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1

Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

Francis, Chester W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Brinkley, Frank S. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Emulsion explosives containing high concentrations of calcium nitrate  

SciTech Connect

A water-in-oil emulsion blasting agent is described having a discontinuous aqueous oxidizer salt solution phase which contains a calcium nitrate (CN) to ammonium nitrate (AN) weight ratio of 1.5 or greater, a continuous oil or water-immiscible liquid organic phase, an emulsifier, and, optionally, a density reducing agent. It is found that emulsion slurry blasting agents containing this relatively high amount of CN to AN have properties that conventional emulsion slurry explosives, those containing more AN than CN or solely AN, do not. Specifically, one property is that the high-CN emulsion blasting agents of the present composition can have much smaller critical diameters but yet pass the US DOT Blasting Agent tests. This result will be shown in the examples that follow. Thus, if AN is present as the principal oxidizer salt, emulsion explosives that have small critical diameters, and even those with relatively large critical diameters, generally are too sensitive to pass the Blasting Agent tests. If CN is the principal oxidizer, the emulsion blasting agents are less sensitive and more likely to pass the tests. This effect of CN has commercial significance. 10 claims.

Jessop, H.A.; Funk, A.G.

1982-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Evaluation of Composite Alumina Nanoparticle and Nitrate Eutectic Materials for use in Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to create and characterize high temperature alumina and nitrate salt eutectic nanofluids for use in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The nitrate eutectic was originally used in the TES system demonstrated as part of the Solar Two power tower and is currently employed as the TES material at Andasol 1 in Spain. Concentrations of alumina nanoparticles between 0.1% and 10% by weight were introduced into the base material in an effort to create nanofluids which would exhibit improved specific heat capacity to reduce the $/kWht thermal energy storage system costs. The composite materials were created using an aqueous mixing method in which both the nanoparticles and nitrate eutectic were placed into solution using acidic water. This solution was then sonicated in an ultrasonic bath in an effort to reduce nanoparticle agglomeration and to improve homogeneity. After boiling off the excess water, the nanoparticle-nitrate eutectic composite was recovered for characterization. The thermal properties of both the composite and base materials were characterized using the differential scanning calorimetry techniques outlined in ASTM E 1269. The created nanofluids were not stable and did not offer a cost-effective alternative to the current nitrate eutectic TES material. Despite these setbacks, a positive correlation between alumina concentration and nanofluid specific heat was demonstrated. Additionally, the specific heat capacities of the created nanofluids exceeded that predicted by the current theoretical models. These findings suggest that further work in the field of high temperature nanofluids for use in TES systems is warranted.

Malik, Darren R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were dispersed in a eutectic of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate (60:40 for mole fraction) to create nanofluids using a hot plate evaporation method and an air dryer method. The nominal Al2O3 (alumina) mass fraction was between 0 and 2%, and was determined as the ratio of the mass of Al2O3 nanoparticles to the total mass of the nanofluid. After the preparation of the nanofluids, Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) was used to measure the actual Al2O3 mass fraction in the nanofluids. The specific heat, heat of fusion, and melting point were measured with a Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter (MDSC). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were measured with Laser Flash Analysis (LFA). The MDSC results showed that the addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles enhanced the specific heat of the nanofluids synthesize from both methods. There was a parabolic relation between the specific heat and the Al2O3 mass fraction for the nanofluids synthesized from the hot plate evaporation method, with a maximum 31% enhancement at 0.78% Al2O3 mass fraction. The nanofluids synthesized from the air dryer method also resulted in enhanced specific heats which were higher at the same Al2O3 mass fraction than those of the nanofluids synthesized from the hot plate evaporation method. It was not determined why this enhancement occurred. The results also showed that the introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles had no significant effect on the heat of fusion and melting point of the nanofluids synthesized from either method. The LFA results showed that adding Al2O3 nanoparticles decreased the thermal diffusivity and the thermal conductivity of the nitrate eutectic.

Shao, Qian

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Transmission Benefits of Co-Locating Concentrating Solar Power and Wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In some areas of the U.S. transmission constraints are a limiting factor in deploying new wind and concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Texas is an example of one such location, where the best wind and solar resources are in the western part of the state, while major demand centers are in the east. The low capacity factor of wind is a compounding factor, increasing the relative cost of new transmission per unit of energy actually delivered. A possible method of increasing the utilization of new transmission is to co-locate both wind and concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage. In this work we examine the benefits and limits of using the dispatachability of thermal storage to increase the capacity factor of new transmission developed to access high quality solar and wind resources in remote locations.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE CYANOBACTERIUM PLECTONEMA BORYANUM: EFFECTS OF INITIAL NITRATE CONCENTRATION, LIGHT INTENSITY, AND INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYSTEM II BY DCMU  

SciTech Connect

The alarming rate at which atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are increasing due to the burning of fossil fuels will have incalculable consequences if disregarded. Fuel cells, a source of energy that does not add to carbon dioxide emissions, have become an important topic of study. Although signifi cant advances have been made related to fuel cells, the problem of cheap and renewable hydrogen production still remains. The cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum has demonstrated potential as a resolution to this problem by producing hydrogen under nitrogen defi cient growing conditions. Plectonema boryanum cultures were tested in a series of experiments to determine the effects of light intensity, initial nitrate concentration, and photosystem II inhibitor DCMU (3-(3,4- dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) upon hydrogen production. Cultures were grown in sterile Chu. No. 10 medium within photobioreactors constantly illuminated by halogen lights. Because the enzyme responsible for hydrogen production is sensitive to oxygen, the medium was continuously sparged with argon/CO2 (99.7%/0.3% vol/vol) by gas dispersion tubes immersed in the culture. Hydrogen production was monitored by using a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector. In the initial experiment, the effects of initial nitrate concentration were tested and results revealed cumulative hydrogen production was maximum at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM. A second experiment was then conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM to determine the effects of light intensity at 50, 100, and 200 ?mole m-2 s-1. Cumulative hydrogen production increased with increasing light intensity. A fi nal experiment, conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 2 mM, tested the effects of high light intensity at 200 and 400 ?mole m-2 s-1. Excessive light at 400 ?mole m-2 s-1 decreased cumulative hydrogen production. Based upon all experiments, cumulative hydrogen production rates were optimal at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM and a light intensity of 100 ?mole m-2 s-1. DCMU was shown in all experiments to severely decrease hydrogen production as time progressed. With the information acquired so far, future experiments with reducing substances could determine maximum rates of hydrogen production. If maximum hydrogen production rates proved to be large enough, Plectonema boryanum could be grown on an industrial scale to provide hydrogen gas as a renewable fuel.

Carter, B.; Huesemann, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Effects of Nanoparticle Augmentation of Nitrate Thermal Storage Materials for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy funded a project to determine if the specific heat of thermal energy storage materials could be improved by adding nanoparticles. The standard thermal energy storage materials are molten salts. The chosen molten salt was a sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic, commercially called Hitec Solar Salt. Two nanoparticle types were chosen, alumina and silica. The nanoparticle composite materials were fabricated by mixing the components in an aqueous solution, mixing that solution for a set amount of time using a sonic mixer, then removing the water from the aqueous solution, leaving the composite molten salt behind as a fine white powder. The thermal properties of the composite and plain material were measured using two techniques: American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) 1269E and Modulating Differential Scanning Calorimetry (MDSC). These two techniques measured the specific heat and the heat of fusion of the plain and composite materials. The results of all the ASTM and MDSC measurements suggest that the addition of the nanoparticles using the given manufacturing technique increased the specific heat of the molten salt by approximately 20 percent, with both measurement techniques showing approximately the same level of increase. The silica and the alumina improved the specific heat by nearly the same amount over the base material. The heat of fusion did not seem to be significantly altered compared to the observed heat of fusion value of the unmodified material. It was also observed that the nitrate and silica composite material's specific heat decreased if the material was raised to a temperature above 400C. The specific heat was observed to decrease over time, even when the temperature was well below 400C. It is unknown why this occurred. The nitrate plus alumina composite and the plain nitrate were stable to a temperature of 450C for the test duration.

Betts, Matthew

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, John L. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

www.elsevier.com/locate/envres Seasonal variation of arsenic concentration in wells in Nevada $  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The issue of seasonal arsenic measurement variability poses consequences regarding the interpretation and frequency of well water measurements for both public health research and surveillance. In this study, we evaluated seasonal variability in arsenic concentration in 356 wells in western Nevada. River flow data obtained from US Geological Survey National Water Information System were used to classify seasons as wet or dry, and mean differences in arsenic well concentrations measured during these seasons were compared. Arsenic concentrations in these wells averaged 72:9 mg=L (range, non-detect to 3000 mg=L). The mean difference in arsenic concentrations between the wet and dry seasons was 3:3 mg=L (p 0:78; average percent difference 2.3%). Eighty wells (22%) had higher arsenic concentrations in the wet season, 75 wells (21%) had higher arsenic concentrations in the dry season and no difference was seen in 201 wells (56%). The mean differences in wells with arsenic levels of 0–10, 11–50, 51–200, 4200 mg=L were 1:4 mg=L ðp 0:43Þ, 9:2mg=L ðp 0:36Þ, 15:1mg=Lðp 0:30Þ, and 49:9 mg=L ðp 0:59Þ. In summary, although changes in arsenic concentrations were seen in some wells, clear trends in arsenic concentration over time were not associated with the wet and dry seasons. These findings provide evidence that, in our study area as a whole, little seasonal variability occurs in arsenic concentrations, and repeated assessments of arsenic

Josef G. Thundiyil A; Yan Yuan B; Allan H. Smith B; Craig Steinmaus B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Location analysis and strontium-90 concentrations in deer antlers on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study was to examine the levels of strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) in deer antlers collected from near previously active reactor sites and distant from the reactor sites along that portion of the Columbia River which borders the Hanford Site. A second objective was to analyze the movements and home-ranges of mule deer residing within these areas and determine to what extent this information contributes to the observed {sup 90}Sr concentrations. {sup 90}Sr is a long-lived radionuclide (29.1 year half life) produced by fission in irradiated fuel in plutonium production reactors on the Hanford Site. It is also a major component of atmospheric fallout from weapons testing. Concentrations of radionuclides found in the developed environment onsite do not pose a health concern to humans or various wildlife routinely monitored. However, elevated levels of radionuclides in found biota may indicate routes of exposure requiring attention.

Tiller, B L; Eberhardt, L E; Poston, T M

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

13

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Concentration of remote-handled, transuranic, sodium nitrate-based sludge using agitated thin-film evaporators  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling and Packaging Plant (WHPP) is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to prepared transuranic waste for final disposal. Once operational, this facility will process, package, and certify remote-handled transuranic waste for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. One of the wastes that will be handled at WHIPP is the transuranic sludge currently stored at ORNL in eight 50,000-gal underground tanks. The use of an Agitated Thin-Film Evaporator (ATFE) for concentration of this waste is being investigated. Tests have shown that the ATFE can be used to produce a thick slurry, a powder, or a fused salt. A computer model developed at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to simulate the operation of ATFE's on their waste is being modified for use on the ORNL transuranic sludge. This paper summarizes the results of the test with the ATFEs to date, discusses the changes in the SRP model necessary to use this model with the ORNL waste, and compares the results of the model with the actual data taken from the operation of ATFEs at vendors' test facilities. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Berry, J.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Pen, Ben-Li (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan (Taiwan))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Evaluation of nitrate destruction methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide variety of high nitrate-concentration aqueous mixed [radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous] wastes are stored at various US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These wastes will ultimately be solidified for final disposal, although the waste acceptance criteria for the final waste form is still being determined. Because the nitrates in the wastes will normally increase the volume or reduce the integrity of all of the waste forms under consideration for final disposal, nitrate destruction before solidification of the waste will generally be beneficial. This report describes and evaluates various technologies that could be used to destroy the nitrates in the stored wastes. This work was funded by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development, through the Chemical/Physical Technology Support Group of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. All the nitrate destruction technologies will require further development work before a facility could be designed and built to treat the majority of the stored wastes. Several of the technologies have particularly attractive features: the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process produces an insoluble waste form with a significant volume reduction, electrochemical reduction destroys nitrates without any chemical addition, and the hydrothermal process can simultaneously treat nitrates and organics in both acidic and alkaline wastes. These three technologies have been tested using lab-scale equipment and surrogate solutions. At their current state of development, it is not possible to predict which process will be the most beneficial for a particular waste stream.

Taylor, P.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kurath, D.E.; Guenther, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Alkali metal nitrate purification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

PREPARATION OF URANIUM(IV) NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

A procedure was developed for the preparation of uranium(IV) nitrate solutions in dilute nitric acid. Zinc metal was used as a reducing agent for uranium(VI) in dilute sulfuric acid. The uranium(IV) was precipitated as the hydrated oxide and dissolved in nitric acid. Uranium(IV) nitrate solutions were prepared at a maximum concentration of 100 g/l. The uranium(VI) content was less than 2% of the uranium(IV). (auth)

Ondrejcin, R.S.

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Photovoltaic concentrator application experiment to be located at Sea World Park, Orlando, Florida. Phase I. System Design. Final report, June 1, 1978-February 28, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The General Electric/Sea World Photovoltaic Concentrator Application Experiment will be located at Sea World's Marine Park near Orlando, Florida. The experiment will consist of nine azimuth-tracking turntable arrays, each containing twenty-four elevation-tracking parabolic trough PV concentrators of a type developed on this contract. The system will produce a peak power output of 330 kW and an annual net electrical energy of 355 MWh corresponding to an annual direct normal insolation of 1375.5 kWh/m/sup 2/. A line-commutated DC/AC inverter controlled to operate at the solar array maximum power point will deliver three-phase power through a bidirectional transformer to a 13-kilovolt line serving the Sea World Park. In addition to generating electrical power, the system will produce 3.56 x 10/sup 5/ ton-hours of cooling for air conditioning a nearby shark exhibit by supplying collected thermal energy to a lithium-bromide absorption chiller. With credit included for the amount of electricity that would be required to produce this cooling by a vapor compression cycle, the overall system efficiency is estimated to be 11.7 percent.

Kirpich, A.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them.

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Perchlorate and Nitrate Remediation Efficiency and Microbial Diversity in a Containerized Wetland Bioreactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a method to remove perchlorate (14 to 27 {micro}g/L) and nitrate (48 mg/L) from contaminated groundwater using a wetland bioreactor. The bioreactor has operated continuously in a remote field location for more than two years with a stable ecosystem of indigenous organisms. This study assesses the bioreactor for long-term perchlorate and nitrate remediation by evaluating influent and effluent groundwater for reduction-oxidation conditions and nitrate and perchlorate concentrations. Total community DNA was extracted and purified from 10-g sediment samples retrieved from vertical coring of the bioreactor during winter. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of short, 16S rDNA, polymerase-chain-reaction products was used to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacteria genera identified were closely affiliated with bacteria widely distributed in soils, mud layers, and fresh water. Of the 17 dominant bands sequenced, most were gram negative and capable of aerobic or anaerobic respiration with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, and Nitrospira). Several identified genera (Rhizobium, Acinetobactor, and Xanthomonas) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a combined form (ammonia) usable by host plants. Isolates were identified from the Proteobacteria class, known for the ability to reduce perchlorate. Initial bacterial assessments of sediments confirm the prevalence of facultative anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing perchlorate and nitrate in situ.

Jr., B D; Dibley, V; Pinkart, H; Legler, T

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

22

ELECTROLYTIC OXIDATION OF ZIRCONIUM IN NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Zirconiurn alloys used in the fabrication of nuclear fuel elements can be disintegrated and converted to insoluble oxides by electrolytic treatment in concentrated nitrate solutions. This reaction shows promise as a technique for reprocessing nuclear fuels clad with Zircaloy-2. For a particular applied voltage, nitric acid achieves the highest rate of attack, but the reaction can be carried out at rates of 2 mg/(cm/sup 2/)(min) or greater in either 7.5M sodium nitrate or 2.3M aluminum nitrate. A reaction rate of 7 mg/(cm/sup 2/) (min) can be easily attained in either 8M nitric acid or 7.5M sodium nitrate. The rate of reaction is a function of the temperature and tho applied voltage. An as-yet unsolved problem is the carry--down of uranium with the insoluble zirconium oxide product. (auth)

Bomar, M.R.

1961-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Thermochemical nitrate reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates  

SciTech Connect

The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates is described, wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300 to 800/sup 0/C is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300.degree. to 800.degree. C. is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN); Stines, William B. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nitrate Removal in NITREXTM Permeable Reactive Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was originally the injection site for our tracer solution, but instead it became our lone up-gradient well) and ~48 hours (low tide) after injection. At every time point, samples were collected from all wells and nitrate concentrations were estimated from samples taken from the injection well right before the solution

Vallino, Joseph J.

28

Calcium nitrate explosive composition  

SciTech Connect

A blasting agent is composed of about 40% by wt of a mixture of calcium nitrate, water, a second inorganic oxidizing salt, and a water miscible organic fuel. These 4 components are provided in proportions to each other so as to provide an effective blasting agent. Optionally, up to 60% of additives well known in the explosives art, e.g., organic and inorganic fuels, sensitizers, density control agents, thickeners and gelling agents, inorganic nitrate based explosive compositions, can be incorporated into the blasting agent to provide certain desired characteristics. (42 claims)

Clark, W.F.; Slykhouse, T.E.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Energetic Material – Electro Nitration  

INL has developed an improved method of nitrating a nitro compound by oxidizing a chemical mediator in the presence of a voltage in order to produce an oxidizing agent. Then, the agent reacts with a nitro compound and ion source in a solution in order ...

30

Ammonium nitrate explosive systems  

SciTech Connect

Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

Stinecipher, Mary M. (Los Alamos, NM); Coburn, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

Steimke, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Project Location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USGS quadrangle base-map. 2. Plot Plan with Exploration Data with Building Footprint: 1 boring or exploration shaft per 5000 ft 2, with minimum of 2 for any one building. Exploratory trench locations. 3. Site Coordinates: (Latitude & Longitude) Engineering Geology/Site Characterization 4. Regional Geology and Regional Fault Maps: Concise page-sized illustrations with site plotted. 5. Geologic Map of Site: Detailed (large-scale) geologic map with proper symbols and geologic legend. 6. Subsurface Geology: Engineering geology description summarized from boreholes or trench logs. Summarize ground water conditions. 7. Geologic Cross Sections: Two or more detailed geologic sections with pertinent foundations and site grading. 8. Active Faulting & Coseismic Deformation Across Site: Prepare page-sized extract map of Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zones and/or any potential fault rupture hazard identified from the Safety Element of the local agency (city or county); show location of fault investigation trenches; 50-foot setbacks perpendicular from fault plane and proposed

Date Reviewed __________________________

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular activated carbon canisters to remove VOCs (Figure x). Following solar treatment, ground water containing approximately 46 mg/L of nitrate and 13 {micro}g/L of perchlorate is gravity-fed continuously into two parallel series of two-1,900 liter tank bioreactors. Each bioreactor contains coarse, aquarium-grade gravel and locally-obtained plant species such as cattails (Typha spp.), sedges (Cyperus spp.), and indigenous denitrifying microorganisms. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Sodium acetate is added to the first bioreactor in each of the two series to promote growth and metabolic activity of rhizome microorganisms. The split flow from each series is combined, and flows through two back-up ion exchange columns to assure complete perchlorate removal. Effluent from the ground water treatment system is monitored and discharged an infiltration trench in accordance with the Substantive Requirements for Waste Discharge issued by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board.

Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

34

Does nitrate deposition following astrophysical ionizing radiation events pose an additional threat to amphibians?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known that amphibians are especially susceptible to the combination of heightened UVB radiation and increased nitrate concentrations. Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that could pose a threat to life on Earth, through destruction of the ozone layer and subsequent increase in UVB, followed by deposition of nitrate. In this study, we investigate whether the nitrate deposition following an ionizing event is sufficiently large to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. We have converted predicted nitrate depositions to concentration values, utilizing data from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Acid Rain Monitoring Network web site. Our results show that the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water following the most intense ionization event likely in the last billion years would not be sufficient to cause a serious additional stress on amphibian populations and may actually provide some benefit by acting as fertilizer.

Brian C. Thomas; Michelle D. Honeyman

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

35

Amphibian nitrate stress as an additional terrestrial threat from astrophysical ionizing radiation events?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As diversity in amphibian species declines, the search for causes has intensified. Work in this area has shown that amphibians are especially susceptible to the combination of heightened UVB radiation and increased nitrate concentrations. Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that could pose a threat to life on Earth, through destruction of the ozone layer and subsequent increase in UVB, followed by deposition of nitrate. In this study, we investigate whether the nitrate deposition following an ionizing event is sufficiently large to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. We have converted predicted nitrate depositions to concentration values, utilizing data from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Acid Rain Monitoring Network web site. Our results show that the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water following the most intense ionization event likely in the last billion years would no...

Thomas, Brian C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Novel Integration of an Ultraviolet Nitrate Sensor On Board a Towed Vehicle for Mapping Open-Ocean Submesoscale Nitrate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results from a deployment of the SUV-6 ultraviolet spectrophotometer, integrated with the SeaSoar towed vehicle, are presented. The innovative, combined system measures nitrate concentration at high spatial resolution (4 m vertically, 5 ...

Rosalind Pidcock; Meric Srokosz; John Allen; Mark Hartman; Stuart Painter; Matt Mowlem; David Hydes; Adrian Martin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Corrosion of aluminides by molten nitrate salt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The corrosion of titanium-, iron-, and nickel-based aluminides by a highly aggressive, oxidizing NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} has been studied at 650{degree}C. It was shown that weight changes could be used to effectively evaluate corrosion behavior in the subject nitrate salt environments provided these data were combined with salt analyses and microstructural examinations. The studies indicated that the corrosion of relatively resistant aluminides by these nitrate salts proceeded by oxidation and a slow release from an aluminum-rich product layer into the salt at rates lower than that associated with many other types of metallic materials. The overall corrosion process and resulting rate depended on the particular aluminide being exposed. In order to minimize corrosion of nickel or iron aluminides, it was necessary to have aluminum concentrations in excess of 30 at. %. However, even at a concentration of 50 at. % Al, the corrosion resistance of TiAl was inferior to that of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al. At higher aluminum concentrations, iron, nickel, and iron-nickel aluminides exhibited quite similar weight changes, indicative of the principal role of aluminum in controlling the corrosion process in NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} salts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Thorium Nitrate Stockpile--From Here to Eternity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC), a field level activity of the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) has stewardship of a stockpile of thorium nitrate that has been in storage for decades. The stockpile is made up of approximately 3.2 million kg (7 million lb) of thorium nitrate crystals (hydrate form) stored at two depot locations in the United States. DNSC sought technical assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define and quantify the management options for the thorium nitrate stockpile. This paper describes methodologies and results comprising the work in Phase 1 and Phase 2. The results allow the DNSC to structure and schedule needed tasks to ensure continued safe long-term storage and/or phased disposal of the stockpile.

Hermes, W. H.; Hylton, T. D.; Mattus, C.H.; Storch, S. N.; Singley, P.S.; Terry. J. W.; Pecullan, M.; Reilly, F. K.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product. 3 figures.

Mattus, A.J.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

Lupica, S.B.

1975-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

Using solvent extraction to process nitrate anion exchange column effluents  

SciTech Connect

Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO), a new organophosphorous extractant, and a new centrifugal mixer-settler both recently developed at Argonne were evaluated for their potential use in the recovery of actinides from nitrate anion exchange column effluents. The performance of the extractant was evaluated by measuring the extraction coefficient values as a function of acid and salt concentration. Additional performance parameters include extraction coefficient behavior as a function of the total metal concentration in the organic phase, and comparison of different stripping and organic scrubbing techniques. A simulated effluent stream was used to evaluate the performance of the centrifugal mixer-settlers by comparing experimental and calculated interstage concentration profiles. Both the CMPO extractant and the centrifugal mixer-settlers have potential for processing nitrate column effluents, particularly if the stripping behavior can be improved. Details of the proposed process are presented in the flowsheet and contactor design analyses.

Yarbro, S.L.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Electrolytic production of uranous nitrate  

SciTech Connect

Efficient production of uranous nitrate is important in nuclear fuel reprocessing because U(IV) acts as a plutonium reductant in solvent extraction and can be coprecipitated with plutonium and/or throium as oxalates during fuel reprocessing. Experimental conditions are described for the efficient electrolytic production of uranous nitrate for use as a reductant in the SRP Purex process. The bench-scale, continuous-flow, electrolysis cell exhibits a current efficiency approaching 100% in combination with high conversion rates of U(VI) to U(IV) in simulated and actual SRP Purex solutions. High current efficiency is achieved with a voltage-controlled mercury-plated platinum electrode and the use of hydrazine as a nitrite scavenger. Conversion of U(VI) to U(IV) proceeds at 100% efficiency. Cathodic gas generation is minimal. The low rate of gas generation permits a long residence time within the cathode, a necessary condition for high conversions on a continuous basis. Design proposals are given for a plant-scale, continuous-flow unit to meet SRP production requirements. Results from the bench-scale tests indicate that an 8-kW unit can supply sufficient uranous nitrate reductant to meet the needs of the Purex process at SRP.

