate chiral nonet in the energy region around 1.4 GeV whose scalar component has a slightly inverted spectrum. Based on the empirical linear rising of the mass of a hadron with the number of constituent quarks which yields a mass around $1.4 $GeV for tetraquarks, we conjecture that this cuasi-chiral nonet arises from the mixing of a chiral nonet composed of tetraquarks with conventional bar{q}q states. We explore this possibility in the framework of a chiral model assuming a tetraquark chiral nonet around 1.4 GeV with chiral symmetry realized directly. We stress that U_{A}(1) transformations can distinguish bar{q}q from tetraquark states, although it cannot distinguish specific dynamics in the later case. We find that the measured spectrum is consistent with this picture. In general, pseudoscalar states arise as mainly bar{q}q states but scalar states turn out to be strong admixtures of bar{q}q and tetraquark states. We work out also the model predictions for the most relevant couplings and calculate explicitly the strong decays of the a_{0}(1450) and K_{0}^*(1430) mesons. From the comparison of some of the predicted couplings with the experimental ones we conclude that observable for the isovector and isospinor sectors are consistently described within the model. The proper description of couplings in the isoscalar sectors would require the introduction of glueball fields which is an important missing piece in the present model.

Mauro Napsuciale; Simon Rodriguez

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Diamond and diamond-like carbon films for advanced electronic applications  

SciTech Connect

Aim of this laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project was to develop diamond and/or diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for electronic applications. Quality of diamond and DLC films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is not adequate for electronic applications. Nucleation of diamond grains during growth typically results in coarse films that must be very thick in order to be physically continuous. DLC films grown by CVD are heavily hydrogenated and are stable to temperatures {le} 400{degrees}C. However, diamond and DLC`s exceptional electronic properties make them candidates for integration into a variety of microelectronic structures. This work studied new techniques for the growth of both materials. Template layers have been developed for the growth of CVD diamond films resulting in a significantly higher nucleation density on unscratched or unprepared Si surfaces. Hydrogen-free DLC with temperature stability {le} 800{degrees}C has been developed using energetic growth methods such as high-energy pulsed-laser deposition. Applications with the largest system impact include electron-emitting materials for flat-panel displays, dielectrics for interconnects, diffusion barriers, encapsulants, and nonvolatile memories, and tribological coatings that reduce wear and friction in integrated micro-electro-mechanical devices.

Siegal, M.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Sullivan, J.P. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Diamond-free Families Jerrold R. Griggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of times a random full chain meets a P-free family, called the Lubell function, and use it for P = Dk, the Lubell function of a family, which gives the average number of times a random full chain meets the family. The Lubell function yields an upper bound on the size of a family. For diamond-free families, we observe

Griggs, Jerrold R.

95

Diamond Beamline I16 (Materials and Magnetism)  

SciTech Connect

We describe the key features and performance specifications of a facility for high-resolution single-crystal x-ray diffraction at Diamond Light Source. The scientific emphasis of the beamline is materials- and x-ray-physics, including resonant and magnetic scattering. We highlight some of the more novel aspects of the beamline design.

Collins, S. P.; Bombardi, A.; Marshall, A. R.; Williams, J. H.; Barlow, G.; Day, A. G.; Pearson, M. R.; Woolliscroft, R. J.; Walton, R. D.; Beutier, G.; Nisbet, G. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

96

Microsoft Word - BAR 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar, New Mexico L-Bar, New Mexico Page 3-1 3.0 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site 3.1 Compliance Summary The L-Bar, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on August 22, 2012. The tailings impoundment was in excellent condition. Erosion and vegetation measurements to monitor the condition of the impoundment cover indicate that no erosion is occurring, and foliar cover of the vegetation has increased since the 2011 inspection. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 3.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the L-Bar site are specified in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy L-Bar, New Mexico, (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site, Seboyeta, New Mexico (DOE-LM/GJ709-2004,

97

MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Field Bend Bar Field Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8967,"lon":-89.6897,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

Dowel Bar Standardization NC^2 Spring Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" > 10" ­ 12" >12" Dowel Bar Diameter 1" 1¼" 1½" 1 ½" Height to center of dowel** 3" 4" 5" 6" **Elect to have thinner cover in bottom of slab vs. top of slab #12;Proposed Dowel Bar Diameters "Engineering" > 10" ­ 12" >12" Dowel Bar Diameter 1" 1¼" 1½" 1 ½" Height to center of dowel** 3" 4" 5" 6" **Elect

99

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

100

BaBar: Direct CPV Searches  

SciTech Connect

Some recent BaBar measurements of CP-violation charge asymmetries in B meson decays to charmless hadronic final states are presented.

Mir, L.M.; /LBL, Berkeley

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

Mullen, Lisa K. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Laser Method for Synthesis and Processing of Continuous Diamond Films on Nondiamond Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...GRAIN-BOUNDARIES IN CVD DIAMOND THIN-FILMS...continuous diamond thin film. Carbon ions were...continuous diamond thin film. Carbon ions were...vapor deposition (CVD) methods such as...while usefilf for coating applications, are not suitable...

J. NARAYAN; V. P. GODBOLE; C. W. WHITE

1991-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

103

Diamond optics V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 20, 21, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Attention is given to unconventional diamond and DLC deposition processes, deposition characterization; diamond characterization, and structural, thermal, and optical properties. Particular attention is given to diamond CVD growth chemistry; a synthesis technique of diamondlike carbon films by a laser ablation ion source in the atmosphere; mass spectrometry studies of diamond deposition; characterization of electron cyclotron resonance plasmas for diamond deposition; thinning and polishing of diamond films by a diffusional reaction with metals; twin quituplets in a CVD diamond; characterization of diamond films deposited by hot-filament CVD using CF4 as a doping gas by Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy; properties of optically smooth diamond thin films produced by ECR-PACVD; calculations of energy barriers to CVD diamon growth; thermal properties of optical-quality diamond films; attenuated total reflectance infrared absorption in CVD diamond films; and optical properties of boron-doped diamond films.

Feldman, A.; Sandor, H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

Bryan, J.B.

1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls (10, 12) are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit (14) and a rigid member (16, 18, 20, 22, 24). One gage ball (10) is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly (34) which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball (12) is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly (38) which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball (12) is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball (10). As the moving ball (12) executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls (10, 12) caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60) actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit (14). Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball (10) locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

Bryan, James B. (Pleasanton, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend April 17, 2012 - 11:43am Addthis Ultrananocrystalline diamond has a diverse range of applications from the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays to coatings for mechanical pump seals and tools. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab Ultrananocrystalline diamond has a diverse range of applications from the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays to coatings for mechanical pump seals and tools. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science How does it work? As computer performance has improved, engineers have had a hard time dissipating the heat produced. Diamond film may be the answer, as it's much better at absorbing and

107

Effectiveness of guidelines for retiming signalized diamond interchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EFFECTIVENESS OF GUIDELINES FOR RETIMING SIGNALIZED DIAMOND INTERCHANGES A Thesis by YVONNE DENISE IRVINE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Thomas Urbanik.... For the diamond interchange test, the participants were randomly assigned to two groups: the control group with no guidelines as reference or the second group, with the guidelines. The average scores on the diamond interchange test were compared using analysis...

Irvine, Yvonne Denise

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Method to fabricate micro and nano diamond devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method including forming a diamond material on the surface of a substrate; forming a first contact and a separate second contact; and patterning the diamond material to form a nanowire between the first contact and the second contact. An apparatus including a first contact and a separate second contact on a substrate; and a nanowire including a single crystalline or polycrystalline diamond material on the substrate and connected to each of the first contact and the second contact.

Morales, Alfredo M; Anderson, Richard J; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Skinner, Jack L; Rye, Michael J

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning  

SciTech Connect

A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass  

SciTech Connect

A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the effect of machine parameters and material properties on precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass. The critical grinding depth to initiate the plastic flow-to-brittle fracture regime will be directly measured using plunge-grind tests. This information will be correlated with machine parameters such as wheel bonding and diamond grain size. Multiaxis grinding tests will then be made to provide data more closely coupled with production technology. One important aspect of the material property studies involves measuring fracture toughness at the very short crack sizes commensurate with grinding damage. Short crack toughness value`s can be much less than the long-crack toughness values measured in conventional fracture tests.

Smith, S.; Paul, H.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

2011 Fact Sheet EMPLOYMENT & BAR PASSAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Resident $22,339 Non-Resident $30,829 Class of 2010 Employment Statistics Bar Passage Employed (2102011 Fact Sheet ENROLLMENT EMPLOYMENT & BAR PASSAGE ACADEMICS Centers Biodefense, Law, and Public students employed in short-term positions funded by the law school's Copeland Fellows Program. Clinical

Rock, Chris

112

Diamond/aluminium nitride composites for efficient thermal management applications  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic diamond/AlN composite materials have been fabricated by a combination of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. These wide band gap semiconductor heterojunctions show promises for many applications, including thermal management, deep ultraviolet light emitting devices, and high power and high temperature electronics. Here, we report results of an interface study of polycrystalline diamond layers grown on single crystal AlN(0001). High resolution transmission microscopy revealed atomically sharp interfaces between diamond and AlN. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy measurements showed reduced thermal resistance on diamond-coated AlN substrates compared to uncoated AlN at temperatures above 330 K.

Cervenka, J.; Dontschuk, N.; Prawer, S. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ladouceur, F. [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Duvall, S. G. [Silanna Semiconductor Pty Ltd., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thin Sheet of Diamond Has Worlds of Uses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A new technique from Argonne National Laboratory creates thin diamond films that are helping industry save energy and could even be used in heart and eye implants.

Sagoff, Jared

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined. 5 figs.

Jostlein, H.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined.

Jostlein, Hans (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Patterning of nanocrystalline diamond films for diamond microstructures useful in MEMS and other devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

MEMS structure and a method of fabricating them from ultrananocrystalline diamond films having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm and feature resolution of less than about one micron . The MEMS structures are made by contacting carbon dimer species with an oxide substrate forming a carbide layer on the surface onto which ultrananocrystalline diamond having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm is deposited. Thereafter, microfabrication process are used to form a structure of predetermined shape having a feature resolution of less than about one micron.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Busmann, Hans-Gerd (Bremen, DE); Meyer, Eva-Maria (Bremen, DE); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL); Krauss, Alan R. (late of Naperville, IL); Krauss, Julie R. (Naperville, IL)

2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells  

SciTech Connect

Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

Offermann, Dustin T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A newly developed Kolsky tension bar.  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of damage and failure of materials under impact loading relies on reliable dynamic tensile experiments. A precise Kolsky tension bar is highly desirable. Based on the template of the Kolsky compression bar that we recently developed and presented at 2009 SEM conference, a new Kolsky tension bar apparatus was completed at Sandia National Laboratories, California. It is secured to the same optical table. Linear bearings with interior Frelon coating were employed to support the whole tension bar system including the bars and gun barrel. The same laser based alignment system was used to efficiently facilitate highly precise alignment of the bar system. However, the gun part was completely re-designed. One end of the gun barrel, as a part of loading device, was directly jointed to the bar system. A solid cylindrical striker is launched inside the gun barrel and then impacts on a flange attached to the other end of the gun barrel to facilitate a sudden tensile loading on the whole system. This design improves the quality of impact to easily produce a perfect stress wave and is convenient to utilize pulse shaping technique. A calibration and dynamic characterization of an aluminum specimen are presented.

Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Korellis, John S.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Cam-controlled boring bar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Diamond thin films: a 21st-century material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research in Inorganic Materials (NIRIM) brought all...diamond lm with lament material. For diamond to be...molecules, the formation of active species, and nally...dia- mond cold cathode eld emission displays...over other electrode materials, such as Pt, which...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Phase I MX Beamlines at Diamond Light Source  

SciTech Connect

Three beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, I02, I03 and I04 at Diamond Light Source are presented. These beamlines formed the life science component of Phase 1 of Diamond Light Source. The article provides details of the design and the current status of the beamlines.

Duke, E. M. H.; Evans, G.; Flaig, R.; Hall, D. R.; Latchem, M.; McAuley, K. E.; Sandy, D. J.; Sorensen, T. L-M.; Waterman, D.; Johnson, L. N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

COMPACTIFICATIONS OF ADJOINT ORBITS AND THEIR HODGE DIAMONDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manifold X, a symplectic Lefschetz fibration (SLF) on X is a fibration f : X C that has only Morse type of the SLF. Calculating such Hodge diamonds is computationally heavy, so we used Macaulay2. Details as for the fibres of the SLF can be read off the Hodge diamonds. Remark 1. Choosing a compactification is in general

Gasparim, Elizabeth

123

The Polishing, Surface Flow and Wear of Diamond and Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Polishing, Surface Flow and Wear of Diamond and Glass F. P. Bowden H. G. Scott It has been shown that a diamond sliding on glass can under suitable conditions induce surface flow of the glass. The speed (v) and load (W) necessary to cause...

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of diamond surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Second harmonic generation (SHG) and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopies have been shown to be powerful and versatile for studying surfaces with submonolayer sensitivity. They have been used in this work to study bare diamond surfaces and molecular adsorption on them. In particular, infrared-visible SFG as a surface vibrational spectroscopic technique has been employed to identify and monitor in-situ surface bonds and species on the diamond (111) surface. The CH stretch spectra allow us to investigate hydrogen adsorption, desorption, abstraction, and the nature of the hydrogen termination. The C(111) surface dosed with atomic hydrogen was found to be in a monohydride configuration with the hydrogen atoms situated at top-sites. The ratio of the abstraction rate to the adsorption rate was appreciable during atomic hydrogen dosing. Kinetic parameters for thermal desorption of H on C(111) were determined showing a near first-order kinetics. For the fully H-terminated (111) surface, a large (110 cm{sup {minus}1}) anharmonicity and {approximately}19 psec lifetime were measured for the first-excited CH stretch mode. The bare reconstructed C(111)-(2 {times} l) surface showed the presence of CC stretch modes which were consistent with the Pandey {pi}-bonded chain structure. When exposed to the methyl radical, the SFG spectra of the C(111) surface showed features suggesting the presence of adsorbed methyl species. After heating to sufficiently high temperatures, they were converted into the monohydride species. Preliminary results on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (100) surface are also presented.

Chin, R.P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Symmetry violations at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following a brief introduction I report the current status of symmetry violation tests from the BaBar experiment, including recent results on the measurement of T violation, and searches for CP and T violation in mixing.

Adrian J. Bevan

2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

126

Diamond machine tool face lapping machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for shaping, sharpening and polishing diamond-tipped single-point machine tools. The isolation of a rotating grinding wheel from its driving apparatus using an air bearing and causing the tool to be shaped, polished or sharpened to be moved across the surface of the grinding wheel so that it does not remain at one radius for more than a single rotation of the grinding wheel has been found to readily result in machine tools of a quality which can only be obtained by the most tedious and costly processing procedures, and previously unattainable by simple lapping techniques.

Yetter, H.H.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nano-diamonds in the Universe A.C. Andersen,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-diamonds in the Universe A.C. Andersen,1 H. Mutschke,2 L. Binette3 , S. Höfner4 1 NORDITA, SE-75120 Uppsala Sweden The first direct evidence for nano-diamonds in space came from meteorites. Laboratory analyses on fine-grained diamond residues from primitive meteorites have shown that nano- diamonds

Andersen, Anja C.

128

Coupling of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to a GaP waveguide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical coupling of guided modes in a GaP waveguide to nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is demonstrated. The electric field penetration into diamond and the loss of the guided mode are measured. The results indicate that the GaP-diamond system could be useful for realizing coupled microcavity-NV devices for quantum information processing in diamond.

K. -M. C. Fu; C. Santori; P. E. Barclay; I. Aharonovich; S. Prawer; N. Meyer; A. M. Holm; R. G. Beausoleil

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Diamond Beamline I13L for Imaging and Coherence  

SciTech Connect

I13L is the first long beamline at Diamond dedicated to imaging and coherence. Two independent branches will operate in the energy range of 6-30 keV with spatial resolution on the micro- to nano-lengthscale. The Imaging branch is dedicated to imaging and tomography with In-line phase contrast and full-field microscopy on the micron to nano-length scale. Ultimate resolution will be achieved on the Coherence branch at I13L with imaging techniques in the reciprocal space. The experimental stations will be located about 250 m from the source, taking advantage of the coherence properties of the source. The beamline has some outstanding features such as the mini-beta layout of the storage ring's straight section. The optical layout is optimized for beam stability and high optical quality to preserve the coherent radiation. In the experimental stations several methods will be available, starting for the first user with in-line phase contrast imaging on the imaging branch and Coherent X-ray Diffraction (CXRD) on the coherence branch.

Rau, C. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Chilton, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Wagner, U.; Peach, A.; Singh, B.; Wilkin, G.; Jones, C. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Chilton, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Robinson, I. K. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Chilton, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Nanomaterials, University College London, London, London (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

Library Locations Locations other than Main Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Library Locations Locations other than Main Library Example: Feminist Studies HQ1410 .U54 2009 University of California, Santa Barbara Library www.library.ucsb.edu Updated 3-2014 A - B.......................................6 Central M - N..................................................Arts Library (Music Building) P

131

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE Location(s): ___________________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of as hazardous waste. 8. Decontamination: Specific instructions: For light contamination of small areas or items12.1 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for PHENOL Location(s): ___________________________________________________ Chemical(s): Phenol Specific Hazards: May be fatal if inhaled. Harmful if absorbed through skin. Harmful

Pawlowski, Wojtek

132

Performance evaluation of bound diamond ring tools  

SciTech Connect

LLNL is collaborating with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM) and the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association (APOMA) to optimize bound diamond ring tools for the spherical generation of high quality optical surfaces. An important element of this work is establishing an experimentally-verified link between tooling properties and workpiece quality indicators such as roughness, subsurface damage and removal rate. In this paper, we report on a standardized methodology for assessing ring tool performance and its preliminary application to a set of commercially-available wheels. Our goals are to (1) assist optics manufacturers (users of the ring tools) in evaluating tools and in assessing their applicability for a given operation, and (2) provide performance feedback to wheel manufacturers to help optimize tooling for the optics industry. Our paper includes measurements of wheel performance for three 2-4 micron diamond bronze-bond wheels that were supplied by different manufacturers to nominally- identical specifications. Preliminary data suggests that the difference in performance levels among the wheels were small.

Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Zeros, Dips and Signs in pp and p$\\rm\\bf\\bar p$ Elastic Amplitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dips observed in the differential cross sections of elastic pp and p$\\bar{\\rm p}$ scattering are studied in terms of the locations of the zeros of the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude and of the sign of real part at large $|t|$. It is confirmed that the differences in shapes of the dips in the pp and p$\\bar{\\rm p}$ systems are determined by a change of sign of the real tail, which seems to be determined by perturbative QCD contributions.

Flavio Pereira; Erasmo Ferreira

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

134

Branching fractions for chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a sample of 25.9 million psi(2S) decays acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e^+e^- collider, we report branching fractions for the decays chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega, with J=0,1,2. Our results for B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar pi^0) and B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar eta) are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements. Furthermore, we include the first measurement of B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar omega).

CLEO Collaboration; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; J. M. Hunt; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. Ledoux; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; S. Adams; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; T. Xiao; A. Tomaradze; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; J. Reed; K. Randrianarivony; A. N. Robichaud; G. Tatishvili; E. J. White; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

ANL/APS/TB-24 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines R.C. Blasdell, L. A. Assoufid, and D. M. Mills TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................1 2. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF DIAMONDS ..................................................5 2.1 Varieties of Diamonds ....................................................................5 2.2 The Lattice Parameter .....................................................................5 2.3 Bulk Thermal and Mechanical Properties ...............................................6 2.4 Typical Surface and Lattice Plane Morphology ......................................8 2.5 The Liquid-GaIn/Diamond Interface ...................................................10 3. DIFFRACTION PROPERTIES OF DIAMOND

136

Software optimization for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters  

SciTech Connect

We previously reported on an electrical conductivity imaging instrument developed for measurements on polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. The instrument uses electrical impedance tomography to profile the conductivity in the diamond table. Conductivity images must be acquired quickly, on the order of 5 sec per cutter, to be useful in the manufacturing process. This paper reports on successful efforts to optimize the conductivity reconstruction routine, porting major portions of it to NVIDIA GPUs, including a custom CUDA kernel for Jacobian computation.

Bogdanov, G.; Ludwig, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Rd, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K. [US Synthetic, 1260 South 1600 West, Orem, UT 84058 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Bars and Dark Matter Halo Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent bars that form in galaxies embedded within cuspy halos are unable to flatten the cusp. Short bars form in models with quasi-flat rotation curves. They lose angular momentum to the halo through dynamical friction, but the continuous concentration of mass within the disk as the bar grows actually compresses the halo further, overwhelming any density reduction due to the modest angular momentum transfer to the halo. Thus the Weinberg-Katz proposed solution to the non-existence of the predicted cuspy halos from CDM simulations would seem to be unworkable. I also find that the concerns over the performance of N-body codes raised by these authors do not apply to the methods used here.

J. A. Sellwood

2002-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ellipticals and Bars: Central Masses and Friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give a very brief review of aspects of internal dynamics that affect the global shape of a galaxy, focusing on triaxiality, bars and warps. There is general agreement that large central masses can destroy triaxial shapes, but recent simulations of this process seem to suffer from numerical difficulties. Central black holes alone are probably not massive enough to destroy global triaxiality, but when augmented by star and gas concentrations in barred galaxies, the global shape may be affected. Even though we do not understand the origin of bars in galaxies, they are very useful as probes of the dark matter density of the inner halo. Finally, I note that dynamical friction acts to reduce a misalignment between the spin axes of the disk and halo, producing a nice warp in the outer disk which has many of the properties of observed galactic warps.

J. A. Sellwood

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

140

Very low friction for diamond sliding on diamond in water Plasma Processing Laboratory, Auburn University, 200 Broun Hall, Auburn, Alabama 36849  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very low friction for diamond sliding on diamond in water Y. Tzeng Plasma Processing Laboratory for publication 17 September 1993) This letter reports the lowest coefficient of friction measured for diamond a load of 50 g, the coefficient of friction falls to -0.001. This clearly shows the effectiveness

Tzeng, Yonhua

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electrodeposited coatings for diamond turning applications  

SciTech Connect

Electrodeposited coatings are attractive for precision machining operations because thick coatings can be economically applied, with good adhesion, to a variety of substrates. Approximately 20 pure metals and a large number of alloys can be deposited from aqueous solutions. Fused salt and organic solvent electrolytes can be used to lengthen the list of metals that can be electrodeposited. However, both the choice of the metallic coating and the control of the plating process are critical for success in precision finishing of electrodeposited coatings. Some preliminary results at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory suggest that electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloys are excellent coatings for single point diamond turning from the standpoint of material properties and low tool wear. Electrodeposited aluminum and aluminum alloy coatings also merit consideration for precision finishing where weight is an important factor. 10 refs., 6 figs.

Mayer, A.; Bramlett, R.D.; Day, R.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Evans, C.J.; Polvani, R.S. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Test Beamline on Diamond Light Source  

SciTech Connect

A Test beamline B16 has been built on the 3 GeV Diamond synchrotron radiation source. The beamline covers a wide photon energy range from 2 to 25 keV. The beamline is highly flexible and versatile in terms of the available beam size (a micron to 100 mm) and the range of energy resolution and photon flux; by virtue of its several operational modes, and the different inter-changeable instruments available in the experiments hutch. Diverse experimental configurations can be flexibly configured using a five-circle diffractometer, a versatile optics test bench, and a suite of detectors. Several experimental techniques including reflectivity, diffraction and imaging are routinely available. Details of the beamline and its measured performance are presented.

Sawhney, K. J. S.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Tiwari, M. K.; Alianelli, L.; Scott, S. M.; Preece, G. M.; Pedersen, U. K.; Walton, R. D. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire-OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

143

Diamond based single molecule magnetic resonance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of a nuclear spin in an individual molecule represents a key challenge in physics and biology whose solution has been pursued for many years. The small magnetic moment of a single nucleus and the unavoidable environmental noise present the key obstacles for its realization. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond can be used to construct a nano-scale single molecule spectrometer that is capable of detecting the position and spin state of a single nucleus and can determine the distance and alignment of a nuclear or electron spin pair. The proposed device will find applications in single molecule spectroscopy in chemistry and biology, such as in determining protein structure or monitoring macromolecular motions and can thus provide a tool to help unravelling the microscopic mechanisms underlying bio-molecular function.

Jianming Cai; Fedor Jelezko; Martin B. Plenio; Alex Retzker

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply January 20, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this project do? Nearly triples the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically Diversifies the U.S. fuel supply Today, Secretary Chu announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $241 million loan guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel, LLC., the DOE Loan Program's first conditional commitment for an advanced biofuels plant. The loan guarantee will support the construction of a 137-million gallon per year renewable diesel facility that will produce renewable diesel fuel primarily from animal fats, used cooking oil and other waste grease

145

Argonne researchers develop two new diamond inventions | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

develop two new diamond inventions By Jared Sagoff * October 10, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory...

146

Low-Pressure, Metastable Growth of Diamond and "Diamondlike" Phases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HYDROCARBON PLASMA, THIN SOLID...MICROWAVE PLASMA, JOURNAL...KAWARADA, H, LARGE AREA CHEMICAL...MAGNETOMICROWAVE PLASMA, JAPANESE...CARBON-FILMS BY RF GLOW-DISCHARGE...INDUCTION THERMAL PLASMA...DIAMOND AT ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE...JOURNAL OF NON-CRYSTALLINE...

