Sample records for local degradation phenomena

  1. Studies of Local Degradation Phenomena in Composite Cathodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerlau, M.; Marcinek, M.; Srinivasan, V.; Kostecki, R.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was attributed to the degradation of the electronicallyelectrode and cell degradation. The extraordinary potentialat 45 o C showed a gradual degradation during cycling. Post-

  2. Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel Sang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

  3. Title of dissertation: GLOBAL PHENOMENA FROM LOCAL RULES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: GLOBAL PHENOMENA FROM LOCAL RULES: PEER-TO-PEER NETWORKS AND CRYSTAL STEPS Amy Finkbiner, Doctor of Philosophy, 2007 Dissertation directed by: Professor James Yorke rules can generate interesting behavior in dynamical systems. This dissertation examines some real world

  4. Experimental study and modeling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Experimental study and modeling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP://www.iet.aau.dk ­ * Corresponding author: mpn@iet.aau.dk Abstract: Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems monitored during experiments. Introduction Fuel cell based combined heat and power production (CHP) systems

  5. Local scale invariance and its applications to strongly anisotropic critical phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malte Henkel; Alan Picone; Michel Pleimling; Jeremie Unterberger

    2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalization of dynamical scaling to local scale invariance is reviewed. Starting from a recapitulation of the phenomenology of ageing phenomena, the generalization of dynamical scaling to local scale transformation for any given dynamical exponent $z$ is described and the two distinct types of local scale invariance are presented. The special case $z=2$ and the associated Ward identity of Schr\\"odinger invariance is treated. Local scale invariance predicts the form of the two-point functions. Existing confirmations of these predictions for (I) the Lifshitz points in spin systems with competing interactions such as the ANNNI model and (II) non-equilibrium ageing phenomena as occur in the kinetic Ising model with Glauber dynamics are described.

  6. Studies of Local Degradation Phenomena in Composite Cathodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerlau, M.; Marcinek, M.; Srinivasan, V.; Kostecki, R.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite Cathodes for Li-ion Batteries Marie Kerlau, Marekfrom commercial Li-ion batteries and mode cells which

  7. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabelström, N., E-mail: sabelstrom.n.aa@m.titech.ac.jp; Hayashi, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Nagata, K. [Department of Conservation Science, Tokyo University of the Arts, 12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100?°C could be observed.

  8. Electric field induced localization phenomena in a ladder network with superlattice configuration: Effect of backbone environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Paramita; Karmakar, S. N. [Condensed Matter Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Sector-I, Block-AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India); Maiti, Santanu K., E-mail: santanu.maiti@isical.ac.in [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 Barrackpore Trunk Road, Kolkata-700 108 (India)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric field induced localization properties of a tight-binding ladder network in presence of backbone sites are investigated. Based on Green's function formalism we numerically calculate two-terminal transport together with density of states for different arrangements of atomic sites in the ladder and its backbone. Our results lead to a possibility of getting multiple mobility edges which essentially plays a switching action between a completely opaque to fully or partly conducting region upon the variation of system Fermi energy, and thus, support in fabricating mesoscopic or DNA-based switching devices.

  9. Degradation Scheme graceful degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiba, Shigeru

    Degradation Scheme graceful degradation degradation scheme OS OS degradation scheme OS degradation scheme 1 Java graceful degradation [8] graceful degradation degradation scheme degradation scheme degradation scheme OS degradation scheme OS Solaris Linux FreeBSD Windows Server Linux 3 OS Tomcat Solaris OS

  10. Understanding local degradation of cycled Ni-rich cathode materials at high operating temperature for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Chang, Wonyoung, E-mail: cwy@kist.re.kr [Center for Energy Convergence, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy to investigate local degradation that occurs in Li{sub x}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} cathode materials (NCA) after 30 cycles with cutoff voltages of 4.3?V and 4.8?V at 55?°C. NCA has a homogeneous crystallographic structure before electrochemical reactions; however, we observed that 30 cycles of charge/discharge reactions induced inhomogeneity in the crystallographic and electronic structures and also introduced porosity particularly at surface area. These changes were more noticeable in samples cycled with higher cutoff voltage of 4.8?V. Effect of operating temperature was further examined by comparing electronic structures of oxygen of the NCA particles cycled at both room temperature and 55?°C. The working temperature has a greater impact on the NCA cathode materials at a cutoff voltage of 4.3?V that is the practical the upper limit voltage in most applications, while a cutoff voltage of 4.8?V is high enough to cause surface degradation even at room temperature.

  11. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Janse, Daniel M. (Brookline, MA)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  12. The Enamovirus P0 protein is a silencing suppressor which inhibits local and systemic RNA silencing through AGO1 degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fusaro, Adriana F. [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia) [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia); Correa, Regis L. [CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia) [CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia); Depto. de Virologia, IMPPG, UFRJ, 21941-902 (Brazil); Nakasugi, Kenlee; Jackson, Craig [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kawchuk, Lawrence [Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB T1J4B1 (Canada)] [Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB T1J4B1 (Canada); Vaslin, Maite F.S. [Depto. de Virologia, IMPPG, UFRJ, 21941-902 (Brazil)] [Depto. de Virologia, IMPPG, UFRJ, 21941-902 (Brazil); Waterhouse, Peter M., E-mail: peter.waterhouse@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The P0 protein of poleroviruses and P1 protein of sobemoviruses suppress the plant's RNA silencing machinery. Here we identified a silencing suppressor protein (SSP), P0{sup PE}, in the Enamovirus Pea enation mosaic virus-1 (PEMV-1) and showed that it and the P0s of poleroviruses Potato leaf roll virus and Cereal yellow dwarf virus have strong local and systemic SSP activity, while the P1 of Sobemovirus Southern bean mosaic virus supresses systemic silencing. The nuclear localized P0{sup PE} has no discernable sequence conservation with known SSPs, but proved to be a strong suppressor of local silencing and a moderate suppressor of systemic silencing. Like the P0s from poleroviruses, P0{sup PE} destabilizes AGO1 and this action is mediated by an F-box-like domain. Therefore, despite the lack of any sequence similarity, the poleroviral and enamoviral SSPs have a conserved mode of action upon the RNA silencing machinery.

  13. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-?} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  14. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  15. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  16. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

  17. Role of holes in the isotope effect and mechanisms for the metaloxidesemiconductor device degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhi

    degradation Zhi Chen,a) Pradeep Garg,b) and Vijay Singh Department of Electrical Engineering, University degradation phenomena. The isotope effect is exclusively due to hot electrons, not hot holes. Holes might break the Si­O bonds to generate interface traps at VG near VT . The dominant degradation mechanism

  18. Spacetime model with superluminal phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Matolcsi; W. A. Rodrigues Jr

    1996-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    recent theoretical results show the existence of arbitrary speeds ($0\\leq v <\\infty$) solutions of the wave equations of mathematical physics. Some recent experiments confirm the results for sound waves. The question arises naturally: What is the appropriate spacetime model to describe superluminal phenomena? In this paper we present a spacetime model that incorporates the valid results of Relativity Theory and yet describes coherently superluminal phenomena without paradoxes.

  19. Graphene tests of Klein phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano De Leo; Pietro Rotelli

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is characterized by chiral electronic excitations. As such it provides a perfect testing ground for the production of Klein pairs (electron/holes). If confirmed, the standard results for barrier phenomena must be reconsidered with, as a byproduct, the accumulation within the barrier of holes.

  20. Nuclear pairing: basic phenomena revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Bertsch

    2012-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the phenomena associated with pairing in nuclear physics, most prominently the ubiquitous presence of odd-even mass differences and the properties of the excitation spectra, very different for even-even and odd-A nuclei. There are also significant dynamical effects of pairing, visible in the inertias associated with nuclear rotation and large-amplitude shape deformation.

  1. New phenomena searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soha, Aron; /UC, Davis

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, which is accumulating data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The new phenomena being explored include Higgs, Supersymmetry, and large extra dimensions. They also present the latest results of searches for heavy objects, which would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model.