Orebaugh, E.G.; Propst, R.C.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel In Concentrated Nitrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Materials. Presentation Title, Stress ...

46

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Title Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hering, Susanne V., Melissa M. Lunden, Marc L. Fischer, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 41 Pagination 639-654 Abstract Time-resolved fine particle concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were examined to assess the appropriateness of using regional data and calculated air exchange rates to model indoor concentrations of particles from outdoor sources. The data set includes simultaneous, sub-hourly aerosol composition measurements at three locations: a regional monitoring site in Fresno, California, inside of an unoccupied residence in Clovis, California, located 6 km northeast of the regional site, and immediately outside of this same residence. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were modeled using varying sets of inputs to determine the influence of three factors on model accuracy: the constraints of the simplified indoor-outdoor model, measured versus modeled air exchange rates, and local versus regional outdoor measurements.

47

Nitrate and Perchlorate removal from groundwater by ion exchange  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a small scale ion exchange unit (Krudico, Inc of Auborn, IA) for removal of nitrate and perchlorate from groundwater at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. The unit was able to treat 3,600 gallons of Site 300 groundwater, at an average influent concentration of 100 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} before breakthrough occurred. The unit contained 2.5 ft{sup 3} of Sybron SR-7 resin. Seventy gallons of regeneration waste were generated (water treated to waste ratio of 51:1). The effluent concentration was about 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -}, which is equivalent to a treatment efficiency of at least 80%. There are several options for implementing this technology at Site 300. A target well, in the 817 area, has been selected. It has a 3 to 4 gpm flow rate, and concentrations of 90 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} and 40 {micro}g/L perchlorate. The different treatment options include ion exchange treatment of nitrate only, nitrate and perchlorate, or perchlorate only. Option 1: For the treatment of nitrate only, this unit will be able to treat 3,700 gallons of water before regeneration is required. If both columns of the ion exchange unit are used, 7,400 gallons could be treated before the columns will need to be regenerated (producing 140 gallons of waste, per cycle or every 1.5 days). The effluent nitrate concentration is expected to be about 17 mg/L. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated. Option 2: If only perchlorate is to be removed with ion exchange at the 817 area, a smaller unit should be considered. A 55 gallon canister filled with ion exchange resin should be able to reduce perchlorate concentrations in the groundwater from 40 {micro}g/L to non-detect levels for three years before the resin would need to be replaced. The contaminant-laden resin would be disposed of as hazardous waste. It is not practical to regenerate the resin because of the extreme difficulty of removing perchlorate from the resin. Due to the selectivity of the ion exchange resin, it will also be possible to selectively remove perchlorate from nitrate-contaminated water. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.02 per gallon of water treated. Option 3: Another alternative is to treat both perchlorate and nitrate. A three column unit would be built. The first column would capture perchlorate and the resin would be replaced rather than regenerated. The second and third column would be operated as under Option 1 to treat nitrate. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated.

Burge, S; Halden, R

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Location and Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facts, Figures Location and Infrastructure Location and Infrastructure LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and...

49

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located...

50

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Concentrating Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concentrating photovoltaics (CPV) are a promising alternative to flat-plate photovoltaics in high direct normal irradiance (DNI) environments. The technology’s basic operating characteristics offer significant upside compared with other solar technologies: higher system efficiencies of upwards of 30%+; higher capacity factors, generated through two-axis tracking, exceeding 30% in ideal locations; lower cellular degradation from heat compared to flat-plate PV; lower water requirements; and reduced footpri...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment Title The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment...

53

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester  

SciTech Connect

A process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester compound and related intermediates is provided.

Chavez, David E; Naud, Darren L; Hiskey, Michael A

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

ARM - Instrument Location Table  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsLocation Table govInstrumentsLocation Table Instruments Location Table Contacts Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument Locations Site abbreviations explained in the key. Instrument Name Abbreviation NSA SGP TWP AMF C1 C2 EF BF CF EF IF C1 C2 C3 EF IF Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor ACSM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer AERI Aethalometer AETH Ameriflux Measurement Component AMC Aerosol Observing System AOS Meteorological Measurements associated with the Aerosol Observing System AOSMET Broadband Radiometer Station BRS

58

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Fiat 500 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer...

59

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Nissan Altima Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle...

60

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chrysler 300 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer...

62

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop...

63

Facility location: distributed approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we initiate the study of the approximability of the facility location problem in a distributed setting. In particular, we explore a trade-off between the amount of communication and the resulting approximation ratio. We give a distributed ... Keywords: distributed approximation, facility location, linear programming, primal-dual algorithms

Thomas Moscibroda; Rogert Wattenhofer

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reading Room Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOIA Offices and Reading Rooms FOIA Offices and Reading Rooms FOIA Office Locations Our FOIA Officers are located at various sites throughout the DOE complex, each with responsibility for records located at or under the jurisdiction of the site. We recommend that you send your request directly to that specific site. This will shorten the processing time. However, if you do not know which location has responsive records, you may either call the Headquarters FOIA office at (202) 586-5955 to determine the appropriate office, or mail the request to the Headquarters FOIA office. Other records are publicly available in the facilities listed below: Headquarters U.S. Department of Energy FOIA/Privacy Act Group 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Phone: 202-586-5955 Fax: 202-586-0575

65

Entrance Maze Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entrance Maze Locations Entrance Maze Locations for the Storage Ring Tunnel Martin Knott LS-83 2/17/87 The Purpose of this note is to document the locations and decision rationale of the entrance mazes for the APS storage ring. There are a total of seven entrance mazes, four on the infield side and three on the operating floor side of the ring. Three of the infield mazes are associated with infield buildings, one in the Extraction Building and one each in the two RF Buildings. These three were located to provide convenient passage between the technical buildings and the storage ring components associated with those buildings. The Extraction Building maze allows passage between the positron beam transfer area and the storage ring two sectors upstream of the injection

66

Magma Source Location Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of Industry/University geophysicists was conducted to obtain their opinions on the existence of shallow (less than 10 km from surface) magma bodies in the western conterminous United States and methods for locating and defining them. Inputs from 35 individuals were received and are included. Responses were that shallow magma bodies exist and that existing geophysical sensing systems are adequate to locate them.

Hardee, H.C.; Dunn, J.C.; Colp, J.L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reduction of Perchlorate and Nitrate by Aluminum Activated by pH Change and Electrochemically Induced Pitting Corrosion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly oxidized species like perchlorate and nitrate that are released into the environment by anthropogenic activities are a source of concern as they have been known to contaminate groundwater. These species are extremely soluble in water and can migrate through aquifer systems, travelling substantial distances from the original site of contamination. Due to their high solubility, these oxy-anions cannot be treated using conventional treatment processes like filtration and sedimentation. Several treatment technologies are currently available to abate the human health risk due to exposure to perchlorate and nitrate. However, most of the existing treatment processes are expensive or have limitations, like generation of brines with high concentrations of perchlorate or nitrate. Aluminum can effectively reduce perchlorate and nitrate, if the protective oxide film that separates the thermodynamically reactive Al0 from most environments is removed. Aluminum was activated by pH change and electrochemically induced, pitting corrosion to remove the passivating oxide layer and expose the underlying, thermodynamically reactive, zero-valent aluminum. A partially oxidized species of aluminum, like monovalent aluminum, is believed to bring about the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate. This research studied the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate by aluminum that was activated by these two mechanisms. Results indicated that aluminum activated by pH change resulted in an instantaneous decrease in perchlorate concentration without any increase in chlorate or chloride concentrations, which suggests that the perchlorate might be adsorbed on the aluminum oxide surface. However, aluminum activated by electrochemically induced pitting corrosion can effectively reduce perchlorate to chlorate. Nitrate, on the other hand, was reduced completely to ammonia by both treatment mechanisms. The studies conducted in this dissertation suggest that aluminum can be effectively used as a reducing agent to develop a treatment process to reduce perchlorate and nitrate.

Raut Desai, Aditya B.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

SEPARATION OF URANYL NITRATE BY EXTRACTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for obtaining U/sup 233/ from solutions containing Pa/sup 233/. A carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/, is formed in such solutions and carries with it the Pa/sup 233/ present. This precipitate is then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is aged to allow decay of the Pa/ sup 233/ into U/sup 233/. After a sufficient length of time the U/sup 233/ bearing solution is made 2.5 to 4.5 Molar in manganese nitrate by addition thereof, and the solution is then treated with ether to obtain uranyl nitrate by solvent extraction techniques.

Stoughton, R.W.; Steahly, F.L.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same before the current treatment (759 ppm dry) and after treatment (745 ppm dry or {approx}248 ppm wet). Treatment of the second batch of resin (No.23408) was very successful. Chloride concentration decreased from 120,000 ppm dry to an average of 44 ppm dry or {approx}15ppm wet, which easily passes the 250 ppm wet criterion. Per guidance from HB Line Engineering, SRNL blended Batch 80302 resin with Batch P9059 resin which had been treated previously by ResinTech to remove chloride. The chloride concentrations for the two drums of Batch P9059 were 248 ppm dry ({approx}83 ppm wet) {+-}22.8% and 583 ppm dry ({approx}194 ppm wet) {+-} 11.8%. The blended resin was packaged in five gallon buckets.

Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.; Leishear, R.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

Pine Tree Growth Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pine Tree Growth Locations Pine Tree Growth Locations Name: Amielee Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do pine trees not grow south of the equator? Replies: Dear Amielee, The natural distribution of the pines is the northern hemisphere: http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/tree/eukaryotes/green_plants/embryophytes/conif ers/pinaceae/pinus/pinus.html However, pines have become introduced into the southern hemisphere through cultivation: http://www.woodweb.com/~treetalk/Radiata_Pine/wowhome.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, Ph.D. Hi Amielee Some pine trees do live south of the equator but we (I live in Australia) do not have the huge forests of native conifers that you have in the northern hemisphere. Even in the northern hemisphere conifers are only found in two forest types: 1. Tiaga

71

location | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

location location Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released November 30th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biodiesel ethanol location production capacity transportation Data application/zip icon Biorefineries.zip (zip, 7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

72

Optimal fault location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic goal of power system is to continuously provide electrical energy to the users. Like with any other system, failures in power system can occur. In those situations it is critical that correct remedial actions are applied as soon as possible after the accurate fault condition and location are detected. This thesis has been focusing on automated fault location procedure. Different fault location algorithms, classified according to the spatial placement of physical measurements on single ended, multiple ended and sparse system-wide, are investigated. As outcome of this review, methods are listed as function of different parameters that influence their accuracy. This comparison is than used for generating procedure for optimal fault location algorithm selection. According to available data, and position of the fault with respect to the data, proposed procedure decides between different algorithms and selects an optimal one. A new approach is developed by utilizing different data structures such as binary tree and serialization in order to efficiently implement algorithm decision engine. After accuracy of algorithms is strongly influenced by available input data, different data sources are recommended in proposed architecture such as the digital fault recorders, circuit breaker monitoring, SCADA, power system model and etc. Algorithm for determining faulted section is proposed based on the data from circuit breaker monitoring devices. This algorithm works in real time by recognizing to which sequence of events newly obtained recording belongs. Software prototype of the proposed automated fault location analysis is developed using Java programming language. Fault location analysis is automatically triggered by appearance of new event files in a specific folder. The tests were carried out using the real life transmission system as an example.

Knezev, Maja

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant on Facebook Tweet about SunShot...

74

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limonene-1-nitrate, 1-hydroxy-butane- 2-nitrate, 3-hydroxy-our measured spectra of the butane hydroxynitrate we foundstandards except for the butane hydroxynitrate the O/C based

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

University Location Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location Project Description Location Project Description Boise State University Boise, Idaho Boise State University has undertaken a study of the structural setting and geothermal potential at Neal Hot Springs that will integrate geology, geochemistry, and geophysics to analyze the site on the western Snake River plain. Boise State will determine if Neal Hot Springs sustains the necessary rock dilation and conduit pathways for hydrothermal fluid flow and successful geothermal development. The result will be new data acquisition, including a deep geophysical survey and fault surface data. Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado Colorado School of Mines will conduct an investigation near Homedale, Idaho, an area that straddles volcanic rock and unconsolidated sediments.

76

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Molten nitrate salt technology development status report  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Solubilty and growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of silver nitrate in ethanol was determined at various temperatures. The growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol were then determined using initial derivaties of temperature and desupersaturation in a mixed-batch crystallizer. For ... Keywords: ethanol, growth kinetics, initial derivatives, silver nitrate, solubility

M. Manteghian; A. Ebrahimi

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Location-based communication services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our demo shows end-user-oriented location-based services based on application-layer, human understandable location descriptions. Keywords: internet telephony, location-based services

Xiaotao Wu; Ron Shacham; Matthew J. Mintz-Habib; Kundan Singh; Henning Schulzrinne

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electric current locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations Locations Clean Cities coalitions are primarily located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. Select the dots on the map for information about individual coalitions. See also the list of coalitions by designation date. United States map showing Clean Cities Coalition locations. Philadelphia State of Delaware Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Connecticut Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State State of Vermont Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Detroit Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) Central New York (Syracuse) Capital District (Albany) Empire Clean Cities State of Maryland Washington DC Metropolitan South Shore Western Riverside County Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Atlanta Alabama Denver Philadelphia State of Delaware Las Vegas Washington DC Metropolitan Massachusetts Clean Cities Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) Southeast Florida Chicago Land of Enchantment Wisconsin-Southeast Area Southern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Long Beach Antelope Valley Utah Clean Cities State of Maryland Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership Coalition Rogue Valley State of West Virginia San Joaquin Valley San Francisco Columbia-Willamette St. Louis Central New York (Syracuse) Dallas/Ft. Worth Honolulu Central Arkansas Pittsburgh Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Los Angeles Coachella Valley Region Northern Colorado Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) Virginia Clean Cities Coalition San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Maine Clean Communities Tulsa Valley of the Sun (Phoenix) Western Riverside County New Jersey Genesee Region (Rochester) Western Washington Clean Cities (Seattle) Ocean State Connecticut Connecticut2 Kansas City Regional Coalition Greater Indiana Clean Cities Coalition Capital District (Albany) Tucson Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Alamo Area (San Antonio) Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill) Twin Cities Clean Fuels Ohio Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Greater Lansing Palmetto State Houston-Galveston Middle Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition State of Iowa Treasure Valley Central Coast Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership Land of Sky Coalition

83

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Locations Locations Clean Cities coalitions are primarily located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. Select the dots on the map for information about individual coalitions. See also the list of coalitions by designation date. United States map showing Clean Cities Coalition locations. Philadelphia State of Delaware Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Connecticut Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State State of Vermont Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Detroit Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) Central New York (Syracuse) Capital District (Albany) Empire Clean Cities State of Maryland Washington DC Metropolitan South Shore Western Riverside County Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Atlanta Alabama Denver Philadelphia State of Delaware Las Vegas Washington DC Metropolitan Massachusetts Clean Cities Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) Southeast Florida Chicago Land of Enchantment Wisconsin-Southeast Area Southern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Long Beach Antelope Valley Utah Clean Cities State of Maryland Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership Coalition Rogue Valley State of West Virginia San Joaquin Valley San Francisco Columbia-Willamette St. Louis Central New York (Syracuse) Dallas/Ft. Worth Honolulu Central Arkansas Pittsburgh Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Los Angeles Coachella Valley Region Northern Colorado Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) Virginia Clean Cities Coalition San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Maine Clean Communities Tulsa Valley of the Sun (Phoenix) Western Riverside County New Jersey Genesee Region (Rochester) Western Washington Clean Cities (Seattle) Ocean State Connecticut Connecticut2 Kansas City Regional Coalition Greater Indiana Clean Cities Coalition Capital District (Albany) Tucson Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Alamo Area (San Antonio) Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill) Twin Cities Clean Fuels Ohio Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Greater Lansing Palmetto State Houston-Galveston Middle Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition State of Iowa Treasure Valley Central Coast Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership Land of Sky Coalition

84

GRAPHITE PRODUCTION UTILIZING URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE CATALYST  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>The graphitizing of a mixture composed of furfuryl alcohol binder and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate hardener and the subsequent curing, baking, and graphitizing with pressure being initially applied prior to curing are described. The pressure step may be carried out by extrusion, methyl cellulose being added to the mixture before the completion of extrusion. Uranium oxide may be added to the graphitizable mixture prior to the heating and pressure steps. The graphitizable mixture may consist of discrete layers of different compositions. (AEC)

Sheinberg, H.; Armstrong, J.R.; Schell, D.H.

1964-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

METHOD OF LOCATING GROUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>This patent presents a method for locating a ground in a d-c circult having a number of parallel branches connected across a d-c source or generator. The complete method comprises the steps of locating the ground with reference to the mildpoint of the parallel branches by connecting a potentiometer across the terminals of the circuit and connecting the slider of the potentiometer to ground through a current indicating instrument, adjusting the slider to right or left of the mildpoint so as to cause the instrument to indicate zero, connecting the terminal of the network which is farthest from the ground as thus indicated by the potentiometer to ground through a condenser, impressing a ripple voltage on the circuit, and then measuring the ripple voltage at the midpoint of each parallel branch to find the branch in which is the lowest value of ripple voltage, and then measuring the distribution of the ripple voltage along this branch to determine the point at which the ripple voltage drops off to zero or substantially zero due to the existence of a ground. The invention has particular application where a circuit ground is present which will disappear if the normal circuit voltage is removed.

Macleish, K.G.

1958-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] 3250 Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Revision Number 1 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3250 31.2 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.462 0.014 Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package - Manual Transmission - All tests completed in ECO mode - EPA shift schedule modified based on vehicle shift light activity Revision Number 1 Notes: Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE Gasoline Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package

87

Corrosion of stainless and carbon steels in molten mixtures of industrial nitrates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion behavior of two stainless steels and carbon steel in mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} was evaluated to determine if impurities found in commodity grades of alkali nitrates aggravate corrosivity as applicable to an advanced solar thermal energy system. Corrosion tests were conducted for 7000 hours with Types 304 and 316 stainless steels at 570C and A36 carbon steel at 316C in seven mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} containing variations in impurity concentrations. Corrosion tests were also conducted in a ternary mixture of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses while oxidation products were examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The nitrate mixtures were periodically analyzed for changes in impurity concentrations and for soluble corrosion products.

Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Prairie, M.R.; Chavez, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Location and design of a competitive facility for profit maximisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A single facility has to be located in competition with fixed existing facilities of similar type. Demand is supposed to be concentrated at a finite number of points,

89

Mine locations: Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect

Upon accepting this internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory, I was excited but a bit nervous because I was placed into a field I knew nothing about and did not incorporate my mechanical engineering background. However, I stayed positive and realized that experience and education can come in many forms and that this would be a once in a lifetime opportunity. The EES-II Division (which stands for Earth and Environmental Sciences, Geophysics division) concentrates on several topics, including Nuclear Treaty Verification Seismology. The study of this is extremely important in order to monitor countries that have nuclear capability and make sure they follow the rules of the international comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty. Seismology is only one aspect of this monitoring and EES-II works diligently with many other groups here at Los Alamos and across the world.

Perry, Bradley A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chrysler 300 Chrysler 300 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 8/7/2013 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 4250 38.61 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.8894 0.01105 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Revision Number 3 Notes: Test Fuel Information 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Fuel type Tier II EEE HF437 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Fuel density [g/ml] Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 0.743 18490 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S

91

Production and Handling Slide 15: Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate, ADU, UO2 Refer to caption below for image...

92

Production and Handling Slide 13: Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADU Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate, ADU Refer to caption below for image...

93

Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions  

SciTech Connect

The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F[sup [minus

Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. (Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (United States))

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

95

RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

Hoffman, E.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Fuel Type Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Include private stations Not all stations are open to the public. Choose this option to also search private fueling stations. Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that stations are open, available to the public, and have the fuel prior to making a trip to that location. Some stations in our database have addresses that could not be located by the Station Locator application. This may result in the station appearing in the center of the zip code area instead of the actual location. If you're having difficulty, please contact the technical response team at

97

Paper: Safeguards design for a plutonium concentrator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the design of a nonlinear estimator to be used in conjunction with on-line detectors for a plutonium nitrate concentrator. Using a complex state-of-the-art process model to simulate 'realistic' data, we show that the estimator ... Keywords: (diversion detection), (nuclear safeguards), Kalman filter, decision theory, nonlinear filtering, nuclear plants, on-line operation, optimal filtering, state estimation

J. V. Candy; R. B. Rozsa

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

USE OF A UNIQUE BIOBARRIER TO REMEDIATE NITRATE AND PERCHLORATE IN GROUNDWATER  

SciTech Connect

Research was conducted to evaluate a multiple-layer system of volcanic rock, limestone, Apatite mineral and a 'biobarrier' to impede migration of radionuclides, metals and colloids through shallow alluvial groundwater, while simultaneously destroying contaminants such as nitrate and perchlorate. The 'bio' portion of this Multi-Barrier system uses highly porous, slowly degradable, carbon-based material (pecan shells) that serves as an energy source and supports the growth of indigenous microbial populations capable of destroying biodegradable compounds. The studies, using elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater, have demonstrated reduction from levels of 6.5-9.7 mM nitrate (400-600 mg/L) to below discharge limits (0.16 mM nitrate). Perchlorate levels of 4.3 {micro}M (350 {micro}g/L) were also greatly reduced. Elevated levels of nitrate in drinking water are a public health concern, particularly for infants and adults susceptible to gastric cancer. Primary sources of contamination include feedlots, agriculture (fertilization), septic systems, mining and nuclear operations. A major source of perchlorate contamination in water is ammonium perchlorate from manufacture/use of rocket propellants. Perchlorate, recently identified as an EPA contaminant of concern, may affect thyroid function and cause tumor formation. A biobarrier used to support the growth of microbial populations (i.e. a biofilm) is a viable and inexpensive tool for cleaning contaminated groundwater. Aquatic ecosystems and human populations worldwide are affected by contaminated water supplies. One of the most frequent contaminants is nitrate. Remediation of nitrate in groundwater and drinking water by biodegradation is a natural solution to this problem. Microbial processes play an extremely important role in in situ groundwater treatment technologies. The assumption of carbon limitation is the basis for addition of carbon-based substrates to a system in the development of bioremediation schemes for nitrate-contaminated groundwater. The biobarrier concept typically involves construction of a wall of porous carbon-based material that is placed in a trench perpendicular to the direction of groundwater flow that extends at least the width and depth of the contaminant plume. A biobarrier can be used as a stand-alone system when biodegradable materials are the only contaminants, or it can be used along with other barriers, as has been done in the LANL Multi-Barrier system, designed to remediate multiple contaminants. The groundwater system must be reasonably well characterized in terms of direction of flow, width and depth of plume, concentrations along the plume, flow velocity and hydraulic conductivity. Barrier technology is largely applicable to shallow, alluvial plumes (less than 20 feet deep), although permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) have been placed at much greater depths, up to 70 ft. deep. Under these conditions, a barrier could be placed across the plume downstream from the source to prevent migration from a controlled site. The most effective barrier materials are natural waste materials of high porosity, resistant to degradation, that will not require removal or replacement with time. Pecan shells are a significant waste problem in pecan-growing areas. The most commonly used solution is land disposal. Use in biobarriers provides a desirable alternative. Pecan shells are composed of cellulose and lignin, and they degrade very slowly, providing a 'time-release' carbon source. If left uncrushed, they provide a high porosity material. Fishbone is a waste product made of calcium phosphate, or hydroxyapatite, which is very resistant to deterioration. Apatite-II effectively removes dissolved metals and radionuclides from groundwater. The precipitates formed with metals and radionuclides are highly insoluble and very unlikely to leach subsequently from the barrier. The residual tissue associated with the fishbones provides nutrient materials that contribute to formation of a microbial population as an additional benefit. W

Strietelmeier, E. A. (Elizabeth A.); Espinosa, Melissa L. (Melissa L.); Adams, J. D. (Joshua D. ); Leonard, P. A. (Patricia A.); Hodge, E. M. (Evangeline M.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Progress on building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 in homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a physically-based, semi-empirical model that describes the concentration of indoor concentration of PM-2.5 (particle mass that is less than 2.5 microns in diameter) and its sulfate, nitrate, organic and black carbon constituents, derived from outdoor sources. We have established the methodology and experimental plan for building the model. Experimental measurements in residential style houses, in Richmond and Fresno, California, are being conducted to provide parameters for and evaluation of this model. The model will be used to improve estimates of human exposures to PM-2.5 of outdoor origin. The objectives of this study are to perform measurement and modeling tasks that produce a tested, semi-mechanistic description of chemical species-specific and residential PM-2.5 arising from the combination of outdoor PM and gas phase sources (HNO{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}), and indoor gas phase (e.g. NH{sub 3}) sources. We specifically address how indoor PM is affected by differences between indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity. In addition, we are interested in losses of particles within the building and as they migrate through the building shell. The resulting model will be general enough to predict probability distributions for species-specific indoor concentrations of PM-2.5 based on outdoor PM, and gas phase species concentrations, meteorological conditions, building construction characteristics, and HVAC operating conditions. Controlled intensive experiments were conducted at a suburban research house located in Clovis, California. The experiments utilized a large suite of instruments including conventional aerosol, meteorological and house characterization devices. In addition, two new instruments were developed providing high time resolution for the important particulate species of nitrate, sulfate, and carbon as well as important gaseous species including ammonia and nitric acid. Important initial observations include the result that, with rare exceptions, there is virtually no nitrate found inside the house. This nitrate appears to dissociate into ammonia and nitric acid with the nitric acid quickly depositing out. Initial model development has included work on characterizing penetration and deposition rates, the dynamic behavior of the indoor/outdoor ratio, and predicting infiltration rates. Results from the exploration of the indoor/outdoor ratio show that the traditional assumption of steady state conditions does not hold in general. Many values of the indoor/outdoor ratio exist for any single value of the infiltration rate. Successful prediction of the infiltration rate from measured driving variables is important for extending the results from the Clovis house to the larger housing stock.