JOHN C. ANGUS; CLIFF C. HAYMAN

1988-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Diamond graphs and super-reflexivity William B. Johnson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond graphs and super-reflexivity William B. Johnson and Gideon Schechtman Abstract The main results is that dimension reduction a-la Johnson­Lindenstrauss fails in any non super reflexive space

Johnson, William B.

149

Thin diamond films provide new material for micro-machines |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin diamond films provide new material for micro-machines By Jared Sagoff * July 31, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Airbags, inkjet printers and video projectors may not...

150

HODGE DIAMONDS OF ADJOINT ORBITS BRIAN CALLANDER AND ELIZABETH GASPARIM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- pactifications of adjoint orbits and of the fibres of symplectic Lefschetz fibra- tions (SLF) on them. The Macaulay2 function hh can then be used to calculate the corresponding Hodge diamonds. An SLF is a fibration

Gasparim, Elizabeth

151

Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a technique to manipulate diamond...

Ampem-Lassen, Eric; Simpson, D A; Gibson, B C; Trpkovski, S; Hossain, F M; Huntington, S T; Ganesan, K; Hollenberg, L C; Prawer, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Argonne CNM News: State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies, Inc., exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The method allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400°C, highly advantageous for integration with processed semiconductor electronic materials and resulting in the deposition of low-defect nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films. The combination of CNM's low-temperature diamond technology with the AKHAN Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor thin-film technology.

153

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Yield Optimization of Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/nmg2870 . 21 3-7 The minimum implantation time to prevent graphitization versus temperature for various doses of 2 MeV nitrogen implantation 22 x FIGURE... is feasible and allows removal of most dirt, some amorphous carbon, and graphite on surface without eroding the diamond. The bond strength of diamond also allows heating in vacuum to high temperature up to 1700C and can be baked in air up to 700C...

Chen, Jeson

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Reevaluation of Type I Diamonds for Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy in High-Pressure Diamond Anvil Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Types Ia, IIa, and IIb diamonds have been compared for their use as anvils in infrared and Raman high-pressure spectroscopy. In the mid-infrared region above 2700 cm?1,...

Wong, P T T; Klug, D D

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NYC Bar Association meeting, March 22, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Fully Integrated Solid Waste Management System 500,000 population served #12;Lancaster County Garden by the plant's Continuous Emissions Monitoring System and verified by PADEP's Bureau of Air Quality Control) CO· NYC Bar Association meeting, · March 22, 2007 Jim Warner #12;Is Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes

Columbia University

158

Hopkinson bar simulation using DYNA2D  

SciTech Connect

A finite-element simulation of a Split Hopkinson's bar (Kolsky apparatus) technique involving mortar specimens is accomplished with DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional finite-element code. Calculations are compared with experimental results contained in a University of Florida report Dynamic Response of Concrete and Concrete Structures, and with analytic solutions of the appropriate wave propagation problem.

Smith, J.A.; Glover, T.A.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

159

Charm Physics at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large production of the $\\ccbar$ pairs and high integrated luminosity make the PEPII B-Factory, an excellent place for studying the charm hadrons. In this paper, we present a few of the most recent results from the BaBar collaboration in the charm sector.

Chunhui Chen

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

160

Resistance of Square Bars to Torsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Encyclopdia Britannica; Prof. Unwin's Elements of Machine Design; Prof. Alexander's Elementary Applied Mechanics; &c. It is stated that the moment of ... Applied Mechanics; &c. It is stated that the moment of resistance of a square bar to torsion appears from Saint-Venant's investigations to be - ...

T. I. DEWAR

1888-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Study of psi(2S) Decays to gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} and Search for p bar{p} Threshold Enhancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decays of psi(2S) into gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} have been studied with the CLEO-c detector using a sample of 24.5 million psi(2S) events obtained from e^+e^- annihilations at sqrt{s} = 3686 MeV. The data show evidence for the excitation of several N^* resonances in p pi^0 and p eta channels in pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} decays, and f_2 states in gamma p bar{p} decay. Branching fractions for decays of psi(2S) to gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} have been determined. No evidence for p bar{p} threshold enhancements was found in the reactions psi(2S)-> X p bar{p}, where X = gamma, pi^0, eta. We do, however, find confirming evidence for a p bar{p} threshold enhancement in J/psi-> gamma p bar{p} as previously reported by BES.

CLEO Collaboration; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; S. Adams; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Xiao; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; L. J. Pearson; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; K. Randrianarivony; G. Tatishvili; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Elasticity, strength, and toughness of single crystal silicon carbide, ultrananocrystalline diamond, and hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elasticity, strength, and toughness of single crystal silicon carbide, ultrananocrystalline diamond carbide 3C-SiC , ultrananocrystalline diamond, and hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous carbon

Espinosa, Horacio D.

163

Mechanical Behavior of Diamond-Sawn Multi-Crystalline Silicon Wafers and its Improvement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Poor mechanical property is identified as a potential barrier to commercial development of diamond wire sawn multi-crystalline silicon wafers. 3-point bending tests of the diamond-sawn multi-crystalline silico...

Hongchen Meng; Lang Zhou

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous diamond flat Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on an interme- diate layer of diamond-like amorphous carbon 9-11,30,35,61, metal carbides 12,14,16,22,23, 25... ,13,72. Nucleation on an intermediate layer of diamond-like...

165

ARM - Instrument Location Table  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsLocation Table govInstrumentsLocation Table Instruments Location Table Contacts Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument Locations Site abbreviations explained in the key. Instrument Name Abbreviation NSA SGP TWP AMF C1 C2 EF BF CF EF IF C1 C2 C3 EF IF Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor ACSM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer AERI Aethalometer AETH Ameriflux Measurement Component AMC Aerosol Observing System AOS Meteorological Measurements associated with the Aerosol Observing System AOSMET Broadband Radiometer Station BRS

166

Reversible micromachining locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and its intermediate states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sig...

Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bnger, C; Grnberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schrder, H; Vo, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Vasseur, G; Y\\`, Ch; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Synchronized B and 13 C Diamond Delta Structures for an Ultimate In-Depth Chemical Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiles in diamond was achieved by the determination of the depth resolution function (DRF). The measurement of this DRF was performed thanks to isotopic-enriched diamond. Applied to boron delta-doped diamond structures, this analysis has resolved edge widths close to 0.3 nm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

Current Issues and Problems in the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...FOR DIAMOND COATINGS, JOURNAL...TO DIAMOND COATINGS, THIN SOLID...SAVVIDES, N, OPTICAL-CONSTANTS...DIAMOND CERAMIC COATING OF THE FUTURE...AND THEIR APPLICATION AS OVERCOATS ON THIN-FILM MEDIA FOR...EFFECT IN THE CVD GROWTH OF...

Walter A. Yarbrough; Russell Messier

1990-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

170

Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b, , Ronald D Available online xxxx Keywords: Atmospheric pressure plasma Diamond-like carbon deposition DLC PECVD The atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) has been

Hicks, Robert F.

171

Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Phase Diamond at High Temperature and Its Release  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this proposed research were: 91) Separation and storage of hydrogen on nanophase diamonds. It is expected that the produced hydrogen, which will be in a mixture, can be directed to a nanophase diamond system directly, which will not only store the hydrogen, but also separate it from the gas mixture, and (2) release of the stored hydrogen from the nanophase diamond.

Tushar K Ghosh

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

Leptonic B Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO October 27, 1989 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Prepared by: R.F. Weston/Office of Technical Services BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to identify and examine the radiological conditions at sites used in the early years of nuclear energy development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), is administered by the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy through the

174

Is Graphite a Diamonds Best Friend? New Information on Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 18th, 2003 November 18th, 2003 Is Graphite a Diamond's Best Friend? New Information on Material Transformation Science has yet to achieve the alchemist's dream of turning lead into gold. But a group of re-searchers using the GeoSoilEn-viroCARS (GSECARS) and High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HP-CAT) facilities at the Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, may have found a way to turn ordinary soft graphite (source of the "lead" found in pencils) into a new, super-hard material that "looks" just like diamond. Using the high-brilliance x-ray beams from the APS, the group discovered that, under extreme pressure, graphite (among the softest of materials and the source of the lead found in pencils) becomes as hard as diamond, the

175

Photonic nano-structures on (111)-oriented diamond  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate the fabrication of single-crystalline diamond nanopillars on a (111)-oriented chemical vapor deposited diamond substrate. This crystal orientation offers optimal coupling of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center emission to the nanopillar mode and is thus advantageous over previous approaches. We characterize single native NV centers in these nanopillars and find one of the highest reported saturated fluorescence count rates in single crystalline diamond in excess of 10{sup 6} counts per second. We show that our nano-fabrication procedure conserves the preferential alignment as well as the spin coherence of the NVs in our structures. Our results will enable a new generation of highly sensitive probes for NV magnetometry and pave the way toward photonic crystals with optimal orientation of the NV center's emission dipole.

Neu, Elke; Appel, Patrick; Ganzhorn, Marc; Miguel-Snchez, Javier; Maletinsky, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.maletinsky@unibas.ch [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Lesik, Margarita; Jacques, Vincent [Laboratoire Aim Cotton, CNRS, Universit Paris-Sud and Ecole Normale Suprieure de Cachan, F-91405 Orsay (France); Mille, Vianney; Tallaire, Alexandre; Achard, Jocelyn [Universit Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cit, Laboratoire des Sciences des Procds et des Matriaux (CNRS UPR 3407), F-93430 Villetaneuse (France)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

Capacitively coupled RF diamond-like-carbon reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of coating a non-conductive fiber with diamond-like carbon, including passing a non-conductive fiber between a pair of parallel metal grids within a reaction chamber, introducing a hydrocarbon gas into the reaction chamber, forming a plasma within the reaction chamber for a sufficient period of time whereby diamond-like carbon is formed upon the non-conductive fiber, is provided together with a reactor chamber for deposition of diamond-like carbon upon a non-conductive fiber, including a vacuum chamber, a cathode assembly including a pair of electrically isolated opposingly parallel metal grids spaced apart at a distance of less than about 1 centimeter, an anode, a means of introducing a hydrocarbon gas into said vacuum chamber, and a means of generating a plasma within said vacuum chamber.

Devlin, David James (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don Mayo (Santa Fe, NM); Archuleta, Thomas Arthur (Espanola, NM); Barbero, Robert Steven (Santa Cruz, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

Qian, Jiang (Los Alamos, NM); Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

SciTech Connect

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Smooth diamond films as low friction, long wear surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article and method of manufacture of a nanocrystalline diamond film. The nanocrystalline film is prepared by forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing an inert gas containing gas stream and combining the gas stream with the carbonaceous containing vapor. A plasma of the combined vapor and gas stream is formed in a chamber and fragmented carbon species are deposited onto a substrate to form the nanocrystalline diamond film having a root mean square flatness of about 50 nm deviation from flatness in the as deposited state.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Bindal, Cuma (Woodridge, IL); Zuiker, Christopher D. (LaGrange, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals  

SciTech Connect

Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Polycrystal diamond growth in a microwave plasma torch  

SciTech Connect

Diamond films of different structures were deposited on quartz, WC-Co, and molybdenum substrates in a microwave plasma torch discharge in an argon-hydrogen-methane gas mixture in a sealed chamber at pressures close to atmospheric by using the chemical vapor deposition technique. Images of diamond polycrystal films and separate crystals, as well as results of Raman spectroscopy, are presented. The spectra of optical plasma radiation recorded during film deposition demonstrate the presence of intense H{sub {alpha}} hydrogen and C{sub 2} radical bands known as Swan bands.

Sergeichev, K. F.; Lukina, N. A.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Arutyunyan, N. R.; Vlasov, I. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Entrance Maze Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entrance Maze Locations Entrance Maze Locations for the Storage Ring Tunnel Martin Knott LS-83 2/17/87 The Purpose of this note is to document the locations and decision rationale of the entrance mazes for the APS storage ring. There are a total of seven entrance mazes, four on the infield side and three on the operating floor side of the ring. Three of the infield mazes are associated with infield buildings, one in the Extraction Building and one each in the two RF Buildings. These three were located to provide convenient passage between the technical buildings and the storage ring components associated with those buildings. The Extraction Building maze allows passage between the positron beam transfer area and the storage ring two sectors upstream of the injection

183

Reading Room Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOIA Offices and Reading Rooms FOIA Offices and Reading Rooms FOIA Office Locations Our FOIA Officers are located at various sites throughout the DOE complex, each with responsibility for records located at or under the jurisdiction of the site. We recommend that you send your request directly to that specific site. This will shorten the processing time. However, if you do not know which location has responsive records, you may either call the Headquarters FOIA office at (202) 586-5955 to determine the appropriate office, or mail the request to the Headquarters FOIA office. Other records are publicly available in the facilities listed below: Headquarters U.S. Department of Energy FOIA/Privacy Act Group 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Phone: 202-586-5955 Fax: 202-586-0575

184

Location linked information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work builds an infrastructure called Location Linked Information that offers a means to associate digital information with public, physical places. This connection creates a hybrid virtual/physical space, called glean ...

Mankins, Matthew William David, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

International land rig locator  

SciTech Connect

Mechanical specifications, ratings, locations, and status are listed for each of the 5,000 contract rotary drilling rigs operated by the more than 700 independent drilling contractors throughout the Free World.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

International land rig locator  

SciTech Connect

Mechanical specifications, ratings, locations, and status are listed for each of the 5,000 contract rotary drilling rigs operated by more than 700 independent drilling contractors throughout the Free World.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Laser-processed three dimensional graphitic electrodes for diamond radiation detectors  

SciTech Connect

We have used an original approach for diamond detectors where three dimensional buried graphitic electrodes are processed in the bulk of a diamond substrate via laser-induced graphitization. Prototype made of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond was fabricated using a nanosecond UV laser. Its charge collection efficiency was evaluated using ?-particles emitted by a 241-Americium source. An improved charge collection efficiency was measured proving that laser micro-machining of diamond is a valid option for the future fabrication of three dimensional diamond detectors.

Caylar, Beno?-carett; Pomorski, Michal; Bergonzo, Philippe [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)] [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

Controlled incorporation of mid-to-high Z transition metals in CVD diamond  

SciTech Connect

We report on a general method to fabricate transition metal related defects in diamond. Controlled incorporation of Mo and W in synthetic CVD diamond was achieved by adding volatile metal precursors to the diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth process. Effects of deposition temperature, grain structure and precursor exposure on the doping level were systematically studied, and doping levels of up to 0.25 at.% have been achieved. The metal atoms are uniformly distributed throughout the diamond grains without any indication of inclusion formation. These results are discussed in context of the kinetically controlled growth process of CVD diamond.

Biener, M M; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, Y M; El-Dasher, B; Teslich, N E; Hamza, A V; Obloh, H; Mueller-Sebert, W; Wolfer, M; Fuchs, T; Grimm, M; Kriele, A; Wild, C

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

189

Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow?_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}?^{+}?^{-}$ and its intermediate states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sigma_{c}(2455)$ or $\\Sigma_{c}(2520)$ resonances, we measure ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{non-\\Sigma_{c}}}=(79 \\pm 4 \\pm 4 \\pm 20)\\times10^{-5}$. The total branching fraction is determined to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{total}}=(123 \\pm 5 \\pm 7 \\pm 32)\\times10^{-5}$. We examine multibody mass combinations in the resonant three-particle $\\Sigma_{c}\\bar{p}\\pi$ final states and in the four-particle $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ final state, and observe different characteristics for the $\\bar{p}\\pi$ combination in neutral versus doubly-charged $\\Sigma_{c}$ decays.

The Babar Collaboration; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; E. Grauges; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; D. N. Brown; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. So; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; C. A. West; A. M. Eisner; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. S. Chao; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; K. T. Flood; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; Z. Huard; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; L. Sun; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; B. Spaan; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; I. Garzia; E. Luppi; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; B. Bhuyan; V. Prasad; M. Morii; A. Adametz; U. Uwer; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; P. D. Dauncey; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; D. N. Brown; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; K. Griessinger; A. Hafner; E. Prencipe; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; E. Behn; R. Cenci; B. Hamilton; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; C. Dallapiccola; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; G. Sciolla; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; P. Biassoni; N. Neri; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. De Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; M. Martinelli; G. Raven; C. P. Jessop; J. M. LoSecco; W. F. Wang; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. Brau; R. Frey; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; S. Akar; E. Ben-Haim; M. Bomben; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; S. Pacetti; A. Rossi; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; A. Perez; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; F. Anulli; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; C. Bnger; O. Grnberg; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schrder; C. Vo; R. Waldi; T. Adye; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Y\\`; D. Aston; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; M. Ebert; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; P. Lewis; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. MacFarlane; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; R. H. Schindler; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; A. P. Wagner; W. J. Wisniewski; M. Wittgen; D. H. Wright; H. W. Wulsin; C. C. Young; V. Ziegler; W. Park; M. V. Purohit; R. M. White; J. R. Wilson; A. Randle-Conde; S. J. Sekula; M. Bellis; P. R. Burchat; T. S. Miyashita; E. M. T. Puccio; M. S. Alam; J. A. Ernst; R. Gorodeisky; N. Guttman; D. R. Peimer; A. Soffer; S. M. Spanier; J. L. Ritchie; A. M. Ruland; R. F. Schwitters; B. C. Wray; J. M. Izen; X. C. Lou; F. Bianchi; D. Gamba; S. Zambito; L. Lanceri; L. Vitale; F. Martinez-Vidal; A. Oyanguren; P. Villanueva-Perez; H. Ahmed; J. Albert; Sw. Banerjee; F. U. Bernlochner; H. H. F. Choi; G. J. King; R. Kowalewski; M. J. Lewczuk; I. M. Nugent; J. M. Roney; R. J. Sobie; N. Tasneem; T. J. Gershon; P. F. Harrison; T. E. Latham; H. R. Band; S. Dasu; Y. Pan; R. Prepost; S. L. Wu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode Nanostructure diamond cathodes can operate at relatively moderate vacuum pressures due to the inert surface/vacuum interface. September 27, 2013 A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode Researchers at LANL have developed a novel, ultra-high-quality, robust electron source, which uses nanostructured polycrystalline diamond in a matrix with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode

191

Electronic states of NO{sub 2}-exposed H-terminated diamond/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerface studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

The energy band-lineup and the electronic structure of NO{sub 2}-exposed H-terminated diamond/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerface have been investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements. It is found that the energy band-lineup is stagger-type, so-called type-II, with its valence band discontinuity of as high as 3.9?eV and its conduction band discontinuity of 2.7?eV. The valence band maximum of the H-terminated diamond surface is positioned at Fermi level as a result of high-density hole accumulation on the diamond side. The XANES measurement has shown that the oxygen-derived interface state locates at about 13?eV above the Fermi level.

Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Imamura, Masaki [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Hirama, Kazuyuki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi 243-0198 (Japan); Kasu, Makoto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

192

Search for the decay of a B0 or B0bar meson to K*0bar K0 or K*0 K0bar  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a search for the decay of a B{sup 0} or {bar B}{sup 0} meson to a {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0} or K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0} final state, using a sample of approximately 232 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. The measured branching fraction is {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) = (0.2{sub -0.8, -0.3}{sup +0.9, +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. They obtain the following upper limit for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) < 1.9 x 10{sup -6}. They use our result to constrain the Standard Model prediction for the deviation of the CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sup 0} from sin 2{beta}.

Aubert, B.

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

THE CAMPUS BAR AS A "BASTARD INSTITUTION"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the unique population, orsubculture it serves. An escape for oJ1.e~ype of clientele might be disc~d~~g~.~~4 cocktails, hut here, it is ehaeaeterized by conV~ts~ti()ll.lleet', music, and games, I.t.is:.npt. aco~p.~te.e~~@'I?~' beci1~;:tbeuni- .. ersity...?" It was not unbearable hot, andt~n# .. .".,0' . 0'.:........ ;'()~ers:: knew this was probably a signal to go outside and "'g~!~t! ':::':::':':1fi~: :::'~';:!Jf The CampusBar high." The owner allows pitchers and glasses to be taken out side, so everything...

Willsie, Deborah A.; Riemer, Jeffrey W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

CP Violation at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We report recent measurements of the three CKM angles of the Unitarity Triangle using about 383 millions b{bar b} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. The results of the angles ({beta}, {alpha}, {gamma}) of the unitarity triangle are consistent with Belle results, and with other CKM constraints such as the measurement of {epsilon}{sub K}, the length of the sides of the unitarity triangle determined from the measurements of {Delta}m{sub d}, {Delta}m{sub s}, |V{sub ub}|. This is an impressive confirmation of Standard Model in quark-flavor sector.

Yeche, Christophe; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

The chemistry of halogens on diamond: effects on growth and electron emission  

SciTech Connect

Diamond growth using halogenated precursors was studied in several diamond growth reactors. In a conventionao plasma reactor, diamond growth using the following gas mixtures was studied: CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}F/H{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}CL/H{sub 2}. Both the diamond growth measurements demonstrated ineffective transport of halogen radicals to the diamond surface during the growth process. In order to transport radical halogen species to the diamond surface during growth, a flow-tube reactor was constructed which minimized gas phase reactions. Also, the flow-tube reactor enabled pulsed gs transport to the diamond surface by fast-acting valves. Molecular beam mass spectroscopy was used to find condition which resulted in atomic hydrogen and/or atomic fluorine transport to the growing diamond surface. Although such conditions were found, they required very low pressures (0.5 Torr and below); these low pressures produce radical fluxes which are too low to sustain a reasonable diamond growth rate. The sequential reactor at Stanford was modified to add a halogen-growth step to the conventinoal atomic hydrogen/atomic carbon diamond growth cycle. Since the atomic fluorine, hydrogen and carbon environments are independent in the sequential reactor, the effect of fluorine on diamond growth could be studied independently of gas phase reactions. Although the diamond growth rate was increased by the use of fluorine, the film quality was seen to deteriorate as well as the substrate surface. Moreover, materials incompatibilities with fluorine significantly limited the use of fluorine in this reactor. A diamond growth model incorporating both gas phase and surface reactions was developed for the halocarbon system concurrent with the film growth efforts. In this report, we review the results of the growth experiments, the modeling, and additional experiments done to understand fluorine with diamond surfaces.

Hsu, W.L.; Pan, L.S.; Brown, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

a r r i o r BUILDING# NAME LOCATION BUILDING# NAME LOCATION OTHER BUILDINGS LOCATION SORORITIES LOCATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Admissions Parking Palmer Lake B l a c k W a r r i o r R i v e r BUILDING# NAME LOCATION BUILDING# NAME LOCATION OTHER BUILDINGS LOCATION SORORITIES LOCATION 7046 70127012 1155 10331033 1150 1039 1038

Carver, Jeffrey C.

197

LEFT The electron gun at the Diamond Synchrotron in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEFT The electron gun at the Diamond Synchrotron in Didcot, Oxfordshire WWW.HOWITWORKSDAILY.COM026" Electron guns are a very versatile electrical component. They are essential to a number of devices, from 3D currents. When installed in an electrical device's vacuum tube, the gun turns electrons and ions

Crowther, Paul

198

Single Crystal Diamond Beam Position Monitors with Radiofrequency Electronic Readout  

SciTech Connect

Over the energy range 5{approx}30 keV a suitably contacted, thin ({approx}100 {mu}m) diamond plate can be operated in situ as a continuous monitor of X-ray beam intensity and position as the diamond absorbs only a small percentage of the incident beam. Single crystal diamond is a completely homogeneous material showing fast (ns), spatially uniform signal response and negligible (diamond beam position monitors of simple quadrant electrode designs with metal contacts, operated using wideband electronic readout corresponding to the RF accelerator frequency. The instrumentation for these monitors must cover a large range of operating conditions: different beam sizes, fluxes, energies and time structure corresponding to the synchrotron fill patterns. Sophisticated new RF sampling electronics can satisfy most requirements: using a modified Libera Brilliance readout system, we measured the center of gravity position of a 25 {mu}m beam at the DORIS III F4 beam line at a rate of 130 Msample/s with narrowband filtering of a few MHz bandwidth. Digitally averaging the signal further provided a spatial resolution {approx}20 nm.

Solar, B.; Graafsma, H.; Potdevin, G.; Trunk, U. [Hasylab, Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, Hamburg (Germany); Morse, J.; Salome, M. [Instrumentation Services and Development Division, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

Aluffi, Paolo

200

An UV-range photodetector based on a diamond photosensor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new UV-range photodetector based on a diamond one-element photosensor has been designed, manufactured and studied. The photodetector possesses the operating range between 180 and 225 nm (the maximum is attained around 220 nm), and the threshold of ...

V. S. Feshchenko; A. A. Altukhov; S. A. L'Vov; Yu. A. Mityagin; V. A. Shepelev

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

New route to the fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond films  

SciTech Connect

Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films offer applications in various fields, but the existing synthetic approaches are cumbersome and destructive. A major breakthrough has been achieved by our group in the direction of a non-destructive, scalable, and economic process of NCD thin-film fabrication. Here, we report a cheap precursor for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond in the form of paraffin wax. We show that NCD thin films can be fabricated on a copper support by using simple, commonplace paraffin wax under reaction conditions of Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD). Surprisingly, even the presence of any catalyst or seeding that has been conventionally used in the state-of-the-art is not required. The structure of the obtained films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region confirm the presence of nanocrystalline diamond. The process is a significant step towards cost-effective and non-cumbersome fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond thin films for commercial production.

