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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were...

Shao, Qian

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate flowsheet Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hanford Site, located in Southeastern Washington... tetrachloride (CT) and nitrate contamination covers at least 5 km2. Within this area, CT concentrations up to 1... nitrate...

3

Application of municipal sludge (biosolids) for agricultural purposes and groundwater nitrate concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the more popular means of handling sewage sludge from municipalities is its application to agricultural lands. A variety of crops are grown with the expectation that plants will utilize the nitrogen. However, a complex scenario allows some of the nitrate to move below root depth and eventually to the water table at depths of up to 30 ft. The City of Raleigh, NC injects sewage sludge ( residuals'', biosolids'') into soils derived largely from the Rolesville Granite in an area of typical rolling Piedmont topography. A 1975 background study of part of the site demonstrated differences in groundwater quality between areas farmed over a period of years and areas dominated by second-growth pine and harwood forests. Groundwater quality data collected semiannually between 1982 and 1988 show gradual buildup of nitrate in some fields; in others groundwater quality apparently remains unaffected by nitrate from the sludge. Monitoring well placement may play a role in these differences. Minimum time from the sludge application to an increase in groundwater nitrate is from 9 to 12 months. An ongoing study of a 12-acre field which lay fallow for a number of years prior to sludge application in 1990 demonstrates that some nitrate does move downward fairly rapidly, its movement being recorded in both the saprolite and groundwater. Comparison of nitrate content of groundwater from monitoring wells at a nearby dairy farm shows that normal agricultural practices may also increase the nitrate content of the shallow groundwater.

Welby, C.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Locating Nearby Sources of Air Pollution by Nonparametric Regression of Atmospheric Concentrations on Wind Direction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Locating Nearby Sources of Air Pollution by Nonparametric Regression of Atmospheric Concentrations. #12;1 Locating Nearby Sources of Air Pollution by Nonparametric Regression of Atmospheric. * Corresponding author. Submitted to Atmospheric Environment July, 2001. Abstract The relationship

Washington at Seattle, University of

5

Evaluation of Composite Alumina Nanoparticle and Nitrate Eutectic Materials for use in Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Solar Two power tower and is currently employed as the TES material at Andasol 1 in Spain. Concentrations of alumina nanoparticles between 0.1% and 10% by weight were introduced into the base material in an effort to create nanofluids which would exhibit...

Malik, Darren R.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE CYANOBACTERIUM PLECTONEMA BORYANUM: EFFECTS OF INITIAL NITRATE CONCENTRATION, LIGHT INTENSITY, AND INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYSTEM II BY DCMU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alarming rate at which atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are increasing due to the burning of fossil fuels will have incalculable consequences if disregarded. Fuel cells, a source of energy that does not add to carbon dioxide emissions, have become an important topic of study. Although signifi cant advances have been made related to fuel cells, the problem of cheap and renewable hydrogen production still remains. The cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum has demonstrated potential as a resolution to this problem by producing hydrogen under nitrogen defi cient growing conditions. Plectonema boryanum cultures were tested in a series of experiments to determine the effects of light intensity, initial nitrate concentration, and photosystem II inhibitor DCMU (3-(3,4- dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) upon hydrogen production. Cultures were grown in sterile Chu. No. 10 medium within photobioreactors constantly illuminated by halogen lights. Because the enzyme responsible for hydrogen production is sensitive to oxygen, the medium was continuously sparged with argon/CO2 (99.7%/0.3% vol/vol) by gas dispersion tubes immersed in the culture. Hydrogen production was monitored by using a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector. In the initial experiment, the effects of initial nitrate concentration were tested and results revealed cumulative hydrogen production was maximum at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM. A second experiment was then conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM to determine the effects of light intensity at 50, 100, and 200 ?mole m-2 s-1. Cumulative hydrogen production increased with increasing light intensity. A fi nal experiment, conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 2 mM, tested the effects of high light intensity at 200 and 400 ?mole m-2 s-1. Excessive light at 400 ?mole m-2 s-1 decreased cumulative hydrogen production. Based upon all experiments, cumulative hydrogen production rates were optimal at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM and a light intensity of 100 ?mole m-2 s-1. DCMU was shown in all experiments to severely decrease hydrogen production as time progressed. With the information acquired so far, future experiments with reducing substances could determine maximum rates of hydrogen production. If maximum hydrogen production rates proved to be large enough, Plectonema boryanum could be grown on an industrial scale to provide hydrogen gas as a renewable fuel.

Carter, B.; Huesemann, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Transmission Benefits of Co-Locating Concentrating Solar Power and Wind  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In some areas of the U.S. transmission constraints are a limiting factor in deploying new wind and concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Texas is an example of one such location, where the best wind and solar resources are in the western part of the state, while major demand centers are in the east. The low capacity factor of wind is a compounding factor, increasing the relative cost of new transmission per unit of energy actually delivered. A possible method of increasing the utilization of new transmission is to co-locate both wind and concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage. In this work we examine the benefits and limits of using the dispatachability of thermal storage to increase the capacity factor of new transmission developed to access high quality solar and wind resources in remote locations.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The influence of dose-rest cycles on the nitrate concentration of deep percolate below septic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in private water sup- plies in Morgan County, Missouri. J. Milk and Food Technology, 30: 224-225. 23. King, L. D. and H. D. Morris. 1972. Land disposal of liquid sewage sludge; the effect on soil nitrate. J. Environmental Quality, 1: 442-446. 34 24... septic- tank technology. J. Environmental Health, 3, 30: 250-262. 37 APPENDIX 0 ~O O I- CL IJ, I U O O O 20 16 12 8 4 20 I FEB. DOSE IO 20 ' 30 MAR. ~ OXYGEN NITRATE RESI 10 20 30 IO 20 30 10 20 APR . MAY JUNE DATE -120 100...

Allison, John Bryan

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of PM2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation.

Thatcher, T.L.; Lunden, M.M.; Sextro, R.G.; Hering, S.; Brown, N.J.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, John L. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nitrate reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

Dziewinski, Jacek J. (Los Alamos, NM); Marczak, Stanislaw (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Concentration of remote-handled, transuranic, sodium nitrate-based sludge using agitated thin-film evaporators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Handling and Packaging Plant (WHPP) is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to prepared transuranic waste for final disposal. Once operational, this facility will process, package, and certify remote-handled transuranic waste for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. One of the wastes that will be handled at WHIPP is the transuranic sludge currently stored at ORNL in eight 50,000-gal underground tanks. The use of an Agitated Thin-Film Evaporator (ATFE) for concentration of this waste is being investigated. Tests have shown that the ATFE can be used to produce a thick slurry, a powder, or a fused salt. A computer model developed at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to simulate the operation of ATFE's on their waste is being modified for use on the ORNL transuranic sludge. This paper summarizes the results of the test with the ATFEs to date, discusses the changes in the SRP model necessary to use this model with the ORNL waste, and compares the results of the model with the actual data taken from the operation of ATFEs at vendors' test facilities. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Berry, J.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Pen, Ben-Li (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan (Taiwan))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

Langlois, Gary N. (Richland, WA)

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic-impedance measurements. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are presented. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

Not Available

1981-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are disclosed. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. 6 figs.

Langlois, G.N.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

18

Validation of the BISON 3D Fuel Performance Code: Temperature Comparisons for Concentrically and Eccentrically Located Fuel Pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BISON is a modern finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behaviour and is used to analyse either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. BISON has been applied to a variety of fuel forms including LWR fuel rods, TRISO-coated fuel particles, and metallic fuel in both rod and plate geometries. Code validation is currently in progress, principally by comparison to instrumented LWR fuel rods. Halden IFA experiments constitute a large percentage of the current BISON validation base. The validation emphasis here is centreline temperatures at the beginning of fuel life, with comparisons made to seven rods from the IFA-431 and 432 assemblies. The principal focus is IFA-431 Rod 4, which included concentric and eccentrically located fuel pellets. This experiment provides an opportunity to explore 3D thermomechanical behaviour and assess the 3D simulation capabilities of BISON. Analysis results agree with experimental results showing lower fuel centreline temperatures for eccentric fuel with the peak temperature shifted from the centreline. The comparison confirms with modern 3D analysis tools that the measured temperature difference between concentric and eccentric pellets is not an artefact and provides a quantitative explanation for the difference.

J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. III. IR spectra of scandium extracts from concentrated nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equilibrium organic phases in extraction systems consisting of tributyl phosphate (TBP) (neat or 1 M in CCl{sub 4}) and 8-12 M nitric acid containing scandium or scandium-free have been studied by IR spectroscopy. Extracted complex contains 3, 4, or 5 nitric acid molecules per Sc atom in the case of extraction from 8.3, 10.9, and 12.2 M HNO{sub 3}, respectively, and corresponds to the formula Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP. Nitric acid molecules are incorporated into extracted complex via H-bond between oxygen atom of coordinated nitrate ion and acid proton.

Nikitina, G.P.; Egorova, V.P.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 7). Nitrate ions are drawn through the membrane pores with elec- trical currents. The nitrate is pulled from the water into a brine waste stream. Ni trate-contaminated water Treated water Nitrate Chloride or hydroxide Exchange resin Figure 6. Ion... and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A&M University System B-6184 3-08 ' the safe levels of chemicals for U.S. drinking water. The EPA conducts research to determine the level of a contaminant in drinking water...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrate melt Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Peat Decomposition in Plum Summary: , phosphate, ammonium and DIC on all of the water samples. Nitrate concentrations were measured according... ;11 indicating greater...

23

NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

Steimke, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nitrate and Prussic Acid Poisoning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning in cattle are noninfectious conditions that can kill livestock. This publication explains the causes and symptoms of these conditions as well as preventive measures and sampling and testing steps....

Stichler, Charles; Reagor, John C.

2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release scenarios were provided to compare with the results of the WIF and convolution approaches.

Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

27

Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Interaction of watershed scale and pollutant transport pathways on pollutant concentrations in rivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive studies of pollutant concentrations during both storm runoff events and non-storm periods have been underway in Ohio tributaries to lake Erie since 1974. More than 60,000 samples have been collected using automatic samplers located at US Geological Survey stream gauging stations. Drainage areas at the collection stations range from 11 km{sup 2} to 16,400 km{sup 2}. Samples have been analyzed for suspended sediments, various particulate pollutants attached to suspended sediments, current generation herbicides, nitrates, and chlorides. In general, for pollutants derived from nonpoint sources, peak concentrations decrease as watershed size increases. However, the duration of exposures to intermediate concentrations increases with increasing watershed size. these effects are most evident for suspended solids and associated particulate contaminants. For pollutants derived primarily from surface runoff but not attached to suspended sediments, the effects of watershed size on peak concentrations are evident, but not as pronounced as for suspended sediments. For compounds such as nitrates, which enter streams largely through interflow or tile drainage, scale effects are least evident. These scale effects are most likely attributable to dilution accompanying storm water routing through drainage networks. Longitudinal dispersion may also affect concentration patterns. These scale effects systematically affect exposure patterns in different positions in drainage networks and must be considered in designing sampling programs to assess impacts of nonpoint pollution on contaminant concentration patterns and loadings.

Baker, D.; Richards, R.P.; Kramer, J.W. [Heidelberg Coll., Tiffin, OH (United States). Water Quality Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity. Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity. Abstract:...

34

Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate in California’s Drinking Water report http://Clark Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking waternitrate contamination of drinking water in high-risk areas

Editors, By

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermal decomposition of nitrated tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), nitric acid and water mixtures are subject to thermal decomposition. The gaseous and liquid decomposition product yields are highly path dependent. Higher temperatures accelerate decomposition rates, but may result in lower extent of reaction than comparable low temperature cases. Actual extent of reaction, and gaseous by-products generation, are affected by the presence of Zr(IV), condensate reflux back into the reaction vessel, the water/HNO{sub 3} and the HNO{sub 3}/TBP molar ratios, and whether the decomposition occurs at isobaric or constant volume conditions. Higher gaseous production results from condensate reflux, lower H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} ratios, and with excess HNO{sub 3} and water present as a second liquid phase. Principal gaseous products include N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO and N{sub 2}O. Measurable concentrations of NO{sub 2} were not observed, although gas coloration indicative of NO{sub 2} were obsessed during the beginning of decomposition measurements. Principal liquid products are dibutyl phosphoric acid and butyl nitrate. Air sparging of TBP solutions (e.g., thru transfers using air lift pumps) may increase the hazards of TBP decomposition reactions by lowering the H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} molar ratios. Runaway reactions were not observed under the conditions of this study. Possible reaction mechanisms and pathways are discussed.

Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

SPATIAL COMPARISONS Considerable variation was observed in the concentrations of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: South Bay), and Golden Gate (BC20: Reference Site) stations (Table 2). No signifi- cant trends were trends showed a significant decrease in dissolved nitrate concentrations at the Dumbarton Bridge (BA30

38

Process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester compound and related intermediates is provided.

Chavez, David E; Naud, Darren L; Hiskey, Michael A

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nitrates and detinning in canned carrots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITRATES AND DETINNING IN CANNED CARROTS A Thesis by Thomas Edward Florine Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1968 Major... Subject: Food Technology NITRATES AND DETINNING IN CANNED CARROTS A Thesis by Thomas Edward Florine Approved as to style and content by: / C-~ (Chairman of Cemi. tee) Head of Department Member) (Member) :-'i ~ (Member) (Member) (Member...

Florine, Thomas Edward

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations with a [ iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.1±0.0. Noat all depths with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0. Thiswith ethyl nitrate with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0.

Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process -- a newly developed low-temperature technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new low-temperature (50-60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), showed that between 90 and 99% of the nitrate at Hanford can be readily converted to ammonia. Aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an alumina-silica-based ceramic solid. The process may utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final nitrate-free ceramic product can be calcined, pressed, and sintered like any other ceramic. Based on starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution (probable supernate concentrations resulting from salt-cake/sludge removal from Hanford SSTs), volume reductions as high as 70% are currently obtained, compared with an expected 40 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data indicate that the process will be very economical. Data were used to cost a batch facility with a production rate of 1200 kilograms of nitrate per hour for processing all the Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Process cost analysis indicates that between $2.01 and 2.66 will be required to convert each kilogram of nitrate. These costs are one-third to one-half of the processing costs for electrolytic and thermal processes. The ceramic waste form offers other cost savings associated with a smaller volume of waste as well as eliminates other process steps such as grouting. Silica added to the reactor, based upon the total sodium in the waste, permits us to actually bind the sodium in a nepheline phase of the final ceramic structure as well as bind most metals and nonmetals in the ceramic.

Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same before the current treatment (759 ppm dry) and after treatment (745 ppm dry or {approx}248 ppm wet). Treatment of the second batch of resin (No.23408) was very successful. Chloride concentration decreased from 120,000 ppm dry to an average of 44 ppm dry or {approx}15ppm wet, which easily passes the 250 ppm wet criterion. Per guidance from HB Line Engineering, SRNL blended Batch 80302 resin with Batch P9059 resin which had been treated previously by ResinTech to remove chloride. The chloride concentrations for the two drums of Batch P9059 were 248 ppm dry ({approx}83 ppm wet) {+-}22.8% and 583 ppm dry ({approx}194 ppm wet) {+-} 11.8%. The blended resin was packaged in five gallon buckets.

Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.; Leishear, R.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Perchlorate and nitrate in situ bioremediation of ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate and perchlorate are growing worldwide problems as mobile anionic groundwater contaminants. Biological rduction of nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater is under development as a technology to address these problems.

Strietelmeier, E. A. (Elizabeth A.); Nuttall, H. Eric; Hatzinger, Paul; Goltz, Mark

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Quantifying uncertainty in nitrate pollution from land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty associated with nitrate-nitrogen pollution of ground water from sludge applications was investigated. Three alternative planning models were proposed. The models estimate annual loads and concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in percolation. Published data from four field studies that included aerobic and anaerobic sludge and surface- and soil-incorporated applications were used for model testing. Point and stochastic validation procedures were used. The models were generally conservative. For three data sets average relative errors were approximately +/- 25% for all three models. The fourth data set had average relative errors of 100-500%. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test results (at ..cap alpha.. = 5%) suggested point-model predictions and observations were drawn from similar distributions. Stochastic validation tests also suggested that observations were samples from distributions of predictions. The models were tested as uncalibrated approximations of nitrate percolation. All three appear sufficiently accurate for planning application systems. A planning procedure was developed which utilizes analytically approximated probability distributions of nitrate loads and concentrations. Distributions are specified with analytical moment expressions and a normal distribution function limited to be non-negative.

Mummert, M.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

3, 59195976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 3, 5919­5976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol field over Europe M. Schaap et al. Title Page Abstract of Utrecht, Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science, PO Box 80005, 3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands 2, The Netherlands 3 Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), PO Box 1, 1755 LE Petten, The Netherlands 4 Joint

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

Spencer, B.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

MAP: Concentrating Solar Power Across the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Explore our latest map, charting the location of concentrating solar power plants across the country.

51

Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Analysis of wet deposition at an urban location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet deposition data collected at the Detroit Edison urban site provided a clear chemical profile at this location for the period studied. Correlations of major anions with acidity indicate that decreases in pH are associated with increases in sulfates and nitrates. However, other components not measured may have a bearing on pH reductions. The differences between two locations 70 km apart were quite small on the average. Strong local source influences at the urban location were not evident in the limited data set available for study. Wind direction can help determine the ultimate origins of pollutants.

Foltman, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Herbicide and nitrate distribution in central Iowa rainfall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Herbicides are detected in rainfall; however, these are a small fraction of the total applied. This study was designed to evaluate monthly and annual variation in atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N{prime}-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine), alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide), metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide), and NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in rainfall over Walnut Creek watershed south of Ames, IA. The study began in 1991 and continued through 1994. Within the watershed, two wet/dry precipitation samplers were positioned 4 km apart. Detections varied during the year with >90% of the herbicide detections occurring in April through early July. Concentrations varied among events from nondetectable amounts to concentrations of 154 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1}, which occurred when atrazine was applied during an extremely humid day immediately followed by rainfall of <10 mm that washed spray drift from the atmosphere. This was a local scale phenomenon, because the other collector had a more typical concentration of 1.7 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} with an 8-mm rainfall. VAriation between the two collectors suggests that local scale meteorological processes affect herbicide movement. Yearly atrazine deposition totals were >100 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} representing <0.1% of the amount applied. Nitrate-N concentrations in precipitation were uniformly distributed throughout the year and without annual variation in the concentrations. Deposition rates of NO{sub 3}-N were about 1.2 g m{sup {minus}2}. Annual loading onto the watershed was about 25% of the amount applied from all forms of N fertilizers. Movement and rates of deposition provide an understanding of the processes and magnitude of the impact of agriculture on the environment. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Hatfield, J.L.; Prueger, J.H.; Pfeiffer, R.L. [National Soil Tilth Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Wesley, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Library Locations Locations other than Main Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Library Locations Locations other than Main Library Example: Feminist Studies HQ1410 .U54 2009 University of California, Santa Barbara Library www.library.ucsb.edu Updated 3-2014 A - B.......................................6 Central M - N..................................................Arts Library (Music Building) P

55

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE Location(s): ___________________________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of as hazardous waste. 8. Decontamination: Specific instructions: For light contamination of small areas or items12.1 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for PHENOL Location(s): ___________________________________________________ Chemical(s): Phenol Specific Hazards: May be fatal if inhaled. Harmful if absorbed through skin. Harmful

Pawlowski, Wojtek

56

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and...

57

ammonium nitrate solution: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

58

acute uranyl nitrate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

59

ammonium nitrates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

60

ammonium nitrate pills: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ammonium nitrate solutions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

62

RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

Hoffman, E.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

Model validation and uncertainty analysis -- An example using a nitrate percolation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model validation and uncertainty analysis are demonstrated using a model previously developed for estimating nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) concentrations in percolation water from land application of sewage sludge. The objectives are to demonstrate alternate validation techniques and to analyze uncertainty associated with model use following validation. Field data from three published sludge application studies and two separate methods are used for the validation. The first method, point validation, is accomplished by inserting mean values into the model to make point predictions. Model accuracy is then assessed by calculating coefficient of determination (r{sup 2}), relative error and standard error. Statistical accuracy is tested using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The second method, statistical validation, uses Monte Carlo simulation to obtain distributions of model predictions. The hypothesis that field data represent reasonable samples from the distribution of model predictions is tested by checking whether observed values are within a range bounded by the 5 and 95% quantities of the distribution. Both validation methods demonstrate that the land application model generally overestimates nitrate concentrations. Monte Carlo simulation is used to identify which model input parameters are the largest contributors to the uncertainty in model predictions.

Mummert, M.C. [R.E. Wright Environmental, Inc., Middletown, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Concentrating collectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selected specifications from sixteen concentrating collector manufacturers are tabulated. Eleven are linear parabolic trough collectors, and the others include slats, cylindrical trough, linear Fresnel lens, parabolic cylindrical Fresnel lens, and two point focus parabolic dish collectors. Also included is a brief discussion of the operating temperatures and other design considerations for concentrating collectors. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium nitrates Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uranium... for uranium,.contaminated groundwater. Nitrate is a common co.contaminant with uranium. Nitrate inhib- ited U... Mexico. Once nitrate was depleted, both U(VI) and...

66

CU(II): catalyzed hydrazine reduction of ferric nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing ferrous nitrate solutions by the cupric ion-catalyzed reduction of ferric nitrate with hydrazine. The reaction is complete in about 1.5 hours at 40/sup 0/C. Hydrazoic acid is also produced in substantial quantities as a reaction byproduct.

Karraker, D.G.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

68

Holdout transshipment policy in two-location inventory systems   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In two-location inventory systems, unidirectional transshipment policies are considered when an item is not routinely stocked at a location in the system. Unlike the past research in this area which has concentrated on ...