Lunden, Melissa M.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Littlejohn, David; Fischer, Marc L.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Brown, Nancy J.; Hering, Susanne

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Precision zero-home locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Precision zero-home locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

Stone, W.J.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Production and Handling Slide 17: Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, UF4 Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate, ADU, UO2, UF4 Refer to caption below for...

105

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C[sub 3] or larger.

Lockridge, J.E.; Fritz, J.S.

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C.sub.3 or larger.

Lockridge, James E. (Ames, IA); Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA)

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effects of 2-Ethylhexyl Nitrate on Diesel-Spray Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel fuel ignition-enhancing additives, such as 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, are known to reduce emissions from diesel engines; however, the mechanisms by which the emissions reduction occur are not understood. This report covers the first phase of a research project supported by Ethyl Corporation that is aimed at developing a detailed understanding of how 2-ethylhexyl nitrate alters in-cylinder injection, ignition, and combustion processes to reduce diesel engine emissions.

Higgins, B.; Mueller, C.; Siebers, D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nonaqueous purification of mixed nitrate heat transfer media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonaqueous, in-line method for removing carbonate and hydroxide contamination from a molten mixed sodium nitrate/potassium nitrate heat transfer salt. The method comprises dissolving a stoichiometric quantity of anhydrous Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2 in the melt whereby an insoluble CaCO.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2 precipitate is formed. The precipitate can be removed by settling, filtration or floatation techniques.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Electroactive Materials for Anion Separation - Technetium from Nitrate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) exist as anions. These include the high priority pollutants chromate, pertechnetate, and nitrate ions. In addition, there are also industrial and urban applications where the separation of anionic species from aqueous streams is critical. Examples include industrial water recycle and waste water treatment (e.g., chloride ion removal for the pulp and paper industry, borate ion in the chemical and nuclear industries) and drinking water and agricultural waste treatment (e.g., nitrate removal). In the proposed research, technetium is chosen as the target pollutant. Because of its half-life of 213,000 years, technetium (99Tc) presents a long-term hazard for waste disposal. Much of the 99Tc in the tank wastes is present as pertechnetate (TcO4-), accounting for its high solubility and mobility in aqueous systems. Several sorbents are available for removing TcO4- from alkaline waste brines, but each has important drawbacks. The use of commercial ion exchange (IX) resins to extract TcO4-, e.g., Reillex{trademark}-HPQ (Reilly Industries) and ABEC 5000 (Eichrom Industries), generates significant secondary waste. The elution of TcO4- from Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resins requires either concentrated nitric acid or a concentrated caustic solution of ethylene-diamine containing a small amount of tin chloride. This eluant has a short shelf life requiring frequent preparation, and the 99Tc is delivered in a complexed, reduced form. While TcO4- can be eluted from ABEC 5000 resins using de-ionized water, the much-reduced capacity of ABEC 5000 resins in comparison to the Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resins leads to a low column capacity. In general, unwanted secondary wastes are generated because (1) the only effective eluant happens to be hazardous and/or (2) the IX material has a low capacity or selectivity for the target ion, resulting in more frequent elution and column replacements. Alternative IX materials that have high capacities, can be regenerated easily, and are highly selective for TcO4- would avoid these problems. Electrochemically active IX media meet these criteria. Such an IX system uses electrically induced changes in the media to expel sorbed ions through a charge imbalance rather than requiring chemical eluants to ''strip'' them. Therefore, this medium eliminates the need to prepare, store, and dispose of many of the process chemicals normally required for IX operations. The focus of the project is to develop a fundamental understanding of how the physical and chemical properties of electroactive ion exchange (EaIX) materials control their efficiency when used as mass separation agents. Specifically, the desirable characteristics of EaIX materials for separation applications are (1) high reversibility, (2) high selectivity, (3) acceptable physical and chemical stability, (4) rapid intercalation and de-intercalation rates, and (5) high capacity. Because of these requirements, EaIX materials share many properties in common with conventional ion exchangers and electroactive polymers. For example, EaIX materials require the selectivity typically found in ion exchangers; they also require the redox reversibility of electroactive polymers. The results of this work will allow the rational design of new materials and processes tailored for the separation of specific anions.

Sukamto, Johanes H.; Smyrl, William H.; McBreen, James; Hubler, Timothy L.; Lilga, Michael A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Photovoltaic solar concentrator  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Nitrate Solution Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approach-to-critical experiments were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas{reg_sign} reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were performed to fill a gap in experimental data regarding criticality limits for storing and handling arrays of Pu solution in reprocessing facilities. Of the thirteen approach-to-critical experiments eleven resulted in extrapolations to critical configurations. Four of the approaches were extrapolated to the critical number of bottles; these were not evaluated further due to the large uncertainty associated with the modeling of a fraction of a bottle. The remaining seven approaches were extrapolated to critical array spacing of 3-4 and 4-4 arrays; these seven critical configurations were evaluation for inclusion as acceptable benchmark experiments in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Detailed and simple models of these configurations were created and the associated bias of these simplifications was determined to range from 0.00116 and 0.00162 {+-} 0.00006 ?keff. Monte Carlo analysis of all models was completed using MCNP5 with ENDF/BVII.0 neutron cross section libraries. A thorough uncertainty analysis of all critical, geometric, and material parameters was performed using parameter perturbation methods. It was found that uncertainty in the impurities in the polyethylene bottles, reflector position, bottle outer diameter, and critical array spacing had the largest effect. The total uncertainty ranged from 0.00651 to 0.00920 ?keff. Evaluation methods and results will be presented and discussed in greater detail in the full paper.

M. A. Marshall; J. D. Bess

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Atmospheric Environment 36 (2002) 41594171 Simulations of monthly mean nitrate concentrations in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and urbanization in many countries of East Asia have resulted in significant growth in the East Asia's energy., Wakamatsu, S., 1985. Long-range transport of air pollution under light gradient wind conditions. Journal a regional air quality Eulerian model (RAQM) with meteorological fields four times per day taken from

113

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Project Locations Biofuels Project Locations BlueFire Ethanol Biochemical Municipal Solid Waste (Mecca, CA) Poet Biochemical Corn Cob/Corn Fiber (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Biochemical Woody Biomass- Ag Residues (Grand Junction, CO) ICM Biochemical Switchgrass, Forage Sorghum, Stover (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa Biochemica Agricultural Residue (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) NewPage Thermochemical Woody Biomass - Mill Residues (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels Thermochemical Woody Waste (Soperton, GA) DSM Innovation Center Biochemical Various (Parsippany, NJ) Novozymes Biochemical Various (Davis, CA) Genencor Biochemical Various (Palo Alto, CA) Verenium Corp Biochemical Various (San Diego, CA)

114

Information about DOE Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information about DOE Locations Information about DOE Locations The following chart provides information about the FOIA program at each of the locations. You can link to the...

115

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects created with...

116

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects...

117

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Solutions and Their Effects on Fluid Flow in Unsaturated Media Tianfu Xu and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT. Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of

118

Nitrate Anion Exchange in Pu-238 Aqueous Scrap Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

Strong base, nitrate anion exchange (IX) is crucial to the purification of {sup 238}Pu solution feedstocks with gross levels of impurities. This paper discusses the work involved in bench scale experiments to optimize the nitrate anion exchange process. In particular, results are presented of experiments conducted to (a) demonstrate that high levels of impurities can be separated from {sup 238}Pu solutions via nitrate anion exchange and, (b) work out chemical pretreatment methodology to adjust and maintain {sup 238}Pu in the IV oxidation state to optimize the Pu(IV)-hexanitrato anionic complex sorption to Reillex-HPQ resin. Additional experiments performed to determine the best chemical treatment methodology to enhance recovery of sorbed Pu from the resin, and VIS-NIR absorption studies to determine the steady state equilibrium of Pu(IV), Pu(III), and Pu(VI) in nitric acid are discussed.

Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Silver, G.L.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Ramsey, K.B.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate  

SciTech Connect

A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 34, 62580 Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria Campus Coatzacoalcos, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Universidad Km 7.5, 96530 Coatzacoalcos, Ver. (Mexico)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nitrate analysis of snow and ice core samples collected in the vicinity of a waste detonation event, McMurdo Station, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 30, 1991, a small quantity of hazardous materials was detonated at a site near McMurdo Station, Antarctica. The materials involved in the detonation represented highly reactive or explosive wastes that could not be transported safely for disposal in the United States. Detonation was therefore considered the safest and most effective means for disposing these hazardous materials. One concern regarding the detonation of these substances was that the process could generate or distribute measurable quantities of contaminants to the area surrounding the detonation site. Nitrate was selected as a tracer to document the distribution of contaminants from the detonation. Snow and ice cores were collected about 4 months after the event. These cores were analyzed for nitrate concentrations in May 1993, and a map was generated to show the extent of nitrate contamination. This report describes the collection of these samples and summarizes the analytical results.

White, G.J.; Lugar, R.M.; Crockett, A.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

station locations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288500 Varnish cache server station locations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, Source Alternative Fuels Data Center Date Released December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords alt fuel alternative fuels alternative fuels stations biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol

122

Vacuum State/Refiner/Location  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vacuum Vacuum State/Refiner/Location Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Barrels per Operating Idle Operating Idle Downstream Charge Capacity Thermal Cracking Delayed Fluid Coking Visbreaking Other/Gas Calendar Day Stream Day Distillation Coking Oil Table 3. Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2013 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) ......................................................... Alabama 120,100 0 130,000 0 48,000 32,000 0 0 0 Goodway Refining LLC 4,100 0 5,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................

123

Embedded Network Sensing of Moisture and Nitrate Propagation During Irrigation with Reclaimed Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation, thus optimizing discharge of nitrate-laden wastewater. rain gauge D ata acquisition a nd wireless

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes to a solid, relatively insoluble, thermally stable form is provided and comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, e.g., kaolin, bentonite, dickite, halloysite, pyrophyllite, etc., with the sodium nitrate-containing radioactive wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at a temperature of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to thereby entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid waste, such as neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes (e.g., anhydrous salt cake) is converted at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to the solid mineral form-cancrinite having an approximate chemical formula 2(NaAlSiO.sub.4) .sup.. xSalt.sup.. y H.sub.2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO.sub.3. In another embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C, the resulting reaction product is air dried eitheras loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600.degree. C to form the solid mineral form-nepheline which has the approximate chemical formula of NaAlSiO.sub.4. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10.sup.-.sup.2 to 10.sup.-.sup.4 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for cancrinite and 10.sup.-.sup.3 to 10.sup.-.sup.5 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for nepheline.

Barney, Gary S. (Richland, WA); Brownell, Lloyd E. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions. Phase 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F{sup {minus}} ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions.

Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. [Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (US)

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Biofuels Project Locations Pacific Ethanol (Boardman, OR) BlueFire Ethanol (Corona, CA) POET (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Innovations (Commerce City, CO) ICM (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) NewPage (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels (Soperton, GA) DSM Innovation Center (Parsippany, NJ) Novozymes (Davis, CA) Genencor (Palo Alto, CA) Verenium Corp (San Diego, CA) Dupont (Wilmington, DE) Mascoma (Lebanon, NH) Cargill Inc (Minneapolis, MN) Regional Partnerships South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD Cornell University, Ithaca, NY University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

127

The LHCb Vertex Locator performance and Vertex Locator upgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LHCb is an experiment dedicated to the study of new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point. The detector operates in a severe and highly non-uniform radiation environment. The small pitch and analogue readout result in a best single hit precision of 4 $\\rm \\mu$m. The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz event rate. The vertex detector will have to cope with radiation levels up to 10$^{16}$ 1 MeV$\\rm n_{eq}/cm^2$, more than an order of magnitude higher than those expected at the current experiment. A solution is under development with a pixel detector, based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips with 55 x 55 $\\rm \\mu m$ pixels. In addition a micro-strip solution is also under development, with finer pitch, higher granularity and lower mass than the current detector. The current status of the VELO will be described together with recent testbeam results.

Pablo Rodríguez Pérez; for the LHCb VELO Group; for the VELO Upgrade group

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Characterization of the nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N NMR, and EXAFS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) are studied in solutions containing nitrate up to 13 molar (M). Three major nitrato complexes are observed and identified using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) as Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. The possibility that Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 1}{sup 3+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 1+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 1{minus}} are major species in solution is not consistent with these results and an upper limit of 0.10 can be set on the fraction for each of these three nitrate complexes in nitrate containing solutions. Fraction of the three major species in nitric acid over the 1--13 M range were calculated from absorption spectra data. The fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} as a function of nitric acid concentration is in good agreement with the literature, whereas the fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} species differ from previous studies. We have modeled the chemical equilibria up to moderate ionic strength ( < 6 molal) using the specific ion interaction theory (SM. Comparison of our experimental observations to literature stability constants that assume the presence of mononitrate species is poor. Stability constant at zero ionic strength for the dinitrato complex is determined to be log({beta}{sub 2}{sup 0})=3.77 {plus_minus} 0.14 (2{sigma}).

Veirs, D.K.; Smith, C.A.; Zwick, B.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Conradson, S.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. NDP-052 (1995) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-052 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-052 image Contributed by Marilyn F. Lamb and Richard A. Feely Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Seattle, Washington and Lloyd Moore and Donald K. Atwood Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Miami, Florida Prepared by Alexander Kozyr* Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. *Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4420 Date Published: September 1995

130

Shock compression of water and solutions of ammonium nitrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.3 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 4.4 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 5 Shock compression of water 95 5.1 Cell development... .pwcs.com.au/display/assets/download.php?id=498. W. B. Sudweeks. Physical and chemical properties of industrial slurry explo- sives. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Product Research and Development, 24(3):432–436, 1985. N. Taylor. Hot spots in Ammonium Nitrate. PhD thesis, University of Cam...

Morley, Michael James

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy Basics: Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

132

Concentrating Solar Power Forum Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation's summaries: a convenient truth, comparison of three concentrator technologies, value of high efficiency, and status of industry.

Kurtz, S.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

Maps & Directions | Custom Map Location | Brookhaven National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Want to share a specific location with others? Drag the marker pin to a new location and then share the following URL: http:www.bnl.govmapspoint.php?Lat40.86827&Lng-72.88113...

134

Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that sites are open prior to making a...

135

Factors of characteristic words: Location and decompositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let @a be an irrational number with 0Keywords: Characteristic word, Decomposition, Location, Overlap factor, Return words, Separate factor

Wai-Fong Chuan; Hui-Ling Ho

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Brosseau, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach M. G. Ierapetritou and C. A. Floudas®elopment plan with well locations, gi®en a reser®oir property map and a set of infrastructure constraints, represents a ®ery challenging prob- lem. The problem of selecting the optimal ®ertical well locations

138

Location tracking via social networking sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of social media has steadily grown in recent years, and now more than ever, people are logging on to websites like Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, and Google Latitude with the aim of broadcasting their location information. The ability to 'check ... Keywords: disclosure, intention, location-based services, location-tracking, social networking, trust

Lisa Thomas; Pam Briggs; Linda Little

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Location, Decentralization, and Knowledge Sources for Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When firms seek to innovate, they must decide where to locate their innovation activity. This location choice requires firms to make a simultaneous choice about the organizational structure of innovation activity: almost by definition, multiple locations ... Keywords: decentralization, imitative innovation, new-to-the-market innovation, research and development

Aija Leiponen; Constance E. Helfat

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Open neighborhood locating-dominating in trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a graph G that models a facility or a multiprocessor network, detection devices can be placed at the vertices so as to identify the location of an intruder such as a thief or saboteur or a faulty processor. Open neighborhood locating-dominating sets ... Keywords: Domination, Open neighborhood locating-dominating set

Suk J. Seo; Peter J. Slater

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fueling Station Locator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Topics: Datasets Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured References: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Research: Data and Resources[1] Logo: Alternative Fueling Station Locator The alternative fuel station locator uses an address based search to find

143

Locational analysis for the aluminum industry  

SciTech Connect

A locational analysis for the aluminum industry suggests that its locational pattern is probably even more clear-cut than that of the steel industry. Because the smelting of alumina into aluminum requires a very large amount of electric power, aluminum has become an industry highly oriented to cheap-power locations. A quick analysis, taking into account present technological and economic conditions, reveals that the potential advantages of the minimum-transport-cost location for an aluminum plant are clearly outweighed by the large power cost savings accruing from locating the plant at a cheap-power location. This holds true even with a fairly small differential in power rates between the two locations.

Isard, W.; Parcels, L.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

Tompkins, E.R.

1959-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF CHLORIDES AND NITRATES FROM AQUEOUS NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing the chloride content of a solution derived from the dissolution of a stainless steel clad nuclear fuel element with an aqua regia dissolution medium. The solutlon is adjusted to a nitric acid concentration in the range 5 to 10 M and is countercurrently contacted at room temperature with a gaseous oxide of nitrogen selected from NO, NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/ O/sub 3/, and N/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Chlo ride is recovered from the contacted solution as nitrosyl chloride. After reduction of the chloride content, the solution is then contacted with gaseous NO to reduce the nitric acid molarity to a desired level. (AEC)

Savolainen, J.E.

1963-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Improving Concentration Measures Used for Evaluating Air Quality Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unfortunate difficulty in model evaluation is that the concentration measure that most models predict, namely the ensemble mean concentration under the plume centerline (or at some location relative to the plume centerline), cannot be measured ...

Russell F. Lee; John S. Irwin

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Concentrating Solar Power Forum Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation's summaries: a convenient truth, comparison of three concentrator technologies, value of high efficiency, and status of industry.

Kurtz, S.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Power SunShot CSP Team Learn more about the SunShot concentrating solar power program staff by visiting the team's profile pages. Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP University of California Los Angeles University of California Los Angeles High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Jet Propulsion Laborator Jet Propulsion Laboratory Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators Abengoa Solar Abengoa Solar Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant HiTek Services HiTek Services Low-Cost Heliostat Development The Department of Energy (DOE) supports research and development of concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies as a unique path to achieve SunShot Initiative cost targets with systems that can supply solar power on demand through the use of thermal storage. CSP technologies use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. Thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity via a turbine or heat engine driving a generator.

149

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation study: Formation of ammonia from nitrate and nitrate in hydrogen generating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Departrnent of Energy (DOE) to immobilize pretreated highly radioactive wastes in glass for permanent disposal in the HWVP, formic acid is added to the waste before vitrification to adjust glass redox and melter feed rheology. The operation of the glass melter and durability of the glass are affected by the glass oxidation state. Formation of a conductive metallic sludge in an over-reduced melt can result in a shortened melter lifetime. An over-oxidized melt may lead to foaming and loss of ruthenium as volatile RuO{sub 4}. Historically, foaming in the joule heated ceramic melter has been attributed to gas generation in the melt which is controlled by instruction of a reductant such as formic acid into the melter feed. Formic acid is also found to decrease the melter feed viscosity thereby facilitating pumping. This technical report discusses the noble metal catalyzed formic acid reduction of nitrite and/or nitrate to ammonia, a problem of considerable concern because of the generation of a potential ammonium nitrate explosion hazard in the plant ventilation system.

King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Our Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Locations Home > About Us > Our Locations Our Locations The NNSA's nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to

151

Our Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Locations Home > About Us > Our Locations Our Locations The NNSA's nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to

152

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Solar is growing rapidly, and the concentrating photovoltaics industry-both high- and low-concentration cell approaches-may be ready to ramp production in 2009.

Kurtz, S.

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

Distribution Fault Location and Waveform Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated fault location algorithms for distribution systems require monitoring equipment to record voltage and current waveforms during an event. In addition, most of these algorithms require circuit-impedance parameters to evaluate the fault location. Locating incipient faults and fault waveform characterization is the main aim of this project. This project builds on work done in 2008 towards sub-cycle blip identification using an algorithm based on arc voltage.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

155

Benchmarking of Fault-Location Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report resumes the studies on fault-location technologies that were conducted in 2009. These studies were undertaken in a joint project done with the collaboration of Hydro-Qubec, Long Island Power Authority, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Two fault-location technologies were tested, the Reactance to Fault (RTF) implemented in the PQView application and the Voltage Drop Fault Location (VDFL) implemented in the MILE application. The RTF is based on substation voltage and current me...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state), Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow'' by Kelly

Flury, Markus

157

Russian Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Russian Locations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

158

Locating Restricted Facilities on Binary Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The encoding could represent clean and polluted areas or desirable and undesirable zones. For this encoding, we consider several facility location problems to ...

159

The Facility Location Problem with Bernoulli Demands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper we address a discrete capacitated facility location problem in which ...... The type of instance for FLPBD (1, 2, 3, or 4) as described above.

160

2010 Hyundai LPI Hybrid Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyundai LPI Hybrid Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Alternative Fuel Hybrid...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2010 Volkswagen Golf TDI Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Golf TDI Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop Vehicle...

162

Procurement Information by Location | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procurement Information by Location Procurement Information by Location Procurement Information by Location As part of our Small Business Opportunity Tool, we are offering information about historical procurement by location. Find historical procurement data by state - check out the list of states below, and click on the state's name to learn more about their current programs and past procurement needs. Click on the state to learn more about our current procurement activity: California Colorado District of Columbia Georgia Idaho Illinois Iowa Louisana Maryland Missouri Nevada New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania South Carolina Tennessee Texas Virginia West Virginia Washington Wyoming

163

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Albuquerque, New Mexico...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Albuquerque Housing Education Recreation Locations Life in Albuquerque Photo of New Mexico landscape Albuquerque is New Mexico's largest city, with a population of more than...

164

Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.  

SciTech Connect

A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the pitting occurred near welds; however this was the hottest region in the chamber. Pitting was observed up to two inches above the weld, indicating independence from weld effects.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon Compounds including 3 Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) in Whole-air Samples graphics Graphics data Data Investigator Donald Blake Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, California, 92697 USA Period of Record April 1979 - December 2012 Methods Whole-air samples are collected in conditioned, evacuated, 2-L stainless steel canisters; each canister is filled to ambient pressure over a period of about 1 minute (approximately 20 seconds to 2 minutes). These canisters are returned to the University of California at Irvine for chromatographic analysis. Analysis for methane includes gas chromatography with flame ionization, as

166

Industrial use of molten nitrate/nitrite salts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrate salts have been used for years as a high-temperature heat transfer medium in the chemical and metal industries. This experience is often cited as an argument for the use of these salts in large-scale solar energy systems. However, this industrial experience has not been well documented and a study was carried out to provide such information to the solar community and to determine the applicability of this data base. Seven different industrial plants were visited and the plant operators were interviewed with regard to operating history and experience. In all cases the molten salt systems operate without problems. However, it is not possible to apply the base of industrial experience directly to solar thermal energy applications because of differences in operating temperature, salt composition, alloys used, and thermal/mechanical conditions.