Varshney, Deepak, E-mail: deepvar20@gmail.com; Morell, Gerardo [Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931, Puerto Rico (United States); Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PO Box 70377, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Palomino, Javier; Resto, Oscar [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PO Box 70377, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Gil, Jennifer [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Weiner, Brad R. [Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931, Puerto Rico (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel. Aerogels are a fascinating class of high surface-area...been made in the case of polycrystalline aerogels through the oxidative aggregation of...radiation detector with high density aerogels . IEEE T Nucl Sci 56 : 1475 1478 . 7 Schaefer...

Peter J. Pauzauskie; Jonathan C. Crowhurst; Marcus A. Worsley; Ted A. Laurence; A. L. David Kilcoyne; Yinmin Wang; Trevor M. Willey; Kenneth S. Visbeck; Sirine C. Fakra; William J. Evans; Joseph M. Zaug; Joe H. Satcher; Jr.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

location | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

location location Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released November 30th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biodiesel ethanol location production capacity transportation Data application/zip icon Biorefineries.zip (zip, 7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

204

Pine Tree Growth Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pine Tree Growth Locations Pine Tree Growth Locations Name: Amielee Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do pine trees not grow south of the equator? Replies: Dear Amielee, The natural distribution of the pines is the northern hemisphere: http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/tree/eukaryotes/green_plants/embryophytes/conif ers/pinaceae/pinus/pinus.html However, pines have become introduced into the southern hemisphere through cultivation: http://www.woodweb.com/~treetalk/Radiata_Pine/wowhome.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, Ph.D. Hi Amielee Some pine trees do live south of the equator but we (I live in Australia) do not have the huge forests of native conifers that you have in the northern hemisphere. Even in the northern hemisphere conifers are only found in two forest types: 1. Tiaga

205

$D^0 \\bar{D}^0$ Mixing at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews the recent measurement of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with the D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} decay channel from the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B-Factory. Averages from the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group between this result and a previous result from BELLE are also presented.

Coleman, Jonathon; /SLAC

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

University Location Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location Project Description Location Project Description Boise State University Boise, Idaho Boise State University has undertaken a study of the structural setting and geothermal potential at Neal Hot Springs that will integrate geology, geochemistry, and geophysics to analyze the site on the western Snake River plain. Boise State will determine if Neal Hot Springs sustains the necessary rock dilation and conduit pathways for hydrothermal fluid flow and successful geothermal development. The result will be new data acquisition, including a deep geophysical survey and fault surface data. Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado Colorado School of Mines will conduct an investigation near Homedale, Idaho, an area that straddles volcanic rock and unconsolidated sediments.

207

Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Liverpool, New York Site Description Commercial-Restaurant Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Aisin Seiki G60 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer ECO Technical Solutions System Enclosure Outdoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 6 kW0.006 MW 6,000 W 6,000,000 mW 6.0e-6 GW 6.0e-9 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 240 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 46105 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller Manufacturer-Integrated Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2005/07/10 Monitoring Termination Date 2005/07/21

208

Computer Lab Information Location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M340 Computer Lab Information · Location: The computer labs accessible to you are Weber 205 it is recommended that you save your files on a floppy when you are finished. · There is another directory, g:\\m340 to the saved files you have to add the directory to the Matlab path. To do this type addpath g:\\m340

Dangelmayr, Gerhard

209

Update of $|V_{cb}|$ from the $\\bar{B}\\to D^*\\ell\\bar?$ form factor at zero recoil with three-flavor lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the zero-recoil form factor for the semileptonic decay $\\bar{B}^0\\to D^{*+}\\ell^-\\bar{\

Jon A. Bailey; A. Bazavov; C. Bernard; C. M. Bouchard; C. DeTar; Daping Du; A. X. El-Khadra; J. Foley; E. D. Freeland; E. Gamiz; Steven Gottlieb; U. M. Heller; A. S. Kronfeld; J. Laiho; L. Levkova; P. B. Mackenzie; E. T. Neil; Si-Wei Qiu; J. Simone; R. Sugar; D. Toussaint; R. S. Van de Water; Ran Zhou

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document explains the cleanup activities and any use limitations for the land surrounding the Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek.

211

Measurement of $?_{cJ}$ decaying into $p\\bar{n}?^{-}$ and $p\\bar{n}?^{-}?^{0}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a data sample of $1.06 \\times 10^{8}$ $\\psip$ events collected with the BESIII detector in 2009, the branching fractions of $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ and $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ ($J$=0,1,2) are measured{Throughout the text, inclusion of charge conjugate modes is implied if not stated otherwise.}. The results for $\\chi_{c0}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ and $\\chi_{c2}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ are consistent with, but much more precise than those of previous measurements. The decays of $\\chi_{c1}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ and $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ are observed for the first time.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; C. Q. Feng; R. B. Ferroli; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; C. Motzko; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. Z. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; Z. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2012-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

212

Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550 C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture. 2 figs.

Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Seals, R.D.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations Locations Clean Cities coalitions are primarily located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. Select the dots on the map for information about individual coalitions. See also the list of coalitions by designation date. United States map showing Clean Cities Coalition locations. Philadelphia State of Delaware Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Connecticut Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State State of Vermont Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Detroit Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) Central New York (Syracuse) Capital District (Albany) Empire Clean Cities State of Maryland Washington DC Metropolitan South Shore Western Riverside County Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Atlanta Alabama Denver Philadelphia State of Delaware Las Vegas Washington DC Metropolitan Massachusetts Clean Cities Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) Southeast Florida Chicago Land of Enchantment Wisconsin-Southeast Area Southern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Long Beach Antelope Valley Utah Clean Cities State of Maryland Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership Coalition Rogue Valley State of West Virginia San Joaquin Valley San Francisco Columbia-Willamette St. Louis Central New York (Syracuse) Dallas/Ft. Worth Honolulu Central Arkansas Pittsburgh Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Los Angeles Coachella Valley Region Northern Colorado Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) Virginia Clean Cities Coalition San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Maine Clean Communities Tulsa Valley of the Sun (Phoenix) Western Riverside County New Jersey Genesee Region (Rochester) Western Washington Clean Cities (Seattle) Ocean State Connecticut Connecticut2 Kansas City Regional Coalition Greater Indiana Clean Cities Coalition Capital District (Albany) Tucson Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Alamo Area (San Antonio) Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill) Twin Cities Clean Fuels Ohio Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Greater Lansing Palmetto State Houston-Galveston Middle Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition State of Iowa Treasure Valley Central Coast Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership Land of Sky Coalition

215

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Locations Locations Clean Cities coalitions are primarily located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. Select the dots on the map for information about individual coalitions. See also the list of coalitions by designation date. United States map showing Clean Cities Coalition locations. Philadelphia State of Delaware Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Connecticut Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State State of Vermont Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Detroit Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) Central New York (Syracuse) Capital District (Albany) Empire Clean Cities State of Maryland Washington DC Metropolitan South Shore Western Riverside County Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Atlanta Alabama Denver Philadelphia State of Delaware Las Vegas Washington DC Metropolitan Massachusetts Clean Cities Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) Southeast Florida Chicago Land of Enchantment Wisconsin-Southeast Area Southern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Long Beach Antelope Valley Utah Clean Cities State of Maryland Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership Coalition Rogue Valley State of West Virginia San Joaquin Valley San Francisco Columbia-Willamette St. Louis Central New York (Syracuse) Dallas/Ft. Worth Honolulu Central Arkansas Pittsburgh Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Los Angeles Coachella Valley Region Northern Colorado Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) Virginia Clean Cities Coalition San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Maine Clean Communities Tulsa Valley of the Sun (Phoenix) Western Riverside County New Jersey Genesee Region (Rochester) Western Washington Clean Cities (Seattle) Ocean State Connecticut Connecticut2 Kansas City Regional Coalition Greater Indiana Clean Cities Coalition Capital District (Albany) Tucson Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Alamo Area (San Antonio) Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill) Twin Cities Clean Fuels Ohio Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Greater Lansing Palmetto State Houston-Galveston Middle Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition State of Iowa Treasure Valley Central Coast Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership Land of Sky Coalition

216

Strategies for improving traffic operations at oversaturated signalized diamond interchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

street improvement goals should include improved traffic flow along with reductions in congestion, air pollution, and energy use, without major new construction. Super-street arterials, which are multi-lane arterials with limited access and a limited...STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING TRAFFIC OPERATIONS AT OVERSATURATED SIGNALIZED DIAMOND INTERCHANGES A Thesis by GEORGE CURTIS HERRICK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Herrick, George Curtis

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Two-dimensional analysis of the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTRUMENTATION The instrumentation used in the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar ex- periment is shown in Figure 20. A brief description of the instru- mentation is given in this appendix. A light beam-photodiode system shown in Figure 21 is used to ob- tain... the progectile velocity. This system consists of two stations located on the gun barrel 1. 55 inches apart. Each station has a light bulb which shines into a vent hole through the barrel and into a photodiode on the opposite side of the barrel. In addition...

Sharp, Richard Norton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Method of forming fluorine-bearing diamond layer on substrates, including tool substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a fluorine-bearing diamond layer on non-diamond substrates, especially on tool substrates comprising a metal matrix and hard particles, such as tungsten carbide particles, in the metal matrix. The substrate and a fluorine-bearing plasma or other gas are then contacted under temperature and pressure conditions effective to nucleate fluorine-bearing diamond on the substrate. A tool insert substrate is treated prior to the diamond nucleation and growth operation by etching both the metal matrix and the hard particles using suitable etchants.

Chang, R. P. H. (Glenview, IL); Grannen, Kevin J. (Evanston, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Perfect preferential orientation of nitrogen-vacancy defects in a synthetic diamond sample  

SciTech Connect

We show that the orientation of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond can be efficiently controlled through chemical vapor deposition growth on a (111)-oriented diamond substrate. More precisely, we demonstrate that spontaneously generated NV defects are oriented with a ?97% probability along the [111] axis, corresponding to the most appealing orientation among the four possible crystallographic axes. Such a nearly perfect preferential orientation is explained by analyzing the diamond growth mechanism on a (111)-oriented substrate and could be extended to other types of defects. This work is a significant step towards the design of optimized diamond samples for quantum information and sensing applications.

Lesik, M.; Roch, J.-F. [Laboratoire Aim Cotton, CNRS, Universit Paris-Sud and Ecole Normale Suprieure de Cachan, 91405 Orsay (France); Tetienne, J.-P.; Jacques, V., E-mail: vjacques@ens-cachan.fr [Laboratoire Aim Cotton, CNRS, Universit Paris-Sud and Ecole Normale Suprieure de Cachan, 91405 Orsay (France); Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Molculaire, Ecole Normale Suprieure de Cachan and CNRS UMR 8537, 94235 Cachan (France); Tallaire, A., E-mail: alexandre.tallaire@lspm.cnrs.fr; Achard, J.; Mille, V.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procds et des Matriaux, CNRS and Universit Paris 13, 93340 Villetaneuse (France)

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

New Superhard Form of Carbon Dents Diamond | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

exists in many different structures, each having different properties (e.g. graphite, graphene, and diamond). This research demonstrated yet another structure that is superhard,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

Mark A. Prelas

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - adherent diamond-like carbon Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Metallurgy, Composites and Coatings Group Collection: Materials Science 31 Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b,...

223

Hydrogen Storage in Diamond Powder Utilizing Plasma NaF Surface Treatment for Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen Fuel Cells offer the vital solution to the world's socio-political dependence on oil. Due to existing difficulty in safe and efficient hydrogen storage for fuel cells, storing the hydrogen in hydrocarbon compounds such as artificial diamond is a realistic solution. By treating the surface of the diamond powder with a Sodium Fluoride plasma exposure, the surface of the diamond is cleaned of unwanted molecules. Due to fluorine's electro negativity, the diamond powder is activated and ready for hydrogen absorption. These diamond powder pellets are then placed on a graphite platform that is heated by conduction in a high voltage circuit made of tungsten wire. Then, the injection of hydrogen gas into chamber allows the storage of the Hydrogen on the surface of the diamond powder. By neutron bombardment in the nuclear reactor, or Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis, the samples are examined for parts per million amounts of hydrogen in the sample. Sodium Fluoride surface treatment allows for higher mass percentage of stored hydrogen in a reliable, resistant structure, such as diamond for fuel cells and permanently alters the diamonds terminal bonds for re-use in the effective storage of hydrogen. The highest stored amount utilizing the NaF plasma surface treatment was 22229 parts per million of hydrogen in the diamond powder which amounts to 2.2229% mass increase.

Leal, David A.; Leal-Quiros, E. [Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico); Velez, Angel; Prelas, Mark A.; Gosh, Tushar [University of Missouri-Columbia, Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute (United States)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrogen Storage in Diamond Powder Utilizing Plasma NaF Surface Treatment for Fuel Cell Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Fuel Cells offer the vital solution to the worlds socio?political dependence on oil. Due to existing difficulty in safe and efficient hydrogen storage for fuel cells storing the hydrogen in hydrocarbon compounds such as artificial diamond is a realistic solution. By treating the surface of the diamond powder with a Sodium Fluoride plasma exposure the surface of the diamond is cleaned of unwanted molecules. Due to fluorines electro negativity the diamond powder is activated and ready for hydrogen absorption. These diamond powder pellets are then placed on a graphite platform that is heated by conduction in a high voltage circuit made of tungsten wire. Then the injection of hydrogen gas into chamber allows the storage of the Hydrogen on the surface of the diamond powder. By neutron bombardment in the nuclear reactor or Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis the samples are examined for parts per million amounts of hydrogen in the sample. Sodium Fluoride surface treatment allows for higher mass percentage of stored hydrogen in a reliable resistant structure such as diamond for fuel cells and permanently alters the diamonds terminal bonds for re?use in the effective storage of hydrogen. The highest stored amount utilizing the NaF plasma surface treatment was 22229 parts per million of hydrogen in the diamond powder which amounts to 2.2229% mass increase.

David A. Leal; Angel Velez; Mark A. Prelas; Tushar Gosh; E. Leal?Quiros

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Characterization of hydrocarbons found in the arctic aquatic environment near the Ekati diamond mine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the aquatic environment of the Ekati Diamond Mine were evaluated in snow, sediment, air and water (via passive membrane samplers). (more)

Nabess, Stephanie Ann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Measurement of light capture in solar cells from silver- and tin-plated patterned bus bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus bars on solar cells shade silicon from light. When the bus bars are patterned, they can reflect light back onto the silicon using total internal reflection. These patterned bus bars are tin plated and produce 1-2.5% ...

Winiarz, Christine Eve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] 3250 Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Revision Number 1 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3250 31.2 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.462 0.014 Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package - Manual Transmission - All tests completed in ECO mode - EPA shift schedule modified based on vehicle shift light activity Revision Number 1 Notes: Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE Gasoline Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package

228

Diamond, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2886428°, -88.2517287° 2886428°, -88.2517287° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2886428,"lon":-88.2517287,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Locations Everyone: Lights, Camera, Action!  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Locations Everyone: Lights, Camera, Action! ... Harvard Institute of Proteomics Harvard Medical School ...

Robert F. Murphy; Joshua LaBaer

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Bar-Halo Friction in Galaxies II: Metastability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well-established that strong bars rotating in dense halos generally slow down as they lose angular momentum to the halo through dynamical friction. Angular momentum exchanges between the bar and halo particles take place at resonances. While some particles gain and others lose, friction arises when there is an excess of gainers over losers. This imbalance results from the generally decreasing numbers of particles with increasing angular momentum, and friction can therefore be avoided if there is no gradient in the density of particles across the major resonances. Here we show that anomalously weak friction can occur for this reason if the pattern speed of the bar fluctuates upwards. After such an event, the density of resonant halo particles has a local inflexion created by the earlier exchanges, and bar slowdown can be delayed for a long period; we describe this as a metastable state. We show that this behavior in purely collisionless N-body simulations is far more likely to occur in methods with adaptive resolution. We also show that the phenomenon could arise in nature, since bar-driven gas inflow could easily raise the bar pattern speed enough to reach the metastable state. Finally, we demonstrate that mild external, or internal, perturbations quickly restore the usual frictional drag, and it is unlikely therefore that a strong bar in a galaxy having a dense halo could rotate for a long period without friction.

J. A. Sellwood; Victor P. Debattista

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

Origin of sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite (Brazil): constraints from carbon isotopes and inclusion compositions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forty-one diamonds sourced from the Juina-5 kimberlite pipe in Southern Brazil, which contain optically identifiable inclusions, have been studied using an integrated approach. The diamonds contain <20ppm ni...

A. R. Thomson; S. C. Kohn; G. P. Bulanova

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Observation of chi_{cJ} Decays to ??bar?^{+}?^{-}  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decays of the chi_{cJ} states (J=0,\\ 1,\\ 2) to \\Lambda \\Lambda bar\\ pi^{+} \\pi^{-}, including processes with intermediate \\Sigma(1385), are studied through the E1 transition psi'-->\\gamma chi_{cJ} using 106 million psi' events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII. This is the first observation of chi_{cJ} decays to the final state \\Lambda\\Lambda bar \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}. The branching ratio of the intermediate process chi_{cJ}-->\\Sigma(1385)^{+/-} \\bar{\\Sigma}(1385)^{-/+} is also measured for the first time, and the results agree with the theoretical predictions based on the color-octet effect.

BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; C. Q. Feng; R. B. Ferroli; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; C. Motzko; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

The properties of photonic band gaps for three-dimensional plasma photonic crystals in a diamond structure  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) for two types of three-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of isotropic dielectric and unmagnetized plasma with diamond lattices are theoretically investigated for electromagnetic waves based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The equations for type-1 structure are theoretically deduced, which depend on the diamond lattices realization (dielectric spheres immersed in plasma background). The influences of dielectric constant of dielectric, plasma collision frequency, filling factor, and plasma frequency on PBGs are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations and the possible methods to realize the three-dimensional PPCs in experiments are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that not only the locations but also the gap/midgap ratios of the PBGs for two types of PPCs can be tuned by plasma frequency, filling factor, and the relative dielectric constant, respectively. However, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the frequency ranges and gap/midgap ratios of the PBGs for two types of PPCs.

Zhang Haifeng [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China); Liu Shaobin [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves of Southeast University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210096 (China); Kong Xiangkun, Chenchen; Bian Borui [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Study of $J/?\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/?\\to n\\bar{n}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decays $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$ have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 million $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. The branching fractions are determined to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p})=(2.112\\pm0.004\\pm0.031)\\times10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n})=(2.07\\pm0.01\\pm0.17)\\times10^{-3}$. Distributions of the angle $\\theta$ between the proton or anti-neutron and the beam direction are well described by the form $1+\\alpha\\cos^2\\theta$, and we find $\\alpha=0.595\\pm0.012\\pm0.015$ for $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $\\alpha=0.50\\pm0.04\\pm0.21$ for $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}$ decay.

BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; R. B. Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; N. Berger; M. B. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; A. C. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; C. Q. Feng; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; X. Q. Hao; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; B. Huang; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. K. Jia; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; J. K. C. Leung; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; N. B. Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; Kun Liu; Kai Liu; K. Y. Liu; P. L. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; H. Mao; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; C. Motzko; N. Yu. Muchnoi; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. P. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; C. S. J. Pun; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; X. D. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; E. H. Thorndike; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; M. U. Ulrich; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. W. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; T. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Z. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. G. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; T. R. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou; J. X. Zuo

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

235

A diamond-window XAFS cell for studies of high-temperature, high-pressure aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

We describe a method to collect x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of ions in a supercritical water solvent. Supercritical water (SCW), at temperatures above water{close_quote}s critical point of 374{degree}C, is an interesting solvent for chemical reactions and hazardous waste destruction due to the high solubility of organics and the aggressive oxidizing environment. XAFS may provide a better understanding of the solvent environment in SCW. The XAFS cell used in these studies was composed of a block of high-nickel alloy, Hastelloy C-22, containing two windows for transmission of the x-ray beam and a single optical view window. All internal wetted surfaces were platinum plated. The maximum operating conditions for this design were 500{degree}C and 700 bar. The x-ray transmission windows consisted of CVD (chemical vapor deposition) diamond windows (3 mm diameter {times}0.5 mm thick) that were brazed to the tip of a standard 1/4-in. high-pressure, coned-shape fitting. Spectra are reported for strontium and rubidium ions in a supercritical water solvent. This cell design could be used for a variety of other solvent systems at high temperatures and high pressures. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Fulton, J.L.; Pfund, D.M. [Chemical Sciences Department, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Chemical Sciences Department, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ma, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg 510 E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg 510 E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A kinetic model of diamond nucleation and silicon carbide interlayer formation during chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A kinetic model of diamond nucleation and silicon carbide interlayer formation during chemical February 2005 Available online 7 April 2005 Abstract The presence of thin silicon carbide intermediate of carbon atoms into the silicon carbide layer and the morphology and orientation of the diamond film

Dandy, David

237

On the optimization of a dc arcjet diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the optimization of a dc arcjet diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor S. W. Reevea) and W. A precursor in our dc arcjet reactor.1 Based on conclusions drawn from that work, an optimization strategy diamond film growth in a dc arcjet chemical vapor deposition reactor has been developed. Introducing

Dandy, David

238

Current Issues and Problems in the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...SEMICONDUCTORS DIAMOND, GALLIUM NITRIDE AND SILICON-CARBIDE...FROM METHANE HYDROGEN WATER MIXED GAS-USING A MICROWAVE...diamond and cubic boron nitride (c-BN; Bora-zon...be related to a high solubility or mobility for C on...

Walter A. Yarbrough; Russell Messier

1990-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

Raman spectroscopy of amorphous, nanostructured, diamondlike carbon, and nanodiamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...varying excitation energy. By visible and ultra- violet excitation measurements, the...diamond, also refereed to as nanodiamond or ultra-nanocrystalline diamond. The chemical...phononfrequency(cm-1) M K GE aexp GE ath exp. MK M K GE aexp GI ath q = (0, , 0) q...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres P and A. Yacoby1 * The nitrogen-vacancy defect centre in diamond1­4 has potential applications processing9 and bioimaging10 . These applications rely on the ability to pos- ition a single nitrogen-vacancy

Walsworth, Ronald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

Englebretson, Steven Carl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Japan lifts bars slightly on foreign capital investment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japan lifts bars slightly on foreign capital investment ... Last week, after months (actually years) of debate, Japan took its first tentative steps toward liberalizing the rules that govern foreign capital investment when the cabinet approved the government's decontrol plan. ...

1967-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Using Data Bars, Color Scales, Icon Sets, and Sparklines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, well look at how you can use four graphical elements to give your worksheets more visual appeal and oomph without using full-scale charts. These four elements are data bars, color scales, icon s...

Guy Hart-Davis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor to produce tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

245

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chrysler 300 Chrysler 300 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 8/7/2013 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 4250 38.61 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.8894 0.01105 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Revision Number 3 Notes: Test Fuel Information 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Fuel type Tier II EEE HF437 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Fuel density [g/ml] Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 0.743 18490 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S

246

D0-D0 Mixing at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BaBar and Belle collaborations have recently found evidence for mixing within the D meson system. We present some of the mixing search techniques used by BaBar and their status as of the beginning of the summer 2007. These have culminated in a measurement in the K decay final state of the D that is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.9 standard deviations.

A. Seiden

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

Vacuum encapsulated hermetically sealed diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first cold-weld ring disposed between the cathode element and the annular insulating spacer and a second cold-weld ring disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the diamond window element. The cathode capsule is formed by a vacuum cold-weld process such that the first cold-weld ring forms a hermetical seal between the cathode element and the annular insulating spacer and the second cold-weld ring forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the diamond window element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

Rao, Triveni; Walsh, John; Gangone, Elizabeth

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Structure and superconductivity of isotope-enriched boron-doped diamond  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting boron-doped diamond samples were synthesized with isotopes of {sup 10}B, {sup 11}B, {sup 13}C and {sup 12}C. We claim the presence of a carbon isotope effect on the superconducting transition temperature, which supports the 'diamond-carbon'-related nature of superconductivity and the importance of the electron-phonon interaction as the mechanism of superconductivity in diamond. Isotope substitution permits us to relate almost all bands in the Raman spectra of heavily boron-doped diamond to the vibrations of carbon atoms. The 500 cm{sup 01} Raman band shifts with either carbon or boron isotope substitution and may be associated with vibrations of paired or clustered boron. The absence of a superconducting transition (down to 1.6 K) in diamonds synthesized in the Co-C-B system at 1900 K correlates with the small boron concentration deduced from lattice parameters.

Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ekimov, E A [INSTIT OF HIGH PRESSURE; Sidorov, V A [INSTIT OF HIGH PRESSURE; Zoteev, A [MOSCOW SU; Lebed, Y [INST FOR NUCI RES; Stishov, S M [INST FOR HIGH PRESSURE

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

New experimental techniques with the split Hopkinson pressure bar  

SciTech Connect

The split Hopkinson pressure bar or Kolsky bar has provided for many years a technique for performing compression tests at strain rates approaching 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/. At these strain rates, the small dimensions possible in a compression test specimen give an advantage over a dynamic tensile test by allowing the stress within the specimen to equilibrate within the shortest possible time. The maximum strain rates possible with this technique are limited by stress wave propagation in the elastic pressure bars as well as in the deforming specimen. This subject is reviewed in this paper, and it is emphasized that a slowly rising excitation is preferred to one that rises steeply. Experimental techniques for pulse shaping and a numerical procedure for correcting the raw data for wave dispersion in the pressure bars are presented. For tests at elevated temperature a bar mover apparatus has been developed which effectively brings the cold pressure bars into contact with the specimen, which is heated with a specially designed furnace, shortly before the pressure wave arrives. This procedure has been used successfully in tests at temperatures as high as 1000/sup 0/C.