  2. PEM fuel cell degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. While significant progress has been made in understanding degradation mechanisms and improving materials, further improvements in durability are required to meet commercialization targets. Catalyst and electrode durability remains a primary degradation mode, with much work reported on understanding how the catalyst and electrode structure degrades. Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) are used to rapidly evaluate component degradation, however the results are sometimes easy, and other times difficult to correlate. Tests that were developed to accelerate degradation of single components are shown to also affect other component's degradation modes. Non-ideal examples of this include ASTs examining catalyst degradation performances losses due to catalyst degradation do not always well correlate with catalyst surface area and also lead to losses in mass transport.

  3. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Anders Christian Olesen, Denmark #12;Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Anders Christian transport phenomena govern- ing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled

  4. Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes 1 1.1 Introduction

  5. Interpolating function and Stokes Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masazumi Honda; Dileep P. Jatkar

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    When we have two expansions of physical quantity around two different points in parameter space, we can usually construct a family of functions, which interpolates the both expansions. In this paper we study analytic structures of such interpolating functions and discuss their physical implications. We propose that the analytic structures of the interpolating functions provide information on analytic property and Stokes phenomena of the physical quantity, which we approximate by the interpolating functions. We explicitly check our proposal for partition functions of zero-dimensional $\\varphi^4$ theory and Sine-Gordon model. In the zero dimensional Sine-Gordon model, we compare our result with a recent result from resurgence analysis. We also comment on construction of interpolating function in Borel plane.

  6. Interpolating function and Stokes Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, Masazumi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When we have two expansions of physical quantity around two different points in parameter space, we can usually construct a family of functions, which interpolates the both expansions. In this paper we study analytic structures of such interpolating functions and discuss their physical implications. We propose that the analytic structures of the interpolating functions provide information on analytic property and Stokes phenomena of the physical quantity, which we approximate by the interpolating functions. We explicitly check our proposal for partition functions of zero-dimensional $\\varphi^4$ theory and Sine-Gordon model. In the zero dimensional Sine-Gordon model, we compare our result with a recent result from resurgence analysis. We also comment on construction of interpolating function in Borel plane.

  7. Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Degradation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Degradation in Petroleum-Contaminated Harbor Sediments under Sulfate of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in- situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum- contaminated did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe

  8. Canister storage building natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallman, A.M.

    1996-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document specifies the natural phenomena loads for the Canister Storage Building in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site.

  9. WESF natural phenomena hazards survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of engineers conducted a systematic natural hazards phenomena (NPH) survey for the 225-B Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The survey is an assessment of the existing design documentation to serve as the structural design basis for WESF, and the Interim Safety Basis (ISB). The lateral force resisting systems for the 225-B building structures, and the anchorages for the WESF safety related systems were evaluated. The original seismic and other design analyses were technically reviewed. Engineering judgment assessments were made of the probability of NPH survival, including seismic, for the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems. The method for the survey is based on the experience of the investigating engineers,and documented earthquake experience (expected response) data.The survey uses knowledge on NPH performance and engineering experience to determine the WESF strengths for NPH resistance, and uncover possible weak links. The survey, in general, concludes that the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems are designed and constructed commensurate with the current Hanford Site design criteria.

  10. Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation, USA ABSTRACT In order to optimize and extend the life of photovoltaics (PV) modules, scientific photovoltaics. The statisti- cally significant relationships were investigated using lifetime and degradation

  11. Damage Assessment Technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

    2011-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The PMMD program is examining LWR component materials and the degradation phenomena that affect them. Of particular interest is how such phenomena can be monitored to predict degradation and prevent component failure. Some forms of degradation, such as stress corrosion cracking, are characterized by a long initiation time followed by a rapid growth phase. Monitoring such long-term degradation will require new NDE methods and measurement procedures. A critical analysis of all reactor components is required to determine if new inspection strategies are required to effectively manage slow degradation mechanisms that may lead to component failure. As reactor lifetimes are extended, degradation mechanisms previously considered too long-term to be of consequence (such as concrete and wiring insulation degradation) may become more important. This paper includes a review of techniques with potential for sensing and monitoring degradation in its early stages and will concisely explain the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to in-service inspection, condition based maintenance, and advanced diagnostics and prognostics.

  12. Damage Assessment Technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy B.; Malik, Shah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The PMMD program is examining LWR component materials and the degradation phenomena that affect them. Of particular interest is how such phenomena can be monitored to predict degradation and prevent component failure. Some forms of degradation, including some modes of stress corrosion cracking, are characterized by a long initiation time followed by a rapid growth phase. Monitoring such long-term degradation will require new non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods and measurement procedures. A critical analysis of all reactor components is required to determine if new inspection strategies are required to effectively manage slow degradation mechanisms that may lead to component failure. As reactor lifetimes are extended, degradation mechanisms previously considered too long-term to be of consequence (such as concrete and wiring insulation degradation) may become more important. This paper includes a review of techniques with potential for sensing and monitoring degradation in its early stages and will concisely explain the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to in-service inspection, condition based maintenance, and advanced diagnostics and prognostics.

  13. Partially Reflected Brownian Motion: A Stochastic Approach to Transport Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis S. Grebenkov

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport phenomena are ubiquitous in nature and known to be important for various scientific domains. Examples can be found in physics, electrochemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, physiology, etc. To obtain new information about diffusive or Laplacian transport towards a semi-permeable or resistive interface, one can study the random trajectories of diffusing particles modeled, in a first approximation, by the partially reflected Brownian motion. This stochastic process turns out to be a convenient mathematical foundation for discrete, semi-continuous and continuous theoretical descriptions of diffusive transport. This paper presents an overview of these topics with a special emphasis on the close relation between stochastic processes with partial reflections and Laplacian transport phenomena. We give selected examples of these phenomena followed by a brief introduction to the partially reflected Brownian motion and related probabilistic topics (e.g., local time process and spread harmonic measure). A particular attention is paid to the use of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. Some practical consequences and further perspectives are discussed.

  14. Fractal Geometry and Spatial Phenomena A Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Fractal Geometry and Spatial Phenomena A Bibliography January 1991 Mark MacLennan, A. Stewart. MEASUREMENT ISSUES........................................................... 8 II.1 ESTIMATION OF FRACTAL DIMENSION - GENERAL ISSUES .......... 8 II.2 ESTIMATION OF FRACTAL DIMENSION FOR CURVES/PROFILES ... 9 II.3

  15. Bayesian nonparametric learning of complex dynamical phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Emily Beth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complexity of many dynamical phenomena precludes the use of linear models for which exact analytic techniques are available. However, inference on standard nonlinear models quickly becomes intractable. In some cases, ...

  16. Drift Degradation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA code, which determines structurally controlled key-block failure, is not applicable for stress-controlled failure in the lithophysal units. To address these limitations, additional numerical codes have been included that can explicitly apply seismic and thermal loads, providing significant improvements to the analysis of drift degradation and extending the validity of drift degradation models.

  17. Reproductive phenomena of a sexual buffelgrass plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taliaferro, Charles Millard

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPRODUCTIVE PHENOMENA OF A SEXUAL EUFFELGRASS PLANT A Thesis 3y Charles Millard Taliaferro . Submitted to the Graduate School of the A & M University of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1964 Major Sub?'ect Agronomy REPRODUCTIVE PHENOMENA OF A SEXUAL BUFFELGRASS PLANT A Thesis Charles Millard Taliaferro Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) / ember) (Member) Memb er) January...