Carling, R.W.; Mar, R.W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL 1909 Pushnik, J.C., R.S. Demaree, J.L.J. Houpis, W.B. Flory, S.M. Bauer, and P.D. Anderson. 1995. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa. Journal of Biogeography 22(2-3):249-254. The impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinus ponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased CO2 conditions (525 mu L L(-1) and 700 mu L L(-1)) for 6 months. These trees exhibited morphological, physiological and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls (350 mu L L(- 1)). Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no

168

Robotic location of underground chemical sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes current progress in a project to develop robotic systems for locating underground chemical sources. There are a number of economic and humanitarian applications for this technology. Finding unexploded ordinance, land mines, and sources ... Keywords: Chemical diffusion, Chemical source location, De-mining, Robotics

R. Andrew Russell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Adding Speech to Location-based Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first generation of Location-based Services (LBSs) did not succeed on the market. In order to prepare LBSs of the next generation for the challenges of pervasive service execution in different situations (e.g. while walking on the street or while ... Keywords: Human Computer Interaction (HCI), Location-based Services, Multimodality, Spoken Dialogue Systems

Patrick Nepper; Georg Treu; Axel Küpper

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Proxying location update for idle mode interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In cellular networks it is the mobile node's responsibility to update the network about its location change, especially when this one enters idle mode. We developed a new framework [8] where the idle interface is powered-off to save energy and thus could ... Keywords: MIH services, idle/active mode, location-update, proxied interface, proxied multi-radio interface, proxy entity

Hicham Mahkoum; Abdelhakim S. Hafid; Behcet Sarikaya

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

180 x 120: designing alternate location systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using 180 RFID tags to track and plot locations over time, guests to an event at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) collectively constructed a public visualization of the individual and group activities by building a history of movement ... Keywords: RFID, crowds, design, location tracking, tessellation

Eric Paulos; Anthony Burke; Tom Jenkins; Karen Marcelo

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Location-Based sponsored search advertising  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proliferation of powerful mobile devices with built-in navigational capabilities and the adoption in most metropolitan areas of fast wireless communication protocols have recently created unprecedented opportunities for location-based advertising. ... Keywords: game theory, location-based advertising, nash equilibrium

George Trimponias, Ilaria Bartolini, Dimitris Papadias

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Slide 1 Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

174

Property:Event/Location | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Location Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Event/Location Property Type String Description The location in which an event will occur. Examples: 'Golden, Colorado' or 'Prestigious Hotel: 11 Rue Leroy, Paris, France'. Pages using the property "Event/Location" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading + Paris, France + 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Day 2 + Paris, France + 15th International Business Forum: Low Carbon High Growth - Business Models for a Changing Climate + Pretoria, South Africa + 18th Africa Partnership Forum + Paris, France + 2 2012 Bonn Climate Change Conference + Bonn, Germany + 7 7th Asia Clean Energy Forum + Manila, Philippines +

175

Property:UtilityLocation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UtilityLocation UtilityLocation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name UtilityLocation Property Type Boolean Description Indicates this is the "mailing" location of the Utility. Usually is Yes if the information from EIA Form 861 File1_a is on the page. Pages using the property "UtilityLocation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3 Phases Energy Services + true + 4 4-County Electric Power Assn + true + A A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + true + AEP Generating Company + true + AEP Texas Central Company + true + AEP Texas North Company + true + AES Eastern Energy LP + true + AGC Division of APG Inc + true + AP Holdings LLC + true + APN Starfirst, L.P. + true + APNA Energy + true + Accent Energy Holdings, LLC + true +

176

Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fault location in distribution systems is a critical component of outage management and service restoration, which directly impacts feeder reliability and quality of the electricity supply. Improving fault location methods supports the Department of Energy (DOE) “Grid 2030” initiatives for grid modernization by improving reliability indices of the network. Improving customer average interruption duration index (CAIDI) and system average interruption duration index (SAIDI) are direct advantages of utilizing a suitable fault location method. As distribution systems are gradually evolving into smart distribution systems, application of more accurate fault location methods based on gathered data from various Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) installed along the feeders is quite feasible. How this may be done and what is the needed methodology to come to such solution is raised and then systematically answered. To reach this goal, the following tasks are carried out: 1) Existing fault location methods in distribution systems are surveyed and their strength and caveats are studied. 2) Characteristics of IEDs in distribution systems are studied and their impacts on fault location method selection and implementation are detailed. 3) A systematic approach for selecting optimal fault location method is proposed and implemented to pinpoint the most promising algorithms for a given set of application requirements. 4) An enhanced fault location method based on voltage sag data gathered from IEDs along the feeder is developed. The method solves the problem of multiple fault location estimations and produces more robust results. 5) An optimal IED placement approach for the enhanced fault location method is developed and practical considerations for its implementation are detailed.

Lotfifard, Saeed

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Concentrating solar power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concentrating solar power Concentrating solar power (Redirected from Concentrating Solar Power) Jump to: navigation, search Concentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text is derived from NREL's concentrating solar power information page.)[1] Concentrating solar power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet our nation's demand for electricity. CSP plants produce power by first using mirrors to focus sunlight to heat a working fluid. Ultimately, this high-temperature fluid is used to spin a turbine or power an engine that drives a generator. And the final product is electricity. Smaller CSP systems can be located directly where the power is needed. Larger, utility-scale CSP applications provide hundreds of megawatts of electricity for the power grid. Both linear concentrator and power tower

178

Concentrating solar power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concentrating solar power Concentrating solar power (Redirected from - Concentrating Solar Power) Jump to: navigation, search Concentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text is derived from NREL's concentrating solar power information page.)[1] Concentrating solar power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet our nation's demand for electricity. CSP plants produce power by first using mirrors to focus sunlight to heat a working fluid. Ultimately, this high-temperature fluid is used to spin a turbine or power an engine that drives a generator. And the final product is electricity. Smaller CSP systems can be located directly where the power is needed. Larger, utility-scale CSP applications provide hundreds of megawatts of electricity for the power grid. Both linear concentrator and power tower

179

Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Linear concentrating solar power (CSP) collectors capture the sun's energy with large mirrors that reflect and focus the sunlight onto a linear receiver tube. The receiver contains a fluid that is...

180

Ferrocyanide Safety Project Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction studies of sodium nickel ferrocyanide reactions with equimolar nitrate/nitrite salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic X-ray Diffraction (DXRD) has been to used to identify and quantify the solid state reactions that take place between sodium nickel ferrocyanide, Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}, and equimolar concentrations of sodium nitrate/nitrite, reactions of interest to the continued environmental safety of several large underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington. The results are supportive of previous work, which indicated that endothermic dehydration and melting of the nitrates take place before the occurrence of exothermic reactions that being about 300{degrees}C. The DXRD results show that a major reaction set at these temperatures is the occurrence of a series reaction that produces sodium cyanate, NaCNO, as an intermediate in a mildly exothermic first step. In the presence of gaseous oxygen, NaCNO subsequently reacts exothermally and at a faster rate to form metal oxides. Measurements of the rate of this reaction are used to estimate the heat release. Comparisons of this estimated heat release rate with heat transfer rates from a hypothetical ``hot spot`` show that, even in a worst-case scenario, the heat transfer rates are approximately eight times higher than the rate of energy release from the exothermic reactions.

Dodds, J.N. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[UNOCAL, Brea, CA (United States). Hartley Research Center

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Extraction of Th(IV) and U(VI) by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of Th(IV) and U(VI) from nitrate media was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)). It was found that the extractant dependency is second power for U(VI) with both DHDECMP and DB(BP). However, the extractant dependency for Th(IV) is third power for DB(BP) but varied from 2.5 to 2.0 power for DHDECMP depending on the total nitrate concentration. The K/sub d/ data do not support the theory that DHDECMP is an effective chelating agent for actinide ions. Significant differences between DHDECMP and DB(BP) do appear in the extraction behavior of Th(IV) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP to buffer itself against the effects of HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Muscatello, A.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Alignment method for parabolic trough solar concentrators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

Diver, Richard B. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Detection and Location of Damage on Pipelines  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL has developed and successfully tested a real-time pipeline damage detection and location system. This system uses porous metal resistive traces applied to the pipe to detect and locate damage. The porous metal resistive traces are sprayed along the length of a pipeline. The unique nature and arrangement of the traces allows locating the damage in real time along miles of pipe. This system allows pipeline operators to detect damage when and where it is occurring, and the decision to shut down a transmission pipeline can be made with actual real-time data, instead of conservative estimates from visual inspection above the area.

Karen A. Moore; Robert Carrington; John Richardson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Method of locating underground mines fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of locating an underground mine fire by comparing the pattern of measured combustion product arrival times at detector locations with a real time computer-generated array of simulated patterns. A number of electronic fire detection devices are linked thru telemetry to a control station on the surface. The mine's ventilation is modeled on a digital computer using network analysis software. The time reguired to locate a fire consists of the time required to model the mines' ventilation, generate the arrival time array, scan the array, and to match measured arrival time patterns to the simulated patterns.

Laage, Linneas (Eagam, MN); Pomroy, William (St. Paul, MN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Critical Parameters of Complex Geometry Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution  

SciTech Connect

About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a "tree") having long, thin arms (or "branches") extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes; and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves when each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

Rothe, Robert Emil; Briggs, Joseph Blair

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Export.gov - Export.gov - Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations Locations Print | E-mail Page Locations 800.872.8723 Domestic Offices International Offices Locations 800.872.8723 Call: 800.872.8723 (1-800-USA-TRAD(E)) Email: tic@trade.gov between 8:30 AM and 6 PM EST to receive immediate answers to your exporting questions on: Tariff and Tax Information Country-specific General Export Information Region-specific Export Information (Middle East, China, Latin America, EU, etc.) International Documentation, Regulations and Standards Logistics and Finance (HS/Schedule B numbers, Freight Forwarders, partners) Free Trade Agreements (qualifying products for FTA benefits, Certificates of origin.) Trade Data Export-related information offered by federal, state and local entities Export-related information related to other USG agencies Note for Importers: Please contact U.S. Customs at 877.227.5511

187

Fault Detection, Location, Isolation and Reconnection in ...  

A University of Colorado research team led by Jae-Do Park has developed a fault detection, location and isolation scheme for a low-voltage DC-bus microgrid system, ...

188

Developing a theory of nightclub location choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is an investigation of the factors that influence where nightclubs locate within a city. Nightclubs, like other social spaces, provide important social and economic benefits in the urban environment. As amenities, ...

Crim, Stephen J. (Stephen Johnson)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Federating location-based data services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the emerging availability of small and portable devices which are able to determine their position and to communicate wirelessly, mobile and spatially-aware applications become feasible. These applications rely on information that is bound to locations ...

Bernhard Mitschang; Daniela Nicklas; Matthias Grossmann; Thomas Schwarz; Nicola Hönle

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Adaptive learning of semantic locations and routes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptation of devices and applications based on contextual information has a great potential to enhance usability and mitigate the increasing complexity of mobile devices. An important topic in context-aware computing is to learn semantic locations and ...

Keshu Zhang; Haifeng Li; Kari Torkkola; Mike Gardner

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Adaptive learning of semantic locations and routes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptation of devices and applications based on contextual information has a great potential to enhance usability and mitigate the increasing complexity of mobile devices. An important topic in context-aware computing is to learn semantic locations and ...

Keshu Zhang; Haifeng Li; Kari Torkkola; Mike Gardner

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Addressing endogeneity in residential location models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some empirical residential location choice models have reported dwelling-unit price estimated parameters that are small, not statistically significant, or even positive. This would imply that households are non-sensitive ...

Guevara-Cue, Cristián Angelo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Russian Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Russian Locations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Russia Tri-Lab S&T Collaborations > Travel

194

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Find Stations Plan a Route Location: Go Start: End: Go Fuel: All Fuels Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) more search options close × More Search Options Include private stations Include planned stations Owner All Private Federal State Local Utility Payment All American Express Discover MasterCard VISA Cash Checks CFN Clean Energy Fuel Man Gas Card PHH Services Voyager WEX Electric charger types Include level 1 Include level 2 Include DC fast Include legacy chargers Limit results to within 5 miles Limit results to within 5 miles 12,782 alternative fuel stations in the United States Excluding private stations

195

Photovoltaic concentrator initiative: Concentrator cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involves the development of a large-area, low-cost, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell for use in the Entech 22-sun linear-focus Fresnel lens concentrator system. The buried contact solar cell developed at the University of New South Wales was selected for this project. Both Entech and the University of New South Wales are subcontractors. This annual report presents the program efforts from November 1990 through December 1991, including the design of the cell, development of a baseline cell process, and presentation of the results of preliminary cell processing. Important results include a cell designed for operation in a real concentrator system and substitution of mechanical grooving for the previously utilized laser scribing.

Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Narayanan, S. [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (US)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. This thermal energy can then be used to...

197

Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concentrator photovoltaic (PV) systems use less solar cell material than other PV systems. PV cells are the most expensive components of a PV system, on a per-area basis. A concentrator makes use...

198

Concentrating Solar Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Protecting location privacy: optimal strategy against localization attacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mainstream approach to protecting the location-privacy of mobile users in location-based services (LBSs) is to alter the users' actual locations in order to reduce the location information exposed to the service provider. The location obfuscation ... Keywords: location inference attacks, location privacy, location-based services, optimal defense strategy, privacy protection, service quality, stackelberg bayesian games

Reza Shokri; George Theodorakopoulos; Carmela Troncoso; Jean-Pierre Hubaux; Jean-Yves Le Boudec

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Exploring temporal effects for location recommendation on location-based social networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Location-based social networks (LBSNs) have attracted an inordinate number of users and greatly enriched the urban experience in recent years. The availability of spatial, temporal and social information in online LBSNs offers an unprecedented opportunity ... Keywords: location recommendation, location-based social networks, temporal effects

Huiji Gao, Jiliang Tang, Xia Hu, Huan Liu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

202

SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Generation Concentrating Solar Power Generation In 2010, DOE issued the Baseload Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Generation funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The following projects were selected under this competitive solicitation: Abengoa: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant eSolar: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility General Atomics: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage HiTek: Low-Cost Heliostat Development Infinia: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power PPG: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector Rocketdyne: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs SENER: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants

203

Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), an important agent for the nuclear industry and the U.S. Army, has been involved in several costly incidents. To prevent similar incidents, the study of HAN safe storage and handling boundary has become extremely important for industries. However, HAN decomposition involves complicated reaction pathways due to its autocatalytic behavior and therefore presents a challenge for definition of safe boundaries of HAN storage and handling. This research focused on HAN decomposition behavior under various conditions and proposed isothermal aging testing and kinetic-based simulation to determine safety boundaries for HAN storage and handling. Specifically, HAN decomposition in the presence of glass, titanium, stainless steel with titanium, or stainless steel was examined in an Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC). n-th order kinetics was used for initial reaction rate estimation. Because stainless steel is a commonly used material for HAN containers, isothermal aging tests were conducted in a stainless steel cell to determine the maximum safe storage time of HAN. Moreover, by changing thermal inertia, data for HAN decomposition in the stainless steel cell were examined and the experimental results were simulated by the Thermal Safety Software package. This work offers useful guidance for industries that manufacture, handle, and store HAN. The experimental data acquired not only can help with aspects of process safety design, including emergency relief systems, process control, and process equipment selection, but also is a useful reference for the associated theoretical study of autocatalytic decomposition behavior.

Zhang, Chuanji

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Abengoa logo Photo of two lit towers surrounded by much smaller blue flat plates that are mounted on the ground. Commercial central receiver plant designs Abengoa, under the Baseload CSP FOA, will demonstrate a 100-megawatt electrical (MWe) central receiver plant using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator. Approach The plan is to operate the plant at full load for 6,400 hours each year using only solar energy. Abengoa is working to create a team of suppliers capable of deploying a commercially ready nitrate salt central receiver technology that can be competitive in the current power marketplace. Innovation Abengoa is developing a new molten-salt power tower technology with a surround heliostat field. Key components include:

205

Alternative Fueling Station Locations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locations Alternative Fueling Station Locations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, view U.S. maps, and more. Access up-to-date fuel station data here: http://www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/data_download The dataset available for download here provides a "snapshot" of the alternative fueling station information for: compressed natural gas (CNG), E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), propane/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), biodiesel, electricity, hydrogen, and liquefied natural gas

206

Reconstructing Spatial Distributions from Anonymized Locations  

SciTech Connect

Devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and sensors are often equipped with GPS that accurately report a person's location. Combined with wireless communication, these devices enable a wide range of new social tools and applications. These same qualities, however, leave location-aware applications vulnerable to privacy violations. This paper introduces the Negative Quad Tree, a privacy protection method for location aware applications. The method is broadly applicable to applications that use spatial density information, such as social applications that measure the popularity of social venues. The method employs a simple anonymization algorithm running on mobile devices, and a more complex reconstruction algorithm on a central server. This strategy is well suited to low-powered mobile devices. The paper analyzes the accuracy of the reconstruction method in a variety of simulated and real-world settings and demonstrates that the method is accurate enough to be used in many real-world scenarios.

Horey, James L [ORNL; Forrest, Stephanie [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Groat, Michael [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Utility Locating in the DOE Environment  

SciTech Connect

Some advances have been made in utility locating in recent years and standards have been recently published to try and categorize the level of information known about the utility in the subsurface. At the same time some characterization about the level of effort or technology in the geophysicist approach to utility locating may be generalized. The DOE environment poses some added difficulties and this presentation covers these issues, costs and the technical approach that has been developed at the INEEL to prevent utility hits and how it fits into the generalized classification of effort.

Clark Scott; Gail Heath

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SOLERAS - solar applications in remote locations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this international technology workshop was to promote the exchange of research information on solar applications in remote locations. Scientists and engineers from the United States, Saudia Arabia, Central and South America, Southeast Asia, and Oceania were represented at this sixth annual workshop conducted under the auspices of the SOLERAS program. The objective of the workshop was to address the issues of construction, operation, and maintenance of solar energy systems in remote locations. Photovoltaic, wind, solar thermal, biomass, and geothermal technologies were considered. Also considered was the use of solar energy for agricultural purposes. Each paper has been separately indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Khoshaim, B.H.; Williamson, J.S.; Meiners, A.; Mallory, R. (eds.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

HLDB: location-based services in databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces HLDB, the first practical system that can answer exact spatial queries on continental road networks entirely within a database. HLDB is based on hub labels (HL), the fastest point-to-point algorithm for road networks, and ... Keywords: SQL, databases, large road networks, location services

Ittai Abraham; Daniel Delling; Amos Fiat; Andrew V. Goldberg; Renato F. Werneck

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach Belén Palop1,2 1Departamento de March 2009 Florida State University #12;Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model;Transportation Network Model Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model Network placement

Palop del Río, Belén

211

Job Location, Neighborhood Change, and Gentrification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper assesses the contribution of employment location to neighborhood change and to gentrification. At the tract level, average household income change is positively correlated both with the change in average pay for nearby jobs and with the start-year average pay for nearby jobs. The relationship between employment location and neighborhood change is stronger for tracts closer to downtown and for tracts in larger metropolitan areas. Change in job pay helps explain metropolitan gentrification within 2 miles of the CBD. The analysis combines Census tract household data for 1990-2000 from the Neighborhood Change Database and zip-code-level employment data for 1992-2000 from the National Establishment Time-Series database. I develop an algorithm for identifying changes in zip codes over time and for matching non-standard zip codes to Census tracts. Because causality between employment location and household location could run in both directions, I instrument for the tract-level change in average job pay with national-level industry growth and average pay.

Jed Kolko; Claudia Goldin; Rucker Johnson; Larry Katz; Jeffrey Lin; Stuart Rosenthal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Location Games and Bounds for Median Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a two-person zero-sum game in which the maximizer selects a point in a given bounded planar region, the minimizer selects K points in that region,.and the payoff is the distance from the maximizer's location ...

Haimovich, Mordecai

213

Property:Water Column Location | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Column Location Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Water Column Location Property Type Text Pages using the property "Water Column Location" Showing 1 page using this...

214

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Program Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations in the United States Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

215

Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Smart Grid Demonstration projects created...

216

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location  

SciTech Connect

Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Livermore, California: Visiting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California Livermore, California administration building Our location and hours of operation Sandia/California is located at 7011 East Avenue in Livermore, Calif., a suburban community about 45 miles east of San Francisco. Positioned at the eastern edge of the San Francisco Bay Area, Sandia is within easy commuting distance of many affordable housing communities in San Joaquin County and the Central Valley. The official hours of operation at Sandia/California are from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. PST, Monday through Friday. General inquiries can be made by calling (925) 294-3000. See our contacts page for additional information. Getting here All three major airports in the San Francisco Bay Area provide access to Sandia/California. Oakland International Airport is the closest airport to

220

VCSEL fault location apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for locating a fault within an optical fiber is disclosed. The apparatus, which can be formed as a part of a fiber-optic transmitter or as a stand-alone instrument, utilizes a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to generate a test pulse of light which is coupled into an optical fiber under test. The VCSEL is subsequently reconfigured by changing a bias voltage thereto and is used as a resonant-cavity photodetector (RCPD) to detect a portion of the test light pulse which is reflected or scattered from any fault within the optical fiber. A time interval .DELTA.t between an instant in time when the test light pulse is generated and the time the reflected or scattered portion is detected can then be used to determine the location of the fault within the optical fiber.

Keeler, Gordon A. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Truckstop Electrification Locator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckstop Electrification Locator Truckstop Electrification Locator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Truckstop Electrification Locator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Perpare a Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Implement the Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

222

Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke  

SciTech Connect

Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Englander, Ella W. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)], E-mail: elenglan@utmb.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A collage of Concentrating Solar Power photographs. The first photo shows a dish-engine solar system. The second is of a SAIC Stirling dish collector. And the third photo shows a SkyTrough solar concentrator located on a mesa top. A collage of Concentrating Solar Power photographs. The first photo shows a dish-engine solar system. The second is of a SAIC Stirling dish collector. And the third photo shows a SkyTrough solar concentrator located on a mesa top. NREL collaborates with industry to further the research and development (R&D) of concentrating solar power (CSP) plant and solar thermal technologies. NREL's projects in concentrating solar power focus on components R&D and systems analysis related to power tower and parabolic trough technologies: Collectors Receivers Power block Thermal energy storage Analysis. In addition, NREL has received funding through the following competitively awarded projects: 10-megawatt supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) turbine test Near-blackbody, enclosed-particle receiver integrated with a

224

Microsoft Word - S08568_CY2011 Annual Rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

significant concentration trends. * Elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater that led to the reportable condition at Area of Concern well B206989 (located east of the...

225

Study of location management for next generation personal communication networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main target of location management is to maintain location of users while minimizing the system operation. The process consists of location update, paging, and database consideration. The location update and paging manages the user-network interaction ... Keywords: centralized database (CDB), distributed database (DDB), location area scheme, location update, timer-based update strategy, velocity paging (VP)

Teerapat Sanguankotchakorn; Panuvit Wibullanon

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Concentrator silicon cell research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Organic photovoltaics and concentrators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

Mapel, Jonathan King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Concentrator-quality evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a reflecting solar concentrator depends, of course, on its surface reflectance, but there are other important factors. Among these are sun-tracking errors, surface-slope errors, and surface irregularities. It is appropriate to use statistics to describe and analyze these non-deterministic factors. A scheme for specifying the quality of a solar concentrator that includes all these effects is described and illustrated. It is believed that this procedure is optimum in the sense that it requires a minimum of measurements to obtain a complete enough description of a concentrator to determine its optical performance under any operating geometry. The specification scheme is, therefore, suitable for use in general systems analysis studies involving solar concentrators.

Biggs, F.; Vittitoe, C.N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Joined concentric tubes  

SciTech Connect

Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Characteristics of Maximum Concentrations from Multiple Point Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple quasi-Newton numerical scheme is applied to determine the hypothetical worst-case meteorology that will result in the maximum combined concentrations at any receptor location in air quality modeling over short distances for multiple ...

N. M. Zoumakis

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Concentrating Photovoltaic Module Testing at NREL's Concentrating Solar Radiation Users Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much recent interest in photovoltaic modules designed to operate with concentrated sunlight (>100 suns). Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) technology offers an exciting new opportunity as a viable alternative to dish Stirling engines. Advantages of CPV include potential for>40% cell efficiency in the long term (25% now), no moving parts, no intervening heat transfer surface, near-ambient temperature operation, no thermal mass, fast response, concentration reduces cost of cells relative to optics, and scalable to a range of sizes. Over the last few years, we have conducted testing of several CPV modules for DOEs Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) program. The testing facilities are located at the Concentrating Solar Radiation Users Facility (CRULF) and consist the 10 kW High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) and a 14m2 Concentrating Technologies, LLC (CTEK) dish. This paper will primarily describe the test capabilities; module test results will be detailed in the presentation.

Bingham, C.; Lewandowski, A.; Stone, K.; Sherif, R.; Ortabasi, U.; Kusek, S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Using GIS and Satellite Imagery to Locate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to show it is possible to use remote sensing techniques to detect oil seeps and oil spills and use ArcView to determine the hydrocarbon locations. Modern remote sensing software was used to process NASA's ASTER Multispectral Images. The files were loaded with Band 3 (0.76- 0.86 µm) as Red, Band 2 (0.63- 069 µm) as Green and Band 1 (0.52- 0.60 µm) as Blue. ASTER's 15 m ground resolution and image enhancement techniques allowed the identification of offshore oil seeps in California and the detection of oil leaking from offshore production platforms in Azerbaijan.