Frantz, C.E.; Follansbee, P.S.; Wright, W.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Enhancement of the nucleation of smooth and dense nanocrystalline diamond films by using molybdenum seed layers  

SciTech Connect

A method for the nucleation enhancement of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon substrates at low temperature is discussed. A sputter deposition of a Mo seed layer with thickness 50 nm on Si substrates was applied followed by an ultrasonic seeding step with nanosized detonation diamond powders. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was used to nucleate and grow NCD films on substrates heated up at 550 deg. C. The nucleation of diamond and the early stages of NCD film formation were investigated at different methane percentages in methane/hydrogen gas mixtures by atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and grazing incidence x-ray analyses in order to gain specific insight in the nucleation process of NCD films. The nucleation kinetics of diamond on the Mo-coated Si substrates was found to be up to ten times higher than on blank Si substrates. The enhancement of the nucleation of diamond on thin Mo interlayers results from two effects, namely, (a) the nanometer rough Mo surface shows an improved embedding of ultrasonically introduced nanosized diamond seeds that act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD and (b) the rapid carbonization of the Mo surface causes the formation of Mo{sub 2}C onto which diamond easily nucleates. The diamond nucleation density progressively increases at increasing methane percentages and is about 5x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} at 4.0% methane. The improved nucleation kinetics of diamond on Mo interlayers facilitates the rapid formation of NCD films possessing a very low surface roughness down to {approx}6 nm, and allows a submicron thickness control.

Buijnsters, J. G. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vazquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Dreumel, G. W. G. van; Meulen, J. J. ter; Enckevort, W. J. P. van [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Celis, J. P. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Observation of $\\eta_{c}$ decay into $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$ final states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a data sample of $2.25\\times10^{8}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector, we present the first observation of the decays of $\\eta_{c}$ mesons to $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$. The branching fractions are measured to be $(2.11\\pm0.28_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.18_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.50_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ and $(0.89\\pm0.16_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.08_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.21_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ for $\\eta_{c} \\to \\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$, respectively. These branching fractions provide important information on the helicity selection rule in charmonium-decay processes.

Ablikim, M; Albayrak, O; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Coccetti, F; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q Z; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhong, Z; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Diamond Patterns in the Cellular Front of an Overdriven Detonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nonlinear integral-differential equation describing the cellular front of an overdriven detonation is obtained by an analysis carried out in the neighborhood of the instability threshold. The analysis reveals both an unusual mean streaming motion, resulting from the rotational part of the oscillatory flow, and pressure bursts generated by the crossover of cusps representative of Mach stems propagating on the detonation front. A numerical study of the nonlinear equation exhibits the diamond patterns observed in experiments. An overall physical understanding is provided.

P. Clavin and B. Denet

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging with a single diamond NV center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

Ryan Beams; Dallas Smith; Timothy W. Johnson; Sang-Hyun Oh; Lukas Novotny; Nick Vamivakas

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

Guide to the Library Locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide to the Libraries #12;Library Locations W.E.B. DU BOIS LIBRARY www.library.umass.edu 154 Hicks Way (413) 545-0150, (413) 545-2622 The Du Bois Library is the primary location for resources machine, and a fax machine. Quiet study space is located on Floors 2 and 3 and throughout the upper floors

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

256

Spring loaded locator pin assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

Groll, Todd A. (Idaho Falls, ID); White, James P. (Pocatelo, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Spring loaded locator pin assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

258

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Fuel Type Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Include private stations Not all stations are open to the public. Choose this option to also search private fueling stations. Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that stations are open, available to the public, and have the fuel prior to making a trip to that location. Some stations in our database have addresses that could not be located by the Station Locator application. This may result in the station appearing in the center of the zip code area instead of the actual location. If you're having difficulty, please contact the technical response team at

259

Optical signatures of silicon-vacancy spins in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colour centres in diamond have emerged as versatile tools for solid-state quantum technologies ranging from quantum information to metrology, where the nitrogen-vacancy centre is the most studied to-date. Recently, this toolbox has expanded to include different materials for their nanofabrication opportunities, and novel colour centres to realize more efficient spin-photon quantum interfaces. Of these, the silicon-vacancy centre stands out with ultrabright single photon emission predominantly into the desirable zero-phonon line. The challenge for utilizing this centre is to realise the hitherto elusive optical access to its electronic spin. Here, we report spin-tagged resonance fluorescence from the negatively charged silicon-vacancy centre. In low-strain bulk diamond spin-selective excitation under finite magnetic field reveals a spin-state purity approaching unity in the excited state. We also investigate the effect of strain on the centres in nanodiamonds and discuss how spin selectivity in the excited state remains accessible in this regime.

Tina Muller; Christian Hepp; Benjamin Pingault; Elke Neu; Stefan Gsell; Matthias Schreck; Hadwig Sternschulte; Doris Steinmueller-Nethl; Christoph Becher; Mete Atature

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond micro-resonators.  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized mechanical properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films grown using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique at 680 C, significantly lower than the conventional growth temperature of {approx}800 C. The films have {approx}4.3% sp{sup 2} content in the near-surface region as revealed by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films, {approx}1 {micro}m thick, exhibit a net residual compressive stress of 370 {+-} 1 MPa averaged over the entire 150 mm wafer. UNCD microcantilever resonator structures and overhanging ledges were fabricated using lithography, dry etching, and wet release techniques. Overhanging ledges of the films released from the substrate exhibited periodic undulations due to stress relaxation. This was used to determine a biaxial modulus of 838 {+-} 2 GPa. Resonant excitation and ring-down measurements in the kHz frequency range of the microcantilevers were conducted under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in a customized UHV atomic force microscope system to determine Young's modulus as well as mechanical dissipation of cantilever structures at room temperature. Young's modulus is found to be 790 {+-} 30 GPa. Based on these measurements, Poisson's ratio is estimated to be 0.057 {+-} 0.038. The quality factors (Q) of these resonators ranged from 5000 to 16000. These Q values are lower than theoretically expected from the intrinsic properties of diamond. The results indicate that surface and bulk defects are the main contributors to the observed dissipation in UNCD resonators.

Sumant, A. V.; Adiga, V. P.; Suresh, S.; Gudeman, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlis, J. A.; Carpick, R. W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Bar-Halo Friction in Galaxies III: Halo Density Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The predicted central densities of dark matter halos in LCDM models exceed those observed in some galaxies. Weinberg & Katz argue that angular momentum transfer from a rotating bar in the baryonic disk can lower the halo density, but they also contend that N-body simulations of this process will not reveal the true continuum result unless many more than the usual numbers of particles are employed. Adopting their simplified model of a rotating rigid bar in a live halo, I have been unable to find any evidence to support their contention. I find that both the angular momentum transferred and the halo density change are independent of the number of particles over the range usually employed up to that advocated by these authors. I show that my results do not depend on any numerical parameters, and that field methods perform equally with grid methods. I also identify the reasons that the required particle number suggested by Weinberg & Katz is excessive. I further show that when countervailing compression by baryonic settling is ignored, moderate bars can reduce the mean density of the inner halo by 20% - 30%. Long, massive, skinny bars can reduce the mean inner density by a factor ~10. The largest density reductions are achieved at the expense of removing most of the angular momentum likely to reside in the baryonic component. Compression of the halo by baryonic settling must reduce, and may even overwhelm, the density reduction achievable by bar friction.

J. A. Sellwood

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Local Galaxy Density and the Bars of Spiral Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a variety of parameters of local galaxy density, we have examined the effects of the environmental density on the presence of bar structures in spiral galaxies of various morphological types. For an extensive sample of nearby galaxies, listed in the ``Nearby Galaxies Catalogue'' (Tully, 1988a), we have found that the spirals characterized by a high local density tend to be barred if they are early-type and early-type if they are barred (at the significance level of $\\sim$3 sigma), confirming some earlier suggestion of low statistical significance. This fact, which is observed substantially in low-luminosity spirals, indicates that galaxy interactions can stimulate the formation of bars, primarily in early-type, low-luminosity spirals. This is in partial, qualitative agreement with the most recent relevant N-body simulations. On the other hand, no significant density segregation is observed between pure S-shaped (S(s)) spirals and spirals with inner rings (S(r)), which are often associated with bars. {\\it Subject headings:} galaxies: general --- galaxies: structure --- galaxies: interactions --- galaxies: clustering

G. Giuricin; F. Mardirossian; M. Mezzetti; P. Monaco

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Induced Nested Galactic Bars Inside Assembling Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the formation and evolution of nested bar systems in disk galaxies in a cosmological setting by following the development of an isolated dark matter (DM) and baryon density perturbation. The disks form within the assembling triaxial DM halos and the feedback from the stellar evolution is accounted for in terms of supernovae and OB stellar winds. Focusing on a representative model, we show the formation of an oval disk and of a first generation of nested bars with characteristic sub-kpc and a few kpc sizes. The system evolves through successive dynamical couplings and decouplings, forcing the gas inwards and settles in a state of resonant coupling. The inflow rate can support a broad range of activity within the central kpc, from quasar- to Seyfert-types, supplemented by a vigorous star formation as a by-product. The initial bar formation is triggered in response to the tidal torques from the triaxial DM halo, which acts as a finite perturbation. This first generation of bars does not survive for more than 4--5 Gyr: by that time the secondary bar has totally dissolved, while the primary one has very substantially weakened, reduced to a fat oval. This evolution is largely due to chaos introduced by the interaction of the multiple non-axisymmetric components.

Clayton Heller; Isaac Shlosman; Lia Athanassoula

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

Plasma etching of cavities into diamond anvils for experiments at high pressures and high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

We describe a method for precisely etching small cavities into the culets of diamond anvils for the purpose of providing thermal insulation for samples in experiments at high pressures and high temperatures. The cavities were fabricated using highly directional oxygen plasma to reactively etch into the diamond surface. The lateral extent of the etch was precisely controlled to micron accuracy by etching the diamond through a lithographically fabricated tungsten mask. The performance of the etched cavities in high-temperature experiments in which the samples were either laser heated or electrically heated is discussed.

Weir, S.T.; Cynn, H.; Falabella, S.; Evans, W.J.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Farber, D.; Vohra, Y.K. (LLNL); (UAB)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

265

LOCATION: Johnson County Sheriff's Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOCATION: Johnson County Sheriff's Office Criminalistics Laboratory 11890 Sunset Drive Olathe, Kansas 66061 DATE: JULY 15TH - JULY 18TH, 2013 TUITION: MAFS MEMBERS: 550 Non-MAFS...

266

Measurements and Studies of Secondary Electron Emission of Diamond Amplified Photocathode  

SciTech Connect

The Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) is a novel approach to generating electrons. By following the primary electron beam, which is generated by traditional electron sources, with an amplifier, the electron beam available to the eventual application is increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in current. Diamond has a very wide band gap of 5.47eV which allows for a good negative electron affinity with simple hydrogenation, diamond can hold more than 2000MV/m field before breakdown. Diamond also provides the best rigidity among all materials. These two characters offer the capability of applying high voltage across very thin diamond film to achieve high SEY and desired emission phase. The diamond amplifier also is capable of handling a large heat load by conduction and sub-nanosecond pulse input. The preparation of the diamond amplifier includes thinning and polishing, cleaning with acid etching, metallization, and hydrogenation. The best mechanical polishing available can provide high purity single crystal diamond films with no less than 100 {micro}m thickness and <15 nm Ra surface roughness. The ideal thickness for 700MHz beam is {approx}30 {micro}m, which requires further thinning with RIE or laser ablation. RIE can achieve atomic layer removal precision and roughness eventually, but the time consumption for this procedure is very significant. Laser ablation proved that with <266nm ps laser beam, the ablation process on the diamond can easily achieve removing a few microns per hour from the surface and <100nm roughness. For amplifier application, laser ablation is an adequate and efficient process to make ultra thin diamond wafers following mechanical polishing. Hydrogenation will terminate the diamond surface with monolayer of hydrogen, and form NEA so that secondary electrons in the conduction band can escape into the vacuum. The method is using hydrogen cracker to strike hydrogen atoms onto the bare diamond surface to form H-C bonds. Two independent experiments were carried out to determine the transport of the electrons within the diamond and their emission at the surface. In transmission mode measurements, the diamond amplifier was coated with metal on both sides, so results simply depend only on the electron transport within the diamond. The SEY for this mode provides one secondary electron per 20eV energy, which gives the gain of more than 200 for 4.7keV (effective energy) primary electrons under 2MV/m. Laser detrapping can help the signal maintain the gain with lops pulse and duty cycle of 1.67 x 10{sup -7}. In emission mode measurements, in which the diamond is prepared as in the actual application, the SEY is {approx}20 for 700eV (effective energy) primary electrons under 1.21MV/m. The electric field applied and the primary electron energy is limited by the experiment setup, but the results show good trend toward large gain under high field. Thermal emittance of the diamond secondary emission is critical for the beam application. A careful design is setup to measure with very fine precision and accuracy of 0.01eV.

Wu,Q.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students January 7, 2010 - 2:58pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For 13 years, Tony Grahame has inspired students to pursue careers building sustainable, energy-efficient houses or to find other niches in the green-building industry. His Residential Building Technology program at Yavapai College in Prescott, Ariz., gets students out of the classroom and constructing real homes in a nearby subdivision. On the jobsite, they learn the skills and knowledge essential to launch their careers as the next generation of energy-efficient builders. Tony's expertise draws from technologies and strategies in residential efficiency and renewable energy developed through

268

Studies of Charmonium-Like States at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Several charmonium-like states above D{bar D} threshold have been discovered at the Belle and BABAR B-factories. Some of these states are produced via Initial State Radiation (e.g. Y(4260) and Y(4350)), and some are observed in B-meson decays (e.g. X(3872), and Y(3940)). The Belle observations of the enhancements in the {Psi}(2S){pi}{sup -} and {chi}{sub cl}{pi}{sup -}, i.e. the Z(4430){sup -}, Z{sub 1}(4050){sup -}, and Z{sub 2}(4250){sup -}, have generated a great deal of interest, because such states must have minimum quark content (c{bar c}d{bar u}), i.e. these are four-quark states. The BABAR Collaboration does not confirm the existence of the Z(4430){sup -}.

Mokhtar, Arafat Gabareen; /SLAC

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Recent Bottomonium Results from BaBar and Belle  

SciTech Connect

Selected studies in bottomonium physics carried out by the BaBar and Belle experiments are presented. They include a study of radiative bottomonium transitions using {gamma} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} conversions done by BaBar, the search for the h{sub b}(1P) and h{sub b}(2P) states leading to an evidence for the h{sub b}(1P) seen by BaBar in {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0} h{sub b} decay and to the Belle observation of both the h{sub b}(1P) and the h{sub b}(2P) in the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} h{sub b}(1P,2P) from {Upsilon}(5S) data.

Ziegler, Veronique; /SLAC

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

270

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado field, South Texas; Final report  

SciTech Connect

Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. Within the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity. The purpose of this report is (1) to describe and analyze the sand-body architecture, depositional facies variations, and structure of Prado field, (2) to determine controls on distribution of hydrocarbons pertinent to reexploration for bypassed hydrocarbons, (3) to describe reservoir models at Prado field, and (4) to develop new data affecting the suitability of Jackson oil fields as possible candidates for thermally enhanced recovery of medium to heavy oil.

Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

~~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I --------------------------------------- NAME: 333 Iv. Mkhi qr) Aw. thka o ~~~---~~~--~~~_-----__ C I TV : 8 Morim 'Love 82 10 bhh &Q Ir -+----------- STATE- fL I - ------ l OWNER(S) -__----_ past: Current: I --------------------____ Owner contacted q yes p no; _____--_____-____------~~~l if yes, data contacted -_--------__- TYPE OF OPERATION ---_------------- 0 Research & Development q Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis Facility Type p Manufacturing I ! fJ University 0 Research Organization ! 0 Government Sponsored F+ci li ty 0 Other ----~~-~~~----~------ 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CUNTRKT ----~---~__----_ / w Prime

272

Spectroscopy of snake states using a graphene Hall bar  

SciTech Connect

An approach to observe snake states in a graphene Hall bar containing a pn-junction is proposed. The magnetic field dependence of the bend resistance in a ballistic graphene Hall bar structure containing a tilted pn-junction oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field. We show that each oscillation is due to a specific snake state that moves along the pn-interface. Furthermore, depending on the value of the magnetic field and applied potential, we can control the lead in which the electrons will end up and hence control the response of the system.

Milovanovi?, S. P., E-mail: slavisa.milovanovic@gmail.com; Ramezani Masir, M., E-mail: mrmphys@gmail.com; Peeters, F. M., E-mail: francois.peeters@ua.ac.be [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development of Designer Diamond Anvils for High Pressure-High-Temperature Experiments in Support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is to develop the next generation of designer diamond anvils that can perform simultaneous joule heating and temperature profile measurements in a diamond anvil cell. A series of tungsten-rhenium thermocouples will be fabricated onto to the anvil and encapsulated by a chemical vapor deposited diamond layer to allow for a complete temperature profile measurement across the anvil. The tip of the diamond anvil will be engineered to reduce the thermal conductivity so that the tungsten-heating coils can be deposited on top of this layer. Several different approaches will be investigated to engineer the tip of the diamond anvil for reduction in thermal conductivity (a) isotopic mixture of 12C and 13C in the diamond layer, (b) doping of diamond with impurities (nitrogen and/or boron), and (c) growing diamond in a higher concentration of methane in hydrogen plasma. Under this academic alliance with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), PI and his graduate students will use the lithographic and diamond polishing facility at LLNL. This proposed next generation of designer diamond anvils will allow multi-tasking capability with the ability to measure electrical, magnetic, structural and thermal data on actinide materials with unparallel sensitivity in support of the stockpile stewardship program.

Yogesh K. Vohra

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films functionalized with therapeutically active collagen networks.  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of biologically amenable interfaces in medicine bridges translational technologies with their surrounding biological environment. Functionalized nanomaterials catalyze this coalescence through the creation of biomimetic and active substrates upon which a spectrum of therapeutic elements can be delivered to adherent cells to address biomolecular processes in cancer, inflammation, etc. Here, we demonstrate the robust functionalization of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with type I collagen and dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory drug, to fabricate a hybrid therapeutically active substrate for localized drug delivery. UNCD oxidation coupled with a pH-mediated collagen adsorption process generated a comprehensive interface between the two materials, and subsequent Dex integration, activity, and elution were confirmed through inflammatory gene expression assays. These studies confer a translational relevance to the biofunctionalized UNCD in its role as an active therapeutic network for potent regulation of cellular activity toward applications in nanomedicine.

Huang, H.; Chen, M.; Bruno, P.; Lam, R.; Robinson, E.; Gruen, D.; Ho, D.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Calculations of electronic states in ultrasmall quantum boxes of diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of ultrasmall quantum boxes (QBs) of diamond with (110) ( 1 1 0 ) and (001) planes saturated by hydrogen is calculated using the extended Hckel-type nonorthogonal tight-binding method. It is shown that in contrast to the QBs with the ideal surfaces which show a clear dependence of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy on the size variation along the [001] direction the energy of the LUMO state in the QBs with a monohydrogenated dimer on the (001) surface depends little on the size variation in agreement with the experiment. It is found that the LUMO state in the latter is surfacelike in character and associated with backbonds of the surface dimers. It is also demonstrated that optical transitions across the energy gap exhibit significant oscillator strength.

Masahiko Nishida

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Diamond amplified photocathode Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York Developed in: 2004-2007 Result of NP research:

278

Reactive ion etching: Optimized diamond membrane fabrication for transmission electron microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commonly used preparation method for thin diamond membranes by focused ion beam (FIB) techniques results in surface damage. Here, the authors introduce an alternative method based on reactive ion etching (RIE). To compare ...

Li, Luozhou

279

Large prolongation of free-exciton photoluminescence decay in diamond by two-photon excitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on time-resolved photoluminescence of a free-exciton in IIa chemical vapor deposition diamond crystal. Large difference between decay times for one- and two-photon excitation...

Kozk, Martin; Trojnek, Frantiek; Mal, Petr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Rheological response and dynamics of the amphiphilic diamond phase from kinetic latticeBoltzmann simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diamond phase from kinetic lattice-Boltzmann simulations R.S. Saksena...are performed using a kinetic lattice-Boltzmann method. Lyotropic liquid crystals...studied previously using our lattice-Boltzmann (LB) approach (Gonzalez-Segredo...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermodynamic modelling of Cr-bearing garnets with implications for diamond inclusions and peridotite xenoliths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Zürich, Switzerland e Geological Survey of Western Australia, Mineral House, 100 Plain Street, East Perth zonations result from metasomatic processes. This sheds further light on peridotitic diamond inclusions

282

Growth and electrical characterisation of {delta}-doped boron layers on (111) diamond surfaces  

SciTech Connect

A plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition protocol for the growth of {delta}-doping of boron in diamond is presented, using the (111) diamond plane as a substrate for diamond growth. AC Hall effect measurements have been performed on oxygen terminated {delta}-layers and desirable sheet carrier densities ({approx}10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) for field-effect transistor application are reported with mobilities in excess of what would expected for equivalent but thicker heavily boron-doped diamond films. Temperature-dependent impedance spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show that the grown layers have metallic-like electrical properties with high cut-off frequencies and low thermal impedance activation energies with estimated boron concentrations of approximately 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}.

Edgington, Robert; Jackman, Richard B. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, and Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Sato, Syunsuke; Ishiyama, Yuichiro; Kawarada, Hiroshi [Department of Electronic and Photonic Systems, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Morris, Richard [Advanced SIMS Projects, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of traffic operations at diamond interchanges using advanced actuated control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents an operational analysis of ographics. advanced actuated traffic control at signalized diamond interchanges. The study attempts to determine the benefits a "flexible'' phasing strategy provides to the interchange. Flexible...

Koonce, Peter John Vincent

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Optical data of meteoritic nano-diamonds from far-ultraviolet to far-infrared wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used different spectroscopic techniques to obtain a consistent quantitative absorption spectrum of a sample of meteoritic nano-diamonds in the wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (0.12 $\\mu$m) to the far infrared (100 $\\mu$m). The nano-diamonds have been isolated by a chemical treatment from the Allende meteorite (Braatz et al.2000). Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) extends the optical measurements to higher energies and allows the derivation of the optical constants (n & k) by Kramers-Kronig analysis. The results can be used to restrain observations and to improve current models of the environment where the nano-diamonds are expected to have formed. We also show that the amount of nano-diamond which can be present in space is higher than previously estimated by Lewis et al. (1989).

H. Mutschke; A. C. Andersen; C. Jaeger; Th. Henning; A. Braatz

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Many-electron states of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and spin density calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a generalized Hubbard Hamiltonian, many-electron calculations of energy levels and corresponding wave functions of negatively charged and neutral nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond were reported. The energies, ...

Ranjbar, Ahmad

286

Quantum nano optics of defect centers in diamond and h-BN with nano-cathodoluminescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a cathodoluminescence-based single photon emitter detection scheme with deep subwavelength resolution. Application to NV0 centers in diamond and a new type of emitter...

Meuret, Sophie; Tizei, Luiz H; Blazit, Jean-Denis; Bourrellier, Romain; Tenc, Marcel; Zobelli, Alberto; Kociak, Mathieu

287

On the nature and removal of saw marks on diamond wire sawn multicrystalline silicon wafers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Clearly visible saw marks are a significant barrier to commercial use of diamond wire sawn multicrystalline silicon wafers for solar cells. Two types of saw marks on the diamond-cut multicrystalline silicon wafers are identifiedthe millimeter scale round-run fringes caused by round-running of the saw wires, and the micron scale scratches caused by scribing of the diamond tips. The latter consists of smooth and shiny grooves covered by a thin layer of amorphous phase. The micro-roughness of diamond-cut wafers is actually ~25% less than that of the conventional slurry-cut wafers. The reason for the visibility of the round-run fringes to naked eyes, and for the relatively rough appearance of diamond-cut wafers, is the visual enhancement from the shiny scratches. Therefore, the key to remove the round-run fringes is to roughen the smooth grooves, as flattening the very slightly sloped fringe zones is very difficult due to lack of chemical contrast over them. Acid-etching texturization cannot remove the saw marks on the diamond-cut silicon wafers. Alkaline-etching can only remove the saw marks on grains near (001) orientation. A vapor blast etching method has been attempted. The preliminary result is encouragingcomplete removal of the saw marks has been achieved, along with a good surface texture, which reduces the light reflectivity to 19%.