Zhang, Jiaqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous magnesium nitrate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

magnesium nitrate Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aqueous magnesium nitrate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Subscriber access provided...

70

Effect of K loadings on nitrate formation/decomposition and on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K loadings on nitrate formationdecomposition and on NOx storage performance of K-based NOx storage-reduction Effect of K loadings on nitrate formationdecomposition and on NOx...

71

Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

Paddleford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermal decomposition of nitrated tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extended contact between heated mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Most solvent extraction operations are conducted at ambient conditions without heating TBP and have been performed safely for decades, but several explosions involving TBP have occurred in the US, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. This investigation was undertaken to characterize the products of thermal decomposition of both single- and two-phase mixtures of TBP, nitric acid, and water under a variety of conditions. The data indicate that the extent of reaction and the rate of gaseous product formation are affected by the presence of Zr{sup 4+}, distillation compared with reflux conditions, temperature, water/HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 3}/TBP ratios, and whether the decomposition occurs under constant pressure or constant volume conditions. Higher reaction temperatures accelerate the rate of decomposition, but the extent of decomposition, as measured by the quantity of gaseous products, was greater at lower temperatures when the decomposition was performed under distillation conditions. Higher gas production occurs under reflux conditions, lower H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} ratios, and when a separate water-HNO{sub 3} phase is initially present. The major gaseous products include N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O. Measurable amounts of NO{sub 2} were not present in the final product mixture, although an orange color suggesting the presence of NO{sub 2} was observed in the early stages of decomposition. The major liquid products were dibutyl phosphoric acid, butyl nitrate, and water. Small amounts of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} carboxylic acids were also present. Because of the small sample sizes that were employed and the isothermal conditions of the decomposition, runaway reactions were not observed. Some possible reaction pathways are considered.

Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Evaluation of Background Concentrations of Contaminants in an Unusual Desert Arroyo Near a Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Cell - 12260  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages 27 sites that have groundwater containing uranium concentrations above background levels. The distal portions of the plumes merge into background groundwater that can have 50 ?g/L or more uranium. Distinguishing background from site-related uranium is often problematic, but it is critical to determining if remediation is warranted, establishing appropriate remediation goals, and evaluating disposal cell performance. In particular, groundwater at disposal cells located on the upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale may have relatively high background concentrations of uranium. Elevated concentrations of nitrate, selenium, and sulfate accompany the uranium. LM used geologic analogs and uranium isotopic signatures to distinguish background groundwater from groundwater contaminated by a former uranium processing site. The same suite of contaminants is present in groundwater near former uranium processing sites and in groundwater seeps emanating from the Mancos Shale over a broad area. The concentrations of these contaminants in Many Devils Wash, located near LM's Shiprock disposal cell, are similar to those in samples collected from many Mancos seeps, including two analog sites that are 8 to 11 km from the disposal cell. Samples collected from Many Devils Wash and the analog sites have high AR values (about 2.0)-in contrast, groundwater samples collected near the tailings disposal cell have AR values near 1.0. These chemical signatures raise questions about the origin of the contamination seeping into Many Devils Wash. (authors)

Bush, Richard P. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (United States); Morrison, Stan J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Reversible micromachining locator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reversible micromachining locator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Photovoltaic solar concentrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

Reversible micromachining locator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A locator with a part support is used to hold a part onto the kinematic mount of a tooling machine so that the part can be held in or replaced in exactly the same position relative to the cutting tool for machining different surfaces of the part or for performing different machining operations on the same or different surfaces of the part. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls placed at equidistant positions around the planar surface of the locator and the kinematic mount has a plurality of magnets which alternate with grooves which accommodate the portions of the steel balls projecting from the locator. The part support holds the part to be machined securely in place in the locator. The locator can be easily detached from the kinematic mount, turned over, and replaced onto the same kinematic mount or another kinematic mount on another tooling machine without removing the part to be machined from the locator so that there is no need to touch or reposition the part within the locator, thereby assuring exact replication of the position of the part in relation to the cutting tool on the tooling machine for each machining operation on the part.

Salzer, Leander J. (Los Almos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (late of Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. #31;e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however, contains nitrate levels... are working on ways to manage the nitrate levels in this aquifer. Tracking the source Nitrates in groundwater can come from runo#27;, fertilizer use, leaks from septic tanks, sewage and erosion of natural deposits, according to the U.S. Environmental...

Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Degradation of the molecular weight and nitrate ester content of cellulose nitrate on thermal aging. [PBX-9404  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in molecular weight and nitrate ester content for cellulose nitrate (NC), either pure or as a constituent of PBX-9404, were determined as a function of time and temperature. Changes in the number-averaged molecular weight, M/sub n/, are described by the simple theory of random chain scission, and M/sub n/ is found to correlate well with nitrate ester loss. Significant differences are seen between NC aged in the isolated condition and aged as the binder in PBX-9404.

Leider, H R

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C[sub 3] or larger.

Lockridge, J.E.; Fritz, J.S.

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nitrate contamination of domestic potable water supplies: a social problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate contamination of potable water supplies is a recognized health hazard. Potentially, the contamination of private drinking water supplies could be a problem in the rural Palouse area of Idaho and Washington. Studies have shown that 12% of the rural population of Whitman County, Washington, may be drinking water containing nitrates in excess of the national standard. Yet there is no organized concern about this potential health hazard among local citizens. After reviewing the literature on nitrate contamination of ground water and discussing nitrate contamination of private potable water supplies in the Palouse, we use a social movement theory of social problems to explain why this situation has not been defined as a public health problem.

Holmes, T.; Jensen, E.L.; Conway, J.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

Waterland, A. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

International land rig locator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical specifications, ratings, locations, and status are listed for each of the 5,000 contract rotary drilling rigs operated by the more than 700 independent drilling contractors throughout the Free World.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

International land rig locator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical specifications, ratings, locations, and status are listed for each of the 5,000 contract rotary drilling rigs operated by more than 700 independent drilling contractors throughout the Free World.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Location linked information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work builds an infrastructure called Location Linked Information that offers a means to associate digital information with public, physical places. This connection creates a hybrid virtual/physical space, called glean ...

Mankins, Matthew William David, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Immobilization of sodium nitrate waste with polymers: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of solidification systems for sodium nitrate waste. Sodium nitrate waste was solidified in the polymers polyethylene, polyester-styrene (PES), and water-extendible polyester-styrene (WEP). Evaluations were made of the properties of waste forms containing various amounts of sodium nitrate by leaching immersion in water, measuring compressive strengths and by the EPA Extraction Procedure. Results of the leaching test are presented as cumulative fraction leached (CFL), incremental leaching rate, and average leaching indices (LI). For waste forms containing 30 to 70 wt% sodium nitrate, the CFL ranged from 9.0 x 10/sup -3/ to 7.3 x 10/sup -1/ and the LI from 11 to 7.8. After ninety days immersion in water, the compressive strengths ranged from 720 psi to 2550 psi. The nitrate releases from these samples using the EPA Extraction Procedure were below 500 ppM. The nitrate releases from PES waste forms were similar to those from polyethylene waste forms at the same waste loadings. The compressive yield strengths, measured after ninety-day immersion in water, ranged between 2070 and 7710 psi. In the case of WEP waste forms, only 30 wt% loaded samples passed the immersion test. 23 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

a r r i o r BUILDING# NAME LOCATION BUILDING# NAME LOCATION OTHER BUILDINGS LOCATION SORORITIES LOCATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Admissions Parking Palmer Lake B l a c k W a r r i o r R i v e r BUILDING# NAME LOCATION BUILDING# NAME LOCATION OTHER BUILDINGS LOCATION SORORITIES LOCATION 7046 70127012 1155 10331033 1150 1039 1038

Carver, Jeffrey C.

89

Crystal chemistry of thorium nitrates and chromates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures and infrared spectra of six novel thorium compounds are reported. Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=14.050(1), b=8.992(7), c=5.954(5) A, {beta}=101.014(2){sup o}. K{sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2), P-3, a=13.606(1), c=6.641(6) A. (C{sub 12}H{sub 28}N){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (3), P2{sub 1}/c, a=14.643(4), b=15.772(5), c=22.316(5) A, {beta}=131.01(1){sup o}. KTh(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (4), P2{sub 1}/c, a=10.070(8), b=12.731(9), c=13.231(8) A, {beta}=128.647(4){sup o}. Th(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (5), P2{sub 1}/n, a=12.731(1), b=9.469(8), c=12.972(1) A, {beta}=91.793(2){sup o}. K{sub 2}Th{sub 3}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} (6), Ama2, a=19.302(8), b=15.580(6), c=11.318(6) A. The coordination polyhedra about Th in these structures are diverse. Th is coordinated by 9 O atoms in 5 and 6, seven of which are from monodentate (CrO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and two are (H{sub 2}O). The Th in compound 1 is coordinated by ten O atoms, four of which are O atoms of two bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and six of which are (OH) and (H{sub 2}O). In compounds 2, 3 and 4 the Th is coordinate by 12 O atoms. In 2 and 3 there are six bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles, and in 4 ten of the O atoms are part of five bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and the others are (H{sub 2}O) groups. The structural units of these compounds consist of a chain of thorium and nitrate polyhedra (1), isolated thorium hexanitrate clusters (2, 3), an isolated thorium pentanitrate dihydrate cluster (4), and a sheet (6) and framework (5) of thorium and chromate polyhedra. These structures illustrate the complexity inherent in the crystal chemistry of Th. - Graphical Abstract: The structures and infrared spectra of four new Th nitrates and two Th chromates are reported. The coordination numbers of the Th cations range from nine to 12 in these compounds. Structural units consist of isolated clusters, chains, sheets and frameworks.

Sigmon, Ginger E. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C., E-mail: pburns@nd.ed [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Atmospheric Environment 36 (2002) 41594171 Simulations of monthly mean nitrate concentrations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1990 and 2030 (Klimont et al., 2001). The resulting environmental impacts, including acid rain , Xinjin Chengb a Acid Deposition and Oxidant Research Center (ADORC), 1182 Sowa, Niigata-shi 950 (Kurita et al., 1985; Huang et al., 1995; *Corresponding author. Acid Deposition and Oxidant Research

91

Computer Lab Information Location  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M340 Computer Lab Information · Location: The computer labs accessible to you are Weber 205 it is recommended that you save your files on a floppy when you are finished. · There is another directory, g:\\m340 to the saved files you have to add the directory to the Matlab path. To do this type addpath g:\\m340

Dangelmayr, Gerhard

92

Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 34, 62580 Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria Campus Coatzacoalcos, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Universidad Km 7.5, 96530 Coatzacoalcos, Ver. (Mexico)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA OF THE URANYL ION IN TWO GEOMETRICALLY SIMILAR COORDINATION ENVIRONMENTS: URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE AND DI-u-AQUO-BIS (DIOXODINITRA-TOURANIUM(VI) DI-IMIDAZOLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coordination sphere of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH). U-Coordination Environments: Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate andin the crystal hosts of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and

Brittain, Harry G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Electric current locator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

STRUCTURE OF PENTAKIS (UREA) DIOXOURANIUM(VI)NITRATE LUO2 (OC (NH2)2)5 (NO3) 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate and urea which wasALL f(O,O.t» URANYL UREA NITRATE FOB AND FCA ARE THEFACTORS CO~TINUE& FOf URANYL UREA NITRATE l F[) B PAGE . ,

Zalkin, Allan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

ARM - Instrument Location Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosionAnnouncements MediagovCampaignsListgovInstrumentsLocation Table

97

Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3-Supported Alkaline Earth Oxides using Density Functional Theory. Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3-Supported...

98

THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Ferraro, J.R.; Katzin, L.I. Temp Data Storage 3: Argonne...

99

THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current...

100

Uranyl nitrate pouring solution for producing nuclear fuel particles and a method for its preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sorbitol, or another polyalcohol such as erythritol, dulcitol or xylitol, is added to a solution containing uranyl nitrate which may also contain another heavy metal, such as thorium or plutonium, prior to preneutralization with ammonia in order to provide a highly viscous solution that can be preneutralized to a great extent without premature precipitation of uranium. The high viscosity makes possible the formation of favorably large drops when the solution is dripped into an ammonia containing bath for external gelification of the drops. According to the pouring apparatus used, the particles after washing, drying and sintering have a diameter between 0.6 and 1.5 mm. The polyalcohol is added to a hydrosol containing from 1.5 to 2 moles per liter of heavy metal, the polyalcohol being added until concentration of onethird mole of polyalcohol per mole of heavy metal is reached. In certain cases up to four moles of ammonium nitrate per liter are added. The solution so produced can be preneutralized with up to 90% of the amount of ammonia stoichiometrically necessary for T separation of uranium without the formation of any precipitate, preferably by first adding ammonia gas under strong stirring and then adding ammonium bicarbonate in excess, which decomposes to liberate ammonia to an extent determined by the temperature, which is to be precisely controlled. It is possible to obtain this way a solution of predetermined viscosity from which the excess ammonium bicarbonate can readily be separated.

Hein, K.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (NWP), collectively referred to as the Permittees Isolation Plan (Plan) for identified nitrate salt bearing waste disposed in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant detailed proposal for the expedited closure of underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit (HWDU) Panel 6, so

Napp, Nils

102

MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

Isaacs, Rufus

103

Regulation by nitrate of protein synthesis and translation of RNA in maize roots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roots of maize seedlings were exposed to /sup 35/S-methionine in the presence or absence of nitrate. Using SDS-PAGE, nitrate-induced changes in labeled polypeptides were noted in the soluble (at 92, 63 and 21kD) and organellar(at 14kD) fractions, as well as in a membrane fraction of putative tonoplast origin (at 31kD). No nitrate-induced changes were noted in a plasmamembrane-enriched fraction or in a membrane fraction of mixed origin. Total RNA from nitrate-treated and control roots was translated in a rabbit reticulocyte system. Five translation products (94, 63, 41, 39 and 21kD) were identified as nitrate-inducible by comparative gel electrophoresis. Changes in protein synthesis and translation of mRNA were apparent within 2-3 h after introduction of nitrate. Within 4-6 h after removal of nitrate, the level of nitrate-inducible translation products diminished to that of control roots. In contrast, the 31kD tonoplast polypeptide was still labeled 26 h after removal of external nitrate and /sup 35/S-methionine. The results will be discussed in relation to the nitrate induction of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the nitrate uptake system.

McClure, P.R.; Bouthyette, P.Y.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Aqueous uranium(IV) concentrations controlled by calcium uranyl vanadate precipitates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxidizing conditions. Uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (Spectrumto contain 300 ?M uranyl nitrate (hexahydrate), 300 ?M

Tokunaga, T.K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Mine locations: Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upon accepting this internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory, I was excited but a bit nervous because I was placed into a field I knew nothing about and did not incorporate my mechanical engineering background. However, I stayed positive and realized that experience and education can come in many forms and that this would be a once in a lifetime opportunity. The EES-II Division (which stands for Earth and Environmental Sciences, Geophysics division) concentrates on several topics, including Nuclear Treaty Verification Seismology. The study of this is extremely important in order to monitor countries that have nuclear capability and make sure they follow the rules of the international comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty. Seismology is only one aspect of this monitoring and EES-II works diligently with many other groups here at Los Alamos and across the world.

Perry, Bradley A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water was studied using a Swietoslawski ebulliometer. The measurements were performed for two constant salt molalities (1 and 2 mol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1]) under isobaric conditions at 50.66 kPa. Strong salting-out of the alcohol was observed in all cases, leading to a complete elimination of the azeotropic point at relatively low salt concentrations. The results were correlated using an extension of the NRTL equation for mixed solvent electrolyte systems proposed by Mock, Evans, and Chen.

Polka, H.M.; Gmehling, J. (Univ. of Oldenburg (Germany). Chair of Industrial Chemistry)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Spring loaded locator pin assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

Groll, Todd A. (Idaho Falls, ID); White, James P. (Pocatelo, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Spring loaded locator pin assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Concentrating Solar Power Forum Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation's summaries: a convenient truth, comparison of three concentrator technologies, value of high efficiency, and status of industry.

Kurtz, S.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

110

Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new field instrument is described that quantifies total particle phase organic nitrates. The instrument is based on the thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) method that thermally converts nitrates to NO2 which is then detected by LIF. This instrument is unique in its ability to provide fast sensitive measurements of particle phase organic nitrates, without interference from inorganic nitrate. Here we use it to quantify organic nitrates in SOA generated from high-NOx photooxidation of limonene, a-pinene, D-3-carene, and tridecane. In these experiments the organic nitrate moiety is observed to be 6-15percent of the total SOA mass, depending on the organic precursor.

Rollins, Andrew W.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Cohen, Ronald C.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PROGRAM REVIEW 2013 Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power Principal Investigator: Prof. Gang Chen Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA...

112

Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar is growing rapidly, and the concentrating photovoltaics industry-both high- and low-concentration cell approaches-may be ready to ramp production in 2009.

Kurtz, S.

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Alignment method for parabolic trough solar concentrators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

Diver, Richard B. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine 23 Evaluation for Biological Reduction of Nitrate and Perchlorate in Brine Water Using Summary: in high salt solution. One culture was capable of reducing up...

116

Micro- and Mini-nitrate Sensors for Monitoring of Soils, Groundwater and Aquatic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate Mini-Sensor with PVC membrane containing liquidmin) Mini-sensors with PVC maintain their sensitivity duringfabricated mini- sensors with PVC membranes showed better

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net1039992010 Summary: . The model in- cludes explicit transport of size-resolved mineral dust and its alkalinity, nitrate... in terms of...

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the experiment... nitrate- dependent Fe(II) ... Source: Roden, Eric E. - Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Environmental...

119

Ureides in active and nitrate-repressed soybean nodules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) detected ureides in his final preparations of two acid soluble peptides which seemed to be associated with nitrogen fixation. He presented evidence that these crude preparations were able to: A) bind and release NH ; and 8) reduce the triple bond... (----1 of nitrate, were analyzed on a Beckman 120B automatic amino acid analyzer. The post arginine peaks (I, II, III) were measured. 38 Table 4. The Effect of N03 on Acid-Soluble Peptide(s) from Soybean Nodules. Acid-soluble ex- tracts were...

Bundy, Timothy K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Location-aware active signage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-dimensional route maps, which depict a path from one location to another, can be powerful tools for visualizing and communicating directions. This thesis presents a client-server architecture for generating and ...

Nichols, Patrick James, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman Oberlin College `13 Advisor and loss. Rapid nitrate addition to salt marshes may stimulate bacterial decomposition of existing peat, and the decomposition may contribute to creek bank destabilization and collapse. Alternately, peat deposited in high

Vallino, Joseph J.

124

Infrared Spectroscopy of the Microhydrated Nitrate Ions NO3 Daniel J. Goebbert,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared Spectroscopy of the Microhydrated Nitrate Ions NO3 - (H2O)1-6 Daniel J. Goebbert ReceiVed: April 15, 2009 We present infrared photodissociation spectra of the microhydrated nitrate ions the infrared spectroscopy of NO3 - (H2O)n clusters, n ) 1-6. The gas-phase vibrational spectroscopy of NO3

Neumark, Daniel M.

125

Nitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental conditions is the modulation of root system architecture (RSA) in response to nitrate supplyNitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in ArabidopsisR393/AFB3 is a unique N- responsive module that controls root system architecture in response

Green, Pamela

126

Strontium sorption and precipitation behaviour during bioreduction in nitrate impacted sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radionuclides (e.g. U and Tc) from groundwaters at these sites is a key challenge for nuclear decommissioning D. Bryan a , Katherine Morris a, a Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning and Williamson Nitrate Nuclear The behaviour of strontium (Sr2+ ) during microbial reduction in nitrate impacted

Burke, Ian

127

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state), Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow'' by Kelly

Flury, Markus

128

The fate and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in northwestern Mississippi, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling . USA Introduction Nitrate is the primary form of dissolved nitrogen in natural waters (MuellerThe fate and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in northwestern Mississippi, USA Heather L. Welch & Christopher T. Green & Richard H. Coupe Abstract Agricultural contamination of groundwater

129

Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the pitting occurred near welds; however this was the hottest region in the chamber. Pitting was observed up to two inches above the weld, indicating independence from weld effects.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Concentrating Solar Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Photovoltaic concentrator initiative: Concentrator cell development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involves the development of a large-area, low-cost, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell for use in the Entech 22-sun linear-focus Fresnel lens concentrator system. The buried contact solar cell developed at the University of New South Wales was selected for this project. Both Entech and the University of New South Wales are subcontractors. This annual report presents the program efforts from November 1990 through December 1991, including the design of the cell, development of a baseline cell process, and presentation of the results of preliminary cell processing. Important results include a cell designed for operation in a real concentrator system and substitution of mechanical grooving for the previously utilized laser scribing.

Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Narayanan, S. [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (US)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Selective and quantitative nitrate electroreduction to ammonium using a porous copper electrode in an electrochemical flow cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,version1-10Jul2014 #12;3 1. Introduction Nitrate ions (NO3 - ) contamination of ground and surface water and physiochemical methods are used for nitrate removal from contaminated water but show drastic limits are costly [10] and produce secondary brine wastes, because the nitrate are only separated but not destroyed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

133

Synchronized sampling improves fault location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

Kezunovic, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Perunicic, B. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

J. B. Briggs (INEEL POC); R. E. Rothe

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Location logistics of industrial facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of company intent1ons is not made at the correct time and in the correct manner. 6. Recommend Best Areas for Further Invest1 ations. Once the on-site evaluations have been completed, the 11st of possibilities is reduced still further and only the best... location and site selection. This data was gathered through library research, atten- dance of various industr1al development conferences, sol1citation of mater1als from individuals currently involved with industrial facil1ties location, and various...