  18. Degradation Of Cementitious Materials Associated With Saltstone Disposal Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G. P; Smith, F. G. III

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone facilities at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) stabilize and dispose of low-level radioactive salt solution originating from liquid waste storage tanks at the site. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives treated salt solution and mixes the aqueous waste with dry cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash to form a grout slurry which is mechanically pumped into concrete disposal cells that compose the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The solidified grout is termed “saltstone”. Cementitious materials play a prominent role in the design and long-term performance of the SDF. The saltstone grout exhibits low permeability and diffusivity, and thus represents a physical barrier to waste release. The waste form is also reducing, which creates a chemical barrier to waste release for certain key radionuclides, notably Tc-99. Similarly, the concrete shell of an SDF disposal unit (SDU) represents an additional physical and chemical barrier to radionuclide release to the environment. Together the waste form and the SDU compose a robust containment structure at the time of facility closure. However, the physical and chemical state of cementitious materials will evolve over time through a variety of phenomena, leading to degraded barrier performance over Performance Assessment (PA) timescales of thousands to tens of thousands of years. Previous studies of cementitious material degradation in the context of low-level waste disposal have identified sulfate attack, carbonation influenced steel corrosion, and decalcification (primary constituent leaching) as the primary chemical degradation phenomena of most relevance to SRS exposure conditions. In this study, degradation time scales for each of these three degradation phenomena are estimated for saltstone and concrete associated with each SDU type under conservative, nominal, and best estimate assumptions. The nominal value (NV) is an intermediate result that is more probable than the conservative estimate (CE) and more defensible than the best estimate (BE). The combined effects of multiple phenomena are then considered to determine the most limiting degradation time scale for each cementitious material. Degradation times are estimated using a combination of analytic solutions from literature and numerical simulation codes provided through the DOE Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Software Toolbox (http://cementbarriers.org). For the SDU 2 design, the roof, wall, and floor components are projected to become fully degraded under Nominal conditions at 3866, 923, and 1413 years, respectively. For SDU 4 the roof and floor are estimated to be fully degraded under Nominal conditions after 1137 and 1407 years, respectively; the wall is assumed to be fully degraded at time zero in the most recent PA simulations. Degradation of these concrete barriers generally occurs from combined sulfate attack and corrosion of embedded steel following carbonation. Saltstone is projected to degrade very slowly by decalcification, with complete degradation occurring in excess of 200,000 years for any SDU type. Complete results are provided.

  19. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  20. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  1. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  2. Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpkins, Alex

    Coulomb Friction Viscous Friction Stribeck Friction Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity. Static Friction Model: Friction force opposes the direction of motion when the sliding velocity is zero. Coulomb Friction Model: Friction force

  3. Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goldak, J.A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DebRoy, T.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rappaz, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

  4. Non-thermal phenomena in galaxies clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfranco Brunetti

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of diffuse synchrotron radio emission and, more recently, of the hard X-ray (HXR) tails have triggered a growing interest about non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters. After a brief review of the most important evidences for non-thermal emission, I will focus on the origin of the emitting particles and of the hadronic component. In particular I will describe the particle-injection and -acceleration mechanisms at work in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and, at the same time, discuss the possibility to test current modellings of these phenomena with future radio, HXR, and gamma rays observatories.

  5. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.A. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)); Durham, M.D. (ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)); Sowa, W.A. (California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Combustion Lab.); Himes, R.M. (Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States)); Mahaffey, W.A. (CHAM of North America, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States))

    1991-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  6. Degradation and recovery of Caribbean coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paredes, Gustavo Adolfo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Causes of coral reef degradation: Response. Science, 302,E. (2008) Baselines and Degradation of Coral Reefs in theCauses of coral reef degradation - Response. Science, 302,

  7. TRANSPORT NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard C. De Jonghe TWO-AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard C. De JongheAND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard C. De Jonghe

  8. Method of microbially degrading trinitrotoluene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN); Vass, Arpad (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of degrading trinitrotoluene (TNT) includes contacting the TNT with intra-amoebic isolate CR-1, ATCC 75528.

  9. TALSPEAK Solvent Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Bruce J. Mincher

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the radiolytic degradation behavior of organic molecules involved in new or existing schemes for the recycle of used nuclear fuels is of significant interest for sustaining a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Here we have conducted several lines of investigation to begin understanding the effects of radiolysis on the aqueous phase of the TALSPEAK process for the separation of the trivalent lanthanides from the trivalent actinides. Using the 60-Co irradiator at the INL, we have begun to quantify the effects of radiation on the aqueous phase complexants used in this separation technique, and how this will affect the actinide lanthanide separation factor. In addition we have started to develop methodologies for stable product identification, a key element in determining the degradation pathways. We have also introduced a methodology to investigate the effects of alpha radiolysis that has previously received limited attention.

  10. Degradation Mechanisms of La-Sr-Co-Fe-O3 SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simner, Steve P.; Anderson, Michael D.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term stability of anode-supported YSZ electrolyte SOFCs utilizing (La0.6Sr0.4)0.98Co0.2Fe0.8O3-? (LSCF-6428) cathodes was assessed. Samples tested for 500 hours at 750 C and 0.7V indicated ?50% degradation. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis indicated no obvious microstructural or chemical phenomena that could explain the high degradation, x-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that enrichment of Sr at the cathode-electrolyte and cathode-current collector interfaces was at least partially responsible for the observed degradation.

  11. Speeding up Entanglement Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann; V. M Villalba

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entanglement between two free bosonic modes can be determined via detection of each mode by different observers and then observing the correlations between their measurements. We show that such entanglement is degraded as a function of time if one observer begins in a state of inertial motion but ends in a state of uniform acceleration while the other remains inertial. At late times we recover previously established results for observers in relative uniform acceleration.

  12. Possible new wave phenomena in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerzy Szwed

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well-known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than currently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of the wave nature of information coding.

  13. ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report+ on ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA . in a COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK presented-coil tokamak configurations that would achieve ignition under presently accepted scaling laws. Studies the extent to which these compact tokamak ignition experiments can resolve the technical issue of under

  14. PHASE COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Ben

    PHASE COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTORS A. LAMACRAFT AND B. D. SIMONS Cavendish on the quasi­particle properties of disordered superconductors. Again, attempts to develop a consistent theory has been formulated. Yet, a complete description of the phenomenology of the disordered superconductor

  15. USE OF COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE ARRAYS TO ADVANCE THE UNDERSTANDING OF SELECTED CORROSION PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.D. Budiansky; F. Bocher; H. Cong; M.F. Hurley; J.R. Scully

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of multi-coupled electrode arrays in various corrosion applications is discussed with the main goal of advancing the understanding of various corrosion phenomena. Both close packed and far spaced electrode configurations are discussed. Far spaced electrode arrays are optimized for high throughput experiments capable of elucidating the effects of various variables on corrosion properties. For instance the effects of a statistical distribution of flaws on corrosion properties can be examined. Close packed arrays enable unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the behavior of local anodes and cathodes. Interactions between corrosion sites can trigger or inhibit corrosion phenomena and affect corrosion damage evolution.

  16. Outdoor PV Degradation Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Smith, R. M.; Osterwald, C. R.; Gelak, E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output; may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined; accurately. At the Performance and Energy Rating Testbed (PERT) at the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) at the; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) more than 40 modules from more than 10 different manufacturers; were compared for their long-term outdoor stability. Because it can accommodate a large variety of modules in a; limited footprint the PERT system is ideally suited to compare modules side-by-side under the same conditions.

  17. Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

  18. Search for collective phenomena in hadron interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokoulina, E. S., E-mail: kokoulin@sunse.jinr.ru; Nikitin, V. A., E-mail: nikitin@sunse.jinr.ru; Petukhov, Y. P., E-mail: Yuri.Petukhov@ihep.r [LHEP, JINR (Russian Federation); Karpov, A. V., E-mail: karpov@dm.komisc.ru; Kutov, A. Ya., E-mail: kutov@dm.komisc.r [Komi SC UrD RAS, Department of Mathematics (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    New results of the search for collective phenomena have been obtained and analyzed in the present report. The experimental studies are carried out on U-70 accelerator of IHEP in Protvino. It is suggested that these phenomena can be discovered at the energy range of 50-70 GeV in the extreme multiplicity region since the high-density matter can form in this very region. The collective behavior of secondary particles is considered to manifest itself in the Bose-Einstein condensation of pions, Vavilov-Cherenkov gluon radiation, excess of soft-photon yield, and other unique phenomena. The perceptible peak in the angular distribution has been revealed. It was interpreted as the gluon radiation and so the parton matter refraction index was determined. The new software was designed for the track reconstruction based on Kalman Filter technique. This algorithm allows one to estimate more precisely the track parameters (especially momentum). The search for Bose-Einstein condensation can be continued by using the selected events with the multiplicity of more than eight charged particles. The gluon dominance model predictions have shown good agreement with the multiplicity distribution at high multiplicity and confirmed the guark-gluon medium formation under these conditions.