Wenhao Chen; Xiaomei Liu; Miao Li; Chuanqiang Yin; Lang Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Pulsed ion beam methods for in situ characterization of diamond film deposition processes  

SciTech Connect

Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) have properties which in principle make them ideally suited to a wide variety of thin-film applications. Their widespread use as thin films, however, has been limited for a number of reasons related largely to the lack of understanding and control of the nucleation and growth processes. Real-time, in situ studies of the surface of the growing diamond film are experimentally difficult because these films are normally grown under a relatively high pressure of hydrogen, and conventional surface analytical methods require an ultrahigh vacuum environment. It is believed, however, that the presence of hydrogen during growth is necessary to stabilize the corrugated diamond surface structure and thereby prevent the formation of the graphitic phase. Pulsed ion beam-based analytical methods with differentially pumped ion sources and particle detectors are able to characterize the uppermost atomic layer of a film during, growth at ambient pressures 5-7 orders of magnitude higher than other surface-specific analytical methods. We describe here a system which has been developed for the purpose of determining the hydrogen concentration and bonding sites on diamond surfaces as a function of sample temperature and ambient hydrogen pressure under hot filament CVD growth conditions. It is demonstrated that as the hydrogen partial pressure increases, the saturation hydrogen coverage of the surface of a CVD diamond film increases, but that the saturation level depends on the atomic hydrogen concentration and substrate temperature.

Krauss, A.R.; Smentkowski, V.S.; Zuiker, C.D.; Gruen, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Im, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Schultz, J.A.; Waters, K. [Ionwerks Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Chang, R.P.H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Bar-halo Friction in Galaxies I: Scaling Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been known for some time that rotating bars in galaxies slow due to dynamical friction against the halo. However, recent attempts to use this process to place constraints on the dark matter density in galaxies and possibly also to drive dark matter out of the center have been challenged. This paper uses simplified numerical experiments to clarify several aspects of the friction mechanism. I explicitly demonstrate the Chandrasekhar scaling of the friction force with bar mass, halo density, and halo velocity dispersion. I present direct evidence that exchanges between the bar and halo orbits at major resonances are responsible for friction and study both individual orbits and the net changes at these resonances. I also show that friction alters the phase space density of particles in the vicinity of a major resonance, which is the reason the magnitude of the friction force depends on the prior evolution. I demonstrate that bar slow down can be captured correctly in simulations having modest spatial resolution and practicable numbers of particles. Subsequent papers in this series delineate the dark matter density that can be tolerated in halos of different density profiles.

J. A. Sellwood

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Search for B -> l(nu)over bar(l)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for the decays B- --> l(-)(l) in a sample of 2.2 x 10(6) charged B decays using the CLEO detector. We see no evidence for a signal in any channel and set upper limits on the branching fractions of B(B- --> tau(-)<(nu)over bar...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Measurements of Form Factors with the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Selected recent results on measurements of form factors by the BaBar Collaboration are reviewed, including e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}{gamma}, leptonic and semileptonic charm decays from data collected at or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance.

Li, Selina Z.; /SLAC

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hopkinson bar simulation using DYNA2D. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A finite-element simulation of a Split Hopkinson's bar (Kolsky apparatus) technique involving mortar specimens is accomplished with DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional finite-element code. Calculations are compared with experimental results contained in a University of Florida report Dynamic Response of Concrete and Concrete Structures, and with analytic solutions of the appropriate wave propagation problem.

Smith, J.A.; Glover, T.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Chips, Sticks, Dips & Bars Kettle Chips with Onion Dip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dip · Lemon or Magic Bars · Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite & UConn Natural Spring Water $5.50 per guest $6.75 per guest Keep it Simple · Gourmet Filled Cookies · Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite & UConn Natural · Seasonal Fresh Fruit Display · Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite & UConn Natural Spring Water $5.50 per guest Take

Holsinger, Kent

294

FIRST DAY SECTION TWO VIRGINIA BOARD OF BAR EXAMINERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRST DAY SECTION TWO VIRGINIA BOARD OF BAR EXAMINERS Roanoke, Virginia - July 25, 2006 You MUST." Richard is still living. George has contracted to sell Tract 1 to Craig. Tract 2. Ten years ago, Cain holds, gave all required notices, and set the sale for 30 days from today. Tract 4. Ten years ago

Marsh, David

295

FIRST DAY SECTION ONE VIRGINIA BOARD OF BAR EXAMINERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRST DAY SECTION ONE VIRGINIA BOARD OF BAR EXAMINERS Roanoke, Virginia -July 27, 2004 Write your's sister, Gladys, who lived in Culpeper, Virginia. In 1994,when Cameron was ten years old, Izzy wrote her fully. * * * * * #12;SECTION ONE PAGE 2 2. Stan is an attorney practicing criminal law in Roanoke

Marsh, David

296

FIRST DAY SECTION TWO VIRGINIA BOARD OF BAR EXAMINERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRST DAY SECTION TWO VIRGINIA BOARD OF BAR EXAMINERS Roanoke, Virginia ­ July 26, 2011 You MUST days from today. Tract 2. Ten years ago, Amelia conveyed Tract 2 to her children, Julia and Mary. Ten years ago, Carl conveyed Tract 4 by a deed reciting, "I convey Tract 4 to Sean and his heirs so

Marsh, David

297

PARAMETERISATION OF POINT BARS IN HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, L.J. van VLIET 2 1 Department of Geotechnology, Delft University of Technology, 2628RX Delft, The Netherlands 2 Quantitative Imaging Group, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands Introduction We fluvial point bar in a meander loop (Coesewijne River, Suriname); b) The two-circle model whose

van Vliet, Lucas J.

298

Hadronic B decays at BaBar and Belle  

SciTech Connect

The authors review recent results of the BABAR and Belle Collaborations on the {alpha} and {gamma} angles of the unitarity triangle, on the B {yields} K{pi}{pi} Dalitz-plot analyses, and on the searches for baryonic B decays and for B {yields} D{bar D} decays.

Lombardo, Vincenzo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/hydrogen-terminated diamond heterojunction  

SciTech Connect

CaF{sub 2} films are deposited on hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) by a radio-frequency sputter-deposition technique at room temperature. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunction are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is confirmed that there are only C-Ca bonds at the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterointerface. Valence and conductance band offsets of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton are determined to be 3.7 {+-} 0.2 and 0.3 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively. It shows a type I straddling band configuration. The large valence band offset suggests advantage of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton for the development of high power and high frequency field effect transistors.

Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Imura, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Koide, Y. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Center of Materials Research for Low Carbon Emission (CMRLC), NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Location-aware active signage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional route maps, which depict a path from one location to another, can be powerful tools for visualizing and communicating directions. This thesis presents a client-server architecture for generating and ...

Nichols, Patrick James, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures  

SciTech Connect

Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

Pyklinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Pernen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka (Helsinki); (Penn)

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

Spreader-Bar Radiation Detection System Enhancements: A Modeling and Simulation Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the modeling and simulation results of the investigation of enhanced spreader bar radiation detection systems.

Ely, James H.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Baciak, James E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Schweppe, John E.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings  

SciTech Connect

There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of material that may be treated. The deposition of DLC at atmospheric pressure has been demonstrated by several researchers. Izake, et al [53] and Novikov and Dymont [54] have demonstrated an electrochemical process that is carried out with organic compounds such as methanol and acetylene dissolved in ammonia. This process requires that the substrates be immersed in the liquid [53-54]. The atmospheric pressure deposition of DLC was also demonstrated by Kulik, et al. utilizing a plasma torch. However, this process requires operating temperatures in excess of 800 oC [55]. In this report, we investigate the deposition of diamond-like carbon films using a low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The films were characterized by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and found to have a ratio of sp2 to sp3 carbon of 43 to 57%. The films were also tested for adhesion, coefficient of friction, and dielectric strength.

Ladwig, Angela

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

304

Weak interaction corrections to hadronic top quark pair production: contributions from quark-gluon and $b \\bar b$ induced reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As an addendum to our previous evaluation of the weak-interaction corrections to hadronic top-quark pair production we determine the leading weak-interaction contributions due to the subprocesses $b {\\bar b} \\to t {\\bar t}$ and $g q ({\\bar q}) \\to t {\\bar t} q ({\\bar q})$. For several distributions in $t {\\bar t}$ production at the LHC we find that these contributions are non-negligible as compared to the weak corrections from the other partonic subprocesses.

Werner Bernreuther; Michael Fuecker; Zong-Guo Si

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Barred Owl (Strix varia) Nest Site Characteristics in the Boreal Forest of Saskatchewan, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barred Owl (Strix varia) Nest Site Characteristics in the Boreal Forest of Saskatchewan, Canada active Barred Owl (Strix varia) nests in the boreal forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada. Eighty records exist. Our objective was to describe Barred Owl nests within the boreal forest of Saskatchewan

306

Location logistics of industrial facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is not growing rapidly or 1s very small, they may not carry a staff from wh1ch the necessary people for a 25 s1te selection team can be drawn. Also, quite possibly, a company may not be involved in the site selection process for expansion. Instead, they may... location and site selection. This data was gathered through library research, atten- dance of various industr1al development conferences, sol1citation of mater1als from individuals currently involved with industrial facil1ties location, and various...

Hammack, William Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Project Locations Biofuels Project Locations BlueFire Ethanol Biochemical Municipal Solid Waste (Mecca, CA) Poet Biochemical Corn Cob/Corn Fiber (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Biochemical Woody Biomass- Ag Residues (Grand Junction, CO) ICM Biochemical Switchgrass, Forage Sorghum, Stover (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa Biochemica Agricultural Residue (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) NewPage Thermochemical Woody Biomass - Mill Residues (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels Thermochemical Woody Waste (Soperton, GA) DSM Innovation Center Biochemical Various (Parsippany, NJ) Novozymes Biochemical Various (Davis, CA) Genencor Biochemical Various (Palo Alto, CA) Verenium Corp Biochemical Various (San Diego, CA)

308

Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities  

SciTech Connect

We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Measurements of $t\\bar{t}$ spin correlations in CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an overview of the measurements of $t\\bar{t}$ spin correlations in the CMS Collaboration. We present two analyses both in the dilepton channel using proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}\\, =\\, 7$ TeV based on an integrated luminosity of 5.0 fb$^{-1}$. The spin correlations and polarization are measured using angular asymmetries. The results are consistent with unpolarized top quarks and Standard Model spin correlation. The second analysis sets a limit on the real part of the top-quark chromo-magnetic dipole moment of $-0.043\\, <\\, Re({\\hat{\\mu}}_{t})\\, <\\, 0.117$ at $95\\,%$ confidence level through the measured azimuthal angle difference between the two charged leptons from $t\\bar{t}$ production.

Kelly Beernaert

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Lepton-Flavor-Violating Tau Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We present the most recent searches for lepton-flavor-violating (LFV) {tau} decays in BABAR. We find no evidence of {tau} decaying to three charged leptons or to a charged lepton and a neutral meson (K{sub S}{sup 0}, {rho}, {phi}, K*{sup 0}, {bar K}*{sup 0}), and set upper limits on the corresponding branching fractions (BF) between 1.8 and 19 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level (CL).

Marchiori, G.; /Paris, LPTHE

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

High-power TSP bits. [Thermally Stable Polycrystalline diamond  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews a three-year R D project to develop advanced thermally stable polycrystalline diamond (TSP) bits that can operate at power levels 5 to 10 times greater than those typically delivered by rotary rigs. These bits are designed to operate on advanced drilling motors that drill 3 to 6 times faster than rotary rigs. TSP bit design parameters that were varied during these tests include cutter size, shape, density, and orientation. Drilling tests conducted in limestone, sandstone, marble, and granite blocks showed that these optimized bits drilled many of these rocks at 500 to 1,000 ft/hr (150 to 300 m/h), compared to 50 to 100 ft/hr (15 to 30 m/h) for roller bits. These tests demonstrated that TSP bits are capable of operating at the high speeds and high torques delivered by advanced drilling motors now being developed. These advanced bits and motors are designed for use in slim-hole and horizontal drilling applications.

Cohen, J.H.; Maurer, W.C. (Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Westcott, P.A. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Building Address Locations -Assumes entire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Housman Building 80 E. Concord St R BU School of Medicine, Instructional Building 80 E. Concord St L BU JBuilding Address Locations - Assumes entire building unless noted Designation Submit through* 560, 4 BU Crosstown Center 801 Massachusetts Ave Floor 1, 2 BMC BCD Building 800 Harrison Avenue BCD BMC

Guenther, Frank

313

Electron microscopic evidence for a tribologically induced phase transformation as the origin of wear in diamond  

SciTech Connect

Tribological testing of a coarse-grained diamond layer, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, was performed on a ring-on-ring tribometer with a diamond counterpart. The origin of the wear of diamond and of the low friction coefficient of 0.15 was studied by analyzing the microstructure of worn and unworn regions by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. In the worn regions, the formation of an amorphous carbon layer with a thickness below 100?nm is observed. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the C-K ionization edge reveals the transition from sp{sup 3}-hybridized C-atoms in crystalline diamond to a high fraction of sp{sup 2}-hybridized C-atoms in the tribo-induced amorphous C-layer within a transition region of less than 5?nm thickness. The mechanically induced phase transformation from diamond to the amorphous phase is found to be highly anisotropic which is clearly seen at a grain boundary, where the thickness of the amorphous layer above the two differently oriented grains abruptly changes.

Zhang, Xinyi; Schneider, Reinhard; Mller, Erich; Gerthsen, Dagmar [Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engesserstr. 7, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mee, Manuel; Meier, Sven [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM, Whlerstr. 11, D-79108 Freiburg (Germany); Gumbsch, Peter [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM, Whlerstr. 11, D-79108 Freiburg (Germany); Institute for Applied Materials IAM, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ interaction in nuclear medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the $\\bar{K}N$ system is submerged in nuclear medium the $\\bar{K}N$ scattering amplitude and the final state branching ratios exhibit a strong energy dependence when going to energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. A sharp increase of $\\bar{K}N$ attraction below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold provides a link between shallow $\\bar{K}$-nuclear potentials based on the chiral $\\bar{K}N$ amplitude evaluated at threshold and the deep phenomenological optical potentials obtained in fits to kaonic atoms data. We show the energy dependence of the in-medium $K^{-}p$ amplitude and demonstrate the impact of energy dependent branching ratios on the $\\Lambda$-hypernuclear production rates. \\keywords{kaon-nucleon amplitude \\and nuclear medium \\and hypernuclei

A. Cieply

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

315

Effects of thickness and cycle parameters on fretting wear behavior of CVD diamond coatings on steel substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of low friction, high hardness, high wear resistance, as well as promising corrosion resistance. © 2010 of thermal expansion between diamond and steel may induce high stress within the deposited diamond films c a School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083, PR

Bristol, University of

316

RHONEY, BRIAN KEITH. Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Truing of Metal Bond Diamond Grinding Wheels. (Under the direction of Albert Shih)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) to profile a metal bond diamond grinding wheel, and then study the wear to rotate the wheel inside a traditional wire EDM machine. Once the process proved feasible, grinding and grinding performance of the EDM trued wheel. Diamond wheels are known to exhibit low wheel wear

Shih, Albert J.

317

station locations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288500 Varnish cache server station locations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, Source Alternative Fuels Data Center Date Released December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords alt fuel alternative fuels alternative fuels stations biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol

318

Development of Designer Diamond Technology for High Pressure High Temperature Experiments in Support of Stockpile Stewardship Program  

SciTech Connect

The role of nitrogen in the fabrication of designer diamond was systematically investigated by adding controlled amount of nitrogen in hydrogen/methane/oxygen plasma. This has led to a successful recipe for reproducible fabrication of designer diamond anvils for high-pressure high-temperature research in support of stockpile stewardship program. In the three-year support period, several designer diamonds fabricated with this new growth chemistry were utilized in high-pressure experiments at UAB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The designer diamond anvils were utilized in high-pressure studies on heavy rare earth metals, high pressure melting studies on metals, and electrical resistance measurements on iron-based layered superconductors under high pressures. The growth chemistry developed under NNSA support can be adapted for commercial production of designer diamonds.

Vohra, Yogesh, K.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

319

Effects of diamond nanoparticle exposure on the internal structure and reproduction of Daphnia magna  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanomaterials have significant technological advantages but their release into the environment also carry potential ecotoxicological risks. Carbon-based nanoparticles and particularly diamond nanoparticles have numerous industrial and medical applications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the toxic effects of diamond nanoparticles with an average particle size of 20nm on the survival, reproduction and tissue structure of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna. The chronic toxicity test results showed 100% mortality at concentrations higher than 12.5mgl?1 and that reproduction inhibition occurred in concentrations higher than 1.3mgl?1. Light microscopy showed that diamond nanoparticles adhere to the exoskeleton surface and accumulate within the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that food absorption by the gut cells may be blocked. The results support the use of chronic approaches in environmental protection as part of an integrated environmental monitoring and assessment strategy.

Elsa Mendona; Mrio Diniz; Lus Silva; Isabel Peres; Lusa Castro; Jos Brito Correia; Ana Picado

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

Greg M. Swain, PI

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Efficient readout of a single spin state in diamond via spin-to-charge conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient readout of individual electronic spins associated with atom-like impurities in the solid state is essential for applications in quantum information processing and quantum metrology. We demonstrate a new method for efficient spin readout of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. The method is based on conversion of the electronic spin state of the NV to a charge state distribution, followed by single-shot readout of the charge state. Conversion is achieved through a spin-dependent photoionization process in diamond at room temperature. Using NVs in nanofabricated diamond beams, we demonstrate that the resulting spin readout noise is within a factor of three of the spin projection noise level. Applications of this technique for nanoscale magnetic sensing are discussed.

B. J. Shields; Q. P. Unterreithmeier; N. P. de Leon; H. Park; M. D. Lukin

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Search for narrow t(t)over-bar resonances in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.8 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for narrow resonances that decay into t (t) over bar pairs has been performed using 130 pb(-1) of data in the lepton + jets channel collected by the DO detector in p (p) over bar collisions at roots=1.8 TeV. There ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV using secondary vertex b tagging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a new measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in pp-bar collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using events with one charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and jets. ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Spin correlation in t(t)over-bar production from p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.8 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The D0 collaboration has performed a study of spin correlation in t (t) over tilde production for the process t (t) over bar --> bW(+)(b) over bar W-, where the W bosons decay to e nu or mu nu. A sample of six events was ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Resonant Higgs boson pair production in the $hh\\rightarrow b\\bar{b} \\; WW \\rightarrow b\\bar{b} \\ell^+ \  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adding a scalar singlet provides one of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model. In this work we briefly review the latest constraints on the mass and mixing of the new Higgs boson and study its production and decay at the LHC. We mainly focus on double Higgs production in the $hh \\rightarrow b \\bar{b} WW \\rightarrow b \\bar{b} \\ell^+ \

Martin-Lozano, Victor; Park, Chan Beom

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

Shurter; Roger Philips (Los Alamos, NM), Devlin; David James (Santa Fe, NM), Moody; Nathan Andrew (Los Alamos, NM), Taccetti; Jose Martin (Santa Fe, NM), Russell; Steven John (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

327

Synthesis of new Diamond-like B-C Phases under High Pressure and Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

A cubic BC3 (c-BC3) phase was synthesized by direct transformation from graphitic phases at a pressure of 39 GPa and temperature of 2200 K in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). A combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron diffraction (ED), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements lead us to conclude that the obtained phase is hetero-nano-diamond, c-BC3. The EELS measurements show that the atoms inside the cubic structure are bonded by sp3 bonds.

Ming, L. C. [University of Hawaii] [University of Hawaii; Zinin, P. V. [University of Hawaii] [University of Hawaii; Sharma, S. K. [University of Hawaii] [University of Hawaii

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

Field emission from bias-grown diamond thin films in a microwave plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing diamond or diamond like films in which a negative bias is established on a substrate with an electrically conductive surface in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The atmosphere that is subjected to microwave energy includes a source of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The negative bias is maintained on the substrate through both the nucleation and growth phase of the film until the film is continuous. Biases between -100V and -200 are preferred. Carbon sources may be one or more of CH.sub.4, C.sub.2 H.sub.2 other hydrocarbons and fullerenes.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Ding, Ming Q. (Beijing, CN); Auciello, Orlando (Bolinbrook, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Design of flexible ultrahigh-Q microcavities in diamond-based photonic crystal slabs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We design extremely flexible ultrahigh-Q diamond-based double-heterostructure photonic crystal slab cavities by modifying the refractive index of the diamond. The refractive index changes needed for ultrahigh-Q cavities with $Q ~ 10^7$, are well within what can be achieved ($\\Delta n \\sim 0.02$). The cavity modes have relatively small volumes $Vdesign is flexible because the range of parameters, cavity length and the index changes, that enables an ultrahigh-Q is quite broad. Furthermore as the index modification is post-processed, an efficient technique to generate cavities around defect centres is achievable, improving prospects for defect-tolerant quantum architectures.

Snjezana Tomljenovic-Hanic; Andrew D. Greentree; C. Martijn de Sterke; Steven Prawer

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

330

Isotope engineering of silicon and diamond for quantum computing and sensing applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the stable isotopes of silicon and carbon have zero nuclear spin, whereas many of the other elements that constitute semiconductors consist entirely of stable isotopes that have nuclear spins. Silicon and diamond crystals composed of nuclear-spin-free stable isotopes (Si-28, Si-30, or C-12) are considered to be ideal host matrixes to place spin quantum bits (qubits) for quntum computing and sensing applications because their coherent properties are not disrupted thanks to the absence of host nuclear spins. The present article describes the state-of-the-art and future perspective of silicon and diamond isotope engineering for development of quantum information processing devices.

Kohei M. Itoh; Hideyuki Watanabe

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

A survey of computational location privacy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is a literature survey of computational location privacy, meaning computation-based privacy mechanisms that treat location data as geometric information. This definition includes privacy-preserving algorithms like anonymity and obfuscation as well ... Keywords: Context, Location, Privacy

John Krumm

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Location and Hours | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location and Hours Location The ORNL Research Library is located off the central corridor of Bldg. 4500N on the main ORNL campus. Hours The library is open 24 hours, seven days a...

333

Vacuum State/Refiner/Location  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vacuum Vacuum State/Refiner/Location Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Barrels per Operating Idle Operating Idle Downstream Charge Capacity Thermal Cracking Delayed Fluid Coking Visbreaking Other/Gas Calendar Day Stream Day Distillation Coking Oil Table 3. Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2013 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) ......................................................... Alabama 120,100 0 130,000 0 48,000 32,000 0 0 0 Goodway Refining LLC 4,100 0 5,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................

334

Some characteristics on nonbreaking waves passing a submerged longshore bar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF SCIENCE December 1971 Major Subject: Civil Engineering SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF NONBREAKING WAVES PASSING A SUBMERGED LONGSHORE BAR A Thesis by PIERCE LEON CHANDLER& JR. Approved as to style and content by: (C arrman of Committee) (Head... on the following pages follow the style of the J 1 ftDWt J, H t *Ed *tl~EH''D' Proceedings of the American Society of Civil Engineers the study of beach processes. The object of the research described herein was to establish limits for the occurrence of modified...

Chandler, Pierce Leon

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Measurement of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We present BABAR experiment studies to measure the CKM angle {alpha} of the Unitarity Triangle. The measurements are based on the B meson decays into the two-body state ({pi}{pi}), the quasi two-body state ({rho}{rho}), and the three-body state ({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}). The results are obtained from data samples of about 230 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected between 1999 and 2004 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC.

Yeche, C.; /Saclay

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

336

Extracting the Odderon from $pp$ and $\\bar pp$ scattering data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from a simple empirical parametrization of the scattering amplitude, successfully describing the dip-bump structure of elastic $pp$ scattering in $t$ at fixed values of $s$, we construct a toy model interpolating between missing energy gaps to extract the Odderon contribution from the difference between $\\bar pp$ and $pp$ elastic and total cross sections. The model is fitted to data from $\\sqrt s=23.5$ GeV to 7 TeV and used to extract the Odderon and its ratio to the Pomeron.

Ster, Andras; Csorgo, Tamas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that sites are open prior to...

338

Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App November 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis As part of the Obama...

339

Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6?mA/cm{sup 2} could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10?V/?m to 20?V/?m. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO{sub 2} insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate.

Posada, Chrystian M.; Grant, Edwin J.; Lee, Hyoung K.; Castao, Carlos H., E-mail: castanoc@mst.edu [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 220 Fulton Hall, Rolla, Missouri 65401 (United States); Divan, Ralu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

X-RAY NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IN S{sup 4}G BARRED GALAXIES: NO LINK BETWEEN BAR STRENGTH AND CO-OCCURRENT SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FUELING  

SciTech Connect

Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d < 35 Mpc) barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We use Chandra observations to measure nuclear 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6 ?m imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q{sub b} , taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing the presence of both stellar bars and nuclear activity, we are able to account for the continuum of bar strengths and degrees of AGN activity. We find nuclear X-ray sources in 31 out of 41 galaxies with median X-ray luminosity and Eddington ratio of L{sub X} = 4.3 10{sup 38} erg s{sup 1} and L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} = 6.9 10{sup 6}, respectively, consistent with low-luminosity AGN activity. Including upper limits for those galaxies without nuclear detections, we find no significant correlation between any of the bar strength indicators and the degree of nuclear activity, irrespective of galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, Hubble type, or bulge size. Strong bars do not favor brighter or more efficient nuclear activity, implying that at least for the low-luminosity regime, supermassive black hole fueling is not closely connected to large-scale features.

Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H.; Gonzlez-Martn, Omaira; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Kim, Taehyun [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Daz-Garca, Simn; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Comern, Sbastien; Laine, Jarkko [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu FI-90014 (Finland); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Gil de Paz, Armando [Departamento de Astrofsica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Holwerda, Benne W., E-mail: mauricio@iac.es [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); and others

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermal conductance of metal-diamond interfaces at high pressure Gregory T. Hohensee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are concerned with the exchange of thermal energy across an interface between two materials. This topic-nonmetal interface, a two-temperature model predicts a thermal resistance of Rep = 1/ gL in series with the phononThermal conductance of metal-diamond interfaces at high pressure Gregory T. Hohensee Department

Cahill, David G.