Jay Rauschkolb

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

1962-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

234

Concentrating solar power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text is derived from NREL's concentrating solar power information page.)[1] Concentrating solar power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet our nation's demand for electricity. CSP plants produce power by first using mirrors to focus sunlight to heat a working fluid. Ultimately, this high-temperature fluid is used to spin a turbine or power an engine that drives a generator. And the final product is electricity. Smaller CSP systems can be located directly where the power is needed. Larger, utility-scale CSP applications provide hundreds of megawatts of electricity for the power grid. Both linear concentrator and power tower systems can be easily integrated with thermal storage, helping to generate

235

Applying Spatiotemporal and Demographic Data to Locate Next Crime Location Control #7501  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geographic profiling is a tool used by law enforcement to predict the location of a serial criminal’s next crime. A typical geographic profile outputs estimated probabilities with the input of time and location of previous crimes. In this paper, we develop a new geographic profile that is able to incorporate demographical observations while remaining an effective predictor. We assume that (1) there are buffer zones around previous crime scenes because the criminal fears capture, (2) there is distance decay as criminals prefer something about the locations where previous crimes were committed, and (3) criminals target potential victims based on income and (4) target areas based on crime rate, which are claims supported by research of serial criminals. In order to find an effective profile, we have combined two models of criminal behavior which predict the location of future crime. First, we compute probability densities using a time-weighted kernel density algorithm, which includes buffer zone

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae, are the most abundant autotrophs in aquatic environments and form the base of all aquatic food chains by fixing carbon and nitrogen into cellular biomass. The single most important nutrient for photosynthesis and growth is nitrate, which is severely limiting in many aquatic environments particularly the open ocean (1, 2). It is therefore not surprising that NrtA, the solute-binding component of the high-affinity nitrate ABC transporter, is the single-most abundant protein in the plasma membrane of these bacteria (3). Here we describe the first structure of a nitratespecific receptor, NrtA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, complexed with nitrate and determined to a resolution of 1.5Å. NrtA is significantly larger than other oxyanionbinding proteins, representing a new class of transport proteins. From sequence alignments, the only other solute-binding protein in this class is CmpA, a bicarbonatebinding protein. Therefore, these organisms created a novel solute-binding protein for two of the most important nutrients; inorganic nitrogen and carbon. The electrostatic charge distribution of NrtA appears to force the protein off of the membrane while the flexible tether facilitates the delivery of nitrate to the membrane pore. The structure not only details the determinants for nitrate selectivity in NrtA, but also the bicarbonate specificity in CmpA. Nitrate and bicarbonate transport are regulated by the cytoplasmic proteins NrtC and CmpC, respectively. Interestingly, the residues lining the ligand binding pockets suggest that they both bind nitrate. This implies that the nitrogen and carbon uptake pathways are synchronized by intracellular nitrate and nitrite.3 The nitrate ABC transporter of cyanobacteria is composed of four polypeptides (Figure 1): a high-affinity periplasmic solute-binding lipoprotein (NrtA), an integral membrane permease (NrtB), a cytoplasmic ATPase (NrtD), and a unique ATPase/solute-binding fusion protein (NrtC) that regulates transport (4). NrtA binds both nitrate and nitrite (Kd = 0.3 mM) and is necessary for cell survival when nitrate is the primary nitrogen source (5). The role of NrtA is to scavenge nitrate/nitrite from the periplasm for delivery to the membrane permease, NrtB. The passage of solute through the transmembrane pore is linked to ATP hydrolysis by NrtC and NrtD. NrtD consists of a single ATPase domain. In contrast, NrtC contains both an ATPase domain and a Cterminal solute-binding domain that shares 50% amino acid sequence similarity with NrtA, and is required for the ammonium-mediated inhibition of nitrate transport (6, 7). Aside from the homologous transporter for bicarbonate, CmpABCD, there are no other known examples of ABC transporters that have an ATPase/solute-binding fusion component. The specificity of the nitrate transporter is conferred by NrtA (4). NrtA is ~49% identical (60% similar) in amino acid sequence to the bicarbonate receptor CmpA. In its entirety, it does not have significant homology to any other known protein. To elucidate the molecular determinants of nitrate specificity, we determined the crystal structure of the Synechocystis 6803 NrtA to 1.5 Å. While the general shape of NrtA is akin to that of other solute binding proteins, NrtA clearly represents a new and unique structural variant of these ‘C clamp’ proteins. From this structure and sequence alignments of other bicarbonate and nitrate transporters, the molecular basis for solute selectivity is clear and suggests that regulatory domains of both icarbonate and nitrate transport systems bind nitrate. Based on these findings, a model is presented that 4 demonstrates how such synergistic regulation of bicarbonate and nitrate transport is important in conserving energy during the process of carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation.

Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

237

Complexation of Lanthanides with Nitrate at Variable Temperatures: Thermodynamics and Coordination Modes  

SciTech Connect

Complexation of neodymium(III) with nitrate was studied at variable temperatures (25, 40, 55 and 70 C) by spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry. The NdNO{sub 3}{sup 2+} complex is weak and becomes slightly stronger as the temperature is increased. The enthalpy of complexation at 25 C was determined by microcalorimetry to be small and positive, (1.5 {+-} 0.2) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, in good agreement with the trend of the stability constant at variable temperatures. Luminescence emission spectra and lifetime of Eu(III) in nitrate solutions suggest that inner-sphere and bidentate complexes form between trivalent lanthanides (Nd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+}) and nitrate in aqueous solutions. Specific Ion Interaction approach (SIT) was used to obtain the stability constants of NdNO{sub 3}{sup 2+} at infinite dilution and variable temperatures.

Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Modeling study of deposition locations in the 291-Z plenum  

SciTech Connect

The TEMPEST (Trent and Eyler 1991) and PART5 computer codes were used to predict the probable locations of particle deposition in the suction-side plenum of the 291-Z building in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site, the exhaust fan building for the 234-5Z, 236-Z, and 232-Z buildings in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site. The Tempest code provided velocity fields for the airflow through the plenum. These velocity fields were then used with TEMPEST to provide modeling of near-floor particle concentrations without particle sticking (100% resuspension). The same velocity fields were also used with PART5 to provide modeling of particle deposition with sticking (0% resuspension). Some of the parameters whose importance was tested were particle size, point of injection and exhaust fan configuration.

Mahoney, L.A.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concentration concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol concentration A measure of the amount of aerosol particles (e.g. number, mass, volume) per unit volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

240

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moody to Lev, SUBJECT: NEPA 2012 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: JAN 25 2012 Moody to Lev, SUBJECT: NEPA 2012 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: JAN 25 2012 Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description EA Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain EA Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $65,000 Annual NEPA Planning Summary NEPA Reviews of Proposals to Implement Enterprise SRS Initiatives unknown The Savannah River Site Strategic Plan for 2011 - 2015 describes 12 initiatives that Enterprise SRS will pursue by applying SRS's management core competencies in nuclear materials. Implementation of new missions resulting from this effort will likely require NEPA review. However, until firm proposals are developed

242

Location of hydraulic fractures using microseismic techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microearthquakes with magnitudes ranging between -6 and -2 have been observed in three successive massive injections of water at the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy demonstration site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The injection was part of a program to increase the heat transfer area of hydraulic fractures and to decrease the flow-through impedance between wells. The microearthquakes were used in mapping the location of the extended hydraulic fractures. A downhole triaxial system positioned approximately 200 m vertically above the injection point in a shut-in production well was used for detection. The microearthquakes occurred in a north-northwest striking zone 400 m in length passing through the injection point. During a third substantially larger injection, microearthquakes occurred in a dispersed volume at distances as great as 800 m from the zone active in the first two injections.

Albright, J.A.; Pearson, C.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A compound parabolic concentrator  

SciTech Connect

A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for solar energy applications is presented in this work. A prototype was built and its thermal performance was determined. Operating temperatures of the order of 150 /sup 0/C with a reasonable efficiency can be attained by means of a fixed CPC.

Manrique, J.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for installation. Because of some testing problems with the Zenergy fault current limiter, installation was delayed until early 2009 with it being put into operation on March 6, 2009. A malfunction of the FCL controller caused the DC power supply to the superconducting magnet to be turned off. This inserted the FCL impedance into the circuit while it was in normal operation causing a voltage resonance condition. While these voltages never reached a point where damage would occur on customer equipment, steps were taken to insure this would not happen again. The FCL was reenergized with load on December 18, 2009. A fault was experienced on the circuit with the FCL in operation on January 14, 2010. The FCL operated properly and reduced the fault current by about 8%, what was expected from tests and modeling. As of the end of the project, the FCL was still in operation on the circuit. The third phase of the project involved the exploration of several advanced protection ideas that might be at a state where they could be applied to the Circuit of the Future and elsewhere in the SCE electrical system. Based on the work done as part of the literature review and survey, as well as a number of internal meetings with engineering staff at SCE, a number of ideas were compiled. These ideas were then evaluated for applicability and ability to be applied on the Circuit of the Future in the time remaining for the project. Some of these basic ideas were implemented on the circuit including measurement of power quality before and after the FCL. It was also decided that we would take what was learned as part of the Circuit of the Future work and extend it to the next generation circuit protection for SCE. Also at this time, SCE put in a proposal to the DOE for the Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration using ARRA funding. SCE was successful in obtaining funding for this proposal, so it was felt that exploration of new protection schemes for this Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration would be a good use of the project resources. With this in mind, a protection system that uses fault interrupting switches, hi

Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Stochastic hydro-economic modeling for optimal management of agricultural groundwater nitrate pollution under hydraulic conductivity uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In decision-making processes, reliability and risk aversion play a decisive role. This paper presents a framework for stochastic optimization of control strategies for groundwater nitrate pollution from agriculture under hydraulic conductivity uncertainty. ... Keywords: Fertilizer allocation, Groundwater, Nitrates, Optimization, Stochastic management model, Uncertainty

S. Peña-Haro; M. Pulido-Velazquez; C. Llopis-Albert

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Page 1 of 3 as of 1242011 Report Name Previous Location New Location Brief Description Multi-Project or Single...

247

Detecting, Locating, and Characterizing Remote Power Sources  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study to determine range and back-azimuth detection methods for an isolated generator powering common loads was completed. The study deployed 3-component E and B field sensors with sampling rates of 100 kHz in a low noise test location in Southern California. Scripted power and load cycling was recorded at ranges of 40 meters to 4 km from the generator/load source. Three loads were tested: a 100 meter string of lights, an inverter powering an air blower, and a resistive heater. No E-field or B-field radiated signals were detected at ranges greater than 40 meters with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than one. Large variations in the broadband background electromagnetic noise were observed and may have been responsible for null detections at some measurement locations. At the 40-meter station, a frequency shift upon generator loading was observed for all load types. Harmonics from the detuned generator (operating at 56.7 Hz) could be observed for all load types but were most pronounced for the inverter source. A back-azimuth estimation methodology was applied to detected harmonics with stable and consistent results. For the inverter source, consistent back azimuths to the source were determined for the fundamental and higher detected harmonics up to the 31st. The method was applied to narrow band ''noise'' at 60 Hz and produced bimodal directions that roughly pointed to large population centers. Details of the method are withheld in this report pending a record of invention submittal. Although the generator/load combinations, which utilized wiring that tended to minimize stray signals, cannot yet be detected at large stand-off range without application of noise-filtering methods, the back-azimuth method appears promising and should be applied to other source types and frequency ranges where an E and B field can be detected. A record of invention describing this new back-azimuth method has been submitted to the Intellectual Property Law Group.

Harben, P; Carrigan, C; Kirkendall, B; Simons, D

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Underground Cable Fault Location Reference and Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes underground cable fault location methods and details the application of the methods for transmission and distribution cable systems. It summarizes both terminal location and tracer location methods that can be applied to transmission and distribution cable systems. The report is an update to a summary of fault location methods. It provides practical technical material in the art and science of locating cable faults, including a description of common fault location instruments and p...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well as recovering stolen vehicles. Because many applications require traveling vehicles, this thesis focused on the AirTouch system's ability to accurately locate a moving vehicle. Recent AirTouch vehicle location system reports were compiled and analyzed to distinguish what factors tend to affect the accuracy of the readings. Based on the results of the reports, two sites were selected to minimize the external effects that could create inaccurate readings. Six speeds were selected ranging from 0 to 80 kmph (O to 50 mph) in 16 kmph (10 mph) increments. Each velocity was tested 20 times at each site. The location readings were compared to differential Global Positioning System (dGPS) readings which currently provide the most accurate location readings available for civilian use. The dGPS readings were also collected at each test site. It was discovered that one site produced more accurate readings compared to the other site. In addition, the longitude differences accounted for most of the error in the readings. Finally, more error was prevalent in the readings associated with the vehicle's direction of travel as opposed to readings perpendicular to the direction of travel. Based on the data analysis, it was impossible to conclude if velocity affected the accuracy of the AirTouch system. The results of this thesis have suggested that the AirTouch system does decrease in accuracy as the velocity increases among traveling vehicles. However, in one case, the accuracy of the stationary readings were less accurate compared to the non-stationary readings. At 80 kmph (50 mph), AirTouch had an approximate inaccuracy of 50 meters (164 feet). When the data was adjusted for human error, this approximate inaccuracy decreased to 33 meters (107 feet). For transit services, these averages are appropriate. When dispatching a transit vehicle, two-way communication between dispatcher and driver can verify the vehicle's exact location. Furthermore, when a customer needs to know where a vehicle is and when it should arrive, 33 to 50 meters (107 to 164 feet) is sufficient for the customers' needs.

Henry, Tracy Lynn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules. 15 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

252

SAPLE: Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine.  

SciTech Connect

We present the Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine (SAPLE) web application, a directory search application for use by Sandia National Laboratories personnel. SAPLE's purpose is to return Sandia personnel 'results' as a function of user search queries, with its mission to make it easier and faster to find people at Sandia. To accomplish this, SAPLE breaks from more traditional directory application approaches by aiming to return the correct set of results while placing minimal constraints on the user's query. Two key features form the core of SAPLE: advanced search query interpretation and inexact string matching. SAPLE's query interpretation permits the user to perform compound queries when typing into a single search field; where able, SAPLE infers the type of field that the user intends to search on based on the value of the search term. SAPLE's inexact string matching feature yields a high-quality ranking of personnel search results even when there are no exact matches to the user's query. This paper explores these two key features, describing in detail the architecture and operation of SAPLE. Finally, an extensive analysis on logged search query data taken from an 11-week sample period is presented.

Procopio, Michael J.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Locating Bound Structure in an Accelerating Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given the overwhelming evidence that the universe is currently undergoing an accelerated expansion, the question of what are the largest gravitationally bound structures remains. A couple of groups, Busha et al. 2003 (B03) and Dunner et al. 2006 (D06), have attempted to analytically define these limits, arriving at substantially different estimates due to differences in their assumptions about the velocities at the present epoch. In an effort to locate the largest bound structures in the universe, we selected the Aquarius (ASC), Microscopium (MSC), Corona Borealis (CBSC), and Shapley (SSC) superclusters for study, due to their high number density of rich Abell clusters. Simple N-body simulations, which assumed negligible intercluster mass, were used to assess the likelihood of these structures being gravitationally bound, and the predictions of the models of B03 and D06 were compared with those results. We find that ASC, and MSC contain pairs of clusters which are gravitationally bound, A2541/A2546 and A3695/...

Pearson, David W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations

256

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Propane Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development

257

Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts...

258

APPENDIX A: FIGURES FIGURE 1. PROJECT LOCATION ON STATE MAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ON STATE MAP PROJECT LOCATION: MCLEAN COUNTY ILLINOIS HEARTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE WIND TURBINE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROJECT LOCATION: LATITUDE: 40-32-14.39N NAD 83...

259

Data center design and location: Consequences for electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data center design and location: Consequences for electricity use and greenhouse-gas emissions Title Data center design and location: Consequences for electricity use and...

260

Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most Vulnerable Places...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most Vulnerable Places in Africa? Jump to: navigation, search Name Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development

262

Derived Concentration Technical Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

196-2011 196-2011 April 2011 DOE STANDARD DERIVED CONCENTRATION TECHNICAL STANDARD U.S. Department of Energy AREA ENVR Washington, D.C. 20585 Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1196-2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Derived Concentration Technical Standard was a collaborative effort sponsored by the DOE Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, with support from Department subject matter experts (SMEs) in the field of radiation protection. This standard, which complements DOE Order (O) 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, was developed taking

263

Concentrating Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After nearly 20 years of commercial dormancy, concentrating solar thermal (CST) power development and investment activity is heating up globally. Encouraged by volatile energy prices, carbon markets, and renewable-friendly policies, an increasing number of established companies, newcomers, utilities, and government agencies are planning to deploy CST systems to tap the technologies' improving conversion efficiencies and low-cost electricity production potential. This renewable energy technology perspecti...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Long-term nitrate measurements in the ocean using the In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer: sensor integration into the Apex profiling float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reagent-free, optical nitrate sensors (ISUS: In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer) can be used to detect nitrate throughout most of the ocean. Although the sensor is a relatively high power device when operated continuously (7.5 W typical), the ...

Kenneth S. Johnson; Luke J. Coletti; Hans W. Jannasch; Carole M. Sakamoto; Dana D. Swift; Stephen C. Riser

266

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably] At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, colloid-facilitated transport is a potential of colloids through Hanford sediments under steady state, unsaturated flow conditions. We isolated colloids

Flury, Markus

267

Criticality experiments with planar arrays of three-liter bottles containing plutonium nitrate solution  

SciTech Connect

The objective of these experiments was to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in critically safety assessments of plant configurations. Arrays containing up to as many as sixteen three-liter bottles filled with plutonium nitrate were used in the experiments. A split-table device was used in the final assembly of the arrays. Ths planar arrays were reflected with close fitting plexiglas on each side and on the bottom but not the top surface. The experiments addressed a number of factors effecting criticality: the critical air gap between bottles in an array of fixed number of bottles, the number of bottles required for criticality if the bottles were touching, and the effect on critical array spacing and critical bottle number due to the insertion of an hydrogeneous substance into the air gap between bottles. Each bottle contained about 2.4l of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solution at a Pu concentration of 105g Pu/l, with the {sup 240}Pu content being 2.9 wt% at a free acid molarity H{sup +} of 5.1. After the initial series of experiments were performed with bottles separated by air gaps, plexiglas shells of varying thicknesses were placed around each bottle to investigate how moderation between bottles affects both the number of bottles required for criticality and the critical spacing between each bottle. The minimum of bottles required for criticality was found to be 10.9 bottles, occurring for a square array with bottles in contact. As the bottles were spaced apart, the critical number increased. For sixteen bottles in a square array, the critical separation between surfaces in both x and y direction was 0.96 cm. The addition of plexiglas around each bottle decreased the critical bottle number, compared to those separated in air, but the critical bottle number, even with interstitial plastic in place was always greater than 10.9 bottles. The most reactive configuration was a tightly packed array of bottles with no intervening material.

Durst, B.M.; Clayton, E.D.; Smith, J.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Criticality experiments with mixed plutonium-uranium nitrate solution at plutonium fractions of 0. 2, 0. 5, and 1. 0 in annular cylindrical geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of these criticality experiments is to provide criticality data for Pu + U solutions for optimizing the physical size of equipment during fissile product conversion and storage and for the design of reprocessing plants. Prior to these measurements, little or no criticality data were available for mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in annular geometry. The experiments were performed under a joint Criticality Data Development Program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The critical experiments were performed in the critical mass facility of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Criticality measurements were made with (Pu + U) nitrate solutions in a water-reflected annular vessel. The concentration of (Pu + U) in the nitrate solution was varied and ranged between 61 and 489 g (Pu + U)/l. The ratio of Pu to (Pu + U) in the solution also was varied, with measurements being made at {approx}0.52, {approx}0.23, {approx}0.97. The measurements provide data essential for validating criticality codes that may be used on configurations similar to those of the experiments.

Lloyd, R.C.; Koyama, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Radiation Measurements 40 (2005) 560568 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Measurements 40 (2005) 560­568 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas Long-term measurements of radon progeny concentrations with solid-state nuclear track detectors K.N.Yua, , D. Nikezica,1 , F-term measurements of radon decay products with solid-state nuclear track detectors. We then propose a method

Yu, K.N.

270

METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of concentrating N/sup 15/ in a liquid is described. Gaseous nitric oxide and at least one liquid selected from the group consisting of the aqueous oxyacids and oxides of nitrogen, wherein the atomic ratio of oxygen to nitrogen is greater than unity, are brought into intimate contact to cause an enrichment of the liquid and a depletion of the gas in N/sup 15/. The liquid is, thereafter, reacted with sulfur dioxide to produce a gas contuining nitric oxide. The gas contuining nitric oxide is then continuously passed in countercurrent contact with the liquid to cause further enrichment of the liquid.

Taylor, T.I.; Spindel, W.

1960-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Characterization of Photovoltaic Concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper will describe the resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for performing characterization of photovoltaic (PV) materials designed for operation under concentrated light. NREL has the capability to measure devices ranging from very small, unencapsulated research cells to reasonably sized, environmentally protected modules. Data gathering and interpretation are also ongoing areas of revision and improvement. The main goal of the current research is to reduce the measurement uncertainty to the lowest practical value. At present, the state of the art is limited at a ?5% level in measuring efficiency accurately.

Kiehl, J.; Emery, E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Concentric Black Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new supersymmetric solutions of five-dimensional minimal supergravity that describe concentric black rings with an optional black hole at the common centre. Configurations of two black rings are found which have the same conserved charges as a single rotating black hole; these black rings can have a total horizon area less than, equal to, or greater than the black hole with the same charges. A numerical investigation of these particular black ring solutions suggests that they do not have closed timelike curves.

Jerome P. Gauntlett; Jan B. Gutowski

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics August 20, 2013 - 5:06pm Addthis In power tower concentrating solar power systems, numerous large, flat, sun-tracking mirrors, known as heliostats, focus sunlight onto a receiver at the top of a tall tower. A heat-transfer fluid heated in the receiver is used to generate steam, which, in turn, is used in a conventional turbine generator to produce electricity. Some power towers use water/steam as the heat-transfer fluid. Other advanced designs are experimenting with molten nitrate salt because of its superior heat-transfer and energy-storage capabilities. Individual commercial plants can be sized to produce up to 200 megawatts of electricity. Illustration of a power tower power plant. Sunlight is shown reflecting off a series of heliostats surrounding the tower and onto the receiver at the top of the tower. The hot heat-transfer fluid exiting from the receiver flows down the tower, into a feedwater reheater, and then into a turbine, which generates electricity that is fed into the power grid. The cool heat-transfer fluid exiting the turbine flows into a steam condenser to be cooled and sent back up the tower to the receiver.

275

Express location: supporting coordination of mobile delivery work  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces Express Location, a mobile web application, supporting drivers in delivery service in the daily coordination of work. Remote communication and cooperation takes place on a shared map view around the drivers' locations and next stop, ... Keywords: CSCW, delivery service, drawing, drivers, express location, field study, location-awareness, mobility, visual representations, workspace

Markus Westerlund; Maria Normark; Lars Erik Holmquist

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Station Locations to someone by E-mail Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations Find biodiesel (B20 and above) fueling stations near an address or ZIP code

277

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Other Location | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Location Other Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Other Location Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in other locations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 28, 2011 CX-006938: Categorical Exclusion Determination Developing Lithium-Ion Cells for Electric Vehicle Batteries CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Daejeon, South Korea, Other Location Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office September 28, 2011 CX-006922: Categorical Exclusion Determination Amerigon Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Germany, California, Indiana, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office

278

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

280

Universal solar concentrator panel  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a solar concentrator device. It comprises: a solar energy receiver; and a flat solar energy reflector arranged to reflect solar energy to the receiver, the reflector including a substantially square-shaped frame limiting an inner space, individual flat reflective panels arranged in the space in a first group or rows extending in a first direction and a second group of rows extending in a second direction substantially transverse to the first direction and so that each of the panels is turnable about three mutually perpendicular axes, and means for mounting the panels so that they are turnable about the axes. The mounting means including first means which connect the panels in the rows extending in one of the directions so that the panels in each of the rows extending in the one direction are jointly turnable about a first one of the axes, second means for mounting each of the panels so that in each of the rows extending in the one direction each of the panels is turnable about a second one of the axes, and third means for mounting each panel in each of the rows extending in the one direction so that each of the panels is turnable about a third one of the axes. This patent also describes a solar concentrator device, wherein the receiver includes a box forming an inner chamber, a plurality of photovoltaic cells sealed with a clear plastic and accommodated in the chamber, and water filling the chamber and surrounding the photovoltaic cells.

Bagno, R.G.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND SULFATE CONCENTRATION ON PROBABLITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR LIQUID WASTE TANKS- PART IV  

SciTech Connect

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion susceptibility. Testing solutions were chosen to build off previous experimental results from FY07, FY08, FY09 and FY10 to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate. The FY11 results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits as well.