  19. Analysis of hydrodynamic phenomena in simulant experiments investigating cavity interactions following postulated vessel meltthrough

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of hydrodynamic phenomena in simulant experiments examining aspects of ex-vessel material interactions in a PWR reactor cavity following postulated core meltdown and localized breaching of the reactor vessel has been carried out. While previous analyses of the tests examined thresholds for the onset of sweepout of fluid from the cavity, the present analysis considers the progression of specific hydrodynamic phenomena involved in the dispersal process: crater formation due to gas jet impingement, radial wave motion and growth, entrainment and transport of liquid droplets, liquid layer formation due to droplet recombination, fluidization of liquid remaining in the cavity, removal of fluidized liquid droplets from the cavity, and the ultimate removal of the remaining liquid layer within the tunnel passageway. Phenomenological models which may be used to predict the phenomena are presented.

  20. Kinematic entanglement degradation of fermionic cavity modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolai Friis; Antony R. Lee; David Edward Bruschi; Jorma Louko

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the entanglement and the non-locality of a (1+1)-dimensional massless Dirac field confined to a cavity on a worldtube that consists of inertial and uniformly accelerated segments, for small accelerations but arbitrarily long travel times. The correlations between the accelerated field modes and the modes in an inertial reference cavity are periodic in the durations of the individual trajectory segments, and degradation of the correlations can be entirely avoided by fine-tuning the individual or relative durations of the segments. Analytic results for selected trajectories are presented. Differences from the corresponding bosonic correlations are identified and extensions to massive fermions are discussed.

  1. Interfacial phenomena on selected cathode materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostecki, Robert; Matsuo, Yoshiaki; McLarnon, Frank

    2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out a series of surface studies of selected cathode materials. Instrumental techniques such as Raman microscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and atomic force microscopy were used to investigate the cathode surfaces. The goal of this study was to identify detrimental processes which occur at the electrode/electrolyte interface and can lead to electrode degradation and failure during cycling and/or storage at elevated temperatures.

  2. Fast flow phenomena in a toroidal plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOMFailure Modesflow phenomena in a

  3. WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

  4. Graceful Degradation Via Versions: Specifications and Implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thekkath, Chandramohan A.

    Graceful Degradation Via Versions: Specifications and Implementations Lidong Zhou, Vijayan to degraded system behavior that deviates from the system's specification and even causing complete unavailability of the system. This paper advocates the notion of graceful degradation as a complementary

  5. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY SCALABLE GRACEFUL DEGRADATION FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY SCALABLE GRACEFUL DEGRADATION FOR DISTRIBUTED EMBEDDED SYSTEMS become a major impediment to system dependability. Graceful degradation mechanisms can potentially degrading system tolerates partial system failures by providing reduced functionality with the remaining

  6. Degradation of Isotopic Lactate and Acetate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronoff, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prescribed, BaC03 from the degradation of Ba acetnte co~~above procedure by the degradation of sjnthetic radio-lacticNo. W-7405-Eng o -48 DEGRADATION OF ISOTOPIC LACTATE AND

  7. Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alinger, Matthew

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the progress made during the October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-NT0004109 for the U. S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled “Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes”. The primary objective of this program is to develop a performance degradation mitigation path for high performing, cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Strategies to mitigate performance degradation are developed and implemented. In addition, thermal spray manufacturing of SOFCs is explored. Combined, this work establishes a basis for cost-effective SOFC cells.

  8. Critical phenomena in N=2* plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

    2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study finite temperature critical behaviour of mass deformed N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling, also known as N=2* gauge theory. For certain range of the mass parameters, N=2* plasma undergoes a second-order phase transition. We compute all the static critical exponents of the model and demonstrate that the transition is of the mean-field theory type. We show that the dynamical critical exponent of the model is z=0, with multiple hydrodynamic relaxation rates at criticality. We point out that the dynamical critical phenomena in N=2* plasma is outside the dynamical universality classes established by Hohenberg and Halperin.

  9. TRANSIENT LUNAR PHENOMENA: REGULARITY AND REALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crotts, Arlin P. S. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient lunar phenomena (TLPs) have been reported for centuries, but their nature is largely unsettled, and even their existence as a coherent phenomenon is controversial. Nonetheless, TLP data show regularities in the observations; a key question is whether this structure is imposed by processes tied to the lunar surface, or by terrestrial atmospheric or human observer effects. I interrogate an extensive catalog of TLPs to gauge how human factors determine the distribution of TLP reports. The sample is grouped according to variables which should produce differing results if determining factors involve humans, and not reflecting phenomena tied to the lunar surface. Features dependent on human factors can then be excluded. Regardless of how the sample is split, the results are similar: {approx}50% of reports originate from near Aristarchus, {approx}16% from Plato, {approx}6% from recent, major impacts (Copernicus, Kepler, Tycho, and Aristarchus), plus several at Grimaldi. Mare Crisium produces a robust signal in some cases (however, Crisium is too large for a 'feature' as defined). TLP count consistency for these features indicates that {approx}80% of these may be real. Some commonly reported sites disappear from the robust averages, including Alphonsus, Ross D, and Gassendi. These reports begin almost exclusively after 1955, when TLPs became widely known and many more (and inexperienced) observers searched for TLPs. In a companion paper, we compare the spatial distribution of robust TLP sites to transient outgassing (seen by Apollo and Lunar Prospector instruments). To a high confidence, robust TLP sites and those of lunar outgassing correlate strongly, further arguing for the reality of TLPs.

  10. Perchlorate Degradation in Acetate-fed Bioreactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perchlorate Degradation in Acetate-fed Bioreactors Yanguang Song Kijung Kim, Bruce Logan Department;· Dechlorosoma sp. KJ: isolated from a perchlorate- degrading packed bed bioreactor; · Dechlorosoma sp. PDX

  11. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff...

  12. Treatise with Reasoning Proof of the Second Law of Energy Degradation: The Carnot Cycle Proof, and Entropy Transfer and Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Treatise with Reasoning Proof of the Second Law of Energy Degradation: The Carnot Cycle Proof andzation: Understanding and Defining Concepts and Phenomena III. Work and Heat Transfer, Reversibility. Physical Explanation and Reasoning Proof of the Carnot Efficiency: Thermal and Mechanical Net

  13. Self-degradable Temporary Cementitious

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and to degrade itself at 200C, 3) to evaluate the compatibility of sealers with drilling fluid, and 4) to transfer developed technology to cost-sharing industrial partners....

  14. Control of DAPK-1 degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yao

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DAPK-1 is calcium-calmodulin regulated protein kinase involved in multiple cellular pathways including apoptosis, autophagy, cell survival and motility. The cytokine TNF-? has been reported to induce the degradation of DAPK-1. Here I identified...

  15. Seawater degradation of polymeric composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Timothy Sean

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEAWATER DEGRADATION OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES A Thesis by TIMOTHY SEAN GRANT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering SEAWATER DEGRADATION OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES A Thesis by TIMOTHY SEAN GRANT Approved as to style and content by: Walter L. Bradley (Chair of mmittee) lan Letton (Member) arry ogan (Member) r John Whitcomb...