342

Microcrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators with quality factor limited by thermoelastic damping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

material. For this reason, materials that have low thermal expansion coefficient and high thermal having the highest thermal conductivity (j ¼ 2200 W m?1 K?1 ) of any material at room temperature, a very measurements show thermal conductivity of 110 W m?1 K?1 for heat transport through the thickness of the diamond

Lin, Liwei

343

The Ising model for the bcc, fcc and diamond lattices; a P. H. Lundow,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ising model for the bcc, fcc and diamond lattices; a comparison P. H. Lundow,1, K. Markstr scale Monte Carlo simulation study of the Ising model for the simple cubic lattice was recently The Ising model was formulated as a model for a uniaxial magnetic system and has become one of the most

Markström, Klas

344

Charge Transfer Equilibria Between Diamond and an Aqueous Oxygen Electrochemical Redox Couple  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exposed to humid atmospheres are common (16...highsurface area diamond powder to small...acidity is generated by atmospheric CO 2 . In this case, the...45-GHz microwave plasma reactor supporting...coupled 13.56-MHz plasma reactor at...electrons leads to large changes...

Vidhya Chakrapani; John C. Angus; Alfred B. Anderson; Scott D. Wolter; Brian R. Stoner; Gamini U. Sumanasekera

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Growth zoning and strain patterns inside diamond crystals as revealed by Raman maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...graphite inclusions and their surrounding diamond, including synchroton micro-analysis, is currently in process. The formation...Journal of Superhard Materials, 24, 44-52. Liu, Z., Wang, L., Zhao, Y., Cui, Q., and Zou, G. (1990) High-pressure...

Lutz Nasdala; Wolfgang Hofmeister; Jeffrey W. Harris; Jrgen Glinnemann

346

Porous Boron-Doped Diamond/Carbon Nanotube Electrodes H. Zanin,*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with BDD (large potential window, chemical inertness, low background levels), but also they have application in electronics and sensors, such B-doped diamond (BDD) films are increasingly being used and a very low background current, in addition to chemical and physical stability.7 Planar BDD electrodes

Bristol, University of

347

CVD Diamond Detectors for Current Mode Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy at OMEGA/NIF  

SciTech Connect

We have performed pulsed neutron and pulsed laser tests of a CVD diamond detector manufactured from DIAFILM, a commercial grade of CVD diamond. The laser tests were performed at the short pulse UV laser at Bechtel Nevada in Livermore, CA. The pulsed neutrons were provided by DT capsule implosions at the OMEGA laser fusion facility in Rochester, NY. From these tests, we have determined the impulse response to be 250 ps fwhm for an applied E-field of 500 V/mm. Additionally, we have determined the sensitivity to be 2.4 mA/W at 500 V/mm and 4.0 mA/W at 1000 V/mm. These values are approximately 2 to 5x times higher than those reported for natural Type IIa diamond at similar E-field and thickness (1mm). These characteristics allow us to conceive of a neutron time-of-flight current mode spectrometer based on CVD diamond. Such an instrument would sit inside the laser fusion target chamber close to target chamber center (TCC), and would record neutron spectra fast enough such that backscattered neutrons and x-rays from the target chamber wall would not be a concern. The acquired neutron spectra could then be used to extract DD fuel areal density from the downscattered secondary to secondary ratio.

G. J. Schmid; V. Yu. Glebov; A. V. Friensehner; D. R. Hargrove; S. P. Hatchett; N. Izumi; R. A. Lerche; T. W. Phillips; T. C. Sangster; C. Silbernagel; C. Stoecki

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Coherent interference effects in a nano-assembled diamond NV center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Rd, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Presently with Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Rd, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA paul.barclay@hp.com Abstract: Diamond nanocrystals containing NV, P. Olivero, A. D. Greentree, S. Prawer, F. Jelezko, and P. Hemmer, "Coherent Population Trapping

Painter, Oskar

349

Poly(phenylcarbyne): A Polymer Precursor to Diamond-Like Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diamond-like carbon by the atmospheric pressure decomposition...therefore favored even at atmospheric pres-sure. High molecular...14. In an inert atmosphere glovebox equipped with...intensity (475 W, 20 kHz, and 0.5-inch tip...for 1:1H NMR (200 MHz, CDCI3): 8 = 7...

Glenn T. Visscher; David C. Nesting; John V. Badding; Patricia A. Bianconi

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

350

High-Sensitivity Temperature Sensing Using an Implanted Single Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Array in Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We presented a high-sensitivity temperature detection using an implanted single Nitrogen-Vacancy center array in diamond. The high-order Thermal Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (TCPMG) method was performed on the implanted single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond in a static magnetic field. We demonstrated that under small detunings for the two driving microwave frequencies, the oscillation frequency of the induced fluorescence of the NV center equals approximately to the average of the detunings of the two driving fields. On basis of the conclusion, the zero-field splitting D for the NV center and the corresponding temperature could be determined. The experiment showed that the coherence time for the high-order TCPMG was effectively extended, particularly up to 108 {\\mu}s for TCPMG-8, about 14 times of the value 7.7 {\\mu}s for thermal Ramsey method. This coherence time corresponded to a thermal sensitivity of 10.1 mK/Hz1/2. We also detected the temperature distribution on the surface of a diamond chip in three different circumstances by using the implanted NV center array with the TCPMG-3 method. The experiment implies the feasibility for using implanted NV centers in high-quality diamonds to detect temperatures in biology, chemistry, material science and microelectronic system with high-sensitivity and nanoscale resolution.

Junfeng Wang; Fupan Feng; Jian Zhang; Jihong Chen; Zhongcheng Zheng; Liping Guo; Wenlong Zhang; Xuerui Song; Guoping Guo; Lele Fan; Chongwen Zou; Liren Lou; Wei Zhu; Guanzhong Wang

2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

Studies of n-type doping and surface modification of CVD diamond for use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of n-type doping and surface modification of CVD diamond for use in thermionic applications the investigation of potential shallow n-type donors that are candidates to be used as thermionic emitters for converting solar energy to electrical energy. Due to the various problems associated with current n

Bristol, University of

352

Advances in PSII Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings for Use as a Corrosion Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in PSII Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings for Use as a Corrosion Barrier R. S to improve corrosion resistance, however, the necessary organometallics needed to implant these materials to produce an adherent, hard, wear and, corrosion-resistant coating plays a vital role. These applications

353

Slide diamond burnishing of tool steels with adhesive coatings and diffusion layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slide diamond burnishing of tool steels with adhesive coatings and diffusion layers W. Brostow*1 with a scratch tester. A combination of both approaches, slide burnishing with hard chrome coating and/or slide in manufacturing tools and structural elements in automotive and aerospace industries. Keywords: Tool steels, Slide

North Texas, University of

354

Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond Lawrence Berkeley of the commissioning of HVAC systems. The approach is based on software that generates a sequence of test signals for new and retrofit projects. Introduction The performance of many HVAC systems is limited more by poor

Diamond, Richard

355

Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2 -on-sp3 Technology Laboratory, Illinois 60439, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Graphene demonstrated potential for practical applications owing to its excellent electronic and thermal properties. Typical graphene field

356

X-Ray Diamond Anvil Cell Facility at NSLS: 2010 Progress Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-Ray Diamond Anvil Cell Facility at NSLS: 2010 Progress Report Zhiqiang ChenZhiqiang Chen Stony) Powder X-ray Diffraction, Total Scattering Pair-Distributiony , g Function (PDF) under high P and high, yield strength, amorphization, texturing, compressibility Hydrothermal DAC (Bassett) Angle Dispersive X-ray

Duffy, Thomas S.

357

Diamonds as timing detectors for MIP: The HADES proton-beam monitor and start detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of a recent development of measuring time of flight of minimum-ionizing particles (MIP) with mono-crystalline diamond detectors. The application in the HADES spectrometer as well as test results obtained with proton beams are discussed.

J. Pietraszko; L. Fabbietti; W. Koenig

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Diamonds as timing detectors for MIP: The HADES proton-beam monitor and start detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of a recent development of measuring time of flight of minimum-ionizing particles (MIP) with mono-crystalline diamond detectors. The application in the HADES spectrometer as well as test results obtained with proton beams are discussed.

,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Biofuels Project Locations Pacific Ethanol (Boardman, OR) BlueFire Ethanol (Corona, CA) POET (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Innovations (Commerce City, CO) ICM (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) NewPage (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels (Soperton, GA) DSM Innovation Center (Parsippany, NJ) Novozymes (Davis, CA) Genencor (Palo Alto, CA) Verenium Corp (San Diego, CA) Dupont (Wilmington, DE) Mascoma (Lebanon, NH) Cargill Inc (Minneapolis, MN) Regional Partnerships South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD Cornell University, Ithaca, NY University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

360

Compact, Rapid Cell Deformability Measurements Using Diode Laser Bar Optical Trapping in Microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a simple, compact, microfluidic system that easily facilitates diode laser bar optical trapping for cell stretching measurements and particle sorting within flowing...

Applegate Jr , Robert W; Squier, Jeff; Vestad, Tor; Oakey, John; Marr, David W

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NordhausGaddum bounds for locating domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A dominating set S of graph G is called metric-locatingdominating if it is also locating, that is, if every vertex v is uniquely determined by its vector of distances to the vertices in S . If moreover, every vertex v not in S is also uniquely determined by the set of neighbors of v belonging to S , then it is said to be locatingdominating. Locating, metric-locatingdominating and locatingdominating sets of minimum cardinality are called ? -codes, ? -codes and ? -codes, respectively. A NordhausGaddum bound is a tight lower or upper bound on the sum or product of a parameter of a graph G and its complement G . In this paper, we present some NordhausGaddum bounds for the location number ? , the metric-locationdomination number ? and the locationdomination number ? . Moreover, in each case, the graph family attaining the corresponding bound is fully characterized.

C. Hernando; M. Mora; I.M. Pelayo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Icarus 174 (2005) 192204 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­4-times-solar abundance up to the 0.6-bar condensation level. Instead, the data require that, relative

363

Recent BaBar Results on Hadron Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Recent results from on hadronic spectroscopy are presented, based on data collected by the BaBar experiment between 1999 and 2004. The properties of the recently discovered D*{sub sJ}(2317){sup +} and D{sub sJ}(2460){sup +} states are studied: resonance parameters and ratios of decay rates are measured from continuum e{sup +}e{sup -} production, and production rates are measured from B decays. A search for the D*{sub sJ}(2632){sup +} state whose observation has been recently reported by the SELEX Collaboration, and a search for a charged partner of the charmonium-like X(3872) state, are performed, yielding negative results. Finally, extensive searches for several pentaquark candidates, both fully inclusive and in B decays, result in no positive evidence.

Robutti, E.; /INFN, Genoa

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

IMPROVED BAR IMPACT TESTS USING A PHOTONIC DOPPLER VELOCIMETER  

SciTech Connect

Bar impact tests, using the techniques described elsewhere in this symposium, were used to measure compressive and tensile strengths of borosilicate glass, soda lime glass, and a glass ceramic. The glass ceramic was 25% crystalline spinel, furnished by Corning Inc. There are two measures of compressive strength: the peak stress that can be transmitted in unconfined compression, and the 'steady state' strength. For borosilicate glass and soda lime glass, these values were similar, being about 1.8 and 1.5 GPa, respectively. The glass ceramic (25% spinel) was almost 50% stronger. Tensile failure in the glass and glass ceramic takes places via surface flaws, and thus tensile strength is an extrinsic, as opposed to intrinsic property.

Bless, S J; Tolman, J; Levinson, S; Nguyen, J

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radial Error Feedback Geometric Adaptive Control for Bar Turning in CNC Turning Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radial Error Feedback Geometric Adaptive Control for Bar Turning in CNC Turning Centers by Chun Fan-6046 liu@eng.fsu.edu, indwang1@eng.fsu.edu Abstract In-process measurement and control of CNC machines can adaptive control (REFGAC) system for bar turning in CNC turning centers. REFGAC system was design to com

Collins, Emmanuel

366

A steady-state dynamical model for the COBE-detected Galactic bar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......known solutions to good accuracy, and the basic technique is suited to constructing numerical equilibrium models. We now pro- ceed to the bar model. 3 INPUTS OF THE MODEL ..3.1 Density model of the bar In addition to the cosmological achievements of COBE......

HongSheng Zhao

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

Current spread and overheating of high power laser bars B. Laikhtmana)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-power lasers, the width of the stripe is much larger than the cladding thick- ness, and the substrate thicknessCurrent spread and overheating of high power laser bars B. Laikhtmana) Power Photonic, 214 Old 11794 Received 27 May 2003; accepted 12 January 2004 The heating of a semiconductor laser bar imbedded

368

Relativistic impulse-approximation calculation of p-bar-nucleus elastic scattering  

SciTech Connect

The first calculations of p-bar-nucleus elastic scattering using the relativistic impulse approximation are presented and compared with the recent 46.8-MeV p-bar-/sup 12/C elastic scattering data. The calculated cross sections agree well with the data. The differences between relativistic and nonrelativistic impulse approximation calculations using the same input are small.

Clark, B.C.; Hama, S.; McNeil, J.A.; Mercer, R.L.; Ray, L.; Serot, B.D.; Sparrow, D.A.; Stricker-Bauer, K.

1984-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Truth Behind Bars Colombian Paramilitary Leaders in U.S. Custody  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Truth Behind Bars Colombian Paramilitary Leaders in U.S. Custody February 2010 International Human Rights Law Clinic University of California, Berkeley School of Law #12;#12;Truth Behind Bars colombian that the extraditions of paramili- tary leaders have had adverse consequences for U.S. foreign policy by undermining

Kammen, Daniel M.

370

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

371

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

372

LOCATION OF THUNDERSTORMS BY RADIO METHODS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... systems are well known, and the exact location can be determined when the line or substation is afterwards inspected. Thus power supply system statistics provide reliable evidence of the location ...

1943-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

373

Carbon nanotunnels form from single-walled carbon nanotubes interacting with a diamond (100)-(2 X 1) surface.  

SciTech Connect

A quantum chemical study of the interaction of (5,5), (7,7), (9,9) and (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes with a clean (100)-(2 x 1) diamond surface is reported. Stable structures with covalent bonds at the interface were found for carbon nanotubes oriented parallel or perpendicular to the dimer rows on the reconstructed (100) surface. The binding energy of the most stable (5,5) nanotube-diamond structure is 1.7 eV/{angstrom}, and is attributed to strong covalent bonds formed between the carbon nanotube and the diamond surface. The structure of the nanotube is distorted by adsorption on the surface such that it adopts a tunnel-like geometry. Two other nanotunnel geometries were found for the (5,5) nanotube, with binding energies of 1.39 and 1.09 eV/{angstrom}. In the most stable (5,5) nanotube-diamond structure the interaction between the nanotube and the diamond surface produces a 0.6 eV band gap near the Fermi level, but the metallic character of the nanotube is maintained in the two other, less strongly bound nanotunnel structures. No charge transfer occurs between the diamond surface and the nanotunnels in any of the three orientations. Binding energies decrease with increases in tube diameter, to the extent that one of the three nanotunnel structures is not formed by (9,9) carbon nanotubes.

Horner, D. A.; Sternberg, M.; Zapol, P.; Curtiss, L. A. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (North Central Coll.)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A gas-rich nuclear bar fuelling a powerful central starburst in NGC 2782  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present evidence that the peculiar interacting starburst galaxy NGC 2782 (Arp 215) harbors a gas-rich nuclear stellar bar feeding an M82-class powerful central starburst, from a study based on OVRO CO (J=1->0) data, WIYN BVR & Halpha observations, along with available NIR images, a 5 GHz RC map and HST images. NGC 2782 harbors a clumpy, bar-like CO feature of radius ~ 7.5'' (1.3 kpc) which leads a nuclear stellar bar of similar size. The nuclear CO bar is massive: it contains ~2.5x10**9 M_sun of molecular gas, which makes up ~ 8 % of the dynamical'mass present within a 1.3 kpc radius. Within the CO bar, emission peaks in two extended clumpy lobes which lie on opposite sides of the nucleus, separated by ~ 6'' (1 kpc). Between the CO lobes, in the inner 200 pc radius, resides a powerful central starburst which is forming stars at a rate of 3 to 6 M_sun yr-1. While circular motions dominate the CO velocity field, the CO lobes show weak bar-like streaming motions on the leading side of the nuclear stellar bar, suggestive of gas inflow. We estimate semi-analytically the gravitational torque from the nuclear stellar bar on the gas, and suggest large gas inflow rates from the CO lobes into the central starburst. These observations, which are amongst the first ones showing a nuclear stellar bar fuelling molecular gas into an intense central starburst, are consistent with simulations and theory which suggest that nuclear bars provide an efficient way of transporting gas closer to the galactic center to fuel central activity. Furthermore, several massive clumps are present at low radii, and dynamical friction might produce further gas inflow. We suggest that the nuclear molecular gas bas and central activity will be very short-lived, likely disappearing within 5x10**8 years.

Shardha Jogee; Jeffrey D. P. Kenney; Beverly J. Smith

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Diode-bar side-pumping of double-clad fibers.  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate direct diode-bar side pumping of a Yb-doped fiber laser using embedded-mirror side pumping (EMSP). In this method, the pump beam is launched by reflection from a micro-mirror embedded in a channel polished into the inner cladding of a double-clad fiber (DCF). The amplifier employed an unformatted, non-lensed, ten-emitter diode bar (20 W) and glass-clad, polarization-maintaining, large-mode-area fiber. Measurements with passive fiber showed that the coupling efficiency of the raw diode-bar output into the DCF (ten launch sites) was {approx}84%; for comparison, the net coupling efficiency using a conventional, formatted, fiber-coupled diode bar is typically 50-70%, i.e., EMSP results in a factor of 2-3 less wasted pump power. The slope efficiency of the side-pumped fiber laser was {approx}80% with respect to launched pump power and 24% with respect to electrical power consumption of the diode bar; at a fiber-laser output power of 7.5 W, the EMSP diode bar consumed 41 W of electrical power (18% electrical-to-optical efficiency). When end pumped using a formatted diode bar, the fiber laser consumed 96 W at 7.5 W output power, a factor of 2.3 less efficient, and the electrical-to-optical slope efficiency was lower by a factor of 2.0. Passive-fiber measurements showed that the EMSP alignment sensitivity is nearly identical for a single emitter as for the ten-emitter bar. EMSP is the only method capable of directly launching the unformatted output of a diode bar directly into DCF (including glass-clad DCF), enabling fabrication of low-cost, simple, and compact, diode-bar-pumped fiber lasers and amplifiers.

Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahv A.V.; Moore, Sean W. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well...

Henry, Tracy Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons Art and Science A Breakthrough in Interface Science APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS MARCH 11, 2008 Bookmark and Share The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is the most commonly used device for obtaining static high pressures above 3 GPa. Experiments in the DAC are frequently performed at the APS, in particular at GSECARS (Sector 13), HP-CAT (Sector 16), and at XOR sectors 1 and 3. In order to have the sample in the DAC be subject to a quasi-hydrostatic pressure it is necessary to surround the

378

Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

News » Featured Articles » 2012 » Dented News » Featured Articles » 2012 » Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 08.27.12 Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential Office of Science supported researchers develop new material with amazing hardness and exciting possibilities. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60 Image courtesy of Carnegie Institute of Washington Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60

379

Fluorinated diamond thin films for tribological applications. Final report, April-October 1989  

SciTech Connect

Diamond (100) substrates have been fluorinated with both atomic and molecular fluorine under ultrahigh vacuum conditions using molecular beams. X-ray photoelectron spectra of the resulting samples indicate that atomic fluorine, F, reacts with an initial accommodation coefficient of 0.25 (+ or - 0.1) at 298 K; a saturation coverage of about three quarters of a monolayer is obtained. The carbon fluoride adlayer is thermally stable to 700 K, but slowly desorbs at temperatures above this. In contrast, molecular fluorine, F2, reacts quite slowly; a saturation coverage of less than one fifth of a monolayer after several hundred monolayers exposure to F2 at temperatures from 300 K to 700 K is achieved. In addition, diamond substrates saturated with fluorine atoms showed no loss of fluorine after exposure to beams of H2 and O2 at temperatures between 300 K and 700 K.

Freedman, A.; Stinespring, C.

1990-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

380

Spectrally dependent photovoltages in Schottky photodiode based on (100) B-doped diamond  

SciTech Connect

Spectrally and spatially resolved photovoltages were measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) on a Schottky photo-diode made of a 4?nm thin tungsten-carbide (WC) layer on a 500?nm oxygen-terminated boron-doped diamond epitaxial layer (O-BDD) that was grown on a Ib (100) diamond substrate. The diode was grounded by the sideways ohmic contact (Ti/WC), and the semitransparent Schottky contact was let unconnected. The electrical potentials across the device were measured in dark (only 650?nm LED of KPFM being on), under broad-band white light (halogen lamp), UV (365?nm diode), and deep ultraviolet (deuterium lamp) illumination. Illumination induced shift of the electrical potential remains within 210?mV. We propose that the photovoltage actually corresponds to a shift of Fermi level inside the BDD channel and thereby explains orders of magnitude changes in photocurrent.

?ermk, Jan, E-mail: cermakj@fzu.cz; Rezek, Bohuslav [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnick 10, 16200 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Koide, Yasuo [Sensor Materials Center, National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Takeuchi, Daisuke [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ultrafast electronic read-out of diamond NV centers coupled to graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonradiative transfer processes are often regarded as loss channels for an optical emitter1, since they are inherently difficult to be experimentally accessed. Recently, it has been shown that emitters, such as fluorophores and nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond, can exhibit a strong nonradiative energy transfer to graphene. So far, the energy of the transferred electronic excitations has been considered to be lost within the electron bath of the graphene. Here, we demonstrate that the trans-ferred excitations can be read-out by detecting corresponding currents with picosecond time resolution. We electrically detect the spin of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond electronically and con-trol the nonradiative transfer to graphene by electron spin resonance. Our results open the avenue for incorporating nitrogen vacancy centers as spin qubits into ultrafast electronic circuits and for harvesting non-radiative transfer processes electronically.

Brenneis, Andreas; Seifert, Max; Karl, Helmut; Brandt, Martin S; Huebl, Hans; Garrido, Jose A; Koppens, Frank H L; Holleitner, Alexander W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Diamond X-ray photodiode for white and monochromatic SR beams  

SciTech Connect

High-purity, single-crystal CVD diamond plates are screened for quality and instrumented into a sensor assembly for quantitative characterization of flux and position sensitivity. Initial investigations have yielded encouraging results and have led to further development. Several limiting complications are observed and discussed, as well as mitigations thereof. For example, diamond quality requirements for X-ray diodes include low nitrogen impurity and crystallographic defectivity. Thin electrode windows and electronic readout performance are ultimately also critical to device performance. Promising features observed so far from prototype devices include calculable responsivity, flux linearity, position sensitivity and timing performance. Recent results from testing in high-flux and high-speed applications are described.

Keister, J.W.; Heroux, A.; Smedley, J.; Muller, E. M.; Bohon, J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Diamond pixel detector for beam profile monitoring in COMET experiment at J-PARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the design and initial prototype results of a pixellized proton beam profile monitor for the COMET experiment at J-PARC. The goal of COMET is to look for charged lepton flavor violation by direct muon to electron conversion at a sensitivity of $0^{-19}$. An 8 GeV proton beam pulsed at 100 ns with $10^{10}$ protons/s will be used to create muons through pion production and decay. In the final experiment, the proton flux will be raised to $10^{14}$ protons/sec to increase the sensitivity. These requirements of harsh radiation tolerance and fast readout make diamond a good choice for constructing a beam profile monitor in COMET. We present first results of the characterization of single crystal diamond (scCVD) sourced from a new company, 2a systems Singapore. Our measurements indicate excellent charge collection efficiency and high carrier mobility down to cryogenic temperatures.

Cerv, M; Pernegger, H; Vageesvaran, P; Griesmayer, E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Quarkonium Spectroscopy And Search for New States at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

The BaBar experiment at the PEP-II B-factory gives excellent opportunities for the quarkonium spectroscopy. Investigation of the properties of new states like the X(3872), Y(3940) and Y(4260) are performed aiming to understand their nature. Recent BaBar results will be presented in this paper. At the B-factories charmonium and charmonium-like states are copiously produced via several mechanisms: in B decay (color suppressed b {yields} c transition), double charmonium production (e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} + c{bar c}), two photons production ({gamma}*{gamma}* {yields} c{bar c}, where the c{bar c} state has positive C-parity) and in initial state radiation (ISR) when the e{sup {+-}} in its initial state emits a photon lowering the effective center of mass energy of the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction (e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{sub ISR} + c{bar c}, where the charmonium state has the quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -2}). Many new states have been recently discovered at the B-factories, BaBar and Belle, above the D{bar D} threshold in the charmonium energy region. While some of them appear to be consistent with conventional c{sub c} states others do not fit with any expectation. Several interpretations for these states have been proposed: for some of them the mass values suggest that they could be conventional charmonia, but also other interpretations like D{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0} molecule or diquark-antidiquark states among many other models have been advanced. Reviews can be found in Refs. [1][2]. In all cases the picture is not completely clear. This situation could be remedied by a coherent search of the decay pattern to D{bar D}, search for production in two-photon fusion and ISR, and of course improving the statistical precision upon the current measurements. The BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric collider, designed to perform precision measurement of CP violation in the B meson system, has an extensive quarkonium spectroscopy program. Recent BaBar outcomes on the X(3872) and Y(4260) and a new result on the Y(3940) are reported here.