Hoffman, E.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

Non-tracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nontracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio is provided. The concentrator includes a plurality of energy absorbers which communicate with a main header by which absorbed heat is removed. Undesired heat flow of those absorbers not being heated by radiant energy at a particular instant is impeded, improving the efficiency of the concentrator.

Hinterberger, Henry (Batavia, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Station Locations Find ethanol (E85) fueling stations near an address or ZIP code or along a

284

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Other Location | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Location Other Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Other Location Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in other locations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 24, 2013 CX-010914: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing of a Highly Efficient Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion (CX)) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 09/24/2013 Location(s): Multiple States, China, Canada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 21, 2013 CX-010781: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Geomechanical Model for Gas Shales Based on Integration of Stress CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/21/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 16, 2013

285

Alternative Fueling Station Locator - Mobile | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fueling Station Locator - Mobile Fueling Station Locator - Mobile Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fueling Station Locator - Mobile Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Mobile Device Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/m/stations/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/m/stations/ Cost: Free References: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Research: Data and Resources[1] Logo: Alternative Fueling Station Locator - Mobile Find fueling stations for your alternative fuel vehicle on-the-go with the

286

Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services) Place Cologne, Germany Zip D-51143 Sector Solar Product A spin-out of the DLR Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, providing consulting, due diligence and component testing for Solar Thermal Electricity Generation (STEG). References Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services) is a company located in Cologne, Germany . References ↑ "Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Concentrating_Solar_Power_Services_CSP_Services&oldid=343830

287

Photovoltaic solar concentrator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation which includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

Chiang, C.J.

1991-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Etherthreads : an infrastructure for location-based messages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes an infrastructure for location-based services for Bluetooth enabled cellular phones. Specifically, it explores the use of this architecture in a location-based messaging application. A user can send ...

Lassey, Bradford, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Wideband source location through frequency-dependent modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for locating multiple wideband sources using the signals received by an array of sensors. In the present approach, the problem of source location is treated as a frequency dependent estimation problem. Each wideband source ...

Y. Grenier

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Inventory and facility location models with market selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider important generalizations of a wide class of traditional deterministic inventory and facility location models that we call inventory/facility location models with market selection. Instead of the traditional setting, we are given a ...

Retsef Levi; Joseph Geunes; H. Edwin Romeijn; David B. Shmoys

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A GIS embedded decision support system for bicriteria location problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe and exemplify the embedment of a Geographical Information System (GIS) platform in a decision support tool previously developed for bicriteria location problems. When the facilities to be located have environmental effects, ...

Sérgio Fernandes; M. Eugénia Captivo; João N. Clímaco

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Policy-aware sender anonymity in Location-based services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBS Server Location Server CSP Sender Figure 1.1: LBS ModelService Provider, denoted as CSP, the Location Server,is either the MPC in the CSP’s network or an Over-The-Top (

Vyas, Avinash

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Map of the United States...

294

Equipment evaluation for low density polyethylene encapsulated nitrate salt waste at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

Mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) are subject to regulation by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Polymer solidification is being developed as a final treatment technology for several of these mixed wastes, including nitrate salts. Encapsulation nitrate salts with low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been the preliminary focus of the RFP polymer solidification effort. Literature reviews, industry surveys, and lab-scale and pilot-scale tests have been conducted to evaluate several options for encapsulating nitrate salts with LDPE. Most of the effort has focused on identifying compatible drying and extrusion technologies. Other processing options, specifically meltration and non-heated compounding machines, were also investigated. The best approach appears to be pretreatment of the nitrate salt waste brine in either a vertical or horizontal thin film evaporator followed by compounding of the dried waste with LDPE in an intermeshing, co-rotating, twin-screw extruder. Additional pilot-scale tests planned for the fall of 1993 should further support this recommendation. Preliminary evaluation work indicates that meltration is not possible at atmospheric pressure with the LDPE (Chevron PE-1409) provided by RFP. However, meltration should be possible at atmospheric pressure using another LDPE formulation with altered physical and rheological properties: Lower molecular weight and lower viscosity (Epoline C-15). Contract modifications are now in process to allow a follow-on pilot scale demonstration. Questions regarding changed safety and physical properties of the resultant LDPE waste form due to use of the Epoline C-15 will be addressed. No additional work with non-heated mixer compounder machines is planned at this time.

Yamada, W.I.; Faucette, A.M.; Jantzen, R.C.; Logsdon, B.W.; Oldham, J.H.; Saiki, D.M.; Yudnich, R.J.

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Nitrogen cycling in oxygen deficient zones : insights from [delta]¹?N and [delta]¹?O of nitrite and nitrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stable isotopes, [delta]¹?N and [delta]¹?O, of nitrite and nitrate can be powerful tools used to interpret nitrogen cycling in the ocean. They are particularly useful in regions of the ocean where there are multiple ...

Buchwald, Carolyn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

Distribution Fault Location Support Tools, Algorithms, and Implementation Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution grid modernization applications such as fault location and automatic sectionalizing require an accurate assessment of fault current. More-accurate prediction of fault locations will shorten the fault investigation (patrol) time, which in turn can reduce the total restoration time and duration of the outage experienced by the customer. This EPRI technical update report presents information on fault location applications, enumerates different methods used to detect the location of faults, ...

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Statistical learning theory for location fingerprinting in wireless LANs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, techniques and algorithms developed in the framework of Statistical Learning Theory are applied to the problem of determining the location of a wireless device by measuring the signal strength values from a set of access points (location ... Keywords: Context-aware computing, Location management, Mobile computing, Statistical learning theory, Wi-Fi

Mauro Brunato; Roberto Battiti

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A cutting plane algorithm for the capacitated facility location problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Capacitated Facility Location Problem (CFLP) is to locate a set of facilities with capacity constraints, to satisfy at the minimum cost the order-demands of a set of clients. A multi-source version of the problem is considered ... Keywords: Capacitated facility location problem, Facet-enumeration, Mixed dicut inequalities

Pasquale Avella; Maurizio Boccia

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Location-based services deployment and demand: a roadmap model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advancements in mobile, wireless and positioning technologies have enabled applications and services such as route guiding and emergency call-out assistance. These and other similar services have become known as `location-based services' (LBS). The ... Keywords: Case study, LBS, Location-aware services, Location-based services, Mobile services

Krassie Petrova; Bin Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Multi-criteria warehouse location selection using Choquet integral  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The location of a warehouse is generally one of the most important and strategic decision in the optimization of logistic systems. Warehouse location is a long-term decision and is influenced by many quantitative and qualitative factors. Among the main ... Keywords: Choquet integral, Fuzzy, Fuzzy measure, Hierarchy, Multi-criteria, Warehouse location

Tufan Demirel; Nihan Çetin Demirel; Cengiz Kahraman

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Facility location selection using fuzzy topsis under group decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a fuzzy TOPSIS model under group decisions for solving the facility location selection problem, where the ratings of various alternative locations under different subjective attributes and the importance weights of all attributes are ... Keywords: facility location, fuzzy TOPSIS, group decisions, interval arithmetic, ranking

Ta-Chung Chu

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A leader-follower game in competitive facility location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of locating new facilities of a firm or franchise that enters a market where a competitor operates existing facilities. The goal of the new entrant firm is to decide the location and attractiveness of its new facilities that maximize ... Keywords: Competitive facility location, Hybrid tabu search heuristic, Leader-follower game, Mixed-integer nonlinear programming

Hande Küçükayd?n; Necati Aras; ?. Kuban Alt?nel

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Maximal covering location problem (MCLP) with fuzzy travel times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fuzzy maximal covering location problem (FMCLP) in which travel time between any pair of nodes is considered to be a fuzzy variable. A fuzzy expected value maximization model is designed for such a problem. Moreover, a hybrid algorithm ... Keywords: Credibility theory, Facility location, Fuzzy travel times, Maximal covering location problem (MCLP), Simulation

Soheil Davari; Mohammad Hossein Fazel Zarandi; Ahmad Hemmati

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The potential for location-aware power management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of location-awareness to dynamically optimise the energy consumption of an office. It makes use of high-accuracy location data collected over 60 days randomly selected from a year in a commercial environment to evaluate the ... Keywords: context-aware, energy efficiency, location-aware, power management

R. K. Harle; A. Hopper

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Mobility-supporting data management for location-based mobile systems: the special case of single category location repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Location-based mobile applications require timely generation of user-centric proximities from application-relevant repositories of business locations. The proximity generation requirement is poorly served by conventional query resolution methods which ...

James E. Wyse

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Site Location of Development Act (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location of Development Act (Maine) Location of Development Act (Maine) Site Location of Development Act (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Site Location of Development Act regulates the locations chosen for

309

Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Technologies Office Search Building Technologies Office Search Search Help Building Technologies Office HOME ABOUT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Office » Residential Buildings Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner

310

Markets for concentrating solar power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the markets for concentrating solar power. As concentrating solar power technologies advance into the early stages of commercialization, their economic potential becomes more sharply defined and increasingly tangible.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power August 20, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Photo of numerous parallel rows of parabolic trough collectors tracking the sun. Cooling towers and other generator equipment are in the midst of the troughs, and two water tanks are in the background. The Solar Electric Generating Station IV power plant in California consists of many parallel rows of parabolic trough collectors that track the sun. The cooling towers can be seen with the water plume rising into the air, and white water tanks are in the background. Credit: Sandia National Laboratory / PIX 14955 Linear concentrating solar power (CSP) collectors capture the sun's energy with large mirrors that reflect and focus the sunlight onto a linear

312

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Southwest Concentrating Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwest Concentrating Solar Power 1000-MW Initiative Southwest Concentrating Solar Power 1000-MW Initiative Photos of various concentrating solar power systems. NREL, working through SunLab, supports the U.S. Department of Energy's goal to install 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new concentrating solar power systems in the southwestern United States by 2010. This level of deployment, combined with research and development to reduce technology component costs, could help reduce concentrating solar power electricity costs to $0.07/kilowatt-hour. At this cost, concentrating solar power can compete effectively in the Southwest's energy markets. To achieve the Initiative's goal, the U.S. Department of Energy is partnering with the Western Governors' Association to encourage concentrating solar power installations in Arizona, California, Colorado,

313

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations

315

Energy Basics: Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

316

Energy Basics: Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

317

Definition: Phasor Data Concentrator (PDC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phasor Data Concentrator (PDC) Phasor Data Concentrator (PDC) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Phasor Data Concentrator (PDC) Receives and time-synchronizes phasor data from multiple phasor measurement units (PMUs) to produce a real-time, time-aligned output data stream. A PDC can exchange phasor data with PDCs at other locations. Through use of multiple PDCs, multiple layers of concentration can be implemented within an individual synchrophasor data system.[1] Related Terms smart grid References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/phasor_data_concentrator_pdc [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitions|Template:BASEPAGENAME]] Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Phasor_Data_Concentrator_(PDC)&oldid=493108"

318

A Review of Spatial Statistical Techniques for Location Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the new economic geography of trade and location has, understandably enough, concentrated on developing models of stylised relationships, it now seems that a review of some techniques which may be applied in empirical testing could prove useful. It is this task that will be approached here, conditioned by the advances taking place in new economic geography on the one hand, and in spatial data analysis on the other. Spatial data analysis ranges from the visualization and exploration of spatial data, through spatial statistics to spatial econometrics. The techniques involved are intended to explore for and demonstrate the presence of dependence between observations in space. Typically, observations are classified into three broad types: fields or surfaces with values at least theoretically observable over the whole study area, as in geostatistics, point patterns representing the occurrence of an observation, such as reported cases in epidemiology, and finally lattice observations, where attribute values adhere to a tesselation of the study area. This last form has much in common with time series studies, and shares a number of key testing techniques with econometrics. The paper reviews chosen techniques which can be applied in new economic geography. Point patterns, for instance, can be readily used to attempt to detect clustering. Lattice observations are used in the study of dynamic externalities, and consequently the effects of testing hypotheses based on spatial series should be examined. Finally, attention will be drawn to problems arising from spatial non-stationarity, when causal relationships may vary across space, and from the modifiable areal unit problem, when test results are influenced by the choice of spatial aggregation employed. 1

Roger Bivand

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report March 31, 2012 Michael Schuller, Frank Little, Darren Malik, Matt Betts, Qian Shao, Jun Luo, Wan Zhong, Sandhya Shankar, Ashwin Padmanaban The Space Engineering Research Center Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University Abstract We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials,

320

Mirror alignment and focus of point-focus solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Distributed point-focusing solar concentrators are being developed for dish-Stirling systems and other applications. Many of these concentrators make use of faceted mirrors that have to be accurately aligned. Some of the solar concentrator designs use stretched-membrane facets that also require focusing. Accurate mirror alignment and focus of faceted solar concentrators have two benefits. First, the concentration ratio of the concentrator/receiver (collector) system is improved with accurate alignment and focus. The receiver aperture diameter can therefore be smaller, thereby reducing thermal losses from the receiver and improving the overall efficiency of the collector. Second, and perhaps more importantly, flux intensities on the receiver can be sensitive to facet alignment and focus. In this paper, the theory and practical application of an alignment and focusing technique are presented. In the technique, light from an artificial source is reflected from the concentrator`s facets to a target. From basic geometric principles, the shape and location of the reflected light on the target can be predicted. Alignment is accomplished by adjusting the facets aim so that the reflected image falls on the predetermined location. To focus a stretched-membrane facet, the reflected image size is adjusted to match that of the target. The governing equations used to draw the alignment targets are developed and the practical application of the technique to the alignment and focus of the Cummins Power Generation, Inc. CPG-460 are presented. Alignment uncertainty associated with this technique on the CPG-460 is also discussed.

Diver, R.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Waste Tank Organic Safety Project organic concentration mechanisms task. FY 1994 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Waste Tank Organic Safety Project is conducting research to support Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) Waste Tank Safety Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Tank Farm Project Office. The goal of PNL`s program is to provide a scientific basis for analyzing organics in Hanford`s underground storage tanks (USTs) and for determining whether they are at concentrations that pose a potentially unsafe condition. Part of this research is directed toward determining what organic concentrations are safe by conducting research on organic aging mechanisms and waste energetics to assess the conditions necessary to produce an uncontrolled energy release in tanks due to reactions between the organics and the nitrate and nitrate salts in the tank wastes. The objective of the Organic Concentration Mechanisms Task is to assess the degree of localized enrichment of organics to be expected in the USTs due to concentration mechanisms. This report describes the progress of research conducted in FY 1994 on two concentration mechanisms of interest to the tank safety project: (1) permeation of a separate organic liquid phase into the interstitial spaces of the tank solids during the draining of free liquid from the tanks; and (2) concentration of organics on the surfaces of the solids due to adsorption. Three experiments were conducted to investigate permeation of air and solvent into a sludge simulant that is representative of single-shell tank sludge. The permeation behavior of air and solvent into the sludge simulant can be explained by the properties of the fluid pairs (air/supernate and solvent supernate) and the sludge. One important fluid property is the interfacial tension between the supernate and either the solvent or air. In general, the greater the interfacial tension between two fluids, the more difficult it will be for the air or solvent to displace the supernate during dewatering of the sludge.

Gerber, M.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:53am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 After estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by building type, building location is an important consideration in evaluating the relevance of energy-saving strategies due to variations in heating and cooling needs, and the GHG reduction potential due to variability of emissions factors across regions of the grid. If site-level energy use estimates are available for each of the program's key building types, the program can identify building locations with the greatest emission reduction potential by using the benchmarking approach. Locations with the worst energy performance relative to the benchmark are

324

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips November 15, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program Smartphone users are familiar with the prompt, "Would you like this site to use your current location?" If you're looking for somewhere to fuel your

325

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips November 15, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program Smartphone users are familiar with the prompt, "Would you like this site to use your current location?" If you're looking for somewhere to fuel your

326

Planar micro-optic solar concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as compound parabolic concentrators and nonimagingas kaleidoscopes or compound parabolic concentrators whicha variation of the compound parabolic concentrator, however,

Karp, Jason Harris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A flexible location management scheme for mobile computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Location management for mobile users is an important issue in distributed, mobile computing environments. In this thesis, I propose a flexible location management scheme on the Internet to support mobile users. The proposed scheme supports location search and update operations based on a data replication technique. I implemented the proposed scheme as an experimental prototype using ORACLE Distributed Database Management System (DDBMS), where two clients access independent database objects on one server to simulate the behavior of a distributed system.

Zhang, Ying

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Automated Detection and Location of Indications in Eddy Current Signals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, said signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

Brudnoy, David M.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Levy, Arthur J.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

THE LABORATORY Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE LABORATORY Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is home to some of the world's most cutting-edge technologies, used by researchers worldwide...

330

Design and Evaluation of an Architecture for Location Privacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many operators of cellphone networks now offer location-based services to their customers, whereby an operator often outsources service provisioning to a third-party provider. Since a person’s location could reveal sensitive information about the person, the operator must ensure that the service provider processes location information about the operator’s customers in a privacy-preserving way. We propose an architecture for location-based services based on Trusted Computing and Secure Logging. Trusted Computing lets an operator query the configuration of a location-based service. The operator will hand over location information to the service only if the service is configured such that the service provider cannot get access to location information using software-based attacks. This includes passive attacks, where the provider monitors the composition or the timing of information flowing into and out of its service, and active attacks, where the provider modifies or injects customer queries to the service. We introduce several requirements that must be satisfied by a location-based service to defend against passive attacks. Furthermore, we present Secure Logging, an auditing mechanism to defend against active attacks. We present an implementation of our architecture and demonstrate its usefulness by building two sample location-based services on top of it. The evaluation of our architecture shows that its processing delay is hardly noticeable and that timing attacks are very unlikely to succeed. 1

Urs Hengartner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Reliability Models for Facility Location: The Expected Failure Cost ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 25, 2003 ... Reliability Models for Facility Location: The Expected Failure Cost Case. Lawrence V. Snyder (larry.snyder ***at*** lehigh.edu) Mark S. Daskin ...

332

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to...

333

Locating Central Actors in Co-offending Networks - CECM - Simon ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in intelligence and security informatics to better serve law enforcement and ... analysis in general, and then home in on research relevant to locating central ...

334

Maximally exposed offsite individual location determination for NESHAPS compliance  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the use of the computer program CAP88 for demonstrating compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS.) One of the inputs required for CAP88 is the location of the maximally exposed individual (MEI) by sector and distance. Distances to the MEI have been determined for 15 different potential release locations at SRS. These locations were compared with previous work and differences were analyzed. Additionally, SREL Conference Center was included as a potential offsite location since in the future it may be used as a dormitory. Worst sectors were then determined based on the distances.

Simpkins, A.A.

2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find...

336

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Claire Datum: Top of Mt. Simon Sandstone Location of cross section Upper Middle Lower shale Model of Mt. Simon Structure Johnston Hinton Manlove Gas Storage Project Key wells...

337

Location | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Assessment (OPA) OPA Home About OPA Director Staff & Responsibilities Location Project Management SC Projects Other Links SC Federal Project Directors (FPD) and FPD Resources...

338

Optimization Online - An Inventory-Location Model: Formulation ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 5, 2001 ... Abstract: We introduce a new distribution center (DC) location model that incorporates working inventory and safety stock inventory costs at the ...

339

Optimization Online - Socially optimal location of facilities with fixed ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The choice of locations for such facilities influences not only distances for users traveling to the facilities but also user waiting times at the facilities. In contrast to ...

340

NETL: News Release - Pipe Locating Sensor Could Help Prevent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ceramic, Plastic and Metallic Objects DES PLAINS, IL - Successful early tests of a pipeline sensor that locates plastic, ceramic and metallic underground pipes could help reduce...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Determining Optimal Locations for New Wind Energy Development in Iowa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research is to generate the most accurate model possible for predicting locations most suitable for new wind energy development using a… (more)

Mann, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

2012 Ford Fusion V6 Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion V6 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input...

343

Property:EIA/861/NercLocation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NercLocation NercLocation Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Description: Nerc Location NERC Location: The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) region where the utility has its primary business operations (service territory), electrical generation, transmission, and distribution equipment, and its administrative headquarters. Some utilities have business operations and service areas in more than one NERC region. Power marketers, because they generally have only office equipment, can have business operations in any NERC region. FRCC = Florida Reliability Coordinating Council; MRO = Midwest Reliability Organization; NPCC = Northeast Power Coordinating Council; RFC = Reliability First Corporation (formerly MAAC, MAIN and ECAR); SERC = SERC Reliability Corporation; SPP =

344

Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented at the 7th International Conference on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (CPV-7), 4-6 April 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada. Many concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems use a polymeric encapsulant to couple an optical component and/or coverglass to the cell. In that location, the encapsulation improves the transmission of concentrated optical flux through interfaces(s) while protecting the cell from the environment. The durability of encapsulation materials, however, is not well established relative to the desired service life of 30 years. Therefore, we have initiated a screen test to identify the field-induced failure modes for a variety of popular PV encapsulation materials.

Miller, D. C.; Muller, M.; Kempe, M. D.; Araki, K.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Design of photovoltaic central power station concentrator array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design for a photovoltaic central power station using tracking concentrators has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes an advanced Martin Marietta two-axis tracking fresnel lens concentrator. The concentrators are arrayed in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic plant output is connected to the existing 115 kV switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Natural convective studies within a compound parabolic concentrator enclosure  

SciTech Connect

The contribution due to natural convection within a compound parabolic concentrator enclosure has been experimentally determined. These studies have been conducted within a truncated compound parabolic concentrator having a concentration ratio of 4, a receiver width of 3.175 cm, and a length of 244.0 cm. The receiver was heated electrically while the aperture was provided with a duct that was cooled by water. The limbs of the collector were fabricated from aluminum. Temperatures were directly obtained with copper constantan thermocouples located throughout the entire enclosure and provided the basis needed to calculate the different modes of heat transfer. The constant heat flux

Tatara, R.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that

349

Closure of the condensed-phase organic-nitrate reaction USQ at hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discovery Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) was declared on the underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in May 1996. The USQ was for condensed-phase organic-nitrate reactions (sometimes called organic complexant reactions) in the tanks. This paper outlines the steps taken to close the USQ, and resolve the related safety issue. Several processes were used at the Hanford Site to extract and/or process plutonium. These processes resulted in organic complexants (for chelating multivalent cations) and organic extraction solvents being sent to the underground waste storage tanks. This paper addresses the organic complexant hazard. The organic complexants are in waste matrices that include inert material, diluents, and potential oxidizers. In the presence of oxidizing material, the complexant salts can be made to react exothermically by heating to high temperatures or by applying an external ignition source of sufficient energy. The first organic complexant hazard assessments focused on determining whether a hulk runaway reaction could occur, similar to the 1957 accident at Kyshtm (a reprocessing plant in the former U.S.S.R.). Early analyses (1977 through 1994) examined organic-nitrate reaction onset temperatures and concluded that a bulk runaway reaction could not occur at the Hanford Site because tank temperatures were well below that necessary for bulk runaway. Therefore, it was believed that organic-nitrate reactions were adequately described in the then current Authorization Basis (AB). Subsequent studies examined a different accident scenario, propagation resulting from an external ignition source (e.g., lightning or welding slag) that initiates a combustion front that propagates through the organic waste. A USQ evaluation determined that localized high energy ignition sources were credible, and that point source ignition of organic complexant waste was not adequately addressed i n the then existing AB. Consequently, the USQ was declared on the underground storage tanks in May 1996 for condensed-phase organic-nitrate reactions. At the same time that the operating contractor recommended that the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) declare a USQ. preventative coiitrols were implemented to minimize potential ignition sources and prevent a possible accident.

COWLEY, W.L.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

Industrial solar breeder project using concentrator photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to demonstrate the use of a concentrating photovoltaic system to provide the energy for operating a silicon solar cell production facility, i.e., to demonstrate a solar breeder. Solarex has proposed to conduct the first real test of the solar breeder concept by building and operating a 200 kW(e) (peak) concentrating photovoltaic system based on the prototype and system design developed during Phase I. This system will provide all of the electrical and thermal energy required to operate a solar cell production line. This demonstration would be conducted at the Solarex Rockville facility, with the photovoltaic array located over the company parking lot and on an otherwise unusable flood plain. Phase I of this program included a comprehensive analysis of the application, prototype fabrication and evaluation, system design and specification, and a detailed plan for Phases II and III. A number of prototype tracking concentrator solar collectors were constructed and operated. Extensive system analysis was performed to design the Phase II system as a stand-alone power supply for a solar cell production line. Finally, a detailed system fabrication proposal for Phase II and an operation and evaluation plan for Phase III were completed. These proposals included technical, management, and cost plans for the fabrication and exercise of the proposed system.

Hamilton, R.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Burkholder, J.; Levine, A.; Storti, G.; Wrigley, C.; McKegg, A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

ARM - Measurement - CO2 concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 concentration The amount of carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas, per unit of volume. Categories Atmospheric Carbon Instruments The above measurement is...