Hammack, William Eugene

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Boston, Massachusetts Location: Boston, MA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-recovery ventilation and water-source heat pumps Each unit has fresh air ducted independently. Each residence is warmed by a heat pump that taps the Trigen Energy Corporation steam lines that run underneath the street. #12;WallsBoston, Massachusetts #12;Location: Boston, MA Building type(s): Multi-unit residential, Retail 350

Prevedouros, Panos D.

138

Building Address Locations -Assumes entire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Address Locations - Assumes entire building unless noted Designation Submit through* 560, 4 BU Crosstown Center 801 Massachusetts Ave Floor 1, 2 BMC BCD Building 800 Harrison Avenue BCD BMC Biosquare III 670 Albany Floors 2, 3, 6, 7 BMC Biosquare III 670 Albany Floors 1, 4, 5, 8 BU Building

Guenther, Frank

139

Assimilation of surface data in a one-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model of the surface ocean: 2. Adjusting a simple trophic model to chlorophyll, temperature, nitrate, and pCO{sub 2} data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper builds on a previous work which produced a constrained physical-biogeochemical model of the carbon cycle in the surface ocean. Three issues are addressed: (1) the results of chlorophyll assimilation using a simpler trophic model, (2) adjustment of parameters using the simpler model and data other than surface chlorophyll concentrations, and (3) consistency of the main carbon fluxes derived by the simplified model with values from the more complex model. A one-dimensional vertical model coupling the physics of the ocean mixed layer and a description of biogeochemical processes with a simple trophic model was used to address these issues. Chlorophyll concentration, nitrate concentration, and temperature were used to constrain the model. The surface chlorophyll information was shown to be sufficient to constrain primary production within the photic layer. The simultaneous assimilation of chlorophyll, nitrate, and temperature resulted in a significant improvement of model simulation for the data used. Of the nine biological and physical parameters which resulted in significant variations of the simulated chlorophyll concentration, seven linear combinations of the mode parameters were constrained. The model fit was an improvement on independent surface chlorophyll and nitrate data. This work indicates that a relatively simple biological model is sufficient to describe carbon fluxes. Assimilation of satellite or climatological data coulc be used to adjust the parameters of the model for three-dimensional models. It also suggests that the main carbon fluxes driving the carbon cycle within surface waters could be derived regionally from surface information. 38 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Prunet, P.; Minster, J.F.; Echevin, V. [Laboratoire CNES-CNRS, Toulouse (France)] [and others] [Laboratoire CNES-CNRS, Toulouse (France); and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

142

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is a rendering of a scattering solar concentrator. Light collected by a cylindrical Fresnel lens is focused within a curved glass "guide" sheet, where it is redirected into...

143

Concentrated Solar Power Generation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solar power generation is the most promising technology to transfer energy consumption reliance from fossil fuel to renewable sources. Concentrated solar power generation is a… (more)

Jin, Zhilei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bedding and Within-Pen Location Effects on Feedlot Pen Runoff Quality Using a Rainfall Simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 1999. Bedding had a significant (P # 0.05) effect on NH4­N concentration and load in 1999, SO4 load in 1998, SO4 concentration and load in 1999, and total coliforms in both years; where these three reactive phosphorus (DRP), total P, and NH4­N concentrations and loads at the bedding pack location in wood

Selinger, Brent

145

Concentration in Green Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, energy, infrastructure or transport. Participants in this specialization area work closely with the GreenConcentration in Green Design Research and Education Opportunities Carnegie Mellon University Civil and Environmental Engineering www.ce.cmu.edu M.S. Concentration Green Design - Course Only Track As an extension

Shewchuk, Jonathan

146

The Effects of Nanoparticle Augmentation of Nitrate Thermal Storage Materials for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Department of Energy funded a project to determine if the specific heat of thermal energy storage materials could be improved by adding nanoparticles. The standard thermal energy storage materials are molten salts. The chosen molten salt was a...

Betts, Matthew

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Modeling of the simultaneous extraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate with tri-n-butyl phosphate. Application to extraction operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model developed for the equilibrium HNO{sub 3}-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-diluent is the basis of the computation of distribution isotherms. The isotherms are used to study the influence of TBP concentration on two chosen operation parameters, distribution coefficients and number of theoretical stages, for the selected flow sheets. It is established that an increase in TBP concentration leads to a decrease in the number of theoretical stages for the extraction flow sheets but to their increase for the striping flow sheets. Given diagrams can be used to determine the efficiency of extraction processes. Agreement with available literature calculations on the number of theoretical stages supports the use of the model in the computation of distribution isotherms, of the system quoted above, in a wide range of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and TBP concentrations.

Comor, J.J.; Tolic, A.S.; Kopecni, M.M.; Petkovic, D.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.] [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO{sub 3}/h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting.

Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Utilizing Microalgae to Remediate Nitrate-Contaminated Groundwater N. Case, M. Sommerfeld, H. Qiang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Microalgae to Remediate Nitrate-Contaminated Groundwater N. Case, M. Sommerfeld, H. Qiang or domestic animals. It can also be used as a fertilizer or converted to biofuels. The photobioreactor can

Hall, Sharon J.

150

Nighttime Measurements of Dinitrogen Pentoxide and the Nitrate Radical via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technique, known as cavity ring-down spectroscopy, will be introduced for simultaneously measuring the nitrate radical and dinitrogen pentoxide. The cavity ring-down spectrometer was initially designed and constructed based on the experiments by Steven Brown...

Perkins, Katie C.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

Sparks, Donald L.

152

Application of Artificially Immobilized Microorganisms to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water By Sean X. Liu andFor biological treatment of drinking water, several crucialalginate gel beads to drinking water treatment has proved to

Liu, Sean X; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali metal nitrate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0021-91930104.00 0 DOI: 10.1128JB.183.19.54915495.2001 Summary: for this heavy metal for its anaerobic growth mode on nitrate (1). However, also in this organism,...

154

Site Location of Development Act (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Site Location of Development Act regulates the locations chosen for state, municipal, quasi-municipal, educational, charitable, commercial and industrial developments with respect to the...

155

Persistent Uniform Resource Locators (PURLs) | Scientific and...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Locators (PURLs) Print page Print page PURLs (Persistent Uniform Resource Locators) are Web addresses that act as permanent identifiers in the face of a dynamic and changing Web...

156

Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App November 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis As part of the Obama...

157

Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

159

LOCATION: Johnson County Sheriff's Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs &JeffIntensitySurfaceLOCATION: Johnson County

160

Ombuds Office Location & Hours  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access1 TechnicalOil inventories inOmbuds Office Location

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Organic photovoltaics and concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

Mapel, Jonathan King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Water Sample Concentrator  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

Idaho National Laboratory

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

163

Concentrator silicon cell research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Joined concentric tubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal collector J.S. Coventry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal collector J.S. Coventry Centre for Sustainable Energy.Coventry@anu.edu.au Abstract Australia is a good location for solar concentrator applications. Current activities in Australia OF THE SOLAR RESOURCE IN AUSTRALIA Australia has relatively high solar insolation, as shown in figure 1

166

Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF ? mediators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 ?M). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ?}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNF? and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup ?} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup ?} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNF? route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium?related diseases. -- Highlights: ? Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ? At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ? At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNF?. ? Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

Orona, N.S. [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D.R., E-mail: deborah.tasat@unsam.edu.ar [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, M. T. de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Airborne agent concentration analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

Gelbard, Fred

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Crystal chemistry of new thorium nitrates and chromates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures and infrared spectra of six novel thorium compounds are reported. Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=14.050(1), b=8.992(7), c=5.954(5) Å, ?=101.014(2)°. K{sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2), P-3, a=13.606(1), c=6.641(6) Å. (C{sub 12}H{sub 28}N){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (3), P21/c, a=14.643(4), b=15.772(5), c=22.316(5) Å, ?=131.01(1)°. KTh(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (4), P21/c, a=10.070(8), b=12.731(9), c=13.231(8) Å, ?=128.647(4)°. Th(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (5), P21/n, a=12.731(1), b=9.469(8), c=12.972(1) Å, ?=91.793(2)°. K{sub 2}Th{sub 3}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} (6), Ama2, a=19.302(8), b=15.580(6), c=11.318(6) Å. The coordination polyhedra about Th in these structures are diverse. Th is coordinated by 9 O atoms in 5 and 6, seven of which are from monodentate (CrO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and two are (H{sub 2}O). The Th in compound 1 is coordinated by ten O atoms, four of which are O atoms of two bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and six of which are (OH) and (H{sub 2}O). In compounds 2, 3 and 4 the Th is coordinate by 12 O atoms. In 2 and 3 there are six bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles, and in 4 ten of the O atoms are part of five bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and the others are (H{sub 2}O) groups. The structural units of these compounds consist of a chain of thorium and nitrate polyhedra (1), isolated thorium hexanitrate clusters (2, 3), an isolated thorium pentanitrate dihydrate cluster (4), and a sheet (6) and framework (5) of thorium and chromate polyhedra. These structures illustrate the complexity inherent in the crystal chemistry of Th.

Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Field descriptions for a developing laminar tube flow with and without a concentrically located spherical obstacle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By Br" r Br" By (6) B'w 1 Bw Bgw Bn . Bw . Bw += ?. += ? . = Re (u ?. + w=) BrB r" Br By2 By r Br By (7) The nonlinear equations (6) and (7) are second order in the nondimensional radial and axial velocity, respectively, and require eight boundary... Approved as to style and content by: (C airman f Commit tee) (Co-Chairman of Committee) A Q' (Head of Dep rtment) P -, qg/, . 7 (Member) (M er) /7 Z~t j&dgc- December 1972 ABSTRACT Field Descriptions for a Developing Laminar Tube Flow...

Mikkelsen, Clark Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of utilizing a suitable fault location method. As distribution systems are gradually evolving into smart distribution systems, application of more accurate fault location methods based on gathered data from various Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs...

Lotfifard, Saeed

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

172

Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice cores are archives of climate change and possibly large solar proton events (SPEs). Wolff et al. (2012) used a single event, a nitrate peak in the GISP2-H core, which McCracken et al. (2001a) time associated with the poorly quantified 1859 Carrington event, to discredit SPE-produced, impulsive nitrate deposition in polar ice. This is not the ideal test case. We critique the Wolff et al. analysis and demonstrate that the data they used cannot detect impulsive nitrate events because of resolution limitations. We suggest re-examination of the top of the Greenland ice sheet at key intervals over the last two millennia with attention to fine resolution and replicate sampling of multiple species. This will allow further insight into polar depositional processes on a sub-seasonal scale, including atmospheric sources, transport mechanisms to the ice sheet, post-depositional interactions, and a potential SPE association.

Smart, D F; Melott, A L; Laird, C M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well...

Henry, Tracy Lynn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A search for regulatory mutants of the nitrate utilization pathway of Neurospora Crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORI MUTANTS OF THE NITRATE UTILIZATION PATHWAl OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by CLAUDE STEVEN MCDANIEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fu1fillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Genetics A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY MUTANTS OF THE NITRATE U1'IIIZA1'ION PA1'NNAY OF ~N A Thesis by CLAUDE STEVEN MCDANIEL Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ e) (Head oi' epar...

McDaniel, Claude Steven

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND SULFATE CONCENTRATION ON PROBABLITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR LIQUID WASTE TANKS- PART IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion susceptibility. Testing solutions were chosen to build off previous experimental results from FY07, FY08, FY09 and FY10 to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate. The FY11 results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits as well.

Hoffman, E.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

Alkyl nitrate (C1-C3) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean E. E. Dahl,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and distribution of tropo- spheric ozone. Atmospheric alkyl nitrates are normally associated with polluted air free radical processes initiated by radioactive decay or cosmic rays, enzymatically mediated reactions expedition in the equatorial Pacific, an equatorial maximum in atmospheric ethyl and isopropyl nitrate

Saltzman, Eric

177

Biological Oxidation of Fe(II) in Reduced Nontronite Coupled with Nitrate Reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate contamination in soils, sediments, and water bodies is a significant issue. Although much is known about nitrate degradation in these environments, especially via microbial pathways, a complete understanding of all degradation processes, especially in clay mineral-rich soils, is still lacking. The objective of this study was to study the potential of removing nitrate contaminant using structural Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite. Specifically, the coupled processes of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite (NAu-2) and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002 was investigated. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in nontronite. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 93% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Magnetite was a mineral product of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, as evidenced by XRD data and TEM diffraction patterns. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate removal in soils.

Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Agrawal, A.; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

NITRATE UTILIZATION BY PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE SUPERIOR IS IMPAIRED BY LOW NUTRIENT (P, Fe) AVAILABILITY AND SEASONAL LIGHT LIMITATION--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITRATE UTILIZATION BY PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE SUPERIOR IS IMPAIRED BY LOW NUTRIENT (P, Fe utilization in this oligotrophic system. Clean sampling methods were used to collect water from Lake Superior during spring and summer 2004, and nitrate utilization was measured by monitoring bioreporter

Sterner, Robert W.

179

Isotopic evidence for source changes of nitrate in rain at Bermuda Meredith Galanter Hastings and Daniel M. Sigman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), or nitrate (NO3 Ã? ), is a significant contributor to acid rain, an important species in marineIsotopic evidence for source changes of nitrate in rain at Bermuda Meredith Galanter Hastings O is 68.6% and 76.9% (versus Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). The few cool season rain events

Sigman, Daniel M.

180

Structural Changes of Bimetallic PdX/Cu (1-X) Nanocatalysts Developed for Nitrate Reduction of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Drinking Water Huiping Xu1,2 , Ray Twesten3 , Kathryn Guy4 , John Shapley4 , Charles Werth5 , Anatoly alternative for nitrate removal in drinking water [1]. Fundamental understanding how the atomic arrangement for the purification of drinking water. INTRODUCTION Presently nitrate in drinking water is either not removed

Frenkel, Anatoly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CONTENTS Concentrated Gas Hydrate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 81,Concentrated Gas

182

Modeled atmospheric radon concentrations from uranium mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium mining and milling operations result in the release of radon from numerous sources of various types and strengths. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Clean Air Act, is assessing the health impact of air emissions of radon from underground uranium mines. In this case, the radon emissions may impact workers and residents in the mine vicinity. To aid in this assessment, the EPA needs to know how mine releases can affect the radon concentrations at populated locations. To obtain this type of information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory used the radon emissions, release characteristics and local meterological conditions for a number of mines to model incremental radon concentrations. Long-term, average, incremental radon concentrations were computed based on the best available information on release rates, plume rise parameters, number and locations of vents, and local dispersion climatology. Calculations are made for a model mine, individual mines, and multiple mines. Our approach was to start with a general case and then consider specific cases for comparison. A model underground uranium mine was used to provide definition of the order of magnitude of typical impacts. Then computations were made for specific mines using the best mine-specific information available for each mine. These case study results are expressed as predicted incremental radon concentration contours plotted on maps with local population data from a previous study. Finally, the effect of possible overlap of radon releases from nearby mines was studied by calculating cumulative radon concentrations for multiple mines in a region with many mines. The dispersion model, modeling assumptions, data sources, computational procedures, and results are documented in this report. 7 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs.

Droppo, J.G.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total AN (gas + aerosol) and ANaer show that on average 21% of ANs are in the condensed phaseGas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield A. W. Rollins samples. These measurements show that ANs are a ubiquitous component of the OA with the ­ONO2 subunit

Cohen, Ronald C.

186

Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells Chontisa Accepted 26 August 2008 Published online 11 September 2008 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Denitrification microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has drawn much attention recently as a new approach of waste- water treatment

Tullos, Desiree

187

Nitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as 25.0%) at the Sacramento­San Joaquin River delta region give rise to a wide range of d18ONO3 valuesNitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition18O) within the estuarine system of San Francisco (SF) Bay, California, to explore the utility

Paytan, Adina

188

Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen and Nitrate Leaching in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen and Nitrate Leaching in Swedish Arable Soils Åsa Myrbeck Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences Department of Soil and Environment Uppsala field experiment, Paper III. (photo: J. Arvidsson) #12;Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen

189

Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry was previously proposed to measure energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. For that method, a reference silver nitrate-ray energy is high enough to avoid total a

Yu, K.N.

190

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably] At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, colloid-facilitated transport is a potential of colloids through Hanford sediments under steady state, unsaturated flow conditions. We isolated colloids

Flury, Markus

191

Water and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model (UPFLOW) suggested that at TS groundwater supplied an importanWater and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas Agropecuaria Parana´, INTA, Ruta 11 km 12.5, 3101 Oro Verde, Argentina 1. Introduction Biogeochemical exchange

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

192

Combined Effects of UV-B, Nitrate, and Low pH Reduce the Survival and Activity Level of Larval Cascades Frogs (Rana cascadae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Effects of UV-B, Nitrate, and Low pH Reduce the Survival and Activity Level of Larval. We investigated interactions between low pH, high nitrate level, and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light were significantly reduced in the treatment with low pH, high nitrate, and UV-B together. In both years

Blaustein, Andrew R.

193

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Community Detection from Location-Tagged Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many real world systems or web services can be represented as a network such as social networks and transportation networks. In the past decade, many algorithms have been developed to detect the communities in a network using connections between nodes. However in many real world networks, the locations of nodes have great influence on the community structure. For example, in a social network, more connections are established between geographically proximate users. The impact of locations on community has not been fully investigated by the research literature. In this paper, we propose a community detection method which takes locations of nodes into consideration. The goal is to detect communities with both geographic proximity and network closeness. We analyze the distribution of the distances between connected and unconnected nodes to measure the influence of location on the network structure on two real location-tagged social networks. We propose a method to determine if a location-based community detection...

Liu, Zhi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Location theory and the location of industry along an interstate highway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine the significance of these locational factors among plants with different characteristics that have located in certain localities should provide pertinent information with both practical and theoretical implications. Since 1956, approximately 64... Summary of Plant Location Theory Cost Fac'tots . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ The Importance of 'the Demand Factor Greenhut's General Theory of Plant Location and the Intangible Factor Location Factors as Revealed by Empirical Study Greenhut's Case...

Miller, James Patterson

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Regenerator Location Problem in Flexible Optical Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 22, 2014 ... Abstract: In this study we introduce the regenerator location problem in flexible optical networks (RLP-FON). With a given traffic demand, ...

BARIS YILDIZ

2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Concentric tube support assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assembly (45) includes a plurality of separate pie-shaped segments (72) forming a disk (70) around a central region (48) for retaining a plurality of tubes (46) in a concentrically spaced apart configuration. Each segment includes a support member (94) radially extending along an upstream face (96) of the segment and a plurality of annularly curved support arms (98) transversely attached to the support member and radially spaced apart from one another away from the central region for receiving respective upstream end portions of the tubes in arc-shaped spaces (100) between the arms. Each segment also includes a radial passageway (102) formed in the support member for receiving a fluid segment portion (106) and a plurality of annular passageways (104) formed in the support arms for receiving respective arm portions (108) of the fluid segment portion from the radial passageway and for conducting the respective arm portions into corresponding annular spaces (47) formed between the tubes retained by the disk.

Rubio, Mark F.; Glessner, John C.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

198

Microfluidic ultrasonic particle separators with engineered node locations and geometries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic microfluidic system includes a separation channel for conveying a sample fluid containing small particles and large particles, flowing substantially parallel, adjacent to a recovery fluid, with which it is in contact. An acoustic transducer produces an ultrasound standing wave, that generates a pressure field having at least one node of minimum pressure amplitude. An acoustic extension structure is located proximate to said separation channel for positioning said acoustic node off center in said acoustic area and concentrating the large particles in said recovery fluid stream.

Rose, Klint A; Fisher, Karl A; Wajda, Douglas A; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P; Bailey, Christoppher; Dehlinger, Dietrich; Shusteff, Maxim; Jung, Byoungsok; Ness, Kevin D

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Locating and tracking assets using RFID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this research, we will focus on how to ?nd the location of an item by using RFID in real time indoors to track equipment. When an item needs to be located, the purpose of using RFID is to minimize the searching time, e?ort, and investment cost. Thus...

Kim, Gak Gyu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED Batteries, toner, ink cartridges & cell phones and recycling is an important part of that effort. Below is a guide to on-campus recycling at RSMAS: Visit http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/msgso/ for map of recycling bin locations. NOTE: This is not an exhaustive list. If unauthorized items are found

Miami, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Location Privacy and the Personal Distributed Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Location Privacy and the Personal Distributed Environment Robert C Atkinson, Swee Keow Goo, James-- The Personal Distributed Environment is a new concept being developed within the Mobile VCE Core 3 research, wherever their location: ubiquitous access. Devices are co-ordinated by Device Management Entities (DMEs

Atkinson, Robert C

202

1,4818 pour le nitrate d'uranyle). Les diffrents m-langes prsentaient sensiblement la mme densit.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

434 1,4818 pour le nitrate d'uranyle). Les différents mé- langes présentaient sensiblement la mème pour des solutions de nitrate d'uranyle dont la densité a été reliée au moyen de chlorure ferrique nitrate d'uranyle sans chlorure fer- rique. En résumé, la mesure précise de l'activité des so- lutions de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

203

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS, DEGREES AND CONCENTRATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY AND SCIENCE (TECS) Biological Engineering (BE) Biomedical Engineering (BME) ChemicalENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS, DEGREES AND CONCENTRATIONS DEPARTMENT DEGREE CONCENTRATION (optional) BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING (BAE) BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (BME) CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR

204

Project Approval Form Concentration in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Undergraduate of Graduation:____________________________ Instructions: Please check one of the following ways in which you Plan to complete the project as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology. Depending upon

Goldberg, Bennett

205

Structure and Function of Metal- and Nitrate-reducing Microbial Communities in the FRC Subsurface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this study is to evaluate structure-function relationships of sedimentary microbial communities likely to regulate U(VI) reduction and immobilization in the subsurface of Area 2 at the Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, TN. Microcosm experiments were conducted under near in situ conditions with FRC subsurface materials cocontaminated with high levels of U(VI) and nitrate. The activity, abundance, and community composition of microorganisms was determined in microcosm samples, stimulated with ethanol or glucose, and compared to those from sediment cores and unamended controls. Activity was assessed by monitoring terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs; nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and iron reduction) as well as electron donor utilization. Microbial functional groups, nitrate- and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, were enumerated during the nitrate- and metal-reduction phases of the incubation and in sediment core samples using a most probable number (MPN) serial dilution assay. U(VI) and Fe(III) were reduced concurrently in the glucose but not the ethanol treatments. In ethanol-amended microcosms, U(VI) was reduced during a 4-day lag phase between nitrate- and Fe(III)-reduction phases. Biostimulation resulted in 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, whereas populations of nitrate-reducers were enhanced by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. One to 2 orders of magnitude more Fe(III)-reducers were observed in ethanol- as compared to glucose-amended treatments in parallel with enhanced U(VI) removal in ethanol treatments. Cultivatable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the ethanol treatments were dominated by Geobacter sp. while those cultured on glucose were dominated by fermentative organisms, i.e., Tolumonas sp. Currently, carbon substrate utilization is being examined through HPLC analysis of microcosm porewaters. In addition, changes in the overall microbial community composition are being assessed using cultivation-independent techniques, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing of structural and functional genes. Our results indicate that the microbially-catalyzed mechanism of U(VI) reduction is electron donor dependent and that more effective U(VI) removal is achieved in parallel with an enrichment of Geobacter sp. upon treatment with ethanol.

Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Kerkhof, Lee; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kostk, Joel E.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION BELOW FREE OVERFALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION BELOW FREE OVERFALL By O. R. Stein,~Associate Member, ASCE, and P. Y. Julien and sediment concentration, which may affect downstream morphology and water quality as well as the structure is to determine relationships between time, scour depth, scour-hole volume, and sediment concentration generated

Julien, Pierre Y.

207

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-91F Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal 1-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX- 111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and dry-wells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching. (authors)

Girardot, Crystal [URS- Safety Management Solutions, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Harlow, Don [ELR Consulting Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Johnson, Jeremy [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Freeze crystallization technology for black liquor concentration. Second interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry is one of the largest consumers of energy. Concentration of black liquor (the stream resulting from the chemical separation of wood fibers in the pulping operation) uses 25% of the purchased energy to produce pulp, an equivalent of 33 million barrels of oil in 1982. Here it is shown that freeze concentration, an emerging concentration technology, has the potential of reducing the energy consumption by at least 45%. This amounts to a cost savings of $5 to $15 per ton of pulp depending on the cost of energy, geographical location, and method of application.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Design of photovoltaic central power station concentrator array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design for a photovoltaic central power station using tracking concentrators has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes an advanced Martin Marietta two-axis tracking fresnel lens concentrator. The concentrators are arrayed in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic plant output is connected to the existing 115 kV switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented at the 7th International Conference on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (CPV-7), 4-6 April 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada. Many concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems use a polymeric encapsulant to couple an optical component and/or coverglass to the cell. In that location, the encapsulation improves the transmission of concentrated optical flux through interfaces(s) while protecting the cell from the environment. The durability of encapsulation materials, however, is not well established relative to the desired service life of 30 years. Therefore, we have initiated a screen test to identify the field-induced failure modes for a variety of popular PV encapsulation materials.

Miller, D. C.; Muller, M.; Kempe, M. D.; Araki, K.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

SFSU Building Coordinators List College or Administrative Unit Location(s)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SFSU Building Coordinators List College or Administrative Unit Location(s) Building Coordinator81193 cathym@sfsu.edu GYM 102B Student Services Building SSB Mirel Tikkanen x53566 mtikkane@sfsu.edu SSB

214

Method of locating underground mines fires  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method of locating an underground mine fire by comparing the pattern of measured combustion product arrival times at detector locations with a real time computer-generated array of simulated patterns. A number of electronic fire detection devices are linked thru telemetry to a control station on the surface. The mine's ventilation is modeled on a digital computer using network analysis software. The time reguired to locate a fire consists of the time required to model the mines' ventilation, generate the arrival time array, scan the array, and to match measured arrival time patterns to the simulated patterns.

Laage, Linneas (Eagam, MN); Pomroy, William (St. Paul, MN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

James Harvey; Michael Gula

1998-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

Summary of aluminum nitrate tests at the F/H-ETF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofouling of the Norton ceramic filters in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) has been minimized by bacterial control strategies on the influent streams. However, enough bacteria still exists in the routine influent to impact the filter performance. One method of remediating biofouling in routine influent, initially observed in laboratory tests on simulant solutions, involves addition of aluminum nitrate to the influent wastewater. Tests on actual feed at the ETF using aluminum nitrate showed significantly improved performance, with increases in filter permeability of up to four-fold compared to the baseline case. These improvements were only realized after modifications to the pH adjustment system were completed which minimized upsets in the pH of the feed solutions.

McCabe, D.J.; Wiggins, A.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Summary of aluminum nitrate tests at the F/H-ETF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofouling of the Norton ceramic filters in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) has been minimized by bacterial control strategies on the influent streams. However, enough bacteria still exists in the routine influent to impact the filter performance. One method of remediating biofouling in routine influent, initially observed in laboratory tests on simulant solutions, involves addition of aluminum nitrate to the influent wastewater. Tests on actual feed at the ETF using aluminum nitrate showed significantly improved performance, with increases in filter permeability of up to four-fold compared to the baseline case. These improvements were only realized after modifications to the pH adjustment system were completed which minimized upsets in the pH of the feed solutions.

McCabe, D.J.; Wiggins, A.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Value of Flexibility in Robust Location-Transportation Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and distribution of products can be delayed until actual orders are ... such as hub locations, supplier locations, air freight hub locations, railway station

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

Impact of pH on the removal of fluoride, nitrate and boron by nanofiltration/reverse osmosis   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of pH on boron, fluoride, and nitrate retention by comparing modelled speciation predictions with retention using six different nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis ...

Richards, Laura A.; Vuachère, Marion; Schäfer, Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Addressing endogeneity in residential location models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some empirical residential location choice models have reported dwelling-unit price estimated parameters that are small, not statistically significant, or even positive. This would imply that households are non-sensitive ...

Guevara-Cue, Cristián Angelo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Developing a theory of nightclub location choice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is an investigation of the factors that influence where nightclubs locate within a city. Nightclubs, like other social spaces, provide important social and economic benefits in the urban environment. As amenities, ...

Crim, Stephen J. (Stephen Johnson)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

THE PLANAR HUB LOCATION PROBLEM: A PROBABILISTIC ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 5, 2012 ... Aykin and Brown, [4]. ...... [8] J.F. Campbell, Integer programming formulations of discrete hub location problems, European J. of O.R.. 72(1994) ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effect of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Nitrate on Gibbsite Dissolution Rate and Solubility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory tests have been completed with simulated tank waste samples to investigate the effects of phosphate, fluoride, and nitrate on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility of gibbsite in sodium hydroxide solution at 22 and 40{degrees}C. Results are compared to relevant literature data and to computer model predictions. The presence of sodium nitrate (3 M) caused a reduction in the rate of gibbsite dissolution in NaOH, but a modest increase in the equilibrium solubility of aluminum. The increase in solubility was not as large, though, as the increase predicted by the computer model. The presence of phosphate, either as sodium phosphate or sodium fluoride phosphate, had a negligible effect on the rate of gibbsite dissolution, but caused a slight increase in aluminum solubility. The magnitude of the increased solubility, relative to the increase caused by sodium nitrate, suggests that the increase is due to ionic strength (or water activity) effects, rather than being associated with the specific ion involved. The computer model predicted that phosphate would cause a slight decrease in aluminum solubility, suggesting some Al-PO4 interaction. No evidence was found of such an interaction.

Herting, Daniel L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

224

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIHENT STATIDJ A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 .--' --7 , The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton - AGRICULTURAL... of nitrate of soda on yield, length and percentage of lint, size of boll, shedding, and other characters of the cotton plant on the sandy soils of eastern Texas, as a basis for developing a more intelligent and profitable fertilizer practice for cotton...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Langley, B. C. (Bryon Caldwell); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus)

1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Personal Digital Assistant PDA ----Location Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, xur],[ ybl, yur ]) k k=100 K k k- AminAmin kLk k Amax TmaxTmax kAminLocation Anonymization ConstraintsAmax TmaxLocation Service Quality Constraints 3.3 3.3.1 id, loc, query id loc (x,y)query GPS / l- l- k- l- k l- l l- l- m-invariant 2 29 #12;[22] A B C D E F R1 R2 R3 6 Outlier 6

228

Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

230

PARKS, RECREATION & TOURISM Concentration in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARKS, RECREATION & TOURISM Concentration in Conservation Law Enforcement School Experience in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism 1 Semester 5 Semester 6 SFR 434/534 - Recreation Site Planning

Thomas, Andrew

231

Concentrated solar power on demand .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten… (more)

Codd, Daniel Shawn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Scaled Tests and Modeling of Effluent Stack Sampling Location Mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code to evaluate the mixing at a sampling system location of a research and development facility. The facility requires continuous sampling for radioactive air emissions. Researchers sought to determine whether the location would meet the criteria for uniform air velocity and contaminant concentration as prescribed in the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standard, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requires that the sampling location be well-mixed and stipulates specific tests (e.g., velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity and cyclonic flow angle) to verify the extent of mixing.. The exhaust system for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory was modeled with a CFD code to better understand the flow and contaminant mixing and to predict mixing test results. The CFD results were compared to actual measurements made at a scale-model stack and to the limited data set for the full-scale facility stack. Results indicated that the CFD code provides reasonably conservative predictions for velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity. Cyclonic flow predicted by the code is less than that measured by the required methods. In expanding from small to full scale, the CFD predictions for full-scale measurements show similar trends as in the scale model and no unusual effects. This work indicates that a CFD code can be a cost-effective aid in design or retrofit of a facility’s stack sampling location that will be required to meet Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barnett, J. M.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Process for concentrated biomass saccharification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA); Seapan, Mayis (Landenberg, PA); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

Declaration of Concentration in Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Declaration of Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Undergraduate Records:____________________________ Instructions: ENG students declaring a Concentration in Nanotechnology should complete this form, obtain REQUIRED COURSES (Choose 1) 1. ENG EC 481­ Fundamentals of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology 4.0 ELECTIVES

Goldberg, Bennett

235

Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the dimmer switch 150 3 lb Effect of age on expected location of the dimmer switch 150 31c Effect of years of driving experience on expected location of the dimmer switch. 151 31d Effect of miles driven in the past year on expected location... IOO. C Sn. i 36. 2 8/. 5 80. 0 87. 5 A=/0. 0 ZD. D 50. 0 0. 0 /0 D 12 5 2D. O 30. 0 0. 0 80. 0 80. 0 62 IDD. O 100. 0 10[. 0 Bn. o o. o 7. 5 20. 0 40. 0 37'. 5 85. 0 23 3 17. 5 16. / 74. 2 42. 5 SZ. 5 Climate C ntrol 17. 2 43. 0 36...

Francis, Dawn Suzette

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Leak locating microphone, method and system for locating fluid leaks in pipes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A leak detecting microphone inserted directly into fluid within a pipe includes a housing having a first end being inserted within the pipe and a second opposed end extending outside the pipe. A diaphragm is mounted within the first housing end and an acoustic transducer is coupled to the diaphragm for converting acoustical signals to electrical signals. A plurality of apertures are provided in the housing first end, the apertures located both above and below the diaphragm, whereby to equalize fluid pressure on either side of the diaphragm. A leak locating system and method are provided for locating fluid leaks within a pipe. A first microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a first selected location and sound is detected at the first location. A second microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a second selected location and sound is detected at the second location. A cross-correlation is identified between the detected sound at the first and second locations for identifying a leak location.

Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL); Spevak, Lev (Highland Park, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Multiple concentric annuli for characterizing spatially nonuniform backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is presented for estimating the background at a given location on a sky map by interpolating the estimated background from a set of concentric annuli which surround this location. If the background is nonuniform but smoothly varying, this method provides a more accurate (though less precise) estimate than can be obtained with a single annulus. Several applications of multi-annulus background estimation are discussed, including direct testing for point sources in the presence of a nonuniform background, the generation of "surrogate maps" for characterizing false alarm rates, and precise testing of the null hypothesis that the background is uniform.

James Theiler; Jeff Bloch

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

Environmental Modelling & Software 15 (2000) 161167 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Modelling & Software 15 (2000) 161­167 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft A fuzzy model "contaminated", defined over the set of 70 sampling sites. The higher the concentration, the higher the degree contaminated sites. The proposed fuzzy model is easy to implement and the results are directly interpretable

Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

239

Proposition of internship/thesis for 2015 Location of the internship/thesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposition of internship/thesis for 2015 Location of the internship/thesis : Laboratory Gulliver, ESPCI Address : 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris Advisor of internship/thesis : LACOSTE David T´el. : 01 in order to describe the dynamics of such concentration fluctuations. During this internship/thesis, which

Lacoste, David

240

Measurements of thoron progeny concentration using apotential alpha-energy monitor in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is reported that thoron concentration in Japanese dwellings may be higher than in other dwellings. Therefore, in order to assess the risk for indoor thoron progeny, the portable potential alpha-energy monitor has been developed. The monitor detects alpha-particles from the {sup 212}Po collected on the filter using a piece of cellulose nitrate film. The detection efficiency of the alpha-particles has been estimated by Monte Carlo calculation. From the results of measurements, the mean indoor thoron progeny concentration in the dwellings was 1.5 Bq m{sup -3} (EC{sub Tn}), and ranged from 0.04 to 8.2 Bq m{sup -3}. The effects of three typical interior walls (soil-based plaster, concrete, and modern materials) on the thoron progeny supply were considered. The mean annual effective dose equivalent was 0.45 mSv. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Yamasaki, T. [Chubu Electric Power Company, Inc., Nagoya (Japan); Iida, T. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Assessment of concentration mechanisms for organic wastes in underground storage tanks at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted an initial conservative evaluation of physical and chemical processes that could lead to significant localized concentrations of organic waste constituents in the Hanford underground storage tanks (USTs). This evaluation was part of ongoing studies at Hanford to assess potential safety risks associated with USTs containing organics. Organics in the tanks could pose a potential problem if localized concentrations are high enough to propagate combustion and are in sufficient quantity to produce a large heat and/or gas release if in contact with a suitable oxidant. The major sources of oxidants are oxygen in the overhead gas space of the tanks and sodium nitrate and nitrite either as salt cake solids or dissolved in the supernatant and interstitial liquids.

Gerber, M.A.; Burger, L.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Ryan, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Zollars, R.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach Belén Palop1,2 1Departamento de March 2009 Florida State University #12;Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model;Transportation Network Model Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model Network placement

Palop del Río, Belén

243

OPTIMAL LOCATION OF ISOLATION VALVES IN WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 7 OPTIMAL LOCATION OF ISOLATION VALVES IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: A RELIABILITY systems to serve expanding population centers. Both the adaptation of existing technologies in water supply systems account for the largest cost item in future maintenance budgets. The aging

Mays, Larry W.

244

Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices Metal Bins Deskside Bins with Side Saddle Rubbermaid Bins.58 for auxiliaries. And Non-Public Areas Public Offices Non-Public Recyclables Recyclables RecyclablesTrash Trash Trash #12;New Recycling Bin Guidelines Frequently Asked Questions (as of December 2008) · Why

Kirschner, Denise

245

Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SSN Cell Phone Home Phone Work Phone Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Date accident treatment provided? Yes No Where Was time lost from work? Yes No If yes, how long? Could this accident have the following information as soon as it relates to your work related accident/injury/illness within 72 hours

Swaddle, John

246

Safe handling of TBP and nitrates in the nuclear process industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory and literature study was made of the reactions of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid and nitrates. Its goal was to establish safe conditions for solvent extraction processes involving these chemicals. The damaging explosions at the Tomsk-7 PUREX plant in Russia graphically illustrated the potential hazard involved in such operations. The study has involved a review of prior and contemporary experiments, and new experiments to answer particular questions about these reactions. TBP extracts nitric acid and some metal nitrates from aqueous solutions. The resulting liquid contains both oxidant and reductant, and can react exothermically if heated sufficiently. Safe handling of these potentially reactive materials involves not only limiting the heat generated by the chemical reaction, but also providing adequate heat removal and venting. Specifically, the following recommendations are made to ensure safety: (1) tanks in which TBP-nitrate complexes are or may be present should be adequately vented to avoid pressurization. Data are supplied as a basis for adequacy; (2) chemically degraded TBP, or TBP that has sat a long time in the presence of acids or radiation, should be purified before use in solvent extraction; (3) evaporators in which TBP might be introduced should be operated at a controlled temperature, and their TBP content should be limited; (4) evaporator bottoms that may contain TBP should be cooled under conditions that ensure heat removal. Finally, process design should consider the potential for such reactions, and operators should be made aware of this potential, so that it is considered during training and process operation.

Hyder, M.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Instrument Development and Measurements of the Atmospheric Pollutants Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrate Radical, and Nitrous Acid by Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy and Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. , A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxidedetermination of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide in theDOAS) have measured nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrate

Medina, David Salvador

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexa?uoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexa?uoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Location deterministic biosensing from quantum-dot-nanowire assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with high fluorescent brightness, stability, and tunable sizes, have received considerable interest for imaging, sensing, and delivery of biomolecules. In this research, we demonstrate location deterministic biochemical detection from arrays of QD-nanowire hybrid assemblies. QDs with diameters less than 10?nm are manipulated and precisely positioned on the tips of the assembled Gold (Au) nanowires. The manipulation mechanisms are quantitatively understood as the synergetic effects of dielectrophoretic (DEP) and alternating current electroosmosis (ACEO) due to AC electric fields. The QD-nanowire hybrid sensors operate uniquely by concentrating bioanalytes to QDs on the tips of nanowires before detection, offering much enhanced efficiency and sensitivity, in addition to the position-predictable rationality. This research could result in advances in QD-based biomedical detection and inspires an innovative approach for fabricating various QD-based nanodevices.

Liu, Chao [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Kim, Kwanoh [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Fan, D. L., E-mail: dfan@austin.utexas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

250

Factors affecting total alkaloid and nitrate levels in pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

('gM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ethan C. Holt Dr. F. M. Roulette, Jr. P l 'lit (P ' t ' (L. )L k)g 'gt d drought stress in the summer of 1978 in East Texas became unpalat- able to grazing cattle. The unpalatable forage contained... as much as 460 ppm total alkaloid and. potentially toxic levels of nitrate (NO ). Several factors which may play a role in the accumula. tion of alkaloids and NO in pearl millet were investigated in these studies. The effect of drought stress, nitrogen...

Krejsa, Beverly Blohowiak

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

Covert, Timothy T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Concentrated Thermoelectric Power | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Concentrated Thermoelectric Power This fact sheet describes a concentrated solar hydroelectric power project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D...

253

Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Design of inflatable solar concentrator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar concentrators improve the performance of solar collection systems by increasing the amount of usable energy available for a given collector size. Unfortunately, they are not known for their light weight and portability, ...

Carrasquillo, Omar (Omar Y. Carrasquillo De Armas)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Optimal concentrations in nectar feeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nectar drinkers must feed quickly and efficiently due to the threat of predation. While the sweetest nectar offers the greatest energetic rewards, the sharp increase of viscosity with sugar concentration makes it the most ...

Kim, Wonjung

256

Concentrated solar power on demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten salt pool, which also functions ...

Codd, Daniel Shawn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Methods and devices for high-throughput dielectrophoretic concentration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein are methods and devices for assaying and concentrating analytes in a fluid sample using dielectrophoresis. As disclosed, the methods and devices utilize substrates having a plurality of pores through which analytes can be selectively prevented from passing, or inhibited, on application of an appropriate electric field waveform. The pores of the substrate produce nonuniform electric field having local extrema located near the pores. These nonuniform fields drive dielectrophoresis, which produces the inhibition. Arrangements of electrodes and porous substrates support continuous, bulk, multi-dimensional, and staged selective concentration.

Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Cummings, Eric B. (Livermore, CA); Fiechtner, Gregory J. (Germantown, MD); Fintschenko, Yolanda (Livermore, CA); McGraw, Gregory J. (Ann Arbor, MI); Salmi, Allen (Escalon, CA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Solar concentration/destruction of pesticide rinsewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion to safe, value-added agricultural products is the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Salladay, D.G.; Ash, D.H.; Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.; Hemmen, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

VCSEL fault location apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for locating a fault within an optical fiber is disclosed. The apparatus, which can be formed as a part of a fiber-optic transmitter or as a stand-alone instrument, utilizes a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to generate a test pulse of light which is coupled into an optical fiber under test. The VCSEL is subsequently reconfigured by changing a bias voltage thereto and is used as a resonant-cavity photodetector (RCPD) to detect a portion of the test light pulse which is reflected or scattered from any fault within the optical fiber. A time interval .DELTA.t between an instant in time when the test light pulse is generated and the time the reflected or scattered portion is detected can then be used to determine the location of the fault within the optical fiber.

Keeler, Gordon A. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Commodity/Vendor Purchasing Matrix Vendor Location  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commodity/Vendor Purchasing Matrix Commodity Vendor N am e and A ddress Vendor N am e in eVA Vendor sheets of paper and bring to business office for payment. Vendor Purchasing Matrix 090413 Page 1 of 4 #12;Commodity Vendor N am e and A ddress Vendor N am e in eVA Vendor Location in eVA PO C ategory eVA PO needed

Swaddle, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Self-Ignition Temperatures of Bitumen Mixtures Containing Transition Metal Nitrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is provided on the self-ignition temperature (SIT) of blown bitumen asphalt mixed with sodium nitrate and some chemicals that are added in the bituminization process to adjust pH and to immobilize the radioactive isotopes of Cs, Sr, and I. In each ignition temperature test, the prepared bitumen sample was heated at a constant rate of temperature increase, and the ignition point was measured. Among the tested chemicals added to the bitumen, Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} shows a relatively large SIT decrease, and furthermore, the mixture of Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and AgNO{sub 3} has been shown to greatly lower the SIT of blown bitumen. It is suggested that, in general, segregation of these nitrates should be avoided in bituminization, and care should be taken in handling Ag in a Purex reprocessing plant from the viewpoint of waste treatment. Furthermore, the oxidation effects of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} were tested by measuring torque of the bitumen sample. It was confirmed that the addition of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} to bitumen rapidly oxidizes the bitumen and increases the viscosity of the bitumen mixture.