Cibinetto, G.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

385

Two photon decay of neutral scalars below 1.5 GeV in a chiral model for bar{q}q and bar{q}bar{q}qq states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the two photon decay of neutral scalars below 1.5 GeV in the context of a recently proposed chiral model for bar{q}q and bar{q}bar{q}qq states. We find good agreement with experimental results for the a_{0}(980)->gamma gamma. Our calculations for f_{0}(980)->gamma gamma shows that further work is necessary in order to understand the structure of this meson. The model predicts Gamma(a_{0}(1450)->gamma gamma)=0.16+/-0.10KeV, Gamma(sigma->gamma gamma)=0.47+/-0.66 KeV, Gamma(f(1370)->gamma gamma)=0.07+/-0.15 KeV, Gamma(f(1500)->gamma gamma)=0.74+/-0.78 KeV.

Simon Rodriguez; Mauro Napsuciale

2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fueling Station Locator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Topics: Datasets Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured References: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Research: Data and Resources[1] Logo: Alternative Fueling Station Locator The alternative fuel station locator uses an address based search to find

387

Three-Dimensional Nonlinear Lattices: From Oblique Vortices and Octupoles to Discrete Diamonds and Vortex Cubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We construct a variety of novel localized topological structures in the 3D discrete nonlinear Schrdinger equation. The states can be created in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in strong optical lattices and crystals built of microresonators. These new structures, most of which have no counterparts in lower dimensions, range from multipole patterns and diagonal vortices to vortex cubes (stack of two quasiplanar vortices) and diamonds (formed by two orthogonal vortices).

R. Carretero-Gonzlez; P. G. Kevrekidis; B. A. Malomed; D. J. Frantzeskakis

2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

Characterization and tribological application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were successfully prepared on glass substrates and surfaces of selenium drums via radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. The...

Ning Cao; Zhen-yi Fei; Yong-xin Qi; Wen-wen Chen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

390

Signal transduction and conversion with color centers in diamond and piezo-elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to measure weak signals such as pressure, force, electric field, and temperature with nanoscale devices and high spatial resolution offers a wide range of applications in fundamental and applied sciences. Here we present a proposal for a hybrid device composed of thin film layers of diamond with color centers implanted and piezo-active elements for the transduction and measurement of a wide variety of physical signals. The magnetic response of a piezomagnetic layer to an external stress or a stress induced by the change of electric field and temperature is shown to affect significantly the spin properties of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. Under ambient conditions, realistic environmental noise and material imperfections, our detailed numerical studies show that this hybrid device can achieve significant improvements in sensitivity over the pure diamond based approach in combination with nanometer scale spatial resolution. Beyond its applications in quantum sensing the proposed hybrid architecture offers novel possibilities for engineering strong coherent couplings between nanomechanical oscillator and solid state spin qubits.

Jianming Cai; Fedor Jelezko; Martin B. Plenio

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Diamond sensors and polycapillary lenses for X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Diamond sensors are evaluated as incident beam monitors for X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. These single crystal devices pose a challenge for an energy-scanning experiment using hard X-rays due to the effect of diffraction from the crystalline sensor at energies which meet the Bragg condition. This problem is eliminated by combination with polycapillary lenses. The convergence angle of the beam exiting the lens is large compared to rocking curve widths of the diamond. A ray exiting one capillary from the lens meets the Bragg condition for any reflection at a different energy from the rays exiting adjacent capillaries. This serves to broaden each diffraction peak over a wide energy range, allowing linear measurement of incident intensity over the range of the energy scan. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data are measured with a combination of a polycapillary lens and a diamond incident beam monitor. These data are of comparable quality to data measured without a lens and with an ionization chamber monitoring the incident beam intensity.

Ravel, B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Attenkofer, K. [Photon Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [Photon Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Bohon, J. [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Muller, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11974-3800 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11974-3800 (United States); Smedley, J. [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Development of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) coatings for multipurpose mechanical pump seals.  

SciTech Connect

The reliability and performance of silicon carbide (SiC) shaft seals on multipurpose mechanical pumps are improved by applying a protective coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). UNCD exhibits extreme hardness (97 GPa), low friction (0.1 in air) and outstanding chemical resistance. Consequently, the application of UNCD coatings to multipurpose mechanical pump seals can reduce frictional energy losses and eliminate the downtime and hazardous emissions from seal failure and leakage. In this study, UNCD films were prepared by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition utilizing an argon/methane gas mixture. Prior to coating, the SiC seals were subjected to mechanical polishing using different grades of micron-sized diamond powder to produce different starting surfaces with well-controlled surface roughnesses. Following this roughening process, the seals were seeded by mechanical abrasion with diamond nanopowder, and subsequently coated with UNCD. The coated seals were subjected to dynamic wear testing performed at 3600 RPM and 100 psi for up to 10 days during which the seals were periodically removed and inspected. The UNCD-coated seals were examined using Raman microanalysis, scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry, and adhesion testing before and after the wear testing. These analyses revealed that delamination of the UNCD films was prevented when the initial SiC seal surface had an initial roughness >0.1 {micro}m. In addition, the UNCD surfaces showed no measurable wear as compared to approximately 0.2 {micro}m of wear for the untreated SiC surfaces.

Kovalchenko, A. M.; Elam, J. W.; Erdemir, A.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.; Libera, J. A.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Hryn, J. N. (Materials Science Division); (Georgia Inst. of Tech.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

394

BaBar Results on E+ E- ---> P Anti-P By Means of ISR  

SciTech Connect

BaBar has measured with unprecedented accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} cross section from the threshold up to Q{sub p{bar p}}{sup 2} {approx} 20 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, finding out an unexpected cross section, with plateaux and negative steps. Evidence for a ratio |G{sub E}/G{sub M}| > 1 has also been found as well as a sudden variation in |G{sub M}| just above the threshold.

Ferroli, Rinaldo Baldini; /Enrico Fermi Ctr., Rome /Frascati

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

An Overview of $D^0\\bar{D}^0$ Mixing Search Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The search for $D^0\\bar{D}^0$ mixing may carry a large discovery potential for new physics since the $D^0\\bar{D}^0$ mixing rate is expected to be small in the Standard Model. This paper gives a brief review of the experimental techniques which can be used to search for $D^0\\bar{D}^0$ mixing in the future. Some ideas, applicable to future mixing searches at hadron machines (such as Tevatron and LHC), and fixed target experiments (such as HEAR-B) are introduced.

Tiehui; Liu

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Diamond Beach, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8.9595572°, -74.8523914° 8.9595572°, -74.8523914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9595572,"lon":-74.8523914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Blue Diamond, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

463595°, -115.4038924° 463595°, -115.4038924° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0463595,"lon":-115.4038924,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

Diamond Ridge, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge, Alaska: Energy Resources Ridge, Alaska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 59.6761111°, -151.5575° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":59.6761111,"lon":-151.5575,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

399

Our Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Locations Home > About Us > Our Locations Our Locations The NNSA's nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to

400

Our Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Locations Home > About Us > Our Locations Our Locations The NNSA's nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Community Detection from Location-Tagged Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many real world systems or web services can be represented as a network such as social networks and transportation networks. In the past decade, many algorithms have been developed to detect the communities in a network using connections between nodes. However in many real world networks, the locations of nodes have great influence on the community structure. For example, in a social network, more connections are established between geographically proximate users. The impact of locations on community has not been fully investigated by the research literature. In this paper, we propose a community detection method which takes locations of nodes into consideration. The goal is to detect communities with both geographic proximity and network closeness. We analyze the distribution of the distances between connected and unconnected nodes to measure the influence of location on the network structure on two real location-tagged social networks. We propose a method to determine if a location-based community detection...

Liu, Zhi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

SciTech Connect

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Location-dependent communications using quantum entanglement  

SciTech Connect

The ability to unconditionally verify the location of a communication receiver would lead to a wide range of new security paradigms. However, it is known that unconditional location verification in classical communication systems is impossible. In this work we show how unconditional location verification can be achieved with the use of quantum communication channels. Our verification remains unconditional irrespective of the number of receivers, computational capacity, or any other physical resource held by an adversary. Quantum location verification represents an application of quantum entanglement that delivers a feat not possible in the classical-only channel. It gives us the ability to deliver real-time communications viable only at specified geographical coordinates.

Malaney, Robert A. [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052 (Australia)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Implementing Rational Surface Locations Measured From Thomson...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rational Surface Locations Measured From Thomson Scattering Into MSTfit by Curtis A. Johnson Senior Thesis (Physics) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison 2014 i Abstract...

406

Stochastic p-Robust Location Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present p-robust models based on two classical facility location problems, ... University, Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences,...

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

407

Regenerator Location Problem in Flexible Optical Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 22, 2014 ... Abstract: In this study we introduce the regenerator location problem in flexible optical networks (RLP-FON). With a given traffic demand,...

BARIS YILDIZ

2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

Procurement Information by Location | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procurement Information by Location Procurement Information by Location Procurement Information by Location As part of our Small Business Opportunity Tool, we are offering information about historical procurement by location. Find historical procurement data by state - check out the list of states below, and click on the state's name to learn more about their current programs and past procurement needs. Click on the state to learn more about our current procurement activity: California Colorado District of Columbia Georgia Idaho Illinois Iowa Louisana Maryland Missouri Nevada New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania South Carolina Tennessee Texas Virginia West Virginia Washington Wyoming

409

Optimization Online - Public Facility Location Using Dispersion ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 27, 2013 ... Our results show close collaboration with the p-median solution when decision makers restrict location to demand points, and use parameter...

Rajan Batta

2013-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the ZH???-bar bb-bar Channel in 5.2??fb(?1) of pp-bar Collisions at s?=1.96??TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search is performed for the standard model Higgs boson in 5.2??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final state considered is a pair of b jets and large missing...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; Moulik, Tania; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; McGivern, Carrie Lynne

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

411

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets 5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 4, 2011 - 7:15am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Rational System Architect. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: IBM Rational System 11.4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect. reference LINKS: IBM Advisory: 21497689 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025464 CVE-2011-1207 Secunia Advisory: SA43399 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the

412

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application December 28, 2009 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application submitted by Areva Enrichment Services LLC to help fund a uranium enrichment facility in Idaho. The simple answer is no. The Act, as passed by Congress, applies only to government procurements. It does not apply to financial assistance programs or loan guarantee programs. The Act, as passed by Congress, also applies only to the investments of the actual offerors (or contractors) for

413

The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, the beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration with a laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is described. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-50 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 70,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar are presented. Preliminary results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross-axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are presented.

Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Observation of $J/?\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}a_{0}(980)$ at BESIII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using $2.25\\times10^{8}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage rings, we observe for the first time the process $J/\\psi\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}a_{0}(980)$, $a_{0}(980)\\rightarrow \\pi^{0}\\eta$ with a significance of $6.5\\sigma$ ($3.2\\sigma$ including systematic uncertainties). The product branching fraction of $J/\\psi\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}a_{0}(980)\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}\\pi^{0}\\eta$ is measured to be $(6.8\\pm1.2\\pm1.3)\\times 10^{-5}$, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. This measurement provides information on the $a_{0}$ production near threshold coupling to $p\\bar{p}$ and improves the understanding of the dynamics of $J/\\psi$ decays to four body processes.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; X. C. Ai; O. Albayrak; M. Albrecht; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; D. W. Bennett; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; D. Bettoni; J. M. Bian; F. Bianchi; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; S. Braun; R. A. Briere; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; X. R. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; X. K. Chu; Y. P. Chu; G. Cibinetto; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; F. De Mori; Y. Ding; C. Dong; J. Dong; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Z. Fan; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; Y. Fang; L. Fava; G. Felici; C. Q. Feng; E. Fioravanti; C. D. Fu; O. Fuks; Q. Gao; Y. Gao; I. Garzia; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Z. Haddadi; S. Han; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; H. P. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; L. W. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; T. Johansson; A. Julin; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; X. L. Kang; X. S. Kang; M. Kavatsyuk; B. C. Ke; B. Kloss; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; A. Kupsc; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; Jin Li; K. Li; K. Li; P. R. Li; Q. J. Li; T. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; D. X. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Lou; H. J. Lu; H. L. Lu; J. G. Lu; Y. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; X. R. Lyu; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; S. Marcello; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; Y. J. Mo; H. Moeini; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; F. Nerling; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. Nisar; X. Y. Niu; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; N. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; C. F. Redmer; M. Ripka; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; V. Santoro; A. Sarantsev; M. Savri; K. Schoenning; S. Schumann; W. Shan; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; M. Tiemens; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; W. Wang; X. F. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. H. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; M. Wolke; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. Xia; D. Xiao; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; L. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; W. C. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; L. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. Yuncu; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. B. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. J. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; Li Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; X. Y. Zhou; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - auxiliary bus-bars routing Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: and VV cooling systems, vacuum pumping and fueling systems, LHe auxiliary cold box, and to route bus-bars... to the tokamak using air-cooled aluminum or copper bus...

416

Microstrip post production tuning bar error and compact resonators using negative refractive index metamaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, two separate research topics are undertaken both in the general area of compact RF/microwave circuit design. The first topic involves characterizing the parasitic effects and error due to unused post-production tuning bars...

Scher, Aaron David

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

High strain rate mechanical characterization of trabecular bone utilizing the split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique has been in use in one form or another for more than fifty years and has recently gained a great deal of attention for its ability to characterize materials such as metals, ...

Johnson, Timothy Paul Mahal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Search for the B to K nu nu-bar Decay Using Semi-Leptonic Tags  

SciTech Connect

We present an update of the search for the flavor-changing neutral current B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} decay using 351 X 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory. Due to the presence of two neutrinos in the final state, we require the reconstruction of the companion B in the event through the decay channel B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}X. We find 38 candidates in the data with an expected background of 31{-+} 12. This allows us to set an upper limit on the branching fraction for B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} of 4.5 X 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level.

Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Nanoparticle-based Bio-Bar Code (MNP probe, barcode amplification, BCA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This bio-bar code can be applied for the ultra-sensitive detection of proteins at attomolar (1018) concentration. Magnetic microparticle probes are equipped with monoclonal antibodies and with DNA unique to the ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

THE IMPACT OF BARS ON DISK BREAKS AS PROBED BY S{sup 4}G IMAGING  

SciTech Connect

We have analyzed the radial distribution of old stars in a sample of 218 nearby face-on disks, using deep 3.6 {mu}m images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. In particular, we have studied the structural properties of those disks with a broken or down-bending profile. We find that, on average, disks with a genuine single-exponential profile have a scale length and a central surface brightness which are intermediate to those of the inner and outer components of a down-bending disk with the same total stellar mass. In the particular case of barred galaxies, the ratio between the break and the bar radii (R{sub br}/R{sub bar}) depends strongly on the total stellar mass of the galaxy. For galaxies more massive than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, the distribution is bimodal, peaking at R{sub br}/R{sub bar} {approx} 2 and {approx}3.5. The first peak, which is the most populated one, is linked to the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar, whereas the second one is consistent with a dynamical coupling between the bar and the spiral pattern. For galaxies below 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, breaks are found up to {approx}10 R{sub bar}, but we show that they could still be caused by resonances given the rising nature of rotation curves in these low-mass disks. While not ruling out star formation thresholds, our results imply that radial stellar migration induced by non-axisymmetric features can be responsible not only for those breaks at {approx}2 R{sub bar}, but also for many of those found at larger radii.

Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Kim, Taehyun [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gil de Paz, Armando [Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Meidt, Sharon [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Comeron, Sebastien; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija [Department of Physical Sciences/Astronomy Division, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 (Finland); Elmegreen, Debra M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Hts., NY 10598 (United States); Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna (Spain); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Hinz, Joannah L. [University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Holwerda, Benne [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200-AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Jarrett, Thomas H., E-mail: jmunoz@nrao.edu [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); and others

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED Batteries, toner, ink cartridges & cell phones and recycling is an important part of that effort. Below is a guide to on-campus recycling at RSMAS: Visit http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/msgso/ for map of recycling bin locations. NOTE: This is not an exhaustive list. If unauthorized items are found

Miami, University of

422

Ab initio investigation of lithium on the diamond C(100) surface K. M. O'Donnell,1,2,* T. L. Martin,2,3 N. A. Fox,3 and D. Cherns3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for diamond thermionic converters currently of interest for solar power generation and heat recycling. INTRODUCTION Diamond is a promising photocathode, field emitter, and thermionic emitter due to its chemical of approximately 400 °C, too low for thermionic applications.3 As such, research into diamond thermionics has

Bristol, University of

423

Acidity and aluminum toxicity caused by iron oxidation around anode bars  

SciTech Connect

Soil acidity and aluminum toxicity are serious environmental problems often found in humid temperate and tropical regions or in areas with acid rain. Iron oxidation in soils can also cause high concentrations of H{sup +}, which, in turn, causes an increase of Al{sup 3+} in the soil solution. To examine this problem, a study was undertaken to discover the cause of crop damage in crops planted over buried anode bars. Anode bars are part of an impressed current cathodic protection system for pipelines near Decatur, Illinois. Soil samples were collected from the problem site and from a non-problem site for comparison. Results showed that Fe oxidation around anode bars at the problem site is stimulated by electric current, a situation that results in high concentrations of H{sup +} and reduces soil pH to less than 3.0. Under the low pH condition, the content of available Al is very high, and therefore, the soil solution becomes toxic for soybean roots. Exchangeable Al was 360 to 700 ppm in soil immediately adjacent to anode bars but only 3 ppm in the soil midway between anode bars. The damage to the plants, such as reduced vegetative growth and lowered seed yield, developed in a circular pattern over the anode bars. Factors contributing to the problem were soil Fe content, rectifier voltage, and soil drainage.

Shen, S. [Dept. of Agriculture, Wyndmoor, PA (United States). ARS Eastern Regional Research Center] [Dept. of Agriculture, Wyndmoor, PA (United States). ARS Eastern Regional Research Center; Pepper, G.E.; Hassett, J.J.; Stucki, J.W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Property:UtilityLocation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UtilityLocation UtilityLocation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name UtilityLocation Property Type Boolean Description Indicates this is the "mailing" location of the Utility. Usually is Yes if the information from EIA Form 861 File1_a is on the page. Pages using the property "UtilityLocation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3 Phases Energy Services + true + 4 4-County Electric Power Assn + true + A A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + true + AEP Generating Company + true + AEP Texas Central Company + true + AEP Texas North Company + true + AES Eastern Energy LP + true + AGC Division of APG Inc + true + AP Holdings LLC + true + APN Starfirst, L.P. + true + APNA Energy + true + Accent Energy Holdings, LLC + true +

425

Property:Event/Location | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Location Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Event/Location Property Type String Description The location in which an event will occur. Examples: 'Golden, Colorado' or 'Prestigious Hotel: 11 Rue Leroy, Paris, France'. Pages using the property "Event/Location" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading + Paris, France + 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Day 2 + Paris, France + 15th International Business Forum: Low Carbon High Growth - Business Models for a Changing Climate + Pretoria, South Africa + 18th Africa Partnership Forum + Paris, France + 2 2012 Bonn Climate Change Conference + Bonn, Germany + 7 7th Asia Clean Energy Forum + Manila, Philippines +

426

Mechanical Spin Control of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond E. R. MacQuarrie, T. A. Gosavi, N. R. Jungwirth, S. A. Bhave, and G. D. Fuchs*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical Spin Control of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond E. R. MacQuarrie, T. A. Gosavi, N. R 2013; published 27 November 2013) We demonstrate direct coupling between phonons and diamond nitrogen-vacancy fundamental interest as a potential mediator of spin-spin interactions [1,2]. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center

Afshari, Ehsan

427

Direct-write milling of diamond by a focused oxygen ion beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in focused ion beam technology have enabled high-resolution, direct-write nanofabrication using light ions. Studies with light ions to date have, however, focused on milling of materials where sub-surface ion beam damage does not inhibit device performance. Here we report on direct-write milling of single crystal diamond using a focused beam of oxygen ions. Material quality is assessed by Raman and luminescence analysis, and reveals that the damage layer generated by oxygen ions can be removed by nonintrusive post-processing methods such as localised electron beam induced chemical etching.

Martin, Aiden A; Botman, Aurelien; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

High stability electron field emitters made of nanocrystalline diamond coated carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

We report enhanced life-time stability for the electron field emitters prepared by coating nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Upon overcoming the problem of poor stability in CNTs, the NCD-CNTs exhibit excellent life-time stability of 250 min tested at different applied voltages of 600 and 900?V. In contrast, the life-time stability of CNTs is only 33 min even at relatively low voltage of 360?V and starts arcing at 400?V. Hence, the NCD-CNTs with improved life-time stability have great potential for the applications as cathodes in flat panel displays and microplasma display devices.

Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Srinivasu, K.; Leou, K. C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

429

Evaluation of TexSIM for modeling traffic behavior at diamond interchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VITA 81 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Typical Diamond Interchange Configurations and Movements 2 Three-Phase Control Strategies 3 TTI Four-Phase Sequence 4 Approach Numbering Scheme for TexSIM Coding 5 Pretimed 1 Interchange Layout and Phasing... Stopped Delay 26 Model Versus Pretimed 2 (7am - 9am) Field Data Stopped Delay 51 53 53 54 54 55 27 Model Versus Field Data Interior Left Turn Stopped Delay 56 28 EfFect of Loop Detector Size on Cycle Length 60 LIST OF TABLES Table 1 Study Sites...

Meadors, Allison Christine Cherry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Localized chemical switching of the charge state of nitrogen-vacancy luminescence centers in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a beam-directed chemical technique for controlling the charge states of near-surface luminescence centers in semiconductors. Specifically, we fluorinate the surface of H-terminated diamond by electron beam irradiation in the presence of NF3 vapor. The fluorination treatment acts as a local chemical switch that alters the charge state of nitrogen-vacancy luminescence centers from the neutral to the negative state. The electron beam fluorination process is highly localized and can be used to control the emission spectrum of individual nanodiamonds and surface regions scanned by the electron beam

Shanley, Toby W; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

Feng, Zhu (Albany, CA); Brewer, Marilee (Goleta, CA); Brown, Ian (Berkeley, CA); Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a technique to nanofabricate nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond based on broad-beam nitrogen implantation through apertures in electron beam lithography resist. This method enables high-throughput nanofabrication of single NV centers on sub-100-nm length scales. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements facilitate depth profiling of the implanted nitrogen to provide three-dimensional characterization of the NV center spatial distribution. Measurements of NV center coherence with on-chip coplanar waveguides suggest a pathway for incorporating this scalable nanofabrication technique in future quantum applications.

Toyli, David M.; Weis, Christoph D.; Fuchs, D.; Schenkel, Thomas; Awschalom, David D.

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

Radiation-assisted Frenkel-Poole transport in single-crystal diamond  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of the density of occupied states as a function of the applied electric field, performed on single-crystal chemical vapour deposition diamond by x-ray modulated photocurrent technique, is reported. Two regimes of non-linear charge transport were observed: a classical Frenkel-Poole (FP) process at high electric fields (>6800 V/cm), and a radiation-assisted transport mechanism at intermediate electric fields (2000 to 6800 V/cm), consisting of a double-step process in which the direct re-emission into the extended band occurs following multiple photo-induced FP-like hopping transitions.

Girolami, M.; Bellucci, A.; Calvani, P.; Flammini, R.; Trucchi, D. M. [CNR-IMIP, Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas, National Research Council, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione, Rome (Italy)] [CNR-IMIP, Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas, National Research Council, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione, Rome (Italy)

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

435

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

All-optical high-resolution magnetic resonance using a nitrogen-vacancy spin in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an all-optical scheme to prolong the quantum coherence of a negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. Optical control of the NV spin suppresses energy fluctuations of the $^{3}\\text{A}_{2}$ ground states and forms an energy gap protected subspace. By optical control, the spectral linewidth of magnetic resonance is much narrower and the measurement of the frequencies of magnetic field sources has higher resolution. The optical control also improves the sensitivity of the magnetic field detection and can provide measurement of the directions of signal sources.

Zhen-Yu Wang; Jian-Ming Cai; Alex Retzker; Martin B. Plenio

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

437

An ultra-thin diamond membrane as a transmission particle detector and vacuum window for external microbeams  

SciTech Connect

Several applications of external microbeam techniques demand a very accurate and controlled dose delivery. To satisfy these requirements when post-sample ion detection is not feasible, we constructed a transmission single-ion detector based on an ultra-thin diamond membrane. The negligible intrinsic noise provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and enables a hit-detection efficiency of close to 100%, even for energetic protons, while the small thickness of the membrane limits beam spreading. Moreover, because of the superb mechanical stiffness of diamond, this membrane can simultaneously serve as a vacuum window and allow the extraction of an ion microbeam into the atmosphere.

Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jaki?, M. [Division of Experimental Physics, Ru?er Bokovi? Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)] [Division of Experimental Physics, Ru?er Bokovi? Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pomorski, M. [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)] [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Kada, W. [Division of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)] [Division of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Iwamoto, N.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

438

Export.gov - Export.gov - Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations Locations Print | E-mail Page Locations 800.872.8723 Domestic Offices International Offices Locations 800.872.8723 Call: 800.872.8723 (1-800-USA-TRAD(E)) Email: tic@trade.gov between 8:30 AM and 6 PM EST to receive immediate answers to your exporting questions on: Tariff and Tax Information Country-specific General Export Information Region-specific Export Information (Middle East, China, Latin America, EU, etc.) International Documentation, Regulations and Standards Logistics and Finance (HS/Schedule B numbers, Freight Forwarders, partners) Free Trade Agreements (qualifying products for FTA benefits, Certificates of origin.) Trade Data Export-related information offered by federal, state and local entities Export-related information related to other USG agencies Note for Importers: Please contact U.S. Customs at 877.227.5511

439

Addressing endogeneity in residential location models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some empirical residential location choice models have reported dwelling-unit price estimated parameters that are small, not statistically significant, or even positive. This would imply that households are non-sensitive ...

Guevara-Cue, Cristin Angelo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Location privacy in mobile computing environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In general, privacy can be viewed as the right to be left alone when desired (solitude), the right to remain anonymous (anonymity), and the right to confidentiality (secrecy of information). More specifically, location privacy is the ability to ...

John P. Baugh; Jinhua Guo

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Data semantics in location-based services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As location-based applications become part of our everyday life, ranging from traffic prediction systems to services over mobile phones providing us with information about our surroundings, the call for more semantics and accurate services is emerging. ...

Nectaria Tryfona; Dieter Pfoser

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Russian Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Russian Locations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Russia Tri-Lab S&T Collaborations > Travel

443

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Find Stations Plan a Route Location: Go Start: End: Go Fuel: All Fuels Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) more search options close × More Search Options Include private stations Include planned stations Owner All Private Federal State Local Utility Payment All American Express Discover MasterCard VISA Cash Checks CFN Clean Energy Fuel Man Gas Card PHH Services Voyager WEX Electric charger types Include level 1 Include level 2 Include DC fast Include legacy chargers Limit results to within 5 miles Limit results to within 5 miles 12,782 alternative fuel stations in the United States Excluding private stations

444

Location-Aware Instant Search Ruicheng Zhong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to find a gas station nearby, she can issue a keyword query "gas station" to a LBS system, which returns the relevant gas stations by considering the user's location and keywords. Traditional spatial keyword search

Li, Guoliang

445

Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 to K0K0bar and B+ to K0barK+ Decays at the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Over the last few years, the B factories have established the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model through the study of the decays of B mesons. The focus of Belle and BaBar has now expanded to the search for signatures of new physics beyond the Standard Model, particularly through examination of flavor-changing neutral-current transitions, which proceed through diagrams involving virtual loops. These decays are suppressed in the Standard Model, increasing sensitivity to new-physics effects but decreasing branching fractions. Exploiting large and growing datasets, BaBar and Belle have made many measurements in loop decays where a b quark transitions to an s quark, observing hints of possible deviations from Standard Model expectations in CP-violating measurements.

Biesiada, Jedrzej; /Princeton U.; ,

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

446

Locating and identifying codes in circulant networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices of a graph G is a dominating set of G if every vertex u of G is either in S or it has a neighbour in S. In other words, S is dominating if the sets S@?N[u] where u@?V(G) and N[u] denotes the closed neighbourhood of u in G, are all ... Keywords: Circulant network, Domination, Identifying code, Locating code, Locating-dominating set

M. Ghebleh; L. Niepel

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Personal Digital Assistant PDA ----Location Based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, xur],[ ybl, yur ]) k k=100 K k k- AminAmin kLk k Amax TmaxTmax kAminLocation Anonymization ConstraintsAmax TmaxLocation Service Quality Constraints 3.3 3.3.1 id, loc, query id loc (x,y)query GPS / l- l- k- l- k l- l l- l- m-invariant 2 29 #12;[22] A B C D E F R1 R2 R3 6 Outlier 6

448

The Value of Flexibility in Robust Location-Transportation Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production and distribution of products can be delayed until actual orders are ... such as hub locations, supplier locations, air freight hub locations, railway station

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

449

Study of the Exclusive Initial-State Radiation Production of the $D \\bar D$ System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of exclusive production of the $D \\bar D$ system through initial-state r adiation is performed in a search for charmonium states, where $D=D^0$ or $D^+$. The $D^0$ mesons are reconstructed in the $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+$, $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^0$, and $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decay modes. The $D^+$ is reconstructed through the $D^+ \\to K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+$ decay mode. The analysis makes use of an integrated luminosity of 288.5 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the BaBar experiment. The $D \\bar D$ mass spectrum shows a clear $\\psi(3770)$ signal. Further structures appear in the 3.9 and 4.1 GeV/$c^2$ regions. No evidence is found for Y(4260) decays to $D \\bar D$, implying an up per limit $\\frac{\\BR(Y(4260)\\to D \\bar D)}{\\BR(Y(4260)\\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-)} < 7.6$ (95 % confidence level).

The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

450

Remarks on Dr. L. Silberstein's Results in his Paper "On the Dispersion of the Diamond."  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dr. Silberstein begins with the assumption that dispersion in general is due to the interaction of the electromagnetic field with the electrical charges on the nuclei of atoms. In the particular case of diamond he deduces from this assumption that the charge on the nucleus of the carbon atom is 2.22 times the electronic charge. He admits that this result is not in harmony with the pan-electronists belief in the indivisibility of the electron. This conclusion justifies us in bringing into question his fundamental premises. It is the author's belief that spectrum effects are in general principally due to the revolving electrons rather than the nuclei of atoms. Reasons for this are given in a book by the author now in press. In the case of diamond, if the Silbertsein ratio, 2.22, which is corrected to read 2.246, is multiplied by the characteristic number of the tetrahedron, namely 8/3ds, the result becomes 5.99, which is very close to the whole number, 6, the atomic number of carbon. The 8/3ds would be required if the effect is due to the revolving electrons. It is pointed out that the dimensions of equations derived from electromagnetic theory by most modern writers are not correct without expressing the specific inductive capacity of the medium. In particular this point is illustrated by Dr. Silberstein's equation (9), and the subject is fully treated in the author's book referred to.

Albert C. Crehore; Ph.D.

1919-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Temperature dependence of mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond films grown by the HFCVD techinque.  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized mechanical properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films grown using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique at 680 C, significantly lower than the conventional growth temperature of -800 C. The films have -4.3% sp{sup 2} content in the near-surface region as revealed by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films, -1 {micro}m thick, exhibit a net residual compressive stress of 370 {+-} 1 MPa averaged over the entire 150 mm wafer. UNCD microcantilever resonator structures and overhanging ledges were fabricated using lithography, dry etching, and wet release techniques. Overhanging ledges of the films released from the substrate exhibited periodic undulations due to stress relaxation. This was used to determine a biaxial modulus of 838 {+-} 2 GPa. Resonant excitation and ring-down measurements in the kHz frequency range of the microcantilevers were conducted under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in a customized UHV atomic force microscope system to determine Young's modulus as well as mechanical dissipation of cantilever structures at room temperature. Young's modulus is found to be 790 {+-} 30 GPa. Based on these measurements, Poisson's ratio is estimated to be 0.057 {+-} 0.038. The quality factors (Q) of these resonators ranged from 5000 to 16000. These Q values are lower than theoretically expected from the intrinsic properties of diamond. The results indicate that surface and bulk defects are the main contributors to the observed dissipation in UNCD resonators.

Adiga, V. P.; Sumant, A. V.; Suresh, S.; Gudeman, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Pennsylvania; Innovative Micro Tech.; Advanced Diamond Tech.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Deposition of diamond-like carbon film using dense plasma focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the deposition of amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on Si ?100?, using a low energy (1.45kJ) dense plasma focus. The high purity graphite is inserted at the tip of the tapered anode, which serves as a carbon source. Silicon substrates are placed in front of the anode tip at different axial and angular positions. The films are deposited using multiple focus shots. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) are used to carry out the structural information of these deposited films. The elemental composition is studied by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) whereas scanning electron microscope (SEM) is employed for the study of the surface morphology. Raman spectroscopy shows the deposition of both diamond type tetragonal sp3 and graphite type trigonal sp2 films. The results point towards the formation of good quality amorphous carbon (DLC) films with higher sp3 content as compared to sp2 content. XRD pattern confirms the amorphous nature of the films showing no additional peak except a peak at 2?=69 which corresponds to substrate original peak Si(400). SEM results demonstrate that the smoothness of the surface decreases with increasing value of angles with respect to anode axis. The substrates placed closer to anode axis have higher carbon content as compared to those placed away from anode axis whereas carbon content decreases with increasing axial distances from anode tip.

Shaista Zeb; Mehboob Sadiq; A. Qayyum; Ghulam Murtaza; M. Zakaullah

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Variations in Nearshore Bar Morphology: Implications for Rip Current Development at Pensacola Beach, Florida from 1951 to 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crest which creates an offshore-directed current also known as undertow (Ruessink et al., 1998; Plant et al., 2001). Onshore bar migration is caused by skewed incident waves which transport sediment landward causing the bar to migrate in the landward... increasing its forward velocity (Stive, 1986). This nearshore bar migration pattern is due in part to a net offshore migration of sediment in the cross-shore direction (Ruessink et al., 1998; 16 Plant et al., 2001). This positive feedback increases...

Barrett, Gemma Elizabeth

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

454

Bar Nunn, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9135767°, -106.3433606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9135767,"lon":-106.3433606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

Study of Rare B Meson Decays Related to the CKM Angle Beta at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

This study reports measurements of the branching fractions of B meson decays to {eta}{prime}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}, {omega}K{sup +}, and {omega}K{sup 0}. Charge asymmetries are measured for the charged modes and the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C are measured for the neutral modes. The results are based on a data sample of 347 fb{sup -1} containing 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage ring located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Statistically significant signals are observed for all channels with the following results: B(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup +}) = (70.0{+-}1.5{+-}2.8)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}) = (66.6{+-}2.6{+-}2.8)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup +}) = (6.7{+-}0.5{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}K{sup +}) = (6.3{+-}0.5{+-}0.3)x10-6, and B(B{sup 0} {yields} ?K0) = (5.6{+-}0.8{+-}0.3)x10-6, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We measure A{sub ch}({eta}{prime}K{sup +}) = +0.010{+-}0.022{+-}0.006, A{sub ch}({omega}{pi}{sup +}) = -0.02{+-}0.08{+-}0.01, A{sub ch}({omega}K{sup +}) = -0.01{+-}0.07{+-}0.01, S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = 0.56{+-}0.12{+-}0.02, C{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = -0.24 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.03, S{sub {omega}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = 0.62+0.25 -0.29 {+-} 0.02, and C{sub {omega}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = -0.39+0.25 -0.24 {+-} 0.03. The result in S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} contributes to the published measurement from BABAR, which differs from zero by 5.5 standard deviations and is the first observation of mixing-induced CP-violation in a charmless B decay.

Ulmer, Keith; /Amherst Coll.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

456

Penetration rate prediction for diamond bit drilling by adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and multiple regressions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In many mining, civil, and petroleum engineering applications diamond bit drilling is widely used due to high penetration rate, core recovery and its ability to drill with less deviation. Recently, many research have been conducted to estimate the penetration rate of diamond drilling which can be considered as one of the most important parameters in project planning and cost estimation of the operation. A database covering the rock properties and the machine operational parameters collected from seven different drilling sites in Turkey is constructed. Construction of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and the multiple regression models for predicting the penetration rate of diamond drilling is described. In the models, rock properties such as the uniaxial compressive strength, the rock quality designation, and the equipment operational parameters like bit load and bit rotation are considered. Although the prediction performance of multiple regression models is high, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference model exhibits better performance based on the comparison of performance indicators. By using the models, penetration rate of diamond bit drilling can be predicted effectively.

H. Basarir; L. Tutluoglu; C. Karpuz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The influence of surface preparation on the electrochemistry of boron doped diamond: A study of the reduction of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advantageous electrochemical characteristics that in- clude: a wide potential window in aqueous electrolyte [2 of couples oxidation and re- duction have been observed within the available poten- tial window diamond electrodes in acidic media occurs via direct electron transfer and results in a polymeric film

Bristol, University of

458

Program plan for the development of advanced synthetic-diamond drill bits for hard-rock drilling  

SciTech Connect

Eight companys have teamed with Sandia Labs to work on five projects as part of a cooperative effort to advance the state of the ar in synthetic-diamond drill bit design and manufacture. DBS (a Baroid Company), Dennis Tool Company, Hughes Christensen Company, Maurer Engineering, Megadiamond, Security Diamond Products, Slimdril International, and Smith International. Objective of each project is to develop advanced bit technology that results in new commercial products with longer bit life and higher penetration rates in hard formations. Each project explores a different approach to synthetic-diamond cutter and bit design and, consequently, uses different approaches to developing the technology. Each of these approaches builds or the respective companies` capabilities and current product interests. Sandia`s role is to assure integration of the individual projects into a coherent program and tc provide unique testing and analytical capabilities where needed. One additional company, Amoco Production Research, will provide synthetic-diamond drill bit research expertise and field testing services for each project in the program.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Diamond and Related Materials, 2 (1993) 661 666 661 Degenerate four-wave mixing diagnostics of atmospheric pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

application of this new spectroscopic technique to an atmospheric pressure plasma synthesis reactor. DFWM synthesis at atmospheric pressure have been performed using an r.f. inductively coupled plasma torch [1 of atmospheric pressure diamond deposition T. G. Owano and C. H. Kruger Iti~'4h7~,mperatureGasdynamies Laboratory

Zare, Richard N.

460

Salsbury and Diamond: Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning -1 -Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diamond: Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning - 1 - Automated Testing of HVAC Systems This paper describes an approach to the automation of the commissioning of HVAC systems. The approach of many HVAC systems is limited more by poor installation, commissioning, and maintenance than by poor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "locations diamond bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Development and evaluation of operational strategies for providing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Therefore, there is a lack of both analysis tools and operational strategies for considering them as an integrated system. One drawback of operating the ramp-metering system and the diamond interchange system in isolation is that traffic from the ramp...

Tian, Zongzhong

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Partial wave analysis of $?(2S) \\to p \\bar{p}?$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a sample of $1.06 \\times 10^{8}$ $\\psi(2S)$ events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII, the decay $\\psi(2S) \\to p \\bar{p}\\eta$ is studied. A partial wave analysis determines that the intermediate state N(1535) with a mass of $1524\\pm5^{+10}_{-4}$ MeV/$c^2$ and a width of $130^{+27+57}_{-24-10}$ MeV/$c^2$ is dominant in the decay; the product branching fraction is determined to be $B(\\psi(2S) \\to N(1535)\\bar{p})\\times B(N(1535)\\to p\\eta)+c.c. = (5.2\\pm0.3^{+3.2}_{-1.2})\\times 10^{-5}$. Furthermore, the branching fraction of $\\psi(2S) \\to \\eta p \\bar{p}$ is measured to be $(6.4\\pm0.2\\pm0.6)\\times 10^{-5}$.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; N. Berger; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; C. Q. Feng; P. Friedel; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; D. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. U. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; J. X. Wamg; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. X. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; Li Li Zhang; R. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Zhenghao Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. Z. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; Z. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

Measurement of the Electric Charge of the Top Quark in $\\boldsymbol{t\\bar{t}}$ Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the electric charge of top quarks using $t\\bar{t}$ events produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Tevatron. The analysis is based on fully reconstructed $t\\bar{t}$ pairs in lepton+jets final states. Using data corresponding to 5.3 $\\rm fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, we exclude the hypothesis that the top quark has a charge of $Q=-4/3\\,e$ at a significance greater than 5 standard deviations. We also place an upper limit of 0.46 on the fraction of such quarks that can be present in an admixture with the standard model top quarks ($Q=+2/3\\,e$) at a 95\\% confidence level.

D0 Collaboration

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

464

Search for {ital B}{r_arrow}l{bar {nu}}{sub l}  

SciTech Connect

We search for the decays {ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}l{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub l} in a sample of 2.2{times}10{sup 6} charged {ital B} decays using the CLEO detector. We see no evidence for a signal in any channel and set upper limits on the branching fractions of {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}){lt}2.2{times}10{sup {minus}3}, {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{mu}{sup {minus}}{nu}2;m{sub {mu}}){lt}2.1{times}10{sup {minus}5}, and {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}){lt}1.5{times}10{sup {minus}5} at the 90% confidence level.

Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Zhu, G.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; (CLEO Co..

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Alternative Fueling Station Locations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locations Alternative Fueling Station Locations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, view U.S. maps, and more. Access up-to-date fuel station data here: http://www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/data_download The dataset available for download here provides a "snapshot" of the alternative fueling station information for: compressed natural gas (CNG), E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), propane/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), biodiesel, electricity, hydrogen, and liquefied natural gas

466

Open neighborhood locatingdominating in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For a graph G that models a facility or a multiprocessor network, detection devices can be placed at the vertices so as to identify the location of an intruder such as a thief or saboteur or a faulty processor. Open neighborhood locatingdominating sets are of interest when the intruder/fault at a vertex precludes its detection at that location. The parameter OLD ( G ) denotes the minimum cardinality of a vertex set S ? V ( G ) such that for each vertex v in V ( G ) its open neighborhood N ( v ) has a unique non-empty intersection with S . For a tree T n of order n we have ? n / 2 ? + 1 ? OLD ( T n ) ? n ? 1 . We characterize the trees that achieve these extremal values.

Suk J. Seo; Peter J. Slater

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Evaluation of the dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector in high energy clinical proton beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diode for accurate relative dose measurements in large and small field high-energy clinical proton beams.Methods: The dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector were assessed by comparison with a reference Markus parallel plate ionization chamber, an Exradin A16 microionization chamber, and Exradin T1a ion chamber. The diamond detector was operated at zero bias voltage at all times. Comparative dose distribution measurements were performed by means of Fractional depth dose curves and lateral beam profiles in clinical proton beams of energies 155 and 250 MeV for a 14 cm square cerrobend aperture and 126 MeV for 3, 2, and 1 cm diameter circular brass collimators. ICRU Report No. 78 recommended beam parameters were used to compare fractional depth dose curves and beam profiles obtained using the diamond detector and the reference ionization chamber. Warm-up/stability of the detector response and linearity with dose were evaluated in a 250 MeV proton beam and dose rate dependence was evaluated in a 126 MeV proton beam. Stem effect and the azimuthal angle dependence of the diode response were also evaluated.Results: A maximum deviation in diamond detector signal from the average reading of less than 0.5% was found during the warm-up irradiation procedure. The detector response showed a good linear behavior as a function of dose with observed deviations below 0.5% over a dose range from 50 to 500 cGy. The detector response was dose rate independent, with deviations below 0.5% in the investigated dose rates ranging from 85 to 300 cGy/min. Stem effect and azimuthal angle dependence of the diode signal were within 0.5%. Fractional depth dose curves and lateral beam profiles obtained with the diamond detector were in good agreement with those measured using reference dosimeters.Conclusions: The observed dosimetric properties of the synthetic single crystal diamond detector indicate that its behavior is proton energy independent and dose rate independent in the investigated energy and dose rate range and it is suitable for accurate relative dosimetric measurements in large as well as in small field high energy clinical proton beams.

Mandapaka, A. K.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Patyal, B. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [INFNDipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)] [INFNDipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Bringing the SciBar detector to the booster neutrino beam  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the physics case for bringing SciBar, the fully active, finely segmented tracking detector at KEK, to the FNAL Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) line. This unique opportunity arose with the termination of K2K beam operations in 2005. At that time, the SciBar detector became available for use in other neutrino beam lines, including the BNB, which has been providing neutrinos to the MiniBooNE experiment since late 2002. The physics that can be done with SciBar/BNB can be put into three categories, each involving several measurements. First are neutrino cross section measurements which are interesting in their own right, including analyses of multi-particle final states, with unprecedented statistics. Second are measurements of processes that represent the signal and primary background channels for the upcoming T2K experiment. Third are measurements which improve existing or planned MiniBooNE analyses and the understanding of the BNB, both in neutrino and antineutrino mode. For each of these proposed measurements, the SciBar/BNB combination presents a unique opportunity or will significantly improve upon current or near-future experiments for several reasons. First, the fine granularity of SciBar allows detailed reconstruction of final states not possible with the MiniBooNE detector. Additionally, the BNB neutrino energy spectrum is a close match to the expected T2K energy spectrum in a region where cross sections are expected to vary dramatically with energy. As a result, the SciBar/BNB combination will provide cross-section measurements in an energy range complementary to MINERvA and complete the knowledge of neutrino cross sections over the entire energy range of interest to the upcoming off-axis experiments.

Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Alcaraz, J.; Andringa, S.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Catala, J.; Cervera, A.; Conrad, J.M.; Couce, E.; Dore, U.; Espinal, X.; Finley,; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Ishii, T.; Jover, G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kurimoto, Y.; Kurosawa, Y.; /Columbia U. /Fermilab /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona, IFAE /Tokyo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The pipeline and valve location problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper, proposes an exact algorithm for the problem of locating a pipeline between two points of a network, as well as a set of safety valves which help control the damage caused by possible spills along the pipeline. A labelling approach is developed to determine simultaneously the optimal pipeline and valve locations, with the objective of optimising an impact measure that depends on the average number of accidents and their cost. Computational experiments on grid and random instances are presented in order to evaluate the algorithm's performance and to compare its results to the solutions provided by sequential approaches. [Received 11 May 2010; Revised 10 October 2010; Accepted 21 November 2010

Gilbert Laporte; Marta M.B. Pascoal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to determine if any of these factors had any effect on the distributions of control locations. In the final phase of the study McGrath measured response time and errors in locating controls in two cars, one was a 1973 Toyota and the other a 1973 Buick..., Chrysler, and Dodge. Also included were the following far eastern car makes: Toyota, Honda, Mazda, Hyundai, Isuzu, Nissan, and Geo. The automobiles were divided into six groups: 14 1. Foreign-make, small, mid-size, and sports cars. 2. Foreign...

Francis, Dawn Suzette

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

A study of the bond characteristics of concrete reinforcing bars coated with epoxy compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selected Refe~ ces. Appendix - A . 12 . 20 . 22 . 24 . 25 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Bond Stress at Slip of 0. 01 in. at Loaded End of the Bar . . . . 13 Bond Stress at Slip of 0. 001 in. at Free End of the Bar. . 14 A-1 Bond Stress and Steel.... SUMMARY A number of processes by which the steel-concrete bond can be improved are described. The procedures involve coating steel with a versamid epoxy compound and either casting the concrete around the treated reinforcement before the epoxy hardens...

Desai, Indravadan S

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Numbers 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement Number 13  

SciTech Connect

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), and Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER. These issues relate to: Design criteria -- structures, components, equipment, and systems; Reactor; Instrumentation and controls; Electrical power systems; Auxiliary systems; Conduct of operations; Accident analysis; and Quality assurance.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Rack Locations (24) Hatch and Berthing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rack Locations (24) Hatch and Berthing Mechanism Endcone Airflow and Plumbing Crossover Corner requirements of 24 equipment racks. Approximately half of these are for accommodation and control of ISS ) Width 4.3 m diameter (14 ft) Mass 14,515 kg (32,000 lb) 24,023 kg (52,962 lb) with all racks

474

Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach Belén Palop1,2 1Departamento de March 2009 Florida State University #12;Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model;Transportation Network Model Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model Network placement

Palop del Río, Belén

475

Forecasting the Locational Dynamics of Transnational Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasting the Locational Dynamics of Transnational Terrorism: A Network Analytic Approach Bruce A-0406 Fax: (919) 962-0432 Email: skyler@unc.edu Abstract--Efforts to combat and prevent transnational terror of terrorism. We construct the network of transnational terrorist attacks, in which source (sender) and target

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

476

Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices Metal Bins Deskside Bins with Side Saddle Rubbermaid Bins.58 for auxiliaries. And Non-Public Areas Public Offices Non-Public Recyclables Recyclables RecyclablesTrash Trash Trash #12;New Recycling Bin Guidelines Frequently Asked Questions (as of December 2008) · Why

Kirschner, Denise

477

Location management and Moving Objects Databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wolfson@cs.uic.edu #12;2 Location based services Examples: Where closest gas station? How do I get there;13 Applications-- Summary · Geographic resource discovery-- e.g. "Closest gas station" · Digital Battlefield/trigger examples: · During the past year, how many times was bus#5 late by more than 10 minutes at station 20

Wolfson, Ouri E.

478

Therapy: location-aware assessment and tasks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a system that allows therapists to assess and engage patients' in activities triggered by specific stressing contexts. The system is composed by: 1) a web application that the therapist uses to specify the activities and its ... Keywords: location based services, physiological recording, therapy

Lus Carrio; Marco de S; Lus Duarte; Tiago Antunes

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Measurement of the [bar over B][0 over s] ? D[? over s]D[+ over s] and [bar over B][0 over s] ? D[superscript ?]D[+ over s] Effective Lifetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the [bar over B][0 over s] meson in the decay[bar over B][0 over s] ? D[? over s]D[+ over s] is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an ...

Ilten, Philip James

480

Measurement of the tt[over-bar] production cross section in pp[over-bar] collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV using events with large missing transverse energy and jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report a measurement of the tt[over-bar] production cross section in pp[over-bar] collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2??fb[superscript -1] collected ...

Bauer, Gerry P.

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