  16. Recursive T matrix algorithm for resonant multiple scattering : Applications to localized plasmon excitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Recursive T matrix algorithm for resonant multiple scattering : Applications to localized plasmon containing interacting localized plasmon resonances, surface resonances, and photonic jet phenomena plasmon resonances. c 2009 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: Keywords: Multiple scattering

  17. Fluctuations around Bjorken Flow and the onset of turbulent phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Floerchinger; Urs Achim Wiedemann

    2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how fluctuations in fluid dynamic fields can be dissipated or amplified within the characteristic spatio-temporal structure of a heavy ion collision. The initial conditions for a fluid dynamic evolution of heavy ion collisions may contain significant fluctuations in all fluid dynamical fields, including the velocity field and its vorticity components. We formulate and analyze the theory of local fluctuations around average fluid fields described by Bjorken's model. For conditions of laminar flow, when a linearized treatment of the dynamic evolution applies, we discuss explicitly how fluctuations of large wave number get dissipated while modes of sufficiently long wave-length pass almost unattenuated or can even be amplified. In the opposite case of large Reynold's numbers (which is inverse to viscosity), we establish that (after suitable coordinate transformations) the dynamics is governed by an evolution equation of non-relativistic Navier-Stokes type that becomes essentially two-dimensional at late times. One can then use the theory of Kolmogorov and Kraichnan for an explicit characterization of turbulent phenomena in terms of the wave-mode dependence of correlations of fluid dynamic fields. We note in particular that fluid dynamic correlations introduce characteristic power-law dependences in two-particle correlation functions.

  18. atmospheric pressure phenomena: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and structure compared well by atmospheric bores and solitons strongly depend upon the life cycle of these phenomena. 1. Introduction One Geerts, Bart 344 Flight Path Planning...

  19. Data-driven modeling of phenomena in wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamthe, Ankur U.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experimentation in wireless sensor networks. Commun. ACM,of Phenomena in Wireless Sensor Networks A dissertationBoavida, editors, Wireless Sensor Networks, volume 5970 of

  20. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seismic Hazard Analysis for Nuclear Facilities at the Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook A Probabilistic Approach to...

  1. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting. Presentations Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Validation of the...

  2. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  3. Degradation Modeling and Monitoring of Truncated Degradation Signals Rensheng Zhou, Nagi Gebraeel, and Nicoleta Serban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serban, Nicoleta

    Degradation Modeling and Monitoring of Truncated Degradation Signals Rensheng Zhou, Nagi Gebraeel a sensor-based degradation signal reaches a pre-specified failure threshold. Parametric degradation models, in most applications, degradation signals can only be observed up to the failure threshold resulting

  4. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Siegmann

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796]).

  5. Mining Photo-sharing Websites to Study Ecological Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    Mining Photo-sharing Websites to Study Ecological Phenomena Haipeng Zhang School of Informatics the occurrence of ecological phenomena including ground snow cover, snow fall and vegetation density. We compare and by Earth- observing satellites. Besides the immediate application to ecology, our study gives insight

  6. CHAPTER 1. COLLECTIVE PLASMA PHENOMENA 1 Collective Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    CHAPTER 1. COLLECTIVE PLASMA PHENOMENA 1 Chapter 1 Collective Plasma Phenomena The properties of a medium are determined by the microscopic processes in it. In a plasma the microscopic processes is actually limited to a distance of order the Debye length in a plasma. On length scales longer than

  7. Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 Overall structure: umbra + penumbra.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 SUNSPOTS Overall structure: umbra + penumbra in decaying spots (hysteresis-like behaviour). #12;Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 Temperature, H2, CH, CN Maltby effect: Umbrae slightly hotter in solar maximum than in minimum. Recent studies

  8. DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. V. Virkar

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL’s test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. This model is under continued development. It shows that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, within the electrolyte. The chemical potential within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just under the oxygen electrode (anode)/electrolyte interface, leading to electrode delamination. This theory is being further refined and tested by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte.

  9. Conceptual Framework to Enable Early Warning of Relevant Phenomena (Emerging Phenomena and Big Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL] [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL] [ORNL; Hively, Lee M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphs are commonly used to represent natural and man-made dynamic systems such as food webs, economic and social networks, gene regulation, and the internet. We describe a conceptual framework to enable early warning of relevant phenomena that is based on an artificial time-based, evolving network graph that can give rise to one or more recognizable structures. We propose to quantify the dynamics using the method of delays through Takens Theorem to produce another graph we call the Phase Graph. The Phase Graph enables us to quantify changes of the system that form a topology in phase space. Our proposed method is unique because it is based on dynamic system analysis that incorporates Takens Theorem, Graph Theory, and Franzosi-Pettini (F-P) theorem about topology and phase transitions. The F-P Theorem states that the necessary condition for phase transition is a change in the topology. By detecting a change in the topology that we represent as a set of M-order Phase Graphs, we conclude a corresponding change in the phase of the system. The onset of this phase change enables early warning of emerging relevant phenomena.

  10. Methods of degrading napalm B

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN); Vass, Arpad (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of degrading napalm and/or trinitrotoluene involve contacting the waste with specific intra-amoebic isolates of ATCC 40908 and/or dispersants derived therefrom. Useful isolates include is deposited as ATCC 77529, NAP-1 deposited as ATCC 77526 and 13 deposited as ATCC 77527.

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 4: High-Temperature Materials PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Ballinger, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weaver, K. D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) technique was used to identify safety-relevant/safety-significant phenomena and assess the importance and related knowledge base of high-temperature structural materials issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The major aspects of materials degradation phenomena that may give rise to regulatory safety concern for the NGNP were evaluated for major structural components and the materials comprising them, including metallic and nonmetallic materials for control rods, other reactor internals, and primary circuit components; metallic alloys for very high-temperature service for heat exchangers and turbomachinery, metallic alloys for high-temperature service for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), other pressure vessels and components in the primary and secondary circuits; and metallic alloys for secondary heat transfer circuits and the balance of plant. These materials phenomena were primarily evaluated with regard to their potential for contributing to fission product release at the site boundary under a variety of event scenarios covering normal operation, anticipated transients, and accidents. Of all the high-temperature metallic components, the one most likely to be heavily challenged in the NGNP will be the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Its thin, internal sections must be able to withstand the stresses associated with thermal loading and pressure drops between the primary and secondary loops under the environments and temperatures of interest. Several important materials-related phenomena related to the IHX were identified, including crack initiation and propagation; the lack of experience of primary boundary design methodology limitations for new IHX structures; and manufacturing phenomena for new designs. Specific issues were also identified for RPVs that will likely be too large for shop fabrication and transportation. Validated procedures for on-site welding, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), and inspections will be required for the materials of construction. High-importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy sections; and the maintenance of high emissivity of the RPV materials over their service lifetime to enable passive heat rejection from the reactor core. All identified phenomena related to the materials of construction for the IHX, RPV, and other components were evaluated and ranked for their potential impact on reactor safety.

  12. Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance are effective in increasing cation stability. With the help of computational modeling, more cations are being

  13. Cindy Zer and Guillaume Chanfreau Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    Cindy Zer and Guillaume Chanfreau Degradation RNase III Cleavage and Exonucleolytic Aci-reductone Dioxygenase mRNA by RNase III Cleavage and Exonucleolytic Degradation* Received for publication, May 31, 2005

  14. Cellulose degradation system of Cytophaga hutchinsonii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chao-Kuo

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Cytophaga hutchinsonii, an aerobic gliding bacterium with cellulose-degrading ability, was studied, since its cellulase system was unknown and might be very different from those of other cellulose-degrading ...

  15. PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project conducted fundamental studies of PEM MEA degradation. Insights gained from these studies were disseminated to assist MEA manufacturers in understanding degradation mechanisms and work towards DOE 2010 fuel cell durability targets.

  16. Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode. Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode. Abstract: The degradation of the ionic pathway throughout the catalyst...