352

Energy Basics: Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. This thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity...

353

Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation andor concentration of aerosols and small liquidsolid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in...

354

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: A Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: A Decomposition Approach M.G. Ierapetritou and C.A. Floudas 1 correspondence should be addressed 1 #12; Abstract The generation of a reservoir development plan with well the optimal vertical well locations is formulated as a MILP problem where the binary variables correspond

355

Survey: Covering problems in facility location: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we review the covering problems in facility location. Here, besides a number of reviews on covering problems, a comprehensive review of models, solutions and applications related to the covering problem is presented after Schilling, Jayaraman, ... Keywords: Covering problem, Facility location, Mathematical formulation, Survey

Reza Zanjirani Farahani; Nasrin Asgari; Nooshin Heidari; Mahtab Hosseininia; Mark Goh

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Locanyms: towards privacy-preserving location-based services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in geolocated capacities, secure and verified positioning techniques, ubiquitous connectivity, as well as mobile and embedded systems, have led to the development of a plethora of Location-Based Services (LBS), personalizing the services ... Keywords: location-based services, privacy, ubiquitous computing

Sebastien Gambs; Marc-Olivier Killijian; Matthieu Roy; Moussa Traore

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Advanced support vector machines for 802.11 indoor location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the proliferation of ubiquitous computing services, locating a device in indoor scenarios has received special attention during recent years. A variety of algorithms are based on Wi-Fi measurements of the received signal strength and estimate ... Keywords: Autocorrelation kernel, Complex support vector machines, Fingerprinting, IEEE 802.11, Indoor location, Support vector machines

Carlos Figuera; José Luis Rojo-Álvarez; Mark Wilby; Inmaculada Mora-Jiménez; Antonio J. Caamaño

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Optimizing Fire Station Locations for the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality IMM seeks to determine locations for additional fire stations to build in Istanbul; its objective is to make residences and historic sites reachable by emergency vehicles within five minutes of a fire station’s ... Keywords: fire station location, geographic information system, maximal-covering problem, set-covering problem

Emel Akta?; Özay Özayd?n; Burçin Bozkaya; Füsun Ülengin; ?ule Önsel

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Active location tracking for projected reality using Wiimotes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some addressed issues in projected reality are location acquisition, limited work space, and geometric distortion. This paper proposes a low-cost, robust, fast, and simple method for handling addressed problems using infrared camera in Nintendo's Wiimotes ... Keywords: augmented reality, perspective location tracking, projected reality

Siam Charoenseang; Nemin Suksen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Measuring long-term location privacy in vehicular communication systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vehicular communication systems are an emerging form of communication that enables new ways of cooperation among vehicles, traffic operators, and service providers. However, many vehicular applications rely on continuous and detailed location information ... Keywords: Accumulated information, Entropy, Location privacy, Metric, Vehicular communication systems

Zhendong Ma; Frank Kargl; Michael Weber

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A transmission line fault locator based on Elman recurrent networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a transmission line fault location model which is based on an Elman recurrent network (ERN) has been presented for balanced and unbalanced short circuit faults. All fault situations with different inception times are implemented on a 380-kV ... Keywords: Elman networks, Fault location, Transmission lines, Wavelet transform

Sami Ekici; Selcuk Yildirim; Mustafa Poyraz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Poetic augmented reality: place-bound literature in locative media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the textopia project, a locative media design experiment set up to explore the relationship between places and literary texts. The system allows a user to walk through the city of Oslo and listen to texts that talk about the ... Keywords: locative media, place-based storytelling, user-generated content

Anders Sundnes Løvlie

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

An adaptive location estimator using tracking algorithms for indoor WLANs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents adaptive algorithms for estimating the location of a mobile terminal (MT) based on radio propagation modeling (RPM), Kalman filtering (KF), and radio-frequency identification (RFID) assisting for indoor wireless local area networks ... Keywords: Calibration, Kalman filtering, Location estimation, Neural network, Radio-frequency identification, Tracking, Wireless local area network

Yih-Shyh Chiou; Chin-Liang Wang; Sheng-Cheng Yeh

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Study of the interactions of molten sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate 50 mol % mixture with water vapor and carbon dioxide in air. Final report, June 2, 1980-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interactions of aerial components such as water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen with the binary 50 mol % mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate have been studied in the temperature range 300 to 600/sup 0/C using electrochemical methods. In addition, the behavior of nitrite ions in this melt was investigated electrochemically. By judicious choice of techniques, in situ electroanalysis was possible and the necessary relevant data to accomplish this is presented, as well as insight into the corresponding electrochemical mechanisms associated with the electroactive species. The influence of each atmospheric component was examined separately. At temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, nitrite ions are found to accumulate due to thermal decomposition of the nitrate. Water is highly soluble in the salt mixture, but no hydrolytic reactions were observed. Two methods of in situ analysis for water are described. Pure carbon dioxide is found to attack the melt at all temperatures above 250/sup 0/C producing carbonate. (LEW)

White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Property:Geothermal/LocationOfProject | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LocationOfProject LocationOfProject Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/LocationOfProject Property Type Page Description Location of Project Pages using the property "Geothermal/LocationOfProject" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + Soda Lake, Nevada + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Butte, Montana + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + Socorro, New Mexico +

366

Process for concentrated biomass saccharification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA); Seapan, Mayis (Landenberg, PA); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Speciation model selection by Monte Carlo analysis of optical absorption spectra: Plutonium(IV) nitrate complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard modeling approaches can produce the most likely values of the formation constants of metal-ligand complexes if a particular set of species containing the metal ion is known or assumed to exist in solution equilibrium with complexing ligands. Identifying the most likely set of species when more than one set is plausible is a more difficult problem to address quantitatively. A Monte Carlo method of data analysis is described that measures the relative abilities of different speciation models to fit optical spectra of open-shell actinide ions. The best model(s) can be identified from among a larger group of models initially judged to be plausible. The method is demonstrated by analyzing the absorption spectra of aqueous Pu(IV) titrated with nitrate ion at constant 2 molal ionic strength in aqueous perchloric acid. The best speciation model supported by the data is shown to include three Pu(IV) species with nitrate coordination numbers 0, 1, and 2. Formation constants are {beta}{sub 1}=3.2{+-}0.5 and {beta}{sub 2}=11.2{+-}1.2, where the uncertainties are 95% confidence limits estimated by propagating raw data uncertainties using Monte Carlo methods. Principal component analysis independently indicates three Pu(IV) complexes in equilibrium. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

Berg, John M. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Veirs, D. Kirk [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Vaughn, Randolph B. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Cisneros, Michael R. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Smith, Coleman A. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

369

PILGRIM: a Location Broker and Mobility-Aware Recommendation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobile computing adds a new, mostly unexplored dimension to data mining: the user's position is now a relevant information, and recommendation systems, i.e. services that select and rank a small number of links that are probably of interest to the user, have the opportunity to take location into account. The use of location discovery systems, that automatically detect the device location, relieve the user from the burden of explicitly inserting that information when formulating a query. In this paper, a mobility-aware recommendation system that uses the location of the user to filter recommended links is proposed. To avoid the potential problems and costs caused by systems where the bindings between locations and resources are inserted by hand, a new middleware layer, the location broker, collects a historic database where user locations and links explored in the past are mined to develop models relating resources to their spatial usage pattern. The models are used to calculate a preference metric when the current user is asking for resources of interest.

Mauro Brunato; Roberto Battiti

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

location privacy based on trusted computing and secure logging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many operators of cellphone networks now offer locationbased services to their customers, whereby an operator often outsources service provisioning to a third-party provider. Since a person’s location could reveal sensitive information about the person, the operator must ensure that the service provider processes location information about the operator’s customers in a privacy-preserving way. So far, this assurance has been based on a legal contract between the operator and the provider. However, there has been no technical mechanism that lets the operator verify whether the provider adheres to the privacy policy outlined in the contract. We propose an architecture for location-based services based on Trusted Computing and Secure Logging that provides such a technical mechanism. Trusted Computing lets an operator query the configuration of a location-based service. The operator will hand over location information to the service only if the service is configured such that the service provider cannot get access to location information using software-based attacks. This includes passive attacks, where the provider monitors information flowing into and out of its service, and active attacks, where the provider modifies or injects customer queries to the service. We introduce several requirements that must be satisfied by a location-based service to defend against passive attacks. Furthermore, we present Secure Logging, an auditing mechanism to defend against active attacks.

Urs Hengartner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Laboratory scale vitrification of low-level radioactive nitrate salts and soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

INEL has radiologically contaminated nitrate salt and soil waste stored above and below ground in Pad A and the Acid Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Pad A contain uranium and transuranic contaminated potassium and sodium nitrate salts generated from dewatered waste solutions at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Acid Pit was used to dispose of liquids containing waste mineral acids, uranium, nitrate, chlorinated solvents, and some mercury. Ex situ vitrification is a high temperature destruction of nitrates and organics and immobilizes hazardous and radioactive metals. Laboratory scale melting of actual radionuclides containing INEL Pad A nitrate salts and Acid Pit soils was performed. The salt/soil/additive ratios were varied to determine the range of glass compositions (resulted from melting different wastes); maximize mass and volume reduction, durability, and immobilization of hazardous and radioactive metals; and minimize viscosity and offgas generation for wastes prevalent at INEL and other DOE sites. Some mixtures were spiked with additional hazardous and radioactive metals. Representative glasses were leach tested and showed none. Samples spiked with transuranic showed low nuclide leaching. Wasteforms were two to three times bulk densities of the salt and soil. Thermally co-processing soils and salts is an effective remediation method for destroying nitrate salts while stabilizing the radiological and hazardous metals they contain. The measured durability of these low-level waste glasses approached those of high-level waste glasses. Lab scale vitrification of actual INEL contaminated salts and soils was performed at General Atomics Laboratory as part of the INEL Waste Technology Development and Environmental Restoration within the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program.

Shaw, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Anderson, B. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States). NRT Div.; Davis, D. [Envitco Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Renewable Energy Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia) Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia) Renewable Energy Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission This legislation applies to distribution facilities, which include poles and wires, cables, pipelines, or other underground conduits by which a renewable generator is able to (i) supply electricity generated at its

373

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations

374

Regional Incentives and Industrial Location in Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses nested logit to estimate the influence of industrial incentives on the location of manufacturing plants in Puerto Rico. Puerto Rican laws grant generous tax exemptions and provide other incentives for investments in less-developed, peripheral regions of the island. Focusing on Puerto Rico allowed us to isolate and test location factors in a closed environment where 76 municipalities received a development zone designation and competed directly against one another for new plants. Simulations indicated that the regional incentive policy reallocated relatively few of the greenfield investments from the congested core to the periphery of the island. Regional Incentives and Industrial Location in Puerto Rico 1.

Paulo Guimaraes; Robert J. Rolfe; Douglas P. Woodward

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A literature review of radiolytic gas generation as a result of the decomposition of sodium nitrate wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this literature review is to determine expected chemical reactions and the gas generation associated with radiolytic decomposition of radioactive sodium nitrate wastes such as the wastes stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The literature survey summarizes expected chemical reactions and identifies the gases expected to be generated as a result of the radiolytic decomposition. The literature survey also identifies G values, which are the expression for radiation chemical yields as molecules of gas formed per 100 eV of absorbed energy, obtained from experimental studies of the radiolytic decomposition of water and sodium nitrate. 2 tabs., 32 refs.

Kasten, J.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Application of the risk-based strategy to the Hanford tank waste organic-nitrate safety issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results from application of the Risk-Based Decision Management Approach for Justifying Characterization of Hanford Tank Waste to the organic-nitrate safety issue in Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). Existing chemical and physical models were used, taking advantage of the most current (mid-1997) sampling and analysis data. The purpose of this study is to make specific recommendations for planning characterization to help ensure the safety of each SST as it relates to the organic-nitrate safety issue. An additional objective is to demonstrate the viability of the Risk-Based Strategy for addressing Hanford tank waste safety issues.

Hunter, V.L.; Colson, S.D.; Ferryman, T.; Gephart, R.E.; Heasler, P.; Scheele, R.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy Department Announces Student Teams, New Location for Solar Decathlon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Student Teams, New Location for Solar Announces Student Teams, New Location for Solar Decathlon 2013 Energy Department Announces Student Teams, New Location for Solar Decathlon 2013 January 26, 2012 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - At an event today in Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced the 20 collegiate teams selected to compete in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 and unveiled the competition's location, the Orange County Great Park in Irvine, California. The 20 teams from colleges and universities across the United States and from around the world will now begin a two-year process to build solar-powered, highly energy-efficient homes that combine affordability, consumer appeal and design excellence. Throughout the two-year process, the teams will design, construct and test their homes

378

PILGRIM: A Location Broker and Mobility-Aware Recommendation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile computing adds a mostly unexplored dimension to data mining: user's position is a relevant piece of information, and recommendation systems, selecting and ranking links of interest to the user, have the opportunity to take location into account.In ...

Mauro Brunato; Roberto Battiti

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A location based security framework for authenticating mobile phones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the utilisation of location information in mobile network access systems has given rise to a variety of applications and services, it is thought that the underlying service authentication model and the related security can be further enhanced. ...

Lishoy Francis; Keith Mayes; Gerhard Hancke; Konstantinos Markantonakis

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using Monthly Production wells rather than the entire field. #12;Introduction Objective Methodology Results Conclusion Objective field. Identify opportunities in mature fields: Sweet spots for infill drilling. Underperformer wells

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ultra-wideband Location Authentication for Item Tracking  

SciTech Connect

International safeguards is increasingly utilizing unattended and remote monitoring methods to improve inspector efficiency and the timeliness of diversion detection. Item identification and tracking has been proposed as one unattended remote monitoring method, and a number of radio-frequency (RF) technologies have been proposed. When utilizing location information for verification purposes, strong assurance of the authenticity of the reported location is required, but most commercial RF systems are vulnerable to a variety of spoofing and relay attacks. ORNL has developed a distance bounding method that uses ultra-wideband technology to provide strong assurance of item location. This distance bounding approach can be coupled with strong symmetric key authentication methods to provide a fully authenticable tracking system that is resistant to both spoofing and relay attacks. This paper will discuss the overall problems associated with RF tracking including the common spoofing and relay attack scenarios, the ORNL distance bounding approach for authenticating location, and the potential applications for this technology.

Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Kuhn, Michael J [ORNL; Stinson, Brad J [ORNL; Holland, Stephen A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Short & long run transmission incentives for generation location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is about one aspect of Britain's electricity trading system, its advantages and its weaknesses concerning the incentives it provides or fails to provide for the location of generation. (Similar considerations ...

Turvey, Ralph

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App November 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to expand access to data and give consumers more transportation options that save money at the pump, the Energy Department today launched a new mobile app to help drivers find stations that provide alternative fuel for vehicles. Developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from the Energy Department, the Alternative Fueling Station Locator app provides information on more than 15,000 stations across the country. Users can search for stations that offer electricity, biodiesel (B20), natural gas (compressed and liquefied), ethanol (E85), hydrogen, and propane. After the

384

Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App November 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to expand access to data and give consumers more transportation options that save money at the pump, the Energy Department today launched a new mobile app to help drivers find stations that provide alternative fuel for vehicles. Developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from the Energy Department, the Alternative Fueling Station Locator app provides information on more than 15,000 stations across the country. Users can search for stations that offer electricity, biodiesel (B20), natural gas (compressed and liquefied), ethanol (E85), hydrogen, and propane. After the

385

Persistent Uniform Resource Locators (PURLs) | Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Persistent Uniform Resource Locators (PURLs) Persistent Uniform Resource Locators (PURLs) Print page Print page Email page Email page PURLs (Persistent Uniform Resource Locators) are Web addresses that act as permanent identifiers in the face of a dynamic and changing Web infrastructure. Instead of resolving directly to Web resources, PURLs describe an intermediate location that allows the underlying Web addresses of resources to change over time without negatively affecting systems that depend on them. This capability provides continuity of references to network resources that may migrate from machine to machine for various reasons. Operation PURLs look just like URLs because they are valid URLs. A PURL has three parts: the protocol used to access the PURL resolver, the resolver IP address or domain, and a user-assigned name.

386

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: School Wind Project Locations  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

School Wind Project Locations School Wind Project Locations This map shows the location of installed and planned school wind energy projects in the United States. Find school wind projects for K-12, community colleges, universities, and more. You can also learn how to use the Google Map and how to add your school wind project to the map. For more information and data from the schools, see the OpenEI website. Text Version School Wind Project Locations , Northern Alberta Institute of Technology Alaska, Alaska Wind-Diesel Wind Application Center (University of Alaska) Alaska, Begich Middle School Alaska, Kodiak High School Alaska, Mt. Edgecumbe High School Alaska, Northwestern Alaska Career and Technical Center Alaska, Sherrod Elementary School Alaska, U.S. Coast Guard - Juneau Alaska, University of Alaska Anchorage - Mat-Su College

387

Methods for short-circuit identification and location in automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the number of electrical components in cars increases at a rapid rate, so too does the chance for electrical failure. A method for locating shorts to the chassis of a car is developed in this thesis. The developed ...

Crumlin, Alex Justin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Location of Diapycnal Mixing and the Meridional Overturning Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale consequences of diapycnal mixing location are explored using an idealized three-dimensional model of buoyancy-forced flow in a single hemisphere. Diapycnal mixing is most effective in supporting a strong meridional overturning ...

Jeffery R. Scott; Jochem Marotzke

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Identifying location in indonesian documents for geographic information retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our research focuses on Geographic Information Retrieval for Indonesian documents. We constructed a Geographical Gazeeter for geographic locations based on information that we collected from the Geographic resources. We used the table to ... Keywords: geographic information retrieval

Mirna Adriani; Monica Lestari Paramita

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

On the integrality of the uncapacitated facility location polytope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extreme points if and only if the graph does not contain a certain type of odd cycles. ... of the uncapacitated facility location problem (UFLP), a set of nodes is ...

391

The Limiting Accuracy of Long Wavelength Lightning Flash Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many recently developed systems for lightning flash location use frequencies of hundreds of kHz or higher to achieve enhanced precision, although this reduces potential range. However, for coherent systems operating at high signal-to-noise ratios ...

Anthony C. L. Lee

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Page 1 of 3 as of 1/24/2011 Report Name Previous Location New Location Brief Description Multi-Project or Single Project Report 2A Project Summary by Program PARS Reports Monthly Reports All active projects listing Pre/Post CD-2 $ and #'s including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has been assessed by the OECM Analyst as being either Red or Yellow a worksheet is created that includes the OECM Analyst's written assessment of the project. The FPD, Site and Contractor with its EVM Certification Status are listed in the report. All appropriate EVM metrics, TPC values and CD approved dates as of the current OA Status Date are a part of the report.

393

Solar concentration/destruction of pesticide rinsewater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion to safe, value-added agricultural products is the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Salladay, D.G.; Ash, D.H.; Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.; Hemmen, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

395

Carbothermic Reduction of Niobium Concentrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ferro Niobium is produced by aluminothermic reduction of the ... However, the niobium concentrate has impurities, such as phosphorus, lead and tin, ... Phase Transformation of Andalusite-Mullite and Its Fiber Reinforcement to ...

396

Concentrated solar power on demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten salt pool, which also functions ...

Codd, Daniel Shawn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Long-Term Nitrate Measurements in the Ocean Using the in situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer: Sensor Integration into the APEX Profiling Float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reagent-free optical nitrate sensors [in situ ultraviolet spectrophotometer (ISUS)] can be used to detect nitrate throughout most of the ocean. Although the sensor is a relatively high-power device when operated continuously (7.5 W typical), the ...

Kenneth S. Johnson; Luke J. Coletti; Hans W. Jannasch; Carole M. Sakamoto; Dana D. Swift; Stephen C. Riser

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Measuring and testing spatial mass concentration of micro-geographic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

densely populated but also have higher levels of income. Empirical evidence brings out that jobs: for example in ecology when studying spatial concentration of biomass from trees and plants locations

Recanati, Catherine

399

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Concentrating Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Resource Maps Concentrating Solar Power Resource Maps These direct-normal solar radiation maps-filtered by solar resource and land availability-identify the most economically suitable lands available for deploying of large-scale concentrating solar power plants in the southwestern United States. Each of the following seven states, as well as the southwestern U.S. region, has two maps: the left and right maps represent analyses excluding land with slopes >1% and >3%, respectively. Lower-resolution jpg versions are available below; much higher-resolution pdf files, suitable for plotting large-scale posters, can be requested. You can also access an unfiltered direct-normal solar radiation map of the southwestern United States. Download Adobe Reader. Southwestern U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Scale formation at various locations in a geothermal operation due to injection of imported waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of waters that are not native to a geothermal formation generates various physical and chemical problems. The major chemical problem resulting from such injections is the formation of sulfate scales (particularly CaSO4, BaSO4 and SrSO4) at various locations starting from the injection well through the production well to the surface facilities of any geothermal operation. One of the ways to prevent this type of scale formation is by reducing the sulfate concentration of the injection waters. The effect of sulfate deionization on scale formation at various locations of the geothermal operations is studied. Some experimental results on the CaSO4 scale formation in porous media upon heating an injection water with and without addition of scale inhibitors are also given.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems August 20, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis Concentrator photovoltaic (PV) systems use less solar cell material than other...

403

Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a nitrate-to-oxide conversion facility  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a materials management system for safeguarding special nuclear materials in a plutonium nitrate-to-oxide conversion facility is developed and evaluated. Dynamic material balances are drawn from information provided by nondestructive-analysis techniques, process-control instrumentation, and conventional chemical analyses augmented by process-monitoring devices. Powerful statistical methods, cast in the framework of decision analysis and applied to unit-process accounting areas, ensure adequate spatial and temporal quantification of possible diversion with minimal process disruption. Modeling and simulation techniques assist in evaluating the sensitivity of the system to various diversion schemes and in comparing safeguards strategies. Features that would improve the safeguardability of the conversion process are discussed.

Dayem, H.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dietz, R.J.; Hakkila, E.A.; Kern, E.A.; Shipley, J.P.; Smith, D.B.; Bowersox, D.F.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

BOOMER KD

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

Effects of Nitrate Exposure on the Functional Structure of a Microbial Community in a Uranium-contaminated Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the final model were COD, iron, and sulfate (p=0.020; f-Samples in FW101-2 and [FW102-2] (µM) Day # COD aSulfate a COD, Sulfide Iron pH Nitrate U(VI) Nitrite NH 4 -H

Van Nostrand, Joy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nighttime Measurements of Dinitrogen Pentoxide and the Nitrate Radical via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of effective pollution control strategies for urban areas requires accurate predictive models. The ability of models to correctly characterize the atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, and deposition rely on accurate data measurements, both as input and verification of output. Therefore, the measurement techniques must be sensitive, accurate, and capable of resolving the spatial and temporal variations of key chemical species. The application of a sensitive in situ optical absorption technique, known as cavity ring-down spectroscopy, will be introduced for simultaneously measuring the nitrate radical and dinitrogen pentoxide. The cavity ring-down spectrometer was initially designed and constructed based on the experiments by Steven Brown and Akkihebal Ravishankara at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The instrument design has since undergone many revisions before attaining the current instrumentation system. Laboratory observations provide verification of accurate N2O5 and NO3 detection with measurements of the nitrate radical absorption spectrum centered at 662 nm, effective chemical zeroing with nitric oxide, and efficient thermal decomposition of N2O5. Field observations at a local park provided further confirmation of the instruments capability in measuring N2O5 and NO3. However, detection limits were too high to detect ambient NO3. Effective and frequent zeroing can easily improve upon the sensitivity of the instrument. Determination of the source of the polluted air masses detected during these studies was unknown since the typical southerly winds from Houston were not observed. Since deployment in the field, instrumentation modifications and laboratory measurements are underway for preparation of the SOOT campaign in Houston, Texas starting April 15, 2009. Current modifications include automation of the titration with a solenoid valve and an automated filter changer. Wall losses and filter transmission for NO3 and N2O5 will be determined through laboratory measurements in coincidence with and ion-drift chemical ionization mass spectrometer prior to the SOOT project. Potential modifications to improve upon the instrument are suggested for future endeavors.

Perkins, Katie C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

410

Concentrating Solar Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrating Solar Power Concentrating Solar Power August 20, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis Text Version This solar concentrator has a fixed-focus faceted dish with a concentration of...