Okada, Ken; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced...

264

RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY UC Davis-Caltrans Air control measure. #12;RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY.......................................................... 3 2.2 The Role of Residential Location Choice

Levinson, David M.

265

The effect of sources of nitrogen on nitrate formation and nitrogen uptake by cotton plants growing on Miller clay loam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the temperature may affect the occurrence of nitrites. Same cultures incubated. at 24oC contained. much ni+rites snd little nitrates, while portions of the same cultures incubated at 3$oC contained nitrates but no nitrites. Cultures from sub-soil are more... criticism during the elaboration of the present work. Appreciation is extended. to Dx. H. E. Hampton, Chaixman of' the Hecognition is due tc Dx. V. M. Artecona and Nr. A. P. Cobra for committee, and. to Dr. A. G. Caldwell for help snd encouragement...

Marcos, Zilmar Ziller

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location More Documents & Publications PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Slide 1 Slide 1...

267

Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

From towers to dishes to linear mirrors to troughs, concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies reflect and collect solar heat to generate electricity. A single CSP plant can generate enough power for about 90,000 homes. This video explains what CSP is, how it works, and how systems like parabolic troughs produce renewable power. For more information on the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's CSP research, see the Solar Energy Technology Program's Concentrating Solar Power Web page at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/csp_program.html.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From towers to dishes to linear mirrors to troughs, concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies reflect and collect solar heat to generate electricity. A single CSP plant can generate enough power for about 90,000 homes. This video explains what CSP is, how it works, and how systems like parabolic troughs produce renewable power. For more information on the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's CSP research, see the Solar Energy Technology Program's Concentrating Solar Power Web page at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/csp_program.html.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick Spinney, and Heather C. Allen*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick, Columbus, Ohio 43210 ReceiVed: July 24, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: December 4, 2008 The water surface structure of aqueous magnesium, calcium, and strontium nitrate solutions with six to seven water

270

Location of laccase in ordered mesoporous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The functionalization with amine groups was developed on the SBA-15, and its effect in the laccase immobilization was compared with that of a Periodic Mesoporous Aminosilica. A method to encapsulate the laccase in situ has now been developed. In this work, spherical aberration (C{sub s}) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with high angle annular dark field detector and electron energy loss spectroscopy were applied to identify the exact location of the enzyme in the matrix formed by the ordered mesoporous solids.

Mayoral, Álvaro [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas, Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, Edificio I - D, Mariano Esquillor, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Gascón, Victoria; Blanco, Rosa M.; Márquez-Álvarez, Carlos; Díaz, Isabel, E-mail: idiaz@icp.csic.es [Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, c/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Property:UtilityLocation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead Jump to:TechnologyUtilityLocation Jump to:

272

ACCELERATED IMPROVEMENT A CONCENTRATED APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCELERATED IMPROVEMENT A CONCENTRATED APPROACH FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT #12;Accelerated.quality.wisc.edu O F F I C E O F Q U A L I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T Accelerated Improvement This guide to improving resources. You will find helpful information needed to conduct an Accelerated Improvement project

Shapiro, Vadim

273

Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept. to Geophysics 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 CHE 1101 Introductory Chemistry - I 3 CHE 1110 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory - I 1 GLY 1101 Intro. to Physical Geology 4 GLY 2250 Evolution of the Earth 4 GLY 4705 Adv

Thaxton, Christopher S.

274

Location-Tracking Applications ecent technological advances in wireless loca-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas they have visited. #12;Location-Tracking Applications broker as part of their service contract

Gruteser, Marco

275

Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Jannett Highfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Jannett Highfill Department of Economics) 677-3374. #12;2 Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Abstract: The present paper considers a municipality that has a landfill (fixed in location) and plans to optimally locate a "recycling

Mou, Libin

276

Draft Genome Sequence for Microbacterium laevaniformans Strain OR221, a Bacterium Tolerant to Metals, Nitrate, and Low pH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbacterium laevaniformans strain OR221 was isolated from subsurface sediments obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. It was characterized as a bacterium tolerant to heavy metals such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, as well as nitrate and low pH. We present its draft genome sequence.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Panikov, Nikolai [ORNL; Ariyawansa, Thilini [Northeastern University; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Epstein, Slava [Northeastern University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY IN LAMINARIA DIGITATA IS ABSENT IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY and lowest in summer. This is the first report of NR activity in any alga that is not strongly regulated the regulation of NR by light that has been observed in other algae and higher plants. Key index words: ammonium

Berges, John A.

278

THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

BOOMER KD

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX-ethanol mixtures in aquifer columns amended with sulfate, chelated ferric iron or nitrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX-ethanol mixtures in aquifer columns amended with sulfate-mail: alvarez@rice.edu) Key words: anaerobic biostimulation, bioremediation, BTEX, ethanol, natural attenuation­Fe(III) or nitrate to enhance the biodegradation of BTEX and ethanol mixtures. The rapid biodegradation of ethanol

Alvarez, Pedro J.

280

Steady state protein levels in Geobacter metallireducens grown with Iron (III) citrate or nitrate as terminal electron acceptor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geobacter species predominate in aquatic sediments and submerged soils where organic carbon sources are oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III). The natural occurrence of Geobacter in some waste sites suggests this microorganism could be useful for bioremediation if growth and metabolic activity can be regulated. 2-DE was used to monitor the steady state protein levels of Geobacter metallireducens grown with either Fe(III) citrate or nitrate to elucidate metabolic differences in response to different terminal electron acceptors present in natural environments populated by Geobacter. Forty-six protein spots varied significantly in abundance (p<0.05) between the two growth conditions; proteins were identified by tryptic peptide mass and peptide sequence determined by MS/MS. Enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were more abundant in cells grown with Fe(III) citrate, while proteins associated with nitrate metabolism and sensing cellular redox status along with several proteins of unknown function were more abundant in cells grown with nitrate. These results indicate a higher level of flux through the TCA cycle in the presence of Fe(III) compared to nitrate. The oxidative stress response observed in previous studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) citrate was not seen in G. metallireducens.

Ahrendt, A. J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Zhu, W.; Yates, J. R., III; Nevin, K. P.; Lovley, D.; Giometti, C. S.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Massachusetts

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Size effect of hematite and corundum inclusions on the efflorescence relative humidities of aqueous ammonium nitrate particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Structure: Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801); 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution ammonium nitrate particles Jeong-Ho Han Department of Environmental Chemistry, Atmospheric Science Division by the saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to the solid. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition

282

Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

Hyder, M.L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of concentrator solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A limited pilot production run on PESC silicon solar cells for use at high concentrations (200 to 400 suns) is summarized. The front contact design of the cells was modified for operation without prismatic covers. The original objective of the contract was to systematically complete a process consolidation phase, in which all the, process improvements developed during the contract would be combined in a pilot production run. This pilot run was going to provide, a basis for estimating cell costs when produced at high throughput. Because of DOE funding limitations, the Photovoltaic Concentrator Initiative is on hold, and Applied Solar`s contract was operated at a low level of effort for most of 1993. The results obtained from the reduced scope pilot run showed the effects of discontinuous process optimization and characterization. However, the run provided valuable insight into the technical areas that can be optimized to achieve the original goals of the contract.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

ARM - Measurement - Particle number concentration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumber concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse

286

Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Hutchison, G. (Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Nowlan, M.J. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous silver nitrate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-Partial list Chemical Incompatibilities Summary: , bromine, copper, fluorine, silver, mercury Acetone Concentrated nitric and sulfuric acid mixtures Alkali... (anhydrous) Ammonium...

288

Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer, including defining within a tree network of the parallel computer two or more sets of non-overlapping test levels of compute nodes of the network that together include all the data communications links of the network, each non-overlapping test level comprising two or more adjacent tiers of the tree; defining test cells within each non-overlapping test level, each test cell comprising a subtree of the tree including a subtree root compute node and all descendant compute nodes of the subtree root compute node within a non-overlapping test level; performing, separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, an uplink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels; and performing, separately from the uplink tests and separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, a downlink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels.

Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

Atmospheric Mercury Concentrations Near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir - Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental and reactive gaseous mercury (EGM/RGM) were measured in ambient air concentrations over a two-week period in July/August 2005 near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir, a popular fishery located 50 km southwest of Twin Falls, Idaho. A fish consumption advisory for mercury was posted at the reservoir in 2002 by the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. The air measurements were part of a multi-media (water, sediment, precipitation, air) study initiated by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 to identify potential sources of mercury contamination to the reservoir. The sampling site is located about 150 km northeast of large gold mining operations in Nevada, which are known to emit large amounts of mercury to the atmosphere (est. 2,200 kg/y from EPA 2003 Toxic Release Inventory). The work was co-funded by the Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Assistance Program and has a secondary objective to better understand mercury inputs to the environment near the INL, which lies approximately 230 km to the northeast. Sampling results showed that both EGM and RGM concentrations were significantly elevated (~ 30 – 70%, P<0.05) compared to known regional background concentrations. Elevated short-term RGM concentrations (the primary form that deposits) were likely due to atmospheric oxidation of high EGM concentrations, which suggests that EGM loading from upwind sources could increase Hg deposition in the area. Back-trajectory analyses indicated that elevated EGM and RGM occurred when air parcels came out of north-central and northeastern Nevada. One EGM peak occurred when the air parcels came out of northwestern Utah. Background concentrations occurred when the air was from upwind locations in Idaho (both northwest and northeast). Based on 2003 EPA Toxic Release Inventory data, it is likely that most of the observed peaks were from Nevada gold mine sources. Emissions from known large natural mercury sources in that area cannot account for the observed EGM peaks due to their diffuse source geometry and the large (170 km) transport distance involved. The EGM peak originating from northwestern Utah air may be from three known mercury sources west of Salt Lake City (Kennecott, US Magnesium, Clean Harbors Aragonite) and/or the 1600 MW coal-fired Intermountain Power plant near Delta. However, the relative importance of these short-term peaks for long-term watershed mercury loading (critical factor affecting fish concentrations) is not known, and there is a need to better quantify the annual frequency and magnitude of these different inputs over a longer period of time.

M. L. Abbott

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

Goldberg, Bennett

292

A microfabricated dielectrophoretic micro-organism concentrator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project focuses on the development of a micro-organism concentrator. Pathogen detection, particularly MEMS based detection, is often limited by sample concentration. The proposed concentrator will interface with a ...

Muller, Rikky, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for installation. Because of some testing problems with the Zenergy fault current limiter, installation was delayed until early 2009 with it being put into operation on March 6, 2009. A malfunction of the FCL controller caused the DC power supply to the superconducting magnet to be turned off. This inserted the FCL impedance into the circuit while it was in normal operation causing a voltage resonance condition. While these voltages never reached a point where damage would occur on customer equipment, steps were taken to insure this would not happen again. The FCL was reenergized with load on December 18, 2009. A fault was experienced on the circuit with the FCL in operation on January 14, 2010. The FCL operated properly and reduced the fault current by about 8%, what was expected from tests and modeling. As of the end of the project, the FCL was still in operation on the circuit. The third phase of the project involved the exploration of several advanced protection ideas that might be at a state where they could be applied to the Circuit of the Future and elsewhere in the SCE electrical system. Based on the work done as part of the literature review and survey, as well as a number of internal meetings with engineering staff at SCE, a number of ideas were compiled. These ideas were then evaluated for applicability and ability to be applied on the Circuit of the Future in the time remaining for the project. Some of these basic ideas were implemented on the circuit including measurement of power quality before and after the FCL. It was also decided that we would take what was learned as part of the Circuit of the Future work and extend it to the next generation circuit protection for SCE. Also at this time, SCE put in a proposal to the DOE for the Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration using ARRA funding. SCE was successful in obtaining funding for this proposal, so it was felt that exploration of new protection schemes for this Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration would be a good use of the project resources. With this in mind, a protection system that uses fault interrupting switches, hi

Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

MobiEyes: A Distributed Location Monitoring Service Using Moving Location Queries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, distributed algorithms, mobile data management. Ç 1 INTRODUCTION WITH the growing availability of mobile-sensitive resource management. The former uses location data to tailor the information delivered to the mobile users traffic and weather. Examples include systems for fleet manage- ment, mobile workforce management

Liu, Ling

295

Infrasound source location An automated method to estimate the location of infrasound sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waterstaat Delft University of Technology (DUT) Department of Earth Observation and Space Systems Acoustic Meteorologisch Instituut (KNMI) and three additional arrays located in Germany and France. The estimated source for a spherical earth. Extensive filtering is applied to clean the data from as much noise and signals from local

Evers, Läslo G.

296

Concentration Averaging | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI:Fresno U.S.Energy Order issuedConcentration

297

SAPLE: Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine (SAPLE) web application, a directory search application for use by Sandia National Laboratories personnel. SAPLE's purpose is to return Sandia personnel 'results' as a function of user search queries, with its mission to make it easier and faster to find people at Sandia. To accomplish this, SAPLE breaks from more traditional directory application approaches by aiming to return the correct set of results while placing minimal constraints on the user's query. Two key features form the core of SAPLE: advanced search query interpretation and inexact string matching. SAPLE's query interpretation permits the user to perform compound queries when typing into a single search field; where able, SAPLE infers the type of field that the user intends to search on based on the value of the search term. SAPLE's inexact string matching feature yields a high-quality ranking of personnel search results even when there are no exact matches to the user's query. This paper explores these two key features, describing in detail the architecture and operation of SAPLE. Finally, an extensive analysis on logged search query data taken from an 11-week sample period is presented.

Procopio, Michael J.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

299

On the Anonymity of Home/Work Location Pairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Anonymity of Home/Work Location Pairs Philippe Golle and Kurt Partridge Palo Alto Research population is 1, 21 and 34,980, for locations known at the granularity of a census block, census track

Golle, Philippe

300

A Privacy Conscious Bluetooth Infrastructure for Location Aware Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a low cost and easily deployed infrastructure for location aware computing that is built using standard Bluetooth® technologies and personal computers. Mobile devices are able to determine their location to ...

Huang, Albert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Etherthreads : an infrastructure for location-based messages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes an infrastructure for location-based services for Bluetooth enabled cellular phones. Specifically, it explores the use of this architecture in a location-based messaging application. A user can send ...

Lassey, Bradford, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Provable and practical location privacy for vehicular and mobile systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, there has been a rapid evolution of location-based vehicular and mobile services (e.g., electronic tolling, congestion pricing, traffic statistics, insurance pricing, location-based social applications), ...

Popa, Raluca Ada

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Locating a semi-obnoxious facility with repelling polygonal regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 30, 2007 ... Page 1 ... For the last years, the location of semi-desirable facilities has been a widely studied topic by the researchers in location theory (see [1 ...

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Concentrating Solar Power: Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) has the potential to contribute significantly to the generation of electricity by renewable energy resources in the U.S.. Thermal storage can extend the duty cycle of CSP beyond daytime hours to early evening where the value of electricity is often the highest. The potential solar resource for the southwest U.S. is identified, along with the need to add power lines to bring the power to consumers. CSP plants in the U.S. and abroad are described. The CSP cost of electricity at the busbar is discussed. With current incentives, CSP is approaching competiveness with conventional gas-fired systems during peak-demand hours when the price of electricity is the highest. It is projected that a mature CSP industry of over 4 GWe will be able to reduce the energy cost by about 50%, and that U.S. capacity could be 120 GW by 2050.

Mehos, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymeric encapsulation materials are typically used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) modules to protect the cell from the field environment. Because it is physically located adjacent to the cell, the encapsulation is exposed to a high optical flux, often including light in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) wavelengths. The durability of encapsulants used in CPV modules is critical to the technology, but is presently not well understood. This work seeks to identify the appropriate material types, field-induced failure mechanisms, and factors of influence (if possible) of polymeric encapsulation. These results will ultimately be weighed against those of future qualification and accelerated life test procedures.

Miller, D. C.; Kempe, M. D.; Araki, K.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Risks of using AP locations discovered through war driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risks of using AP locations discovered through war driving Minkyong Kim, Jeffrey J. Fielding the actual locations are often unavailable, they use estimated locations from war driving estimated through war driving. War driving is the process of collecting Wi-Fi beacons by driving or walking

Kotz, David

307

Accurate Eye Center Location through Invariant Isocentric Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Accurate Eye Center Location through Invariant Isocentric Patterns Roberto Valenti, Student Member, IEEE, and Theo Gevers, Member, IEEE, Abstract--Locating the center of the eyes allows for valuable information to be captured and used in a wide range of applications. Accurate eye center location

Gevers, Theo

308

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Linking specific heterotrophic bacterial populations to bioreduction of uranium and nitrate using stable isotope probing in contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [{sup 13}C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions.

Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Watson, David B [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Combined uranous nitrate production consisting of undivided electrolytic cell and divided electrolytic cell (Electrolysis ? Electrolytic cell)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate is a green, mild way to make uranous ions. Undivided electrolyzers whose maintenance is less but their conversion ratio and current efficiency are low, have been chosen. However, at the beginning of undivided electrolysis, high current efficiency can also be maintained. Divided electrolyzers' conversion ratio and current efficiency is much higher because the re-oxidation of uranous on anode is avoided, but their maintenance costs are more, because in radioactive environment the membrane has to be changed after several operations. In this paper, a combined method of uranous production is proposed which consists of 2 stages: undivided electrolysis (early stage) and divided electrolysis (late stage) to benefit from the advantages of both electrolysis modes. The performance of the combined method was tested. The results show that in combined mode, after 200 min long electrolysis (80 min undivided electrolysis and 120 min divided electrolysis), U(IV) yield can achieve 92.3% (500 ml feed, U 199 g/l, 72 cm{sup 2} cathode, 120 mA/cm{sup 2}). Compared with divided mode, about 1/3 working time in divided electrolyzer is reduced to achieve the same U(IV) yield. If 120 min long undivided electrolysis was taken, more than 1/2 working time can be reduced in divided electrolyzer, which means that about half of the maintenance cost can also be reduced. (authors)

Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Hui; Xian, Liang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275-26, Beijing 102413 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Production of fullerenes using concentrated solar flux  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing soot containing high amounts of fullerenes comprising: providing a primary concentrator capable of impingement of a concentrated beam of sunlight onto a carbon source to cause vaporization of carbon and subsequent formation of fullerenes, or providing a solar furnace having a primary concentrator with a focal point that concentrates a solar beam of sunlight; providing a reflective secondary concentrator having an entrance aperture and an exit aperture at the focal point of the solar furnace; providing a carbon source at the exit aperture of the secondary concentrator; supplying an inert gas over the carbon source to keep the secondary concentrator free from vaporized carbon; and impinging a concentrated beam of sunlight from the secondary concentrator on the carbon source to vaporize the carbon source into a soot containing high amounts of fullerenes.

Fields, Clark L. (Greeley, CO); Pitts, John Roland (Lakewood, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Hale, Mary Jane (Golden, CO); Bingham, Carl E. (Denver, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Aerobic Oxidation of Bromide to Dibromine Catalyzed by Homogeneous Oxidation Catalysts and Initiated by Nitrate in Acetic Acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small amount of nitrate, ~0.002 molal, initiates the Co/Mn catalyzed aerobic oxidation of bromide compounds (HBr,NaBr,LiBr) to dibromine in acetic acid at room temperature. At temperatures 40oC or less , the reaction is autocatalytic. Co(II) and Mn(II) themselves and mixed with ionic bromide are known homogeneous oxidation catalysts. The reaction was discovered serendipitously when a Co/Br and Co/Mn/Br catalyst solution was prepared for the aerobic oxidation of methyaromatic compounds and the Co acetate contained a small amount of impurity i.e. nitrate. The reaction was characterized by IR, UV-VIS, MALDI and EXAFS spectroscopies and the coordination chemistry is described. The reaction is inhibited by water and its rate changed by pH. The change in these variables, as well as others, are identical to those observed during homogeneous, aerobic oxidation of akylaromatics. A mechanism is proposed. Accidental addition of a small amount of nitrate compound into a Co/Mn/Br/acetic acid mixture in a large, commercial feedtank is potentially dangerous.

Partenheimer, Walt; Fulton, John L.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Pham, Van Thai; Chen, Yongsheng

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method and apparatus for aligning a solar concentrator using two lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for aligning the facets of a solar concentrator. A first laser directs a first laser beam onto a selected facet of the concentrator such that a target board positioned adjacent to the first laser at approximately one focal length behind the focal point of the concentrator is illuminated by the beam after reflection thereof off of the selected facet. A second laser, located adjacent to the vertex of the optical axis of the concentrator, is used to direct a second laser beam onto the target board at a target point thereon. By adjusting the selected facet to cause the first beam to illuminate the target point on the target board produced by the second beam, the selected facet can be brought into alignment with the target point. These steps are repeated for other selected facets of the concentrator, as necessary, to provide overall alignment of the concentrator.

Diver Jr., Richard Boyer

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

315

Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet the nation's goal of making solar energy cost competitive with other energy sources by the end of the decade. The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy technologies cost-competitive with other forms of energy by reducing the cost of solar energy systems by about 75% by the end of the decade. Reducing the total installed cost for utility-scale solar electricity to roughly 6 cents per kilowatt hour without subsidies will result in rapid, large-scale adoption of solar electricity across the United States. Reaching this goal will re-establish American technological leadership, improve the nation's energy security, and strengthen U.S. economic competitiveness in the global clean energy race. SunShot will work to bring down the full cost of solar - including the costs of solar cells and installation by focusing on four main pillars: (1) Technologies for solar cells and arrays that convert sunlight to energy; (2) Electronics that optimize the performance of the installation; (3) Improvements in the efficiency of solar manufacturing processes; and (4) Installation, design, and permitting for solar energy systems.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor. 5 figs.

Chiang, C.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

Chiang, Clement J. (New Brunswick, NJ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

Yueting Chen

2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

Modelling the settling of suspended sediments for concentrations close to the gelling concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling the settling of suspended sediments for concentrations close to the gelling concentration the sedimentation phase. In the case of cohesive sediments, the estimation of the gelling concentration, although and consolidation behaviour for concentrations close to the gelling concentration. Key words: sedimentation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

320

Modeling of concentrating solar thermoelectric generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conversion of solar power into electricity is dominated by non-concentrating photovoltaics and concentrating solar thermal systems. Recently, it has been shown that solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are a viable ...

Ren, Zhifeng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assessment of the Revised 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to support the air emissions permit for the 3410 Building, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a series of tests in the exhaust air discharge from the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The objective was to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring meets the applicable regulatory criteria governing such effluent monitoring systems. In particular, the capability of the air sampling probe location to meet the acceptance criteria of ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 , Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities was determined. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks address 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity of tracer particle concentration. Testing was performed to conform to the quality requirements of NQA-1-2000. Fan configurations tested included all fan combinations of any two fans at a time. Most of the tests were conducted at the normal flow rate, while a small subset of tests was performed at a slightly higher flow rate achieved with the laboratory hood sashes fully open. The qualification criteria for an air monitoring probe location are taken from ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 and are paraphrased as follows with key results summarized: 1. Angular Flow—The average air velocity angle must not deviate from the axis of the stack or duct by more than 20°. Our test results show that the mean angular flow angles at the center two-thirds of the ducts are smaller than 4.5? for all testing conditions. 2. Uniform Air Velocity—The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ? 20% across the center two thirds of the area of the stack. Our results show that the COVs of the air velocity across the center two-thirds of the stack are smaller than 2.9% for all testing conditions. 3. Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases—The uniformity of the concentration of potential contaminants is first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The tracer is injected downstream of the fan outlets and at the junction downstream fan discharges meet. The acceptance criteria are that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. Our test results show that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is < 2.9% for all test conditions and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >6.5%. 4. Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles—Tracer particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter are used for the second demonstration of concentration uniformity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ? 20% across the center two thirds of the sampling plane. Our test results indicate that the COV of particle concentration is <9.9% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane among all testing conditions. Thus, the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack was determined to meet the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside the bounds described in this report (e.g., exhaust stack velocity changes, relocation of sampling probe, and addition of fans) may require re-testing or re-evaluation to determine compliance.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Glissmeyer, John A.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Concentration in Mathematics (2014-2015)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concentration in Mathematics (2014-2015) What Can You Do With Math? Concentration in mathematics is an excellent preparation for a career in either pure or applied mathematics, in academia or in industry on mathematical methods, a math concentration can provide an invaluable background for many different careers

Wolfe, Patrick J.

323

CHARACTERIZING THE INFLUENCE OF ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS AND TRANSPORT VARIABILITY ON SULFATE AEROSOL CONCENTRATIONS AT MAUNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONCENTRATIONS AT MAUNA LOA OBSERVATORY Sulfate aerosol in the atmosphere has substantial impacts on human health confirmed that anthropogenic pollutants from Asian sources can be transported long distances with important implications for future air quality and global climate change. Located in the remote Pacific Ocean (19.54°N

Pierce, Jeffrey

324

Automated detection and location of indications in eddy current signals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

Brudnoy, David M. (Albany, NY); Oppenlander, Jane E. (Burnt Hills, NY); Levy, Arthur J. (Schenectady, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

Mohd, Shukri [Nondestructive Testing Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys [Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen's Buildings, The Parade, CARDIFF CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Lower Bounding Procedures for the Single Allocation Hub Location ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[9] O'Kelly, M. E., A quadratic integer program for the location of interacting hub facilities, European Journal of Operational Research 32 (1987), pp. 393–404.

2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Value of Flexibility in Robust Location-Transportation Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 25, 2014 ... Abstract: Facility location decisions play a critical role in transportation planning. In fact, it has recently become essential to study how such ...

Amir Ardestani-Jaafari

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

p-facility Huff location problem on networks ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sidering the location of two competing facilities on a linear market. ... This perturbs how the market is shared, since the new facilities will ..... Transactions in.

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Open Location-Oriented Services for the Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

point of a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Technically,the Web Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) ArchitecturalLocation-Oriented Services for the Web architecture based on

Wilde, Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Colorado CRS 29-20-108, Location, Construction, or Improvement...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location, Construction, or Improvement of Major Electrical or Natural Gas Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

332

acoustic location system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 203 Distribution Locational Marginal Pricing for Optimal Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary:...

333

anatomic subsite location: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

services (e.g., electronic tolling, congestion pricing, traffic statistics, insurance pricing, location-based social applications), ... Popa, Raluca Ada 2010-01-01 First Page...

334

agency dtra location: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

flows or spillovers between multinational enterprises (MNEs the diversity of locational environments. The localization of knowledge sources depends on MNE group of...

335

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fueling Station Locator website. It provides information on more than 15,000 public and private alternative fueling stations throughout the United States. The app lists where...

336

Nanotechnology enterprise in the United States: structure and location.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the structure and location of the nanotechnology enterprise in the United States. Nanotechnology merits focus because of the high degree of innovative… (more)

Bhaskarabhatla, Ajay Sivaram

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the location of all projects created with funding from the Smart Grid Demonstration and Energy Storage Project, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act....

338

Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time:...

339

Determining Optimal Locations for New Wind Energy Development in Iowa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research is to generate the most accurate model possible for predicting locations most suitable for new wind energy development using a… (more)

Mann, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Title 33 CFR 115 Bridge Locations and Clearances: Administrative...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bridge Locations and Clearances: Administrative Procedures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An Aggressive Reduction Scheme for the Simple Plant Location ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We used routines from the Callable Library of IBM CPLEX version. 12.1 to solve ..... [23] M. Sun (2006) Solving the uncapacitated facility location problem using.

2011-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Located in historic Los Alamos, New Mexico against the backdrop...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Located in historic Los Alamos, New Mexico against the backdrop of the lush Jemez Mountains, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) offers its education program participants...

343

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, while associations with the sludge incineration factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAPs-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary factors and the majority of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased rMSSD in winter were difficult to determine due to lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. In Steubenville, we observed significant changes in HR (both increases and decreases), SDNN, and rMSSD in the summer, but not in the winter. We examined associations between individual source factors/PM components and HRV metrics segregated by predominant wind direction (NE or SW). Changes in HR (both increases and decreases) were linked with metal processing, waste incineration, and iron/steel factors along with most of their associated elemental constituents. Reductions in SDNN were associated with metal processing, waste incineration, and mobile source factors and the majority of elements loading onto these factors. There were no consistent associations between changes in rMSSD and source factors/components. Despite the large number of coal-fired power plants in the region, and therefore the large contribution of secondary sulfate to overall PM mass, we did not observe any associations with the coal/secondary factor or with the majority of its associated components. There were several inconsistencies in our results which make definitive conclusions difficult. For example, we observed opposing signs of effect estimates with some components depending on season, and with others depending on wind direction. In addition, our extensive dataset clearly would be subject to issues of multiple comparisons, and the 'true' significant results are unknown. Overall, however, our results suggest that acute changes in cardiac function were most strongly associated with local industrial sources. Results for coal-fired power plant-derived PM were

Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Scale formation at various locations in a geothermal operation due to injection of imported waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of waters that are not native to a geothermal formation generates various physical and chemical problems. The major chemical problem resulting from such injections is the formation of sulfate scales (particularly CaSO4, BaSO4 and SrSO4) at various locations starting from the injection well through the production well to the surface facilities of any geothermal operation. One of the ways to prevent this type of scale formation is by reducing the sulfate concentration of the injection waters. The effect of sulfate deionization on scale formation at various locations of the geothermal operations is studied. Some experimental results on the CaSO4 scale formation in porous media upon heating an injection water with and without addition of scale inhibitors are also given.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Apparatus for the field determination of concentration of radioactive constituents in a medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The instant invention is an apparatus for determining the concentration of radioactive constituents in a test sample; such as surface soils, via rapid real-time analyses, and direct readout on location utilizing a probe made up of multiple layers of detection material used in combination with an analyzer and real-time readout unit. This is accomplished by comparing the signal received from the probe, which can discriminate between types of radiation and energies with stored patterns that are based upon experimental results. This comparison can be used in the calibration of a readout display that reads out in real-time the concentrations of constituents per given volume. For example, the concentration of constituents such as Cs-137, Sr-90, U-238 in the soil, and noble gas radionuclides such as Kr-85 in the atmosphere, can be measured in real-time, on location, without the need for laboratory analysis of samples. 14 figs.

Perkins, R.W.; Schilk, A.J.; Warner, R.A.; Wogman, N.A.

1995-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems use a polymeric encapsulant to couple and optical component and/or coverglass to the cell. In that location, the encapsulation improves the transmission of concentrated optical flux through interface(s), while protecting the cell from the environment. The durability of encapsulation materials, however, is not well established relative to the desired service life of 30 years. Therefore, we have initiated a screen test to identify the field-induced failure modes for a variety of popular PV encapsulation materials. An existing CPV module (with no PV cells present) was modified to accommodate encapsulation specimens. The module (where nominal concentration of solar flux is 500x for the domed-Fresnel design) has been mounted on a tracker in Golden, CO (elevation 1.79 km). Initial results are reported here for 18 months cumulative exposure, including the hottest and coldest months of the past year. Characteristics observed at intervals during that time include: visual appearance, direct and hemispherical transmittance, and mass. Degradation may be assessed from subsequent analysis (including yellowness index and cut-on frequency) relative to the ambient conditions present during field exposure. The fluorescence signature observed of all the silicone specimens is examined here, including possible factors of causation -- the platinum catalyst used in the addition cured materials as well as the primer used to promote adhesion to the quartz substrate and superstrate.

Miller, D. C.; Muller, M.; Kempe, M. D.; Araki, K.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Multiple Aphid Resistance from Alien Sources and its Chromosomal Location  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple Aphid Resistance from Alien Sources and its Chromosomal Location in Bread Wheat Leonardo A Alien Sources and Its Chromosomal Location in Bread Wheat Abstract Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is a very of this thesis were to: 1) identify novel sources of resistance to multiple aphid species in a wheat-alien

348

WORKING PAPER N 2009 -11 Regulatory policy and the location  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pamina Koenig Megan MacGarvie JEL Codes: F23, I18 Keywords: Pharmaceutical industry, location choices: pharmaceutical industry, location choices, price regulations, discrete choice model This paper was prepared plants. The pharmaceutical industry is one example of this type of industry. The pharmaceutical industry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

Predicting Debris-Slide Locations in Northwestern California1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Debris-Slide Locations in Northwestern California1 Mark E. Reid,2 Stephen D. Ellen,3 tested four topographic models for predicting locations of debris-slide sources: 1) slope; 2) proximity to stream; 3) SHALSTAB with "standard" parameters; and 4) debris-slide-prone landforms, which delineates

Standiford, Richard B.

350

Quest for Personal Control over Mobile Location Privacy Pradeep Khosla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

live and work, offering the promise of bringing us close to the holy grail of information technology to be utilized. Many efforts have been made to get it available, as one of the key services in the ubiquitous the architecture, there is a centralized location server, where a mobile user can register and submit her location

Wu, Dapeng Oliver

351

Comparison of Different Methods for Next Location Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Different Methods for Next Location Prediction Jan Petzold, Faruk Bagci, Wolfgang prediction anticipates a person's movement based on the history of previous sojourns. It is useful location prediction methods: dynamic Bayesian network, multi-layer perceptron, Elman net, Markov predictor

Ungerer, Theo

352

Derivation of Locational Marginal Prices for Restructured Wholesale Power Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Derivation of Locational Marginal Prices for Restructured Wholesale Power Markets Haifeng Liu restructured wholesale power markets, the detailed derivation of LMPs as actually used in industry practice Operator (MISO). Keywords: Locational marginal pricing, wholesale power market, AC optimal power flow, DC

Tesfatsion, Leigh

353

Blind Channel Identification for the Emitter Location Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a thesis entitled "Blind Channel Identification for the Emitter Location Problem: A Least Square ApproachBlind Channel Identification for the Emitter Location Problem: A Least Square Approach BY Cheung C. Chau B.S.E.E., Binghamton University, 2000 Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

Fowler, Mark

354

Dietary nitrate increases arginine availability and protects mitochondrial complex I and energetics in the hypoxic rat heart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, before thorough vortexing and centrifugation at 13,000 x g for 15 min. The aqueous and organic fractions were removed and aliquoted into separate 2 mL tubes and kept on ice. A further 600 µL 2:1 methanol:chloroform was added to protein pellet... : ajm267@cam.ac.uk Keywords: Hypoxia; Mitochondria; Energy Metabolism Word count: 6589 (exc. references, figure legends, table) TOC category: Cardiovascular Ashmore et al: Dietary nitrate and the hypoxic heart 2 Key points summary...

Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Branco-Price, Cristina; West, James A.; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Heather, Lisa C.; Griffin, Julian L.; Johnson, Randall S.; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Power Technical Management Position On July 12, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, Job Listing, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News,...

356

Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety and Health Go Green Initiative On December 19, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Events, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News...

357

Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sandia and EMCORE: Solar Photovoltaics, Fiber Optics, MODE, and Energy Efficiency On March 29, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Renewable...

358

Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center in Vermont Achieves Milestone Installation On September 23, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

359

Concentrating Solar Power Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies supplemented by specific information to apply CSP within the Federal sector.

360

A combined microfluidic/dielectrophoretic microorganism concentrator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the development of a high-throughput microfluidic microorganism concentrator for pathogen detection applications. Interdigitated electrodes lining the bottom of the channel use positive dielectrophoretic ...

Gadish, Nitzan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Change in Contaminant Concentration in Fraser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during this period: dioxins, furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorophenolics, resin to the peak in suspended sediment concentration during the freshet sampling period, iv) dioxins

362

Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power: Efficiently...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility,...

363

Concentrating Solar Power (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Microtracking and Self-Adaptive Solar Concentration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

365

Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Concentrators California Institute of TechnologyJet Propulsion Laboratory Award Number:0595-1612 | April 18, 2013 | Ganapathi * Mirror module development has been approached with...

366

Concentrating Solar Power: Energy from Mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet explains how concentrating solar power technology works and the three types of systems in development today: trough, dish, and central receiver.

Poole, L.

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

Seasonal variations in nitrate reductase activity and internal N pools in intertidal brown algae are correlated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of primary production in many coastal regions and dominating near-shore nutrient cycling (Duggins, Simenstad of the macroalgal biomass in the Lough is fucoid algae (Fucus and Ascophyllum species) and kelps (Laminaria species, irradiance and nutrient concentration that impose con- straints on their physiology. Furthermore, variations

Berges, John A.

368

29The North Carolina Geographer The Effects of Local Weather Patterns on Nitrate and Sulfate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rainwater Concentrations in Wilmington, North Carolina Sarah Beth Jenkins Douglas W. Gamble Michael M weather conditions proximal to collection sites. A study that focuses on local weather conditions may lead temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and maximum and minimum temperatures) were collected

Gamble, Douglas W.

369

Mercury extraction by the TRUEX process solvent: I. Kinetics, extractable species, dependence on nitric acid concentration and stoichiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury extraction from acidic aqueous solutions by the TRUEX process solvent (0.2 M CMPO, 1.4 M TBP in n-dodecane) has not extensively been examined. Research at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant is currently in progress to evaluate the TRUEX process for actinide removal from several acidic waste streams, including liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW), which contains significant quantities of mercury. Preliminary experiments were performed involving the extraction of Hg{sup 203}, added as HgCl{sub 2}, from 0.01 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solutions. Mercury distribution coefficients (D{sub Hg}) range between 3 and 60 from 0.01 M to 2 M HNO{sub 3}. At higher nitric acid concentrations, i.e. 5 M HNO{sub 3} or greater, D{sub Hg} significantly decreases to values less than 1. These results indicate mercury is extracted from acidic solutions {<=}{approximately}2 M HNO{sub 3} and stripped with nitric acid solutions {>=}{approximately}5 M HNO{sub 3}. Experimental results indicate the extractable species is HgCl{sub 2} from nitrate media, i.e., chloride must be present in the nitrate feed to extract mercury. Extractions from Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solutions indicated substantially reduced distribution ratios, typically D{sub Hg}< 1, for the range of nitric acid concentrations examined (0.01 to 8 M HNO{sub 3}). Extraction of mercury, as HgCl{sub 2}, by the individual components of the TRUEX solvent was also examined from 2 M HNO{sub 3}. The diluent, n-dodecane, does not measurably extract mercury. With a 1.4 M TBP/n-dodecane solvent, D{sub Hg} {approximately}3.4 compared with D{sub Hg} {approximately}7 for the TRUEX solvent. Classical slope analysis techniques were utilized to evaluate the stoichiometric coefficients of Hg extraction independently for both CMPO and TBP.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Laboratory performance testing of an extruded bitumen containing a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based, low-level aqueous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory results of a comprehensive, regulatory performance test program, utilizing an extruded bitumen and a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based waste, have been compiled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using a 53 millimeter, Werner and Pfleiderer extruder, operated by personnel of WasteChem Corporation of Paramus, New Jersey, laboratory-scale, molded samples of type three, air blown bitumen were prepared for laboratory performance testing. A surrogate, low-level, mixed liquid waste, formulated to represent an actual on-site waste at ORNL, containing about 30 wt % sodium nitrate, in addition to eight heavy metals, cold cesium and strontium was utilized. Samples tested contained three levels of waste loading: that is, forty, fifty and sixty wt % salt. Performance test results include the ninety day ANS 16.1 leach test, with leach indices reported for all cations and anions, in addition to the EP Toxicity test, at all levels of waste loading. Additionally, test results presented also include the unconfined compressive strength and surface morphology utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Data presented include correlations between waste form loading and test results, in addition to their relationship to regulatory performance requirements.

Mattus, A.J.; Kaczmarsky, M.M.

1986-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES The management information systems concentration, like a major, focuses on the use of information technology for value creation creation. Link to Rensselaer 2012-2013 Catalog Required Courses MGMT 4240 Systems Analysis & Design MGMT

Salama, Khaled

373

Requirements for a Concentration in Energy Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies ­ 4 cr ENG EC 417 ­ Electric Energy Systems: Adapting to Renewable Resources ­ 4 cr Additional* - Methods of Environmental Policy ­ 4 cr ENG ME 533 ­ Energy Conversion ­ 4 cr ENG EC/ME/SE 543Requirements for a Concentration in Energy Technologies The concentration in Energy Technologies

374

EFFECTS OF VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF DDT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF DDT ON SEVERAL SPECIES OF FISH OF DIFFERENT SIZES Marine Biiii OF VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF DDT ON SEVERAL SPECIES OF FISH OF DIFFERENT SIZES Marine Binlo^'i., i i Report - Fisheries No. U EFFECTS OF VARIOUS 0ONCENTRATI)^S OF DDT ON SEVEKAL SPECIES OF FISH OF DIFFERENT

375

Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

Residential mobility and location choice: a nested logit model with sampling of alternatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waddell, P. : Modeling residential location in UrbanSim. In:D. (eds. ) Modelling Residential Location Choice. Springer,based model system and a residential location model. Urban

Lee, Brian H.; Waddell, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Short & long run transmission incentives for generation location  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is about one aspect of Britain's electricity trading system, its advantages and its weaknesses concerning the incentives it provides or fails to provide for the location of generation. (Similar considerations ...

Turvey, Ralph

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Versatile Heuristic Approach for Generalized Hub Location ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all costs. The hub location research has diverse sources but was standardized with the work of O'Kelly [15] and the following papers of Campbell [7, 8]. 1 ...

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

379

Location and Institution SOUTH AFRICA -PRETORIA FORDHAM UNIVERSITY -UBUNTU PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Location and Institution SOUTH AFRICA - PRETORIA FORDHAM UNIVERSITY - UBUNTU demographics, and South Africa. Students will also take a required module in Sociology holders need a student visa to enter and study in South Africa, which must

Galles, David

380

New approach to the fault location problem using synchronized sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a new approach to solving the problem of fault location on a transmission line using synchronized data from both ends of the line. The synchronized phase voltage and current samples taken during the fault transient are used...

Mrkic, Jasna

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Icarus 168 (2004) 249256 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Icarus 168 (2004) 249­256 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus TRACE observations of the 15 November 1999 of an unpublished star atlas (Kilburn et al., 2003), reported on the 31 October 1736 and 25 October 1743 transits

Schneider, Glenn

382

Energy 29 (2004) 14671478 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy 29 (2004) 1467­1478 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy Sensitivity of sequestration efficiency-5442/$ - see front matter # 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.energy.2004.03.080 #12

Gnanadesikan, Anand

383

Infill location determination and assessment of corresponding uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tried to solve this problem with statistical approaches. In this study, a reservoir simulation based approach was used to select infill well locations. I used multiple reservoir realizations to take different possible outcomes into consideration...

Senel, Ozgur

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Scalable Energy Efficient Location Aware Multicast Protocol for MANET (SEELAMP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multicast plays an important role in implementing the group communications in bandwidth scarce multihop mobile ad hoc networks. However, due to the dynamic topology of MANETs it is very difficult to build optimal multicast trees and maintaining group membership, making even more challenging to implement scalable and robust multicast in Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANET). A scalable and energy efficient location aware multicast algorithm, called SEELAMP, for mobile ad hoc networks is presented in the paper that is based on creation of shared tree using the physical location of the nodes for the multicast sessions. It constructs a shared bi-directional multicast tree for its routing operations rather than a mesh, which helps in achieving more efficient multicast delivery. The algorithm uses the concept of small overlapped zones around each node for proactive topology maintenance with in the zone. Protocol depends on the location information obtained using a distributed location service, which effectively reduces th...

Kamboj, Pariza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Application Process: Student Conservation Association (SCA) Forestry and biological Wildlife Refuge. This forestry position will be mostly field work within the Lower

Mazzotti, Frank

386

Rapid location of mount points JONATHAN M. SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­­ ­­ Rapid location of mount points JONATHAN M. SMITH Computer Science Department, Columbia ``core'' is ``/u2/smith/core''. The current directory is a directory­valued variable. It is an implied

387

Microsoft Word - postdoc-career-fair-locations-maps.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los A lamos N ational L aboratory Postdoc C areer F air 2 014 Location of Events (Maps with driving instructions) Tuesday, S ept. 9 th Otowi B uilding, 3 rd F loor LANL, T A---03,...

388

Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

Siekhaus, Wigbert (Berkeley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Radionuclide concentrations in honey bees from Area G at TA-54 during 1997. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Honey bees were collected from two colonies located at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Area G, Technical Area 54, and from one control (background) colony located near Jamez Springs, NM. Samples were analyzed for the following: cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239,240}Pu), tritium ({sup 3}H), total uranium, and gross gamma activity. Area G sample results from both colonies were higher than the upper (95%) level background concentration for {sup 238}Pu and {sup 3}H.

Haarmann, T.K.; Fresquez, P.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-F(Pt) was characterized using a batch reactor system. The reaction kinetics of PCE degradation by GR-F(Cu) and GR-F(Pt) was strongly dependent on pH over the range of pH 7.5-11, with the fastest rate at pH 11. Increasing concentrations of Cu(II) over the range of 0 to 5 m...

Choi, Jeong Yun

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Mercury concentrations in Maine sport fishes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess mercury contamination of fish in Maine, fish were collected from 120 randomly selected lakes. The collection goal for each lake was five fish of the single most common sport fish species within the size range commonly harvested by anglers. Skinless, boneless fillets of fish from each lake were composited, homogenized, and analyzed for total mercury. The two most abundant species, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, were also analyzed individually. The composite fish analyses indicate high concentrations of mercury, particularly in large and long-lived nonsalmonid species. Chain pickerel Esox niger, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, and white perch Morone americana had the highest average mercury concentrations, and brook trout and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the lowest. The mean species composite mercury concentration was positively correlated with a factor incorporating the average size and age of the fish. Lakes containing fish with high mercury concentrations were not clustered near known industrial or population centers but were commonest in the area within 150 km of the seacoast, reflecting the geographical distribution of species that contained higher mercury concentrations. Stocked and wild brook trout were not different in length or weight, but wild fish were older and had higher mercury concentrations. Fish populations maintained by frequent introductions of hatchery-produced fish and subject to high angler exploitation rates may consist of younger fish with lower exposure to environmental mercury and thus contain lower concentrations than wild populations.

Stafford, C.P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)] [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Haines, T.A. [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)] [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Uniform flux dish concentrators for photovoltaic application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have designed a unique and innovative molded dish concentrator capable of producing a uniform flux profile on a flat target plane. Concentration levels of 100--200 suns, which are uniform over an area of several square inches, can be directly achieved for collection apertures of a reasonable size ({approximately}1.5-m diameter). Such performance would be immediately applicable to photovoltaic (PV) use. Economic concerns have shown that the proposed approach would be less expensive thatn Fresnel lens concepts or other dish concentrator designs that require complicated and costly receivers to mix the flux to obtain a uniform distribution. 12 refs.

Jorgensen, G; Wendelin, T

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Si concentrator solar cell development. [Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency, low-cost concentrator solar cell compatible with Spectrolab`s existing manufacturing infrastructure for space solar cells. The period covered is between 1991 and 1993. The program was funded through Sandia National Laboratories through the DOE concentrator initiative and, was also cost shared by Spectrolab. As a result of this program, Spectrolab implemented solar cells achieving an efficiency of over 19% at 200 to 300X concentration. The cells are compatible with DOE guidelines for a cell price necessary to achieve a cost of electricity of 12 cents a kilowatthour.

Krut, D.D. [Spectrolab, Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two.

Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Laidler, James J. (Burr Ridge, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor. Final report. Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of the DOE-sponsored program discussed in this report is to commercialize an instrument for real-time, in-situ measurement of lignin in wood pulp at a variety of locations in the pulp process stream. The instrument will be used as a primary sensor for process control in the pulp and paper industry. Work done by B&W prior to the initiation of this program had shown: there is a functional relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the Kappa number as measured at the pulp mill laboratory. Kappa number is a standard wet chemical method for determination of the lignin concentration; the relationship is one of decreasing intensity with Kappa number, indicating operation in the quenched fluorescence regime; a great deal of scatter in the data. Because of the preliminary nature of the study, the origin of the scatter was not identified. This report documents the results of laboratory measurements made on a variety of well defined pulp samples to generate the data necessary to: determine the feasibility of an instrument for on-line lignin concentration measurement using laser fluorescence; identify the preferred measurement strategy; define the range of applicability of the instrument; and to provide background information to guide the design of a field-worthy prototype.

Jeffers, L.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two. 12 figs.

Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Concentrating Solar Power Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power Addthis Description From towers to dishes to linear mirrors to troughs, concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies...

398

Low-Cost Installation of Concentrating Photovoltaic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-Cost Installation of Concentrating Photovoltaic Renewable Energy Research Renewable Energy inhibit the potential growth of the California photovoltaic market: high installation costs, expenses improvements have been made in recent years on the assembly and deployment of flatplate photovoltaic

399

Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molten Salt Test Loop Melted Salt On October 10, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, News, Renewable Energy, Solar The Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) team at Sandia National...

400

Concentrating Solar Power Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

heat. This thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity via a steam turbine or heat engine that drives a generator. Concentrating solar power offers a utility-scale,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine. 4 figs.

Salomon, R.E.

1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Physics and Astronomy Engineering Electronics Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics and Astronomy Engineering Electronics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 2 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 PHY 4635 Advanced Microprocessors Grade PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics & Engineering 3 PHY 4620 Optics 4 PHY 4735

Thaxton, Christopher S.

403

Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications for prevention strategies interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

404

Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

What does stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations mean?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is applied to an exploration of the national emissions obligations that would be required to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at levels now under active ...

Jacoby, Henry D.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Reiner, David M.

406

Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine.

Salomon, Robert E. (Philadelphia, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Concentrator E-F11 water test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the Process Test Report for performing operation testing with water of the modified E-F11 concentrator in PUREX on water. The test was performed to determine the effects of the following concentrator modifications; routing concentrator off-gasses via the PUREX air tunnel to the main stack, blanking of condenser cooling water, blanking of process condensate route to a crib, restricting flow to steam tube bundles, and routing of steam condensate to TK-F12. The test was successful. Concentrator boil-off rates of 6--7 gpm were achieved while the overheads exited the PUREX plant in vapor form. With minor recommended modifications, this process is recommended for use in processing PUREX deactivation flush solutions and other miscellaneous wastes accumulated during the completion of the deactivation project.

Ethington, P.R.

1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

408

DNA Concentration By UV Spectrophotometry Measure Absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA Concentration By UV Spectrophotometry Measure Absorption: 1. Dilute DNA to 0.5 to 50 µg 2. Measure absorption at 260 nm (A260). Start by zeroing instrument with TE buffer or dH2O alone

Aris, John P.

409

Landscape Design, Construction and Management Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape Design, Construction and Management Concentration Program of Study The Landscape for careers in the landscape and nursery industries, public gardens and arboreta. Opportunities include plant production, landscape design, construction and maintenance, marketing, management

Isaacs, Rufus

410

Concentrating solar power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text is derived from NREL's concentrating solar

411

Market concentration, strategic suppliers, and price dispersion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

locations. In the decentralized market structure, suppliers allocate goods among the local markets without knowing the realized prices (or allocation strategies of the other firms) in the economy. The mechanism by which suppli- ers determine the delivery... that the relative prices of these commodities does not fluctuate around a mean, but are serially correlated or influenced heavily by the exchange...

Wade, Chad R.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Design of wetted wall bioaerosol concentration cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 24 Aerosol-to-aerosol collection efficiency.................................................... 24 Wetting pattern on the impacting wall ? effect of an atomizer.................. 24..................................................................................... 67 Figure 3.4. Cold temperature experiemental setup ........................................................... 68 Figure 3.5. Preliminary heating system for the 1250 L/min cyclone and thermo-couple locations...

Seo, Youngjin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Effect of the TBP and Water on the Complexation of Uranyl Nitrate and the Dissolution of Nitric Acid into Supercritical CO2. A Theoretical Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

started from "random" mixtures of water, TBP, nitric acid, and uranyl nitrate, complexation of uranyl to dissolve nitric acid in the supercritical phase. Indeed, without TBP, nitric acid alone self aggregates via containing the acid and uranyl salts. The simulations show that a high TBP/nitric acid ratio is needed

Boyer, Edmond

415

Effect of temperature on the extraction of nitric acid and plutonium(IV) nitrate with 30 vol% tributyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author's own and published data were evaluated for characterizing the effect of temperature on the distribution of nitric acid and plutonium(IV). The solutes were distributed between 30 vol% TBP in an aliphatic diluent and aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and zero to macro amounts of plutonium(IV) and uranyl nitrates. The temperature dependence of the distribution ratios is described with empirical model equations and examples of the dependence in the absence and presence of uranium(VI) are given. Taking infinite dilution of all solutes of the system as a standard state, the enthalpy change of the extraction reaction could be estimated as -17 kJ/mol for nitric acid, but no numerical estimate was possible for plutonium(IV).

Kolarik, Z.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Persistence of Hydrologic Variables and Reactive Stream Solute Concentrations in an East Tennessee Watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time and frequency domain analyses were conducted on weekly time series of water chemistry (nitrate, sulfate and calcium concentrations) collected from November 1995 to December 2005 at the West Fork of Walker Branch in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to evaluate the extent of their persistence and the relationship of this persistence to discharge and rainfall. In this study, spectral and wavelet analyses provided a theoretical basis for insights into long-term water chemistry behavior. All water chemistry parameters showed some level of persistence that was influenced by rainfall and/or discharge. Short-term persistence (less than a year) was related to the persistence of rainfall and discharge, whereas long-term persistence (more than a year) was related to the persistence of discharge. The Walker Branch conceptual hydrology model is augmented by these results that relate characteristic periodicities with flowpaths through different zones: the vadose zone (< 20 week period), saturated zone (20-50 week period) and bedrock zone (> 50 week period) with implications for reactive chemistries within the watershed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Koirala, Shesh R [ORNL; Gentry, Randall W [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL; Schwartz, John S [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effect of chloride content of molten nitrate salt on corrosion of A516 carbon steel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of A516 carbon steel was evaluated to determine the effect of the dissolved chloride content in molten binary Solar Salt. Corrosion tests were conducted in a molten salt consisting of a 60-40 weight ratio of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} at 400{sup o}C and 450{sup o}C for up to 800 hours. Chloride concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% were investigated to determine the effect on corrosion of this impurity, which can be present in comparable amounts in commercial grades of the constituent salts. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses, corrosion morphology was examined by metallographic sectioning, and the types of corrosion products were determined by x-ray diffraction. Corrosion proceeded by uniform surface scaling and no pitting or intergranular corrosion was observed. Corrosion rates increased significantly as the concentration of dissolved chloride in the molten salt increased. The adherence of surface scales, and thus their protective properties, was degraded by dissolved chloride, fostering more rapid corrosion. Magnetite was the only corrosion product formed on the carbon steel specimens, regardless of chloride content or temperature.

Bradshaw, Robert W.; Clift, W. Miles

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities. The apparatus comprises a focused and pulsed laser, a photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

Siekhaus, W.

1985-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Flammability limits of dusts: Minimum inerting concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new flammability limit parameter has been defined as the Minimum Inerting Concentration (MIC). This is the concentration of inertant required to prevent a dust explosion regardless of fuel concentration. Previous experimental work at Fike in a 1-m{sup 3} spherical chamber has shown this flammability limit to exist for pulverized coal dust and cornstarch. In the current work, inerting experiments with aluminum, anthraquinone and polyethylene dusts as fuels were performed, using monoammonium phosphate and sodium bicarbonate as inertants. The results show that an MIC exists only for anthraquinone inerted with sodium bicarbonate. The other combustible dust and inertant mixtures did not show a definitive MIC, although they did show a strong dependence between inerting level and suspended fuel concentration. As the fuel concentration increased, the amount of inertant required to prevent an explosion decreased. Even though a definitive MIC was not found for most of the dusts an effective MIC can be estimated from the data. The use of MIC data can aid in the design of explosion suppression schemes.

Dastidar, A.G.; Amyotte, P.R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Going, J.; Chatrathi, K. [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)] [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Point-focus spectral splitting solar concentrator for multiple cells concentrating photovoltaic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present and experimentally validate a low-cost design of a spectral splitting concentrator for the efficient conversion of solar energy. The optical device consists of a dispersive prismatic lens made of polycarbonate designed to simultaneously concentrate the solar light and split it into its spectral components. With respect to our previous implementation, this device concentrates the light along two axes and generates a light pattern compatible with the dimensions of a set of concentrating photovoltaic cells while providing a higher concentration ratio. The mathematical framework and the constructive approach used for the design are presented and the device performance is simulated using ray-tracing software. We obtain spectral separation in the visible range within a 3x1 cm2 area and a maximum concentration of 210x for a single wavelength. The device is fabricated by injection molding and its performance is experimentally investigated. We measure an optical transmissivity above 90% in the...

Maragliano, Carlo; Stefancich, Marco

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Icarus 182 (2006) 343349 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Icarus 182 (2006) 343­349 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus Solar wind plasma protrusion, Finland i Finnish Meteorological Institute, Box 503, FIN-00101 Helsinki, Finland j Space Physics Research. The peak electron energy often exceeds the peak energy at the bow shock that indicates a significant

California at Berkeley, University of

426

TWRS information locator database system administrator`s manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a guide for use by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Locator Database (ILD) System Administrator. The TWRS ILD System is an inventory of information used in the TWRS Systems Engineering process to represent the TWRS Technical Baseline. The inventory is maintained in the form of a relational database developed in Paradox 4.5.

Knutson, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

Location Coding for Mobile Image Retrieval Sam S. Tsai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Location Coding for Mobile Image Retrieval Sam S. Tsai , David Chen , Gabriel Takacs , Vijay, gtakacs, vijayc, bgirod}@stanford.edu, jatinder.singh@telekom.de ABSTRACT For mobile image retrieval images using a "bag-of-words" approach while the latter is used in a geometric consistency check to map

Girod, Bernd

428

COMMUNICATION Does the Location of a Mutation Determine the Ability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATION Does the Location of a Mutation Determine the Ability to Form Amyloid Fibrils? Marina by a domain swapping mechanism. Domain swapping is a specific means by which oligomeric proteins are formed that the mutations in our model system facilitate domain swapping as the pathway to amyloid for- mation (Figure 1(b

Regan, Lynne

429

Icarus 181 (2006) 302308 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Icarus 181 (2006) 302­308 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus Near-infrared spectra of laboratory H2O could change peaks in the near-IR as well. This would complicate the interpretation of reflection online 13 December 2005 Abstract We present 1.25­19 µm infrared spectra of pure solid CH4 and H2O/CH4

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Updated 09/30/2014 College & Department Advisor Phone Location  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated 09/30/2014 College & Department Advisor Phone Location College of Agriculture 406 Linfield Agricultural Education Office Assigns Advisor 2132 230 Linfield Animal & Range Sciences Denise) Music Office Assigns Advisors 3562 189 Howard Business Office Assigns Advisors 4681 338 Reid Elementary

Maxwell, Bruce D.

431

Enhancing Location Privacy for Electric Vehicles (at the right time)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An electric vehicle (also known as EV) is powered by an electric motor instead of a gasoline engine sudden demands for power). In future development, it has been proposed that such use of electric vehiclesEnhancing Location Privacy for Electric Vehicles (at the right time) Joseph K. Liu1 , Man Ho Au2

432

Energy 25 (2000) 445461 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy 25 (2000) 445­461 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy A risk based heat exchanger analysis Ltd. All rights reserved. PII: S0360-5442(99)00081-X #12;446 A.K. Sheikh et al. / Energy 25 (2000) 445

Budair, Mohammed Omar

433

Energy 25 (2000) 427443 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy 25 (2000) 427­443 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy A risk based heat exchanger analysis;428 S.M. Zubair et al. / Energy 25 (2000) 427­443 Nomenclature A heat transfer area (m2 ) C fluid;429S.M. Zubair et al. / Energy 25 (2000) 427­443 max maximum min minimum r removal Superscripts

Budair, Mohammed Omar

434

Energy 28 (2003) 11831202 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy 28 (2003) 1183­1202 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy Minimum power requirement Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The development of new energy systems for aircraft. doi:10.1016/S0360-5442(03)00105-1 #12;1184 J.C. Ordonez, A. Bejan / Energy 28 (2003) 1183

Ordonez, Juan C.

435

Structural Location of Disease-associated Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Location of Disease-associated Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms Nathan O. Stitziel1 , Yan-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNP) of genes introduces amino acid changes to proteins, and plays reserved Keywords: single-nucleotide polymorphism; alpha shape; hidden Markov model; surface pockets

Pervouchine, Dmitri D.

436

Lamar Fleming 564 1 1 UH Vending Locations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lamar Fleming 564 1 1 UH Vending Locations Building Map Coke Snack Fresh Coffee Frozen Ice Cream A Basement 534 2 Hilton College 590 4 Houston Science Center 593 1 1 KUHT TV Bldg 536 2 1 1 Lamar Fleming 564

Azevedo, Ricardo

437

Energy 29 (2004) 1317 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

round trip travel of 6100 km. For comparison, global aver- age annual per capita energy consumption with US Energy Information Administration fig- ures [10]. My dEnergy 29 (2004) 13­17 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy Brief Note Personal energy impact

Vermont, University of

438

Efficient Dynamic Programming for Optimal Multi-Location Robot Rendezvous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be utilized in real world robot applications. To demonstate the practical potential of our algorithm, we use in a state space with dimension greater than that of the individual robots. We use the application of multiEfficient Dynamic Programming for Optimal Multi-Location Robot Rendezvous Ken Alton and Ian M

Mitchell, Ian

439

Optimal Location of a Mobile Sensor Continuum for Environmental Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution monitoring, seismic monitoring, or monitoring of large infrastructures in civil is proposed for the goal of optimal location of a mobile sensor continuum. The monitoring of pollution on a 2D or track distributed environmental phenomena (weather, seismic events, wildfires, air, soil or river

Boyer, Edmond

440

VEHICLE USE RECORD M/Y DEPARTMENT VEHICLE LOCATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEHICLE USE RECORD M/Y DEPARTMENT VEHICLE LOCATION Date Origin/Destination Purpose Time Out Time) Accuracy of Information (b) Valid Driver's License VEHICLE # TAG # VEHICLE MAKE, MODEL, AND YEAR NOTE: Vehicle logs must be maintained for audit purposes. It is important that all of the required information

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Icarus 188 (2007) 535539 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.9 GW (Spencer et al., 2006). So some heating mechanism provides about 6 GW of energy to the system bodies is the same. Thus conventional tidal heating in the current orbital configuration does not passIcarus 188 (2007) 535­539 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus Note Tidal heating in Enceladus Jennifer

Wisdom, Jack

442

Building and Facility Codes Code Building Location Bldg # Coordinates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building and Facility Codes Code Building Location Bldg # Coordinates APM Applied Physics & Mathematics Building Muir 249 F7 ASANT Asante Hall Eleanor Roosevelt 446 F5 BIO Biology Building Muir 259 F7 BIRCH Birch Aquarium SIO 2300 S-D7 BONN Bonner Hall Revelle 131 G8 BSB Biomedical Sciences Building

Russell, Lynn

443

1 INTRODUCTION The geothermal Bouillante area is located on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION The geothermal Bouillante area is located on the western coast of Basse and isotopic composition of the deep geothermal fluids using well and spring waters. The predictable nature the production stage and for future exploration drilling related to the development of the geothermal field. 2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

444

Double Difference Earthquake Locations at the Salton Sea Geothermal Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to report on processing of raw waveform data from 4547 events recorded at 12 stations between 2001 and 2005 by the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) seismic network. We identified a central region of the network where vertically elongated distributions of hypocenters have previously been located from regional network analysis. We process the data from the local network by first autopicking first P and S arrivals; second, improving these with hand picks when necessary; then, using cross-correlation to provide very precise P and S relative arrival times. We used the HypoDD earthquake location algorithm to locate the events. We found that the originally elongated distributions of hypocenters became more tightly clustered and extend down the extent of the study volume at 10 Km. However, we found the shapes to depend on choices of location parameters. We speculate that these narrow elongated zones of seismicity may be due to stress release caused by fluid flow.

Boyle, K L; Hutchings, L J; Bonner, B P; Foxall, W; Kasameyer, P W

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

445

Nearoptimal solutions to large scale facility location problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instances of size m \\Theta n = 3000 \\Theta 3000; for the capacitated case the largest instances were 1000 widely broad area of applications many heuristics have been devised to solve it. Among these, the most report our computational experience with problems with up to 3000 potential facility locations

Chudak, Fabian

446

Icarus 193 (2008) 387396 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the ice-shell thickness. For Enceladus, we demonstrate that an Onset I transition can produce tectonicIcarus 193 (2008) 387­396 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus Thermal convection in ice-I shells­450] investigated the dynamics of an ice shell overlying a pure liquid-water ocean and showed that transitions from

447

Location-Based Tax Incentives: Evidence From India Ritam Chaurey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in India. Specifically, I examine the federally financed New Industrial Policy for the statesLocation-Based Tax Incentives: Evidence From India Ritam Chaurey Department of Economics, State University of New York, Binghamton August 24, 2014 Abstract While policies targeting particular geographic

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

448

Seismic Event Location: Nonlinear Inversion Using a Neighbourhood Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an important part of seismological practice with a wide range of applications, but has particularly signi and the majority of natural earthquakes is provided by the depth of the source. Drilling techniques there is a need to obtain the best possible location by combining data from regional and more distant stations

Sambridge, Malcolm

449

Location and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Quebec, is organic-rich black shale and hosting oil and gas. It is equivalent to the Ithaca shaleLocation and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale in the Anticosti Island in the Gulf of St. d13C for calcite disseminated in the black shale range from 2.6o to 2.8 / The values are lower

450

Network Based Approaches for Clustering and Location Decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in large scale graphs, determining location of facilities for pre-positioning emergency relief supplies, and selecting nodes to form a virtual backbone in a wireless sensor network. To begin with, a new clique relaxation called a k-community is defined...

Verma, Anurag

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

451

Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

452

Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRFProvide Insight for RotorConcentratingConcentrating

453

Physics and Astronomy Engineering/Physics Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics and Astronomy Engineering/Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Electromagnetic Fields & Waves 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics.) taken Grade PHY 4620 Optics 4 PHY 3211 Modern Physics II 3 PHY 4730 Analog Circuits 3 PHY 4640 Quantum

Thaxton, Christopher S.

454

Physics and Astronomy Radiation Safety Physics Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics and Astronomy Radiation Safety Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Environucleonics Lab 1 PHY 3211 Modern Physics II 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 PHY 4820 Medical Physics 3 CHE 1101 Intro. Chemistry I 3 CHE 1110 Intro. Chemistry I Lab 1 CHE 1102 Intro

Thaxton, Christopher S.

455

Physics and Astronomy Chemical Physics Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics and Astronomy Chemical Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept Fields & Waves 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4640 Quantum Mechanics 3 PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics & Engineering 3 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 CHE 1101 Intro. Chemistry I 3 CHE 1110 Intro

Thaxton, Christopher S.

456

Measuring overall emittance of concentrator receiver pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple and accurate method for measuring the overall emittance of receiver pipes used with cylindrical concentrators is described. Experimental measurements obtained for steel pipes with a black chrome over nickel selective surface are presented. The observed strong temperature dependence of emittance indicates that the use of room temperature emittance data will substantially overestimate collector efficiency. (SPH)

Gerich, J.W.; Reitter, T.A.; Merriam, M.F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ideal light concentrators with reflector gaps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cylindrical or trough-like radiant energy concentration and collection device is provided. The device includes an energy absorber, a glazing enveloping the absorber and a reflective wall. The ideal contour of the reflective wall is determined with reference to a virtual absorber and not the actual absorber cross section.

Winston, R.

1980-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Nonimaging light concentrator with uniform irradiance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nonimaging light concentrator system including a primary collector of light, an optical mixer disposed near the focal zone for collecting light from the primary collector, the optical mixer having a transparent entrance aperture, an internally reflective housing for substantially total internal reflection of light, a transparent exit aperture and an array of photovoltaic cells disposed near the transparent exit aperture.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gee, Randy C. (Arvada, CO)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2013 Radiological Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2013 Radiological Concentration Fall Math 141 or 147 (4) FA, SP, SU-approved by the department. Courses in Nuclear Engineering other than 500, 502 or 598 may also be used as technical electives on academic performance. Factors considered include overall grade point average, performance in selescted

Tennessee, University of

460

BME ERGONOMICS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BME ERGONOMICS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION1 ­ F10 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum Advisor: Thomas J. Armstrong, Ph.D. (tja@umich.edu) Ergonomics /Rehabilitation Engineering: IOE 463 Measurement and Design of Work (3) (I, II) (Prerequisite: IOE 333 Ergonomics) BIOMED E 534

Eustice, Ryan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Business of Fashion Concentration & Minor -Newark Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business of Fashion Concentration & Minor - Newark Description The Business of Fashion program was designed to bridge the gap between creativity and business acumen. It is for artistic individuals who want to solidify their understanding of business, as well as for business students who want to learn how to apply

Lin, Xiaodong

462

Low chemical concentrating steam generating cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A steam cycle for a nuclear power plant having two optional modes of operation. A once-through mode of operation uses direct feed of coolant water to an evaporator avoiding excessive chemical concentration buildup. A recirculation mode of operation uses a recirculation loop to direct a portion of flow from the evaporator back through the evaporator to effectively increase evaporator flow.

Mangus, James D. (Greensburg, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Ideal light concentrators with reflector gaps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cylindrical or trough-like radiant energy concentration and collection device is provided. The device includes an energy absorber, a glazing enveloping the absorber and a reflective wall. The ideal contour of the reflective wall is determined with reference to a virtual absorber and not the actual absorber cross section.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2014 Radiological Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2014 Radiological Concentration Fall Math 141 or 147 (4) FA, SP, SU-approved by the department. Courses in Nuclear Engineering other than 500, 502 or 598 may also be used as technical electives. No more than four (4) credit hours of nuclear engineering courses in which a C- or lower is the highest

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

465

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2013 Biotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2013 Biotechnology BIOTECHNOLOGY (select one course): BIOMEDE 410 Design and Applications of Biomaterials (3) (I) BIOMEDE 556 Cellular and Molecular Biomechanics (3) (I) BIOMEDE 574 Cells in Their Environment (3) (II) BIOMEDE 616 Analysis of Chemical Signaling

Eustice, Ryan

466

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Bioelectrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Bioelectrical Advisor: Cynthia Chestek, Ph.D. BIOELECTRICAL: BIOMEDE 417 Electrical Biophysics (4) (II) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I) BIOMEDICAL

Eustice, Ryan

467

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2013 Biomechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2013 Biomechanics BIOMECHANICS (select one course): BIOMEDE 456 Tissue Mechanics (3) (I) BIOMEDE 476 Biofluid Mechanics (4) (II) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics

Eustice, Ryan

468

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biomaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Biomaterials Advisor: David Kohn, Ph.D. BIOMATERIALS: BIOMEDE 410 Design and Applications of Biomaterials (3) (I) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I) BIOMEDICAL

Eustice, Ryan

469

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2013 Bioelectrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2013 Bioelectrical BIOELECTRICAL: BIOMEDE 417 Electrical Biophysics (4) (II) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I) BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND DESIGN (select one

Eustice, Ryan

470

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2013 Biomaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2013 Biomaterials BIOMATERIALS: BIOMEDE 410 Design and Applications of Biomaterials (3) (I) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I) BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

Eustice, Ryan

471

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biomechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Biomechanics Advisor: Scott Hollister, Ph.D. BIOMECHANICS (select one course): BIOMEDE 456 Tissue Mechanics (3) (I) BIOMEDE 476 Biofluid Mechanics (4) (II) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550

Eustice, Ryan

472

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Biotechnology Advisor: Michael Mayer, Ph.D. BIOTECHNOLOGY (select one course): BIOMEDE 410 Design and Applications of Biomaterials (3) (I) BIOMEDE 556 Cellular and Molecular Biomechanics (3) (I) BIOMEDE 574 Cells in Their Environment (3) (II) BIOMEDE 616

Eustice, Ryan

473

Fluid density and concentration measurement using noninvasive in situ ultrasonic resonance interferometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The specific gravity or solute concentration of a process fluid solution located in a selected structure is determined by obtaining a resonance response spectrum of the fluid/structure over a range of frequencies that are outside the response of the structure itself. A fast fourier transform (FFT) of the resonance response spectrum is performed to form a set of FFT values. A peak value for the FFT values is determined, e.g., by curve fitting, to output a process parameter that is functionally related to the specific gravity and solute concentration of the process fluid solution. Calibration curves are required to correlate the peak FFT value over the range of expected specific gravities and solute concentrations in the selected structure.

Pope, Noah G. (Los Alamos, NM); Veirs, Douglas K. (Espanola, NM); Claytor, Thomas N. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Fluid density and concentration measurement using noninvasive in situ ultrasonic resonance interferometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The specific gravity or solute concentration of a process fluid solution located in a selected structure is determined by obtaining a resonance response spectrum of the fluid/structure over a range of frequencies that are outside the response of the structure itself. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the resonance response spectrum is performed to form a set of FFT values. A peak value for the FFT values is determined, e.g., by curve fitting, to output a process parameter that is functionally related to the specific gravity and solute concentration of the process fluid solution. Calibration curves are required to correlate the peak FFT value over the range of expected specific gravities and solute concentrations in the selected structure. 7 figs.

Pope, N.G.; Veirs, D.K.; Claytor, T.N.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

475

Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

Forozani, Ghasem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM size distribution. The sensitivity of the model results to the initial sea spray profile further suggests there would be great benefit in better definition of the vertical profile of size resolved sea-spray for use in such model studies.

Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

477

Criticality experiments with mixed oxide fuel pin arrays in plutonium-uranium nitrate solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having a Pu/(Pu + U) ratio of approximately 0.22 in a boiler tube-type lattice assembly. These experiments were conducted as part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of the experiments and data are included in this report. The experiments were performed with an array of mixed oxide fuel pins in aqueous plutonium-uranium solutions. The fuel pins were contained in a boiler tube-type tank and arranged in a 1.4 cm square pitch array which resembled cylindrical geometry. One experiment was perfomed with the fuel pins removed from the vessel. The experiments were performed with a water reflector. The concentration of the solutions in the boiler tube-type tank was varied from 4 to 468 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was approximately 0.22 for all experiments.

Lloyd, R.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Smolen, G.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Multi-facet concentrator of solar setup for irradiating the objects placed in a target plane with solar light  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to the proposed invention, this technical result is achieved so that many-facet concentrator of a solar setup for exposure of objects, placed in a target plane, to the action of solar radiation containing a supporting frame and facets differing by that the facets of the concentrator are chosen with spherical focusing reflective surfaces of equal focal lengths and with selective coatings reflecting a desired spectral fraction of solar radiation, and are arranged on the supporting frame symmetrically with respect to the common axis of the concentrator, their optical axes being directed to the single point on the optical axis of the concentrator located before the nominal focus point of the concentrator and determining the position of arranging the target plane.

Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Yampolskiy, Vladislav (Moscow, RU); Alekseev, Valerie (Moscow, RU); Son, Valentin (Moscow, RU)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

System and method for optically locating microchannel positions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method is disclosed for optically locating a microchannel position. A laser source generates a primary laser beam which is directed at a microchannel plate. The microchannel plates include microchannels at various locations. A back-reflectance beam detector receives a back-reflected beam from the plate. The back-reflected beam is generated when the primary beam reflects off of the plate. A photodiode circuit generates a trigger signal when the back-reflected beam exceeds a predetermined threshold, indicating a presence of the microchannel. The method of the present invention includes the steps of generating a primary beam, directing the primary beam to a plate containing a microchannel, receiving from the plate a back-reflected beam generated in response to the primary beam, and generating a trigger signal when the back-reflected beam exceeds a predetermined threshold which corresponds to a presence of the microchannel.

Brewer, Laurence R. (Oakland, CA); Kimbrough, Joseph (Pleasanton, CA); Balch, Joseph (Livermore, CA); Davidson, J. Courtney (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "location concentration nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Helicopter Surveys for Locating Wells and Leaking Oilfield Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to the injection of CO2 into geological formations, either for enhanced oil recovery or for CO2 sequestration, it is necessary to locate wells that perforate the target formation and are within the radius of influence for planned injection wells. Locating and plugging wells is necessary because improperly plugged well bores provide the most rapid route for CO2 escape to the surface. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of helicopter and ground-based well detection strategies at a 100+ year old oilfield in Wyoming where a CO2 flood is planned. This project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and Fugro Airborne Surveys

Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Hodges, G. (Fugro Airborne Surveys)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Mapping the location and configuration of nitrogen in diamond nanoparticles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding how impurities such as nitrogen are included in diamond nanoparticles is expected to be important for use in future nanodevices, such as qubits for quantum computing. Most commercial diamond nanoparticles contain approximately 2-3% nitrogen, but it is difficult to determine experimentally whether it is located within the core or at the surface of the nanoparticles. Presented here are density functional tight-binding simulations examining the configuration and potential energy surface of substitutional nitrogen in diamond nanoparticles, directly comparing results of different sizes, shapes and surface chemistry. The results predict that nitrogen is metastable within the core of both hydrogenated and dehydrogenated particles, but that the binding energy, coordination and preferred location is dependent upon the structure of the nanoparticle as a whole.

Barnard, A. S.; Sternberg, M.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Oxford

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

483

X-ray focal spot locating apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

Gilbert, Hubert W. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

484

Locating Pleistocene refugia: Comparing phylogeographic and ecological niche model predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York, United States of America, 2 International Rice Research Institute, Los Ban˜os, Laguna, Philippines, 3Natural History Museum & Biodiversity Research Center, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas.... Refugia identified in phylogeographic studies are shown as black outlines. Areas predicted to be refugia are in green, areas not predicted are in gray, and hatching indicates approximate locations of ice sheets [68]. Gray lines indicate present day...

Waltari, Eric; Hijmans, Robert J.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Nyá ri, Á rpá d S.; Perkins, Susan L.; Guralnick, Robert P.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

485

Determining Mountaintop Mining Locations in West Virginia Using Elevation Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determining Mountaintop Mining Locations in West Virginia Using Elevation Datasets Danny Rowland Haskell Indian Nations University Image from: http://www.colorado.edu/geography/cartpro/cartography2/spring2006/syphers.../projects/westvirginia/whatis.htm Image from: http://washingtonindependent.com/49008/congress-takes-on-mountaintop-mining Mountaintop Mining Operation 2 Elevation datasets: NED & SRTM West Virginia NED SRTM Elevation Change Over ~30 Year Period 20021970’s SRTM Subtracted from...

Rowland, Danny

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

486

The application of satellite time references to HVDC fault location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An HVdc fault location scheme is described which relies on very precise detection of the time of arrival of fault created surges at both ends of the line. Such detection is achieved by a very accurate data acquisition and processing system combined with the time reference signals provided by a global positioning system receiver. Extensive digital simulation is carried out to determine the voltage and current waveforms, to identify the main sources of error and suggest possible compensation techniques.

Dewe, M.B.; Sankar, S.; Arrillaga, J. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Summit Location Announced: Hilton Anaheim, California | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at Young - RaineyAprilSummaryEnergy Location

488

Temperature-dependent mechanical property testing of nitrate thermal storage salts.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three salt compositions for potential use in trough-based solar collectors were tested to determine their mechanical properties as a function of temperature. The mechanical properties determined were unconfined compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and indirect tensile strength. Seventeen uniaxial compression and indirect tension tests were completed. It was found that as test temperature increases, unconfined compressive strength and Young's modulus decreased for all salt types. Empirical relationships were developed quantifying the aforementioned behaviors. Poisson's ratio tends to increase with increasing temperature except for one salt type where there is no obvious trend. The variability in measured indirect tensile strength is large, but not atypical for this index test. The average tensile strength for all salt types tested is substantially higher than the upper range of tensile strengths for naturally occurring rock salts. Interest in raising the operating temperature of concentrating solar technologies and the incorporation of thermal storage has motivated studies on the implementation of molten salt as the system working fluid. Recently, salt has been considered for use in trough-based solar collectors and has been shown to offer a reduction in levelized cost of energy as well as increasing availability (Kearney et al., 2003). Concerns regarding the use of molten salt are often related to issues with salt solidification and recovery from freeze events. Differences among salts used for convective heat transfer and storage are typically designated by a comparison of thermal properties. However, the potential for a freeze event necessitates an understanding of salt mechanical properties in order to characterize and mitigate possible detrimental effects. This includes stress imparted by the expanding salt. Samples of solar salt, HITEC salt (Coastal Chemical Co.), and a low melting point quaternary salt were cast for characterization tests to determine unconfined compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Experiments were conducted at multiple temperatures below the melting point to determine temperature dependence.

Everett, Randy L.; Iverson, Brian D.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Bronowski, David R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Big Crunch-based omnidirectional light concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Omnidirectional light concentration remains an unsolved problem despite such important practical applications as design of efficient mobile photovoltaic cells. Optical black hole designs developed recently offer partial solution to this problem. However, even these solutions are not truly omnidirectional since they do not exhibit a horizon, and at large enough incidence angles light may be trapped into quasi-stationary orbits around such imperfect optical black holes. Here we propose and realize experimentally another gravity-inspired design of a broadband omnidirectional light concentrator based on the cosmological Big Crunch solutions. By mimicking the Big Crunch spacetime via corresponding effective optical metric we make sure that every photon world line terminates in a single point.

Igor I. Smolyaninov; Yu-Ju Hung

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

490

High-efficiency silicon concentrator cell commercialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the first phase of a forty-one month program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell and facility for manufacturing it. The period covered is November 1, 1990 to December 31, 1991. This is a joint program between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Sandia National Laboratories. (This report is also published by EPRI as EPRI report number TR-102035.) During the first year of the program, SunPower accomplished the following major objectives: (1) a new solar cell fabrication facility, which is called the Cell Pilot Line (CPL), (2) a baseline concentrator cell process has been developed, and (3) a cell testing facility has been completed. Initial cell efficiencies are about 23% for the baseline process. The long-range goal is to improve this efficiency to 27%.

Sinton, R.A.; Swanson, R.M. [SunPower Corp., Sunnyvale, CA (US)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Thermal regeneration of an electrochemical concentration cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for thermally regenerating an electrochemical concentration cell having first and second aluminum electrodes respectively positioned in contact with first and second electrolytes separated by an ion exchange member, the first and second electrolytes being composed of different concentrations of an ionic solvent and a salt, preferably an aluminum halide. The ionic solvent may be either organic or inorganic with a relatively low melting point, the ionic solvent and the salt form a complex wherein the free energy of formation of said complex is less than about -5 Kcal/mole. A distillation column using solar heat or low grade industrial waste heat receives the first and second electrolytes and thermally decomposes the salt-solvent complex to provide feed material for the two half cells.

Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Bates, John K. (Plainfield, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Measurement of phenol concentrations using hemoglobin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major pollutant found in coal conversion wastewaters is phenol. Its removal by methods such as gravity separation, steam stripping, solvent extraction, biotreatment, and carbon adsorption must be monitored in order to determine that the water has been made safe for release back into the environment. Monitoring phenol concentrations in aqueous waste solutions is usually by the aminoantipyrine method. Other methods described for phenol determination include the use of enzyme electrodes based on immobilized tyrosinase and immobilized phenol hydroxylase. The authors present preliminary data upon which a new assay for phenols could be based. It concerns the peroxidatic activity of hemoglobin. When phenol, hemoglobin, and hydrogen peroxide are incubated together, there is an increase in absorbance at 260 nm which is proportional to the concentration of phenol. 5 references, 2 figures.

Woodward, J.; Allen, B.F.; Scott, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

494

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

496

Ozone concentrations in El Paso, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

El Paso, Texas may have a problem in meeting ambient air standards due to influx of pollutants from foreign sources. Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua, and Fort Bliss abut the city and are areas over which the Texas Air Control Board (TACB) has little or no jurisdiction. The Board maintains two Continuous Air Monitoring Stations (CAM) in El Paso. Ozone, nitric oxide, and nitrogen dioxide data were obtained from these stations. If the EPA Empirical Kinetic Model is used for El Paso, reducing NMHC concentrations may increase rather than decrease O/sub 3/ concentrations. The Texas State Implementation Plan, while not based on Empirical Kinetic Modeling, calls for a reduction of 18% in NMHC. However, 31% of all NMHC in El Paso arise from sources over which Texas had little (a federal military reservation) or no (Cd. Juarez) jurisdiction. It appears the TACB is correct in believing the SIP for O/sub 3/ may not bring El Paso into compliance. (JMT)

Crocker, J.E. (Texas Air Control Board, Austin); Applegate, H.G.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Thermal regeneration of an electrochemical concentration cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method are described for thermally regenerating an electrochemical concentration cell having first and second aluminum electrodes respectively positioned in contact with first and second electrolytes separated by an ion exchange member, the first and second electrolytes being composed of different concentrations of an ionic solvent and a salt, preferably an aluminum halide. The ionic solvent may be either organic or inorganic with a relatively low melting point, the ionic solvent and the salt form a complex wherein the free energy of formation of said complex is less than about -5 kcal/mole. A distillation column using solar heat or low grade industrial waste heat receives the first and second electrolytes and thermally decomposes the salt-solvent complex to provide feed material for the two half cells.

Krumpelt, M.; Bates, J.K.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

498

Material for a luminescent solar concentrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for use in a luminescent solar concentrator, formed by ceramitizing the luminescent ion Cr/sup 3 +/ with a transparent ceramic glass containing mullite. The resultant material has tiny Cr/sup 3 +/-bearing crystallites dispersed uniformly through an amorphous glass. The invention combines the high luminescent efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/ in the crystalline phase with the practical and economical advantages of glass technology.

Andrews, L.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Photovoltaic concentrator assembly with optically active cover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic concentrator assembly that includes a housing that defines an internal volume and includes a rim, wherein the rim defines an opening into the internal volume, a photovoltaic cell positioned in the internal volume, and an optical element that includes an optically active body and a flange extending outward from the body, wherein the flange is sealingly engaged with the rim of the housing to enclose the internal volume.

Plesniak, Adam P

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

500

Linear Concentrator Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach,October,Lighthouse Solar JumpLindeLinear