  17. Enzymatic Degradation of Cellulose by the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Christopher Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of plant cell wall degradation by the model filamentousessential for chitin degradation, J. Biol. Chem. 280, 28492-Trichoderma-Reesei in the Degradation of Cellulose, Bio-

  18. SLOW DEGRADATION AND ELECTRON INJECTION IN SODIUM-B ALUMINAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer of 703 XBB 804 4126 Degradation of sulfur side ofsilver staining. The degradation layer becomes more uniformMaterials Science SLOW DEGRADATION AND ELECTRON INJECTION IN

  19. INITIATION OF DEGRADATION IN POLYCRYSTALLINE SODIUM-BETA ALUMINA ELECTROLYTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, L.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boundaries. XBB 804 4130 2B Degradation initiation at 300 C,the Proceedings INITIATION OF DEGRADATION IN POLYCRYSTALLINEs w a m INITIATION OF DEGRADATION IN POLYCRYSTALLINE SODIUM-

  20. In vitro analysis of ER-associated protein degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Renee Marie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    required for ER-associated degradation. Nat Cell Biol, 3,Cue1p in ubiquitination and degradation at the ER surface.1999) Measuring protein degradation with green fluorescent

  1. MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT for the modeling of geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production/injection and the cyclic dependence

  2. Title of Dissertation: ANALOGIES AS CATEGORIZATION PHENOMENA: STUDIES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: ANALOGIES AS CATEGORIZATION PHENOMENA: STUDIES FROM SCIENTIFIC DISCOURSE Leslie Jill Atkins, Ph.D., 2004 Dissertation Directed By: Associate Professor David Hammer knowledge. This dissertation begins with the contention that science classrooms should encourage scientific

  3. High speed imaging of transient non-Newtonian fluid phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallup, Benjamin H. (Benjamin Hodsdon), 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I investigate the utility of high speed imaging for gaining scientific insight into the nature of short-duration transient fluid phenomena, specifically applied to the Kaye effect. The Kaye effect, noted ...

  4. ADSORPTION PHENOMENA AND MACROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF FERRONEMATICS CAUSED BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sluckin, Tim

    ADSORPTION PHENOMENA AND MACROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF FERRONEMATICS CAUSED BY ORIENTATIONAL the effect of adsorption and desorption of rod-like magnetic grains on the macroscopic properties and the nematic orientational texture. In the presence of ferroparticle adsorption, the segregation effect

  5. Non-equilibrium fluctuation induced-phenomena in quantum electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golyk, Vladyslav Alexander

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study fluctuation-induced phenomena in systems out of thermal equilibrium, resulting from the stochastic nature of quantum and thermal fluctuations of electromagnetic currents and waves. Specifically, we study radiative ...

  6. Simulation and design optimization for linear wave phenomena on metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saŕ-Seoane, Joel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodicity can change materials properties in a very unintuitive way. Many wave propagation phenomena, such as waveguides, light bending structures or frequency filters can be modeled through finite periodic structures ...

  7. Novel resonant and light-guiding phenomena in photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamam, Rafif E. (Rafif Ezzat)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate theoretically five novel resonant and light-guiding photonics phenomena. First, we develop a universal coupled mode theory (CMT) treatment of the freespace scattering of waves from resonant objects. This ...

  8. CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility (HSS CRAD 45-54) This Criteria Review and Approach Document (HSS CRAD 45-54)...

  9. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    Abstract Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). ...

  10. Characterization of Microexplosion Phenomena of Methanol-Glycerol Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Ge-Yi

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions even when combusting glycerol-based mixtures. In this research, microexplosion phenomena of methanol-in-glycerol mixtures have been studied using a high speed camera and an acoustic sensor system. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm has been...

  11. Service Degradation in Context Management Ahmed Shawky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Service Degradation in Context Management Frameworks Ahmed Shawky Networks and Security Dept aware application. This paper will review the service degradation in Context Management Frameworks (CMF in sever degradation? 2) What is the impact of the delay estimation on the mmPr? 3) How can this knowledge

  12. Permeation & Degradation Data Introduction to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyet, Alwell

    Permeation & Degradation Data 8thEDITION #12;Introduction to the 8th Edition When reviewing. Ansell's ASTM standard permeation and degradation tests are presented on the following pages as an aid ratings are comparisons of permeation rates to each other. Degradation is a reduction in one or more

  13. Structural Degradation in Mediterranean Sea Food Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Structural Degradation in Mediterranean Sea Food Webs: Testing Ecological Hypotheses Using in species composition and abun- dance in marine ecosystems which translate into degradation of food of ecosystem degradation. We assembled species lists and ecological information for both re- gions and time

  14. ACCELERATED DESTRUCTIVE DEGRADATION TESTS: DATA, MODELS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACCELERATED DESTRUCTIVE DEGRADATION TESTS: DATA, MODELS, AND ANALYSIS Luis A. Escobar Dept Group Hewlett-Packard Corvallis, OR 97330, USA Abstract Degradation data analysis is a powerful tool for reliability assessment. Useful reliability information is available from degradation data when there are few

  15. Quantum coherence phenomena in x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anisimov, Petr Mikhailovich

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN X-RAY OPTICS A Dissertation by PETR MIKHAILOVICH ANISIMOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December... 2008 Major Subject: Physics QUANTUM COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN X-RAY OPTICS A Dissertation by PETR MIKHAILOVICH ANISIMOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  16. Seawater degradation of polymeric composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Timothy Sean

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level, without a noticeable effect on material property degradation, in graphite epoxy systems. The effect of pressure is small; the trends indicate that pressure increases slightly the equilibrium saturation level. DEDICATION This work.../Graphite SEM Results 13 Vinylester 510/Graphite SEM Results 14 Comparison of Equilibrium Saturation Levels 15 Comparison of Ultimate Tensile Strengths 16 Summary of Equilibrium Saturation Levels Page 26 32 40 42 47 52 54 63 65 67 69 71 73...

  17. Methods for degrading lignocellulosic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlasenko, Elena (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA); Xu, Feng (Davis, CA)

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading a lignocellulosic material, comprising: treating the lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying a lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant; (b) fermenting the saccharified lignocellulosic material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microorganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  18. Methods for degrading lignocellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vlasenko, Elena (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA); Xu, Feng (Davis, CA)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading a lignocellulosic material, comprising: treating the lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying a lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant; (b) fermenting the saccharified lignocellulosic material of step (a) with one or more fermentating microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  19. Stimulus Degradation and Sleep Deprivation THE EFFECTS OF STIMULUS DEGRADATION AFTER 48

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stimulus Degradation and Sleep Deprivation 1 THE EFFECTS OF STIMULUS DEGRADATION AFTER 48 HOURS OF SLEEP DEPRIVATION Running Head: Stimulus Degradation and Sleep Deprivation Brian C. Rakitin, Ph.D.1, 4-342-1838 (fax) br130@columbia.edu #12;Stimulus Degradation and Sleep Deprivation 2 Abstract Study Objectives

  20. Degradation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 |A Sign In About | Careers

  1. Optical transmittance degradation in tapered fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masazumi Fujiwara; Kiyota Toubaru; Shigeki Takeuchi

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the cause of optical transmittance degradation in tapered fibers. Degradation commences immediately after fabrication and it eventually reduces the transmittance to almost zero. It is a major problem that limits applications of tapered fibers. We systematically investigated the effect of the dust-particle density and the humidity on the degradation dynamics. The results clearly show that the degradation is mostly due to dust particles and that it is not related to the humidity. In a dust free environment it is possible to preserve the transmittance with a degradation of less than the noise (+/- ?0.02) over 1 week.

  2. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  3. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  4. Syntrophic Degradation of Lactate in Methanogenic Co-cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Birte

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics during lactate degradation 2 Lactate + 4 H 2 O ? 2N-2222 Syntrophic Degradation of Lactate in Methanogenic

  5. Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials Performance Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials Performance The collaborative...

  6. Local Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Local Transportation. Transportation from the Airport to Hotel. There are two types of taxi companies that operate at the airport: special and regular taxis (

  7. Energy Localization in Molecules, Bifurcation Phenomena, and Their Spectroscopic Signatures: The Global View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of which require a comprehensive understanding of molecular dynamics. Generally, elementary chemical analysis, valid at low excitation energies, inaccurate. The molecular potential energy surfaces (PESs of vibrationally excited and reacting molecules. As found for general nonlinear dynamical systems with a few

  8. Research subjects for analytical estimation of core degradation at Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagase, F.; Ishikawa, J.; Kurata, M.; Yoshida, H.; Kaji, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Amaya, M; Okumura, K.; Katsuyama, J. [Fukushima Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimation of the accident progress and status inside the pressure vessels (RPV) and primary containment vessels (PCV) is required for appropriate conductance of decommissioning in the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP. For that, it is necessary to obtain additional experimental data and revised models for the estimation using computer codes with increased accuracies. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, considering previously obtained information, conditions specific to the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP accident, and recent progress of experimental and analytical technologies. As a result, research and development items have been picked up in terms of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the RPV and PCV, progression of fuel bundle degradation, failure of the lower head of RPV, and analysis of the accident. This paper introduces the selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, research plans and recent results from the JAEA's corresponding research programs. (authors)

  9. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.A. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Durham, M.D. [ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States); Sowa, W.A. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Himes, R.M. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Mahaffey, W.A. [CHAM of North America, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States)

    1991-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  10. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen degradation of materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    degradation of materials ECIS-I2CNER: Hydrogen Infrastructure Research Aids Energy Independence Goal On February 14, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC),...

  12. Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions SANUM Conference (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

  13. Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions CSIRO CSS TCP Detournay (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

  14. Computational analysis of temperature rise phenomena in electric induction motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    machines in general, and induction motors in particular, temperature limits is a key factor affectingComputational analysis of temperature rise phenomena in electric induction motors Ying Huai Kraftwerkstechnik, PetersenstraĂ?e 30, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany b Faculty of Science and Engineering, Mads Clausen

  15. Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana Songprakorp BSc, Prince of Songkhla University to the modeling and under- standing of the dynamic behavior of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs

  16. Electromagnetically and Thermally Driven Flow Phenomena in Electroslag Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) Electromagnetically and Thermally Driven Flow Phenomena in Electroslag Welding A. H. DILAWARI, J for the Electroslag Welding Process. In the formulation, allowance has been made {or both etee- tromagnetic and b in the use of electroslag welding (ESW), particularly for the construction of thick walled pressure vessels

  17. FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    size distribution model for estimating oil reserves and for use in forest management under the `natural estimates of oil reserves, and be of use for ecosystem based forest management under the `naturalFOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract

  18. Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modication experiment at Troms, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modi®cation experiment at Tromsù, Norway N. F-9037, Tromsù, and The University Courses of Svalbard, Svalbard, Norway 3 EISCAT, N-9027 Ramfjùrdbotn, Norway Received: 13 October 1997 / Revised: 11 May 1998 / Accepted: 26 May 1998 Abstract. We present

  19. Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model K nuclear matter produced by heavy-ion reactions is isospin asymmetric. Although the critical exponents. Miyazaki Abstract We have studied the liquid-gas phase transition of warm asymmetric nuclear matter

  20. New Phenomena in NC Field Theory and Emergent Spacetime Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ydri, Badis [Institute of Physics BM Annaba University, BP 12-23000-Annaba (Algeria)

    2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief review of two nonperturbative phenomena typical of noncommutative field theory which are known to lead to the perturbative instability known as the UV-IR mixing. The first phenomena concerns the emergence/evaporation of spacetime geometry in matrix models which describe perturbative noncommutative gauge theory on fuzzy backgrounds. In particular we show that the transition from a geometrical background to a matrix phase makes the description of noncommutative gauge theory in terms of fields via the Weyl map only valid below a critical value g*. The second phenomena concerns the appearance of a nonuniform ordered phase in noncommutative scalar {phi}{sup 4} field theory and the spontaneous symmetry breaking of translational/rotational invariance which happens even in two dimensions. We argue that this phenomena also originates in the underlying matrix degrees of freedom of the noncommutative field theory. Furthermore it is conjectured that in addition to the usual WF fixed point at {theta} = 0 there must exist a novel fixed point at {theta} = {infinity} corresponding to the quartic hermitian matrix model.

  1. Assessment of Relevant Physical Phenomena Controlling Thermal Performance of Nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Assessment of Relevant Physical Phenomena Controlling Thermal Performance of Nanofluids Majid thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Through an investigation, a large degree of randomness and scatter has and lower bounds are developed for steady-state conduction in stationary nanofluids. Comparisons between

  2. ENVIRONENTAL DEGRADATION OF ADVANCED AND TRADITIONAL ENGINERING Chapter 14. Forms of Polymer Degradation: Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roylance, David

    ENVIRONENTAL DEGRADATION OF ADVANCED AND TRADITIONAL ENGINERING MATERIALS Chapter 14. Forms of Polymer Degradation: Overview Margaret Roylance and David Roylance 1. Introduction 1.1. Usage of polymeric of Environmental Degradation in Polymers 2.1. Thermal depolymerization 2.2. Photolytic oxidation 2.3. Moisture

  3. Lysozyme Degradation by the Bovine Multicatalytic Proteinase Complex (Proteasome): Evidence for a Nonprocessive Mode of Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    Lysozyme Degradation by the Bovine Multicatalytic Proteinase Complex (Proteasome): Evidence for a Nonprocessive Mode of Degradation Rong Wang, Brian T. Chait, Imrey Wolf,§ Ronald A. Kohanski,§ and Christopher suggest that degradation of proteins by the complex is processive and have led to the proposal

  4. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and carbon corrosion measurements #12;Budget DOE Cost Share Recipient Cost Share TOTAL $8,225,000 $501,263 $8 of an integrated comprehensive model of cell degradation · Methods to mitigate degradation of components #12 and mechanical stabilized ionomers. M4: LANL: Completion of drive cycle (load) life testing with start

  5. Natural phenomena evaluations of the K-25 site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.

    1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards are used for the temporary storage of UF{sub 6} normal assay cylinders and long-term storage of other UF{sub 6} cylinders. The K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards consist of six on-site areas: K-1066-B, K-1066-E, K-1066-F, K-1066-J, K-1066-K and K-1066-L. There are no permanent structures erected on the cylinder yards, except for five portable buildings. The operating contractor for the K-25 Site is preparing a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) to examine the safety related aspects of the K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards. The SAR preparation encompasses many tasks terminating in consequence analysis for the release of gaseous and liquid UF{sub 6}, one of which is the evaluation of natural phenomena threats, such as earthquakes, floods, and winds. In support of the SAR, the six active cylinder storage yards were evaluated for vulnerabilities to natural phenomena, earthquakes, high winds and tornados, tornado-generated missiles, floods (local and regional), and lightning. This report summarizes those studies. 30 refs.

  6. THE AUDIO DEGRADATION TOOLBOX AND ITS APPLICATION TO ROBUSTNESS EVALUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauch, Matthias

    THE AUDIO DEGRADATION TOOLBOX AND ITS APPLICATION TO ROBUSTNESS EVALUATION Matthias Mauch Sebastian.ewert}@eecs.qmul.ac.uk ABSTRACT We introduce the Audio Degradation Toolbox (ADT) for the controlled degradation of audio signals degradation. For example, audio is degraded by low-quality microphones, noisy recording environments, MP3

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Super-Explosions in the Universe and Related High-Energy Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Postnov

    2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent progress in studies of gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and host galaxies is discussed. The emphasis is given to high-energy phenomena associated with gamma-ray burst explosions: high-energy cosmic rays, neutrinos, gravitational waves. We also show how the relativistic fireball model for GRBs can be used to constrain modern theories of large and infinite extra-dimensions. In particular, in the frame of 5D gravity with the Standard Model localized on 3D brane (Dvali et al. 2000), the very existence of relativistic fireballs of $\\sim 10^{53}$ ergs puts the lower bound on the quantum gravity scale $\\sim 0.1$ eV.

  8. The ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway directs ubiquitin-mediated degradation of a variety of ER-associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    476 The ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway directs ubiquitin-mediated degradation carboxypeptidase Y DER degradation in the ER ERAD ER-associated degradation FPP farnesyl pyrophosphate HMGR 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase HRD HMG-CoA reductase degradation SCAP SREBP cleavage

  9. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Yuhu [PPPL; Calzolaio, Ciro [Univ of Geneva; Senatore, Carmine [Univ of Geneva

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanical loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.

  10. On the multiscale origins of fracture resistance in human bone and its biological degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and   its  biological  degradation   DISCLAIMER   This  and   its  biological  degradation   E.  A.  Zimmermanntissue  fails  due  to  degradation  of  the  collagen  

  11. Thermal degradation of the performance of elastomeric bearings for seismic isolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirazi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Thermal Degradation of the Performance90 Degradation of93 5 DEGRADATION PHENOMENON IN ELASTOMERIC BEARINGS AND THE

  12. ESM of Ionic and Electrochemical Phenomena on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [Pennsylvania State University; Balke, Nina [ORNL; McCorkle, Morgan L [ORNL; Guo, Senli [ORNL; Arruda, Thomas M [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of energy storage and conversion devices is ultimately controlled by series of intertwined ionic and electronic transport processes and electrochemical reactions at surfaces and interfaces, strongly mediated by strain and mechanical processes [1-4]. In a typical fuel cell, these include chemical species transport in porous cathode and anode materials, gas-solid electrochemical reactions at grains and triple-phase boundaries (TPBs), ionic and electronic flows in multicomponent electrodes, and chemical and electronic potential drops at internal interfaces in electrodes and electrolytes. All these phenomena are sensitively affected by the microstructure of materials from device level to the atomic scales as illustrated in Fig. 1. Similar spectrum of length scales and phenomena underpin operation of other energy systems including primary and secondary batteries, as well as hybrid systems such flow and metal-air/water batteries.

  13. Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Molecular Level Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay A Brandes

    2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This was a grant to support travel for scientists to present data and interact with others in their field. Specifically, speakers presented their data in a session entitled “Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Macroscopic Properties: Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Structure and Reactivity of Mineral Surfaces”. The session ran across three ˝ day periods, March 30-31 2004. The session’s organizers were David J. Wesolowski andGordon E. Brown Jr. There were a total of 30 talks presented.

  14. Fourth DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Conference: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference allowed an interchange in the natural phenomena area among designers, safety professionals, and managers. The papers presented in Volume I of the proceedings are from sessions I - VIII which cover the general topics of: DOE standards, lessons learned and walkdowns, wind, waste tanks, ground motion, testing and materials, probabilistic seismic hazards, risk assessment, base isolation and energy dissipation, and lifelines and floods. Individual papers are indexed separately. (GH)

  15. Search for Higgs and new phenomena at colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammel, Stephan; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of searches for the Higgs boson(s) and new phenomena is reviewed. The focus is on analyses and results from the current runs of the HERA and Tevatron experiments. The LEP experiments have released their final combined MSSM Higgs results for this conference. Also included are results from sensitivity studies of the LHC experiments and lepton flavor violating searches from the B factories, KEKB and PEP-II.

  16. Asymmetric mitosis: Unequal segregation of proteins destined for degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Robertis, Eddy M.

    Asymmetric mitosis: Unequal segregation of proteins destined for degradation Luis C. Fuentealba by polyubiquiti- nylation and proteasomal degradation after essential phosphory- lations by MAPK and glycogen- somal degradation are inherited preferentially by one mitotic daughter during somatic cell division

  17. Performance degradation of OFDM systems due to Doppler spreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, T J; Proakis, J G; Masry, E; Zeidler, James R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6, JUNE 2006 Performance Degradation of OFDM Systems Due toWANG et al. : PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION OF OFDM SYSTEM DUE TOWANG et al. : PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION OF OFDM SYSTEM DUE TO

  18. Regulation of cellular signaling pathways by endocytosis and protein degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Windler, Sarah

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    but dispensable for degradation. Dev. Cell. 2, 209-219. 40.Role for Slimb in the degradation of Drosophila Periodby targeting RhoA for degradation. Science 5651, 1775-1779.

  19. A genetic bistable switch utilizing nonlinear protein degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Daniel; Holtz, William J; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T: Nonlinear protein degradation and the function of geneticRT: Evolution of the ssrA degradation tag in Mycoplasma:AD: Inducible protein degradation in Bacillus subtilis using

  20. Degradation of Materials in Combustion Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, J. M.; Federer, J. I.; Parks, W. P. Jr.; Reid, J. S.

    Report No.2, Analysis of Basic Refractories Degraded by Residual Oil Combustion Products," ORNL/TM-6088, February 1978. [4] G. C. Wei and V. J. Tennery, "Effects of Alternate Fuels Report No.3, Analysis of High-Duty Fireclay Refractories Degraded..., April 1978. [6] G. C. Wei and V. J. Tennery, "Effects of Alternate Fuels Report No.5, Analysis of Fused Cast AZS Refractory, Silica Refractory, and High-MgO Refractory Degraded by Residual Oil Combustion Products," ORNL/TM-6278, April 1978. [7] G...

  1. Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat Transfer Fluid Containment Materials Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat Transfer...

  2. Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for Li-ion Batteries by In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for...

  3. Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy...

  4. Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics with SEI Layer Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics with SEI Layer 2011 DOE...

  5. Targeted Protein Degradation by Salmonella under Phagosome-Mimicking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Degradation by Salmonella under Phagosome-Mimicking Culture Conditions Investigated Using Comparative Targeted Protein Degradation by Salmonella under Phagosome-Mimicking...

  6. Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending Filter Life Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending...

  7. Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, D. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources...

  8. Synthetic biology approach to cellulose degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhundi, Sahreena Saleem

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on earth, is composed of ? – 1,4 – linked glucose units, which in turn form a highly ordered crystalline structure that is insoluble and recalcitrant to degradation. It is the ...

  9. Method of degrading pollutants in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Lopez-De-Victoria, G.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are a method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms. This is accomplished by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant. 5 figures.

  10. Method of degrading pollutants in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Lopez-De-Victoria, Geralyne (Irmo, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant.

  11. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  12. Uncertainty Analysis for Photovoltaic Degradation Rates (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Hansen, C.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dependable and predictable energy production is the key to the long-term success of the PV industry. PV systems show over the lifetime of their exposure a gradual decline that depends on many different factors such as module technology, module type, mounting configuration, climate etc. When degradation rates are determined from continuous data the statistical uncertainty is easily calculated from the regression coefficients. However, total uncertainty that includes measurement uncertainty and instrumentation drift is far more difficult to determine. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was chosen to investigate a comprehensive uncertainty analysis. The most important effect for degradation rates is to avoid instrumentation that changes over time in the field. For instance, a drifting irradiance sensor, which can be achieved through regular calibration, can lead to a substantially erroneous degradation rates. However, the accuracy of the irradiance sensor has negligible impact on degradation rate uncertainty emphasizing that precision (relative accuracy) is more important than absolute accuracy.

  13. Degradation of Trichloroethylene Using Advanced Reduction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzaneh, Hajar

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    , photolysis, and photocatalysis. According to their results, the 10 degradation rate decreased by increasing TCE initial concentration whereas, it was increased by increasing the amount of NZLc to a certain value and the rate did not increase further...

  14. Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, D. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources...

  15. Cyanide-degrading enzymes for bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basile, Lacy Jamel

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    CYANIDE-DEGRADING ENZYMES FOR BIOREMEDIATION A Thesis by LACY JAMEL BASILE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 2008 Major Subject: Microbiology CYANIDE-DEGRADING ENZYMES FOR BIOREMEDIATION A Thesis by LACY JAMEL BASILE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  16. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming © Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

  17. Anderson localization of partially incoherent light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capeta, D.; Radic, J.; Buljan, H. [Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, PP 332, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Szameit, A.; Segev, M. [Physics Department and Solid State Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study Anderson localization and propagation of partially spatially incoherent wavepackets in linear disordered potentials, motivated by the insight that interference phenomena resulting from multiple scattering are affected by the coherence of the waves. We find that localization is delayed by incoherence: the more incoherent the waves are, the longer they diffusively spread while propagating in the medium. However, if all the eigenmodes of the system are exponentially localized (as in one- and two-dimensional disordered systems), any partially incoherent wavepacket eventually exhibits localization with exponentially decaying tails, after sufficiently long propagation distances. Interestingly, we find that the asymptotic behavior of the incoherent