411

Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most Vulnerable Places in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most Vulnerable Places in Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most Vulnerable Places in Africa? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most Vulnerable Places in Africa? Agency/Company /Organization: The Robert Strauss Center Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: ccaps.strausscenter.org/system/research_items/pdfs/19/original.pdf?128 UN Region: "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

412

Solar Decathlon 2013: New Teams! New Location! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Decathlon 2013: New Teams! New Location! Solar Decathlon 2013: New Teams! New Location! Solar Decathlon 2013: New Teams! New Location! January 26, 2012 - 1:32pm Addthis Orange County Great Park in Irvine, California -- venue for the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. | Image credit: Richard King. Orange County Great Park in Irvine, California -- venue for the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. | Image credit: Richard King. Richard King Director, Solar Decathlon "With each competition, entry into the Solar Decathlon becomes harder... We are so pleased with the caliber of the 20 new teams." Richard King, Director of the Solar Decathlon We have never been more excited to start a U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. In addition to welcoming 20 new collegiate teams and hundreds of

413

New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 Announced | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 Announced Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 Announced New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 Announced February 23, 2011 - 5:00pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Sept. 23-Oct. 2, 2011 The National Mall -- West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C. This year's U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon competition will be held at the National Mall's West Potomac Park. Specifically, between the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and the Potomac River. The Solar Decathlon challenges 20 teams to design, build and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive. The first Solar Decathlon was held in 2002. Since then, they've been held biennially in 2005, 2007, 2009 and this year. The 2011 event will be held

414

Solar Decathlon 2013: New Teams! New Location! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013: New Teams! New Location! 2013: New Teams! New Location! Solar Decathlon 2013: New Teams! New Location! January 26, 2012 - 1:32pm Addthis Orange County Great Park in Irvine, California -- venue for the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. | Image credit: Richard King. Orange County Great Park in Irvine, California -- venue for the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. | Image credit: Richard King. Richard King Director, Solar Decathlon "With each competition, entry into the Solar Decathlon becomes harder... We are so pleased with the caliber of the 20 new teams." Richard King, Director of the Solar Decathlon We have never been more excited to start a U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. In addition to welcoming 20 new collegiate teams and hundreds of

415

Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Techniques For Locating Geothermal Resources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Techniques For Locating Geothermal Resources Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Techniques For Locating Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Poster: Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Techniques For Locating Geothermal Resources Abstract Demonstrating the effectiveness of hyperspectral sensors to explore for geothermal resources will be critical to our nation's energy security plans. Discovering new geothermal resources will contribute to established renewable energy capacity and lower our dependence upon fuels that contribute to green house gas emissions. The use of hyperspectral data and derived imagery products is currently helping exploration managers gain greater efficiencies and drilling success. However, more work is needed as geologists continue to learn about hyperspectral imaging and, conversely,

416

EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located 99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications Summary This EA was being prepared to evaluate potential environmental impacts of a proposal to dispose of nickel scrap that is volumetrically contaminated with radioactive materials and that DOE recovered from equipment it had used in uranium enrichment. This EA is on hold. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time.

417

LEDS Collaboration in Action Workshop Location | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDS Collaboration in Action Workshop Location Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us ACDS Workshop Participant Pack Agenda Accommodations Participants Location Arrival Form Open Space Sessions Speakers Presentations Links Contact Us Location Sitemap.jpg Latimer Place Latimer, Chesham, Buckinghamshire HP5 1UG Telephone: (01494) 545500 Fax: (01494) 762473 Email: latimer@deverevenues.co.uk The Centre is conveniently situated just off the M25, yet in a peaceful

418

Asset Locator - A Framework for Enterprise Software Asset Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces the Enterprise Software Asset Management (ESAM) paradigm, which defines an approach to doing automated software asset management. ESAM is a comprehensive integrated solution supporting search and reuse, collaboration, knowledge sharing, impact analysis, and other enterprise-centric services. We describe Asset Locator, a low-cost, scalable and extensible solution that realizes ESAM. Asset Locator uses a set of autonomous scheduled crawlers that scan enterprise repositories to discover development resources. A set of domain-specific analyzers process the discovered resources by identifying and extracting semantic features. Powerful search and navigation engines enable clients to explore the analyzed information. The design of Asset Locator as an extensible framework has enabled its easy integration into several IBM product offerings. 1

Avi Yaeli; Alex Akilov; Sara Porat; Iftach Ragoler; Shlomit Shachor-ifergan; Gabi Zodik

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 February 23, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON -- The Department of Energy and the Department of the Interior today announced that the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 will be held at the National Mall's West Potomac Park, on the banks of the Potomac River along the path between the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials. Specifically, the event will be held on the peninsula just south of the new Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial - scheduled to open in August of this year - between the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and the Potomac River. The Decathlon will begin in late September as originally

420

Solar Tracing Sensors for Maximum Solar Concentrator ...  

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) relies on thermodynamic processes to convert concentrated light into useful forms of energy. Accurate sun tracking ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Department's Fleet Vehicle Sustainability Initiatives at Selected Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department's Fleet Vehicle Department's Fleet Vehicle Sustainability Initiatives at Selected Locations DOE/IG-0896 October 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 24, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department's Fleet Vehicle Sustainability Initiatives at Selected Locations" BACKGROUND In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, the Department of Energy's fleet consisted of 14,457 vehicles operated at an annual cost of approximately $131 million. Nearly 72 percent of the vehicles were leased through the General Services Administration (GSA), with the remaining Department-owned and

422

began at the PC4 facility, which is located  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

began at the PC4 facility, which is located at the Alabama Power Gaston began at the PC4 facility, which is located at the Alabama Power Gaston Power Plant Unit 5 (an 880-megawatt [MW] supercritical pulverized coal unit), when researchers used a monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent to capture CO 2 from a slipstream of flue gas from the plant. To date, the MEA solvent has exceeded the expected 90 percent CO 2 capture; the unit is now in steady operation, capturing approximately 10 tons

423

Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid response to leakage * Chemical species analysis in well-heads * P & T monitoring in injection wells Challenges in MMV * Small variation of CO 2 in a high concentration base...

425

Concentrating solar collector: technical note  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Acurex Model 3002 concentrator is a reflecting parabolic trough collector designed to heat liquids or gases to temperatures between 140/sup 0/F and 350/sup 0/F. The cost effectiveness, performance, reliability, and technical description of the collector are presented.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Protecting the sink location privacy in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are widely deployed to collect data in military and civilian applications today. Due to the open nature of a WSN, it is relatively easy for an adversary to eavesdrop and trace packets in order to capture the receiver. ... Keywords: Location privacy, Receiver, Sink, WSN

Lin Yao, Lin Kang, Pengfei Shang, Guowei Wu

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Location privacy and resilience in wireless sensor networks querying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the wireless nature of communication in sensor networks, the communication patterns between sensors could be leaked regardless of the adoption of encryption mechanisms-those would just protect the message content. However, communication patterns ... Keywords: Location privacy, Probabilistic algorithm, Resiliency, Security, Wireless sensor networks

Roberto Di Pietro; Alexandre Viejo

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Locawe: a novel platform for location-aware multimedia services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a suggestion for a next generation mobile GIS architecture. The proposed architecture enables to use GIS data also in mobile devices and to handle information received from local sensors. The architecture has been used to design ... Keywords: location-awareness, ubiquitous computing, wireless sensor networks

Mika Luimula; Kari Kuutti

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Coded DNA Self-Assembly for Error Detection/Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel framework in which DNA self-assembly can be analyzed for error detection/ location. The proposed framework relies on coding and mapping functions that allow to establish the presence of erroneous bonded tiles based on the ... Keywords: Coding, Nano Manufacturing, Error Detection, Error Resilience

Zahra Mashreghian Arani; Masoud Hashempour; Fabrizio Lombardi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Energy 29 (2004) 16431650 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy 29 (2004) 1643­1650 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy Studies on enhancing carbon sequestration carbon and the implications for fossil-fuel use, emission of other greenhouse gases (such as N2O and CH4 of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research, to conduct basic scientific studies

431

Hybrid TOA---AOA Location Positioning Techniques in GSM Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Positioning algorithms and their implementation in mobile networks are being investigated in the literature due to their importance in location services. Nowadays, the need for superior accuracy has cast attention to hybrid positioning techniques. In ... Keywords: Access delay, Angle of arrivals, GSM procedure, Hybrid techniques, Paging signalling, Time of arrivals

Nikos Deligiannis; Spiros Louvros

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Locating related regulations using a comparative analysis approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sheer volume and complexity of government regulations make any attempt to locate, understand and interpret the information a daunting task. Other factors, such as the scattered distribution of the regulations across many sources, different terminologies ... Keywords: regulatory comparison, relatedness analysis, structural analysis

Gloria T. Lau; Haoyi Wang; Kincho H. Law

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Analysis of facility location model using Bayesian Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we propose an integrated approach that combines Bayesian Networks and Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) to address complexities involved in selecting an international facility for a manufacturing plant. Our goal is to efficiently represent ... Keywords: Bayesian Networks, Facility location, Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)

Ibrahim Dogan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Optimization locations of wind turbines with the particle swarm optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new algorithm is presented for the locations of wind turbine in the distribution systems. Technical constraints such as feeder capacity limits, bus voltage, and load balance are considered. The Particle Swarm Optimization(PSO) is applied ... Keywords: distribution system, equivalent current injection, particle swarm optimization, wind turbine

Ming-Tang Tsai; Szu-Wzi Wu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Location and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Quebec, is organic-rich black shale and hosting oil and gas. It is equivalent to the Ithaca shaleLocation and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale in the Anticosti Island in the Gulf of St. d13C for calcite disseminated in the black shale range from 2.6o to 2.8 / The values are lower

436

A Location-Based Secure Spatial Audit Policy Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Besides RBAC, securing access to data in location-based services and mobile applications requires the definition of spatially aware audit policy model. In Spatial DBMS applications, spatial query based on spatial predication is main object of secure ... Keywords: spatial database, spatial audit, audit policy, spatial relation

Zhang Pingping; Ju Shiguang; Chen Weihe

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Research on Fault Location of Power Cable with Wavelet Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article researChes for 10kV transmission cable form the ground substation to the underground central substation in the coal mine. The transient traveLing wave signal of the cable fault is disposed by the wavelet transformation based on the cable ... Keywords: Wavelet analysis, Fault Location, TraveLing wave

Ji-meng Zhang; Shuo Liang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Discriminative sum types locate the source of type errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a type system for locating the source of type errors in an applied lambda calculus with ML-style polymorphism. The system is based on discriminative sum types---known from work on soft typing---with annotation subtyping and recursive types. ... Keywords: polymorphism, type errors, type inference

Matthias Neubauer; Peter Thiemann

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

I am the antenna: accurate outdoor AP location using smartphones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's WiFi access points (APs) are ubiquitous, and provide critical connectivity for a wide range of mobile networking devices. Many management tasks, e.g. optimizing AP placement and detecting rogue APs, require a user to efficiently determine the ... Keywords: access point location, smartphones, wifi

Zengbin Zhang; Xia Zhou; Weile Zhang; Yuanyang Zhang; Gang Wang; Ben Y. Zhao; Haitao Zheng

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

New approach to the fault location problem using synchronized sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new approach to solving the problem of fault location on a transmission line using synchronized data from both ends of the line. The synchronized phase voltage and current samples taken during the fault transient are used to calculate the location of the fault. Time domain models of lines are used as a basis for derivation of two different algorithms. One algorithm is developed using the RL line model and the other one is developed using the traveling wave based line model. The main idea of the fault location concept is based on the general characteristics of any transmission line. At any location along the unfaulted line, the instantaneous values of voltage and current signals are related to the instantaneous values of the corresponding values of voltage and current signals at both ends of the line, line parameters, and distance between that particular location and each of the line ends. This enables the derivation of the generic fault location equation of the following form: [ ] where Lv is the linear operator, VA, t'A, VB, z'B are vectors of voltage and current samples at line ends, d is the length of the line, and x is the unknown distance to the fault point. For a particular transmission line, the generic equation has a unique form that determines the way it is solved. In any case, the Minimum Square Error Estimation Method is used since an overspecified system of linear equations needs to be solved. The performance evaluation of both algorithms was done using the Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP) generated data [1]. Obtained results indicate the high accuracy of the approach and its robustness regarding various fault conditions. The following are the conclusions based on the results presented in this thesis: The error of the approach is rather small and almost invariant to the various fault conditions and, hence, the technique provides a robust solution to the fault location problem. The new approach has high accuracy while the computational burden is still kept relatively low. The synchronized sampling technique required for this approach is emerging as a reliable and cost effective practice.

Mrkic, Jasna

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Basics: Power Tower Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

are experimenting with molten nitrate salt because of its superior heat-transfer and energy-storage capabilities. Individual commercial plants can be sized to produce up to 200...

442

Residential mobility and location choice: a nested logit model with sampling of alternatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waddell, P. : Modeling residential location in UrbanSim. In:D. (eds. ) Modelling Residential Location Choice. Springer,based model system and a residential location model. Urban

Lee, Brian H.; Waddell, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Silicon concentrator solar cell research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted between December 1990 and May 1992 continuing research on silicon concentrator solar cells. The objectives of the work were to improve the performance of high-efficiency cells upon p-type substrates, to investigate the ultraviolet stability of such cells, to develop concentrator cells based on n-type substrates, and to transfer technology to appropriate commercial environments. Key results include the identification of contact resistance between boron-defused areas and rear aluminum as the source of anomalously large series resistance in both p- and n-type cells. A major achievement of the present project was the successful transfer of cell technology to both Applied Solar Energy Corporation and Solarex Corporation.

Green, M.A.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.; Dai, X.; Milne, A.; Cai, S.; Aberle, A.; Wenham, S.R. [Univ. of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (AU). Centre for Photovoltaic Devices and Systems

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Development of concentrator solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A limited pilot production run on PESC silicon solar cells for use at high concentrations (200 to 400 suns) is summarized. The front contact design of the cells was modified for operation without prismatic covers. The original objective of the contract was to systematically complete a process consolidation phase, in which all the, process improvements developed during the contract would be combined in a pilot production run. This pilot run was going to provide, a basis for estimating cell costs when produced at high throughput. Because of DOE funding limitations, the Photovoltaic Concentrator Initiative is on hold, and Applied Solar`s contract was operated at a low level of effort for most of 1993. The results obtained from the reduced scope pilot run showed the effects of discontinuous process optimization and characterization. However, the run provided valuable insight into the technical areas that can be optimized to achieve the original goals of the contract.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Hutchison, G. (Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Nowlan, M.J. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Advanced high efficiency concentrator cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research to develop the technology needed to demonstrate a monolithic, multijunction, two-terminal, concentrator solar cell with a terrestrial power conversion efficiency greater than 35%. Under three previous subcontracts, Varian developed many of the aspects of a technology needed to fabricate very high efficiency concentrator cells. The current project was aimed at exploiting the new understanding of high efficiency solar cells. Key results covered in this report are as follows. (1) A 1.93-eV AlGaAs/1.42-eV GaAs metal-interconnected cascade cell was manufactured with a one-sun efficiency at 27.6% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) global. (2) A 1.0eV InGaAs cell was fabricated on the reverse'' side of a low-doped GaAs substrate with a one-sun efficiency of 2.5% AM1.5 diffuse and a short-circuit current of 14.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Small-scale manufacturing of GaAs p/n concentrator cells was attempted and obtained an excellent yield of high-efficiency cells. (4) Grown-in tunnel junction cell interconnects that are transparent and thermally stable using C and Si dopants were developed. 10 refs.

Gale, R. (Varian Associates, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Varian Research Center)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Critical Leakage Pathways in Modeling Critical Leakage Pathways in a Risk Assessment Framework: Representation of Abandoned Wells Michael A. Celia 1 , Stefan Bachu 2 , Jan M. Nordbotten 3 , Dmitri Kavetski 1 , and Sarah E. Gasda 1 1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA (celia@princeton.edu, kavetski@princeton.edu, sgasda@princeton.edu) 2 Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Edmonton, Alberta, T6B 2X3, Canada (Stefan.Bachu@gov.ab.ca) 3 Department of Mathematics, University of Bergen, Bergen 5020, Norway (janmn@mi.uib.no) CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Abstract In many locations in North America, likely injection sites for CO 2 storage in deep geological formation are located in mature sedimentary basins. These basins have a century-long history of oil and gas exploration and

449

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Name Previous Location New Location Brief Description Multi-Project or Single Project Report 2A Project Summary by Program PARS Reports Monthly Reports All active projects listing Pre/Post CD-2 $ and #'s including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has been assessed by the OECM Analyst as being either Red or Yellow a worksheet is created that includes the OECM Analyst's written assessment of the project. The FPD, Site and Contractor with its EVM Certification Status are listed in the report. All appropriate EVM metrics, TPC values and CD approved dates as of the current OA Status Date are a part of the report. Multi-Project 4B Projects Post-CD-2 PARS Reports Monthly Reports

450

Fast Flux Test Facility Asbestos Location Tracking Program  

SciTech Connect

Procedure Number HNF-PRO-408, revision 0, paragraph 1.0, ''Purpose,'' and paragraph 2.0, ''Requirements for Facility Management of Asbestos,'' relate building inspection and requirements for documentation of existing asbestos-containing building material (ACBM) per each building assessment. This documentation shall be available to all personnel (including contractor personnel) entering the facility at their request. Corrective action was required by 400 Area Integrated Annual Appraisal/Audit for Fiscal Year 1992 (IAA-92-0007) to provide this notification documentation. No formal method had been developed to communicate the location and nature of ACBM to maintenance personnel in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) 400 Area. The scope of this Data Package Document is to locate and evaluate any ACBM found at FFTF which constitutes a baseline. This includes all buildings within the protected area. These findings are compiled from earlier reports, numerous work packages and engineering evaluations of employee findings.

REYNOLDS, J.A.

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

Helicopter Surveys for Locating Wells and Leaking Oilfield Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Prior to the injection of CO2 into geological formations, either for enhanced oil recovery or for CO2 sequestration, it is necessary to locate wells that perforate the target formation and are within the radius of influence for planned injection wells. Locating and plugging wells is necessary because improperly plugged well bores provide the most rapid route for CO2 escape to the surface. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of helicopter and ground-based well detection strategies at a 100+ year old oilfield in Wyoming where a CO2 flood is planned. This project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and Fugro Airborne Surveys

Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Hodges, G. (Fugro Airborne Surveys)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Location and identification of radioactive waste in Massachusetts Bay  

SciTech Connect

The accurate location and identification of hazardous waste materials dumped in the world`s oceans are becoming an increasing concern. For years, the oceans have been viewed as a convenient and economical place to dispose of all types of waste. In all but a few cases, major dump sites have been closed leaving behind years of accumulated debris. The extent of past environmental damage, the possibility of continued environmental damage, and the possibility of hazardous substances reaching the human food chain need to be carefully investigated. This paper reports an attempt to accurately locate and identify the radioactive component of the waste material. The Department of Energy`s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), in support of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), provided the precision navigation system and prototype underwater radiological monitoring equipment that were used during this project. The paper also describes the equipment used, presents the data obtained, and discusses future equipment development.

Colton, D.P.; Louft, H.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

The application of satellite time references to HVDC fault location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An HVdc fault location scheme is described which relies on very precise detection of the time of arrival of fault created surges at both ends of the line. Such detection is achieved by a very accurate data acquisition and processing system combined with the time reference signals provided by a global positioning system receiver. Extensive digital simulation is carried out to determine the voltage and current waveforms, to identify the main sources of error and suggest possible compensation techniques.

Dewe, M.B.; Sankar, S.; Arrillaga, J. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Load cell having strain gauges of arbitrary location  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A load cell utilizes a plurality of strain gauges mounted upon the load cell body such that there are six independent load-strain relations. Load is determined by applying the inverse of a load-strain sensitivity matrix to a measured strain vector. The sensitivity matrix is determined by performing a multivariate regression technique on a set of known loads correlated to the resulting strains. Temperature compensation is achieved by configuring the strain gauges as co-located orthogonal pairs.

Spletzer, Barry (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

Globally Averaged Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations: Monthly and Annual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorofluorocarbons » Chlorofluorocarbons » Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations Globally Averaged Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations: Monthly and Annual Data for the Period 1975-1992 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1010 data Data (DB1010) Investigator M. A. K. Khalil and R. A. Rasmussen Description This data set presents globally averaged atmospheric concentrations of chlorofluorocarbon 11, known also as CFC-11 or F-11 (chemical name: trichlorofluoromethane; formula: CCl3F). The monthly global average data are derived from flask air samples collected at eight sites in six locations over the period August 1980-July 1992. The sites are Barrow (Alaska), Cape Meares (Oregon), Cape Kumukahi and Mauna Loa (Hawaii), Cape Matatula (American Samoa), Cape Grim (Tasmania), Palmer Station, and the

456

Locating PHEV exchange stations in V2G  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PREV) is an environment friendly modem transportation method and has been rapidly penetrate the transportation system. Renewable energy is another contributor to clean power but the associated intermittence increases the uncertainty in power generation. As a foreseen benefit of a vchicle-to-grid (V2G) system, PREV supporting infrastructures like battery exchange stations can provide battery service to PREV customers as well as being plugged into a power grid as energy sources and stabilizer. The locations of exchange stations are important for these two objectives under constraints from both ,transportation system and power grid. To model this location problem and to understand and analyze the benefit of a V2G system, we develop a two-stage stochastic program to optimally locate the stations prior to the realizations of battery demands, loads, and generation capacity of renewable power sources. Based on this model, we use two data sets to construct the V2G systems and test the benefit and the performance of these systems.

Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berscheid, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Izraelevitz, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Concentrating Solar Power Program overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the US solar thermal industry has established a track record in the power industry by building and operating utility-scale power plants with a combined rated capacity of 354 megawatts (MW). The technology used in these power plants is based on years of research and development (R and D), much of it sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). DOE`s Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program is collaborating with its partners in the private sector to develop two new solar technologies -- power towers and dish/engines -- to meet the huge commercial potential for solar power.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Mathematical modeling of solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computational capability that models the operation of any solar energy collector that uses flux concentrators is a valuable aid in the planning, design, construction, calibration, safety analysis, and operation of the system. In addition to the usual optical considerations, the model should treat such imperfections as reflecting-surface slope errors, suntracking and alignment errors, and mirror-focusing errors. It should properly account for the angular distribution of incoming sun rays and the effects of atmospheric transmission on this distribution. A model with these capabilities is described, and two computer programs for implementing it are illustrated.

Biggs, F.; Vittitoe, C.N.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum "recipe" for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600ºC.

A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; R. J. Kirkham

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Iodine-129 in forage and deer on the Hanford site and other Pacific Northwest locations  

SciTech Connect

Samples of surface soil, litter, forage, and deer (rumen content, muscle, liver, and thyroid gland) were collected from Bend, Oregon; Centralia, Washington; Wenatchee, Washington; the Wooten Game Range near Dayton, Washington; and on or near the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The concentrations of /sup 129/I and /sup 127/I were determined using neturon activation techniques. The purpose of the study was to establish the current levels of /sup 129/I in the environs of the Hanford Site prior to the proposed restart of fuel reprocessing at the PUREX plant. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the longevity of /sup 129/I in the biosphere following gaseous release from a nuclear facility. Analyses of thyroid glands showed that deer living within 160 km (Wooten Game Range) of Hanford had elevated levels of /sup 129/I when compared to the more distant Pacific Northwest locations (Centralia, or Bend). Levels of /sup 129/I in deer thyroid from Bend, or Centralia, (15 fCi/g wet weight), were about five times higher than values reported for the central United States, while, Hanford samples were about 2,700 times higher. The average concentration of /sup 129/I in deer thyroids collected at Hanford in 1978 was similar to samples collected 14 years earlier. The concentrations of /sup 129/I in soil, litter, forage, and other deer samples generally decrease in the order: Hanford > Wooten > Wenatchee > Centralia approx. = Bend. This corresponds to an increase in distance from the Hanford Site.

Price, K.R.; Cadwell, L.L.; Schreckhise, R.G.; Brauer, F.P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Optimizing luminescent solar concentrator design.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) use fluorescent materials and light guides to convert direct and diffuse sunlight into concentrated wavelength-shifted light that produces electrical power in small photovoltaic (PV) cells with the goal of significantly reducing the cost of solar energy utilization. In this paper we present an optimization analysis based on the implementation of a genetic algorithm (GA) subroutine to a numerical ray-tracing Monte Carlo model of an LSC, SIMSOLAR-P. The initial use of the GA implementation in SIMSOLAR-P is to find the optimal parameters of a hypothetical 'perfect luminescent material' that obeys the Kennard Stepanov (K-S) thermodynamic relationship between emission and absorption. The optimization balances the efficiency losses in the wavelength shift and PV conversion with the efficiency losses due to re-scattering of light out of the collector. The theoretical limits of efficiency are provided for one, two and three layer configurations; the results show that a single layer configuration is far from optimal and adding a second layer in the LSC with wavelength shifted material in the near infrared region significantly increases the power output, while the gain in power by adding a third layer is relatively small. The results of this study provide a theoretical upper limit to the performance of an LSC and give guidance for the properties required for luminescent materials, such as quantum nanocrystals, to operate efficiently in planar LSC configurations.

Hernandez-Noyola, H.; Potterveld, D. H.; Holt, R. J.; Darling, S. B. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( PHY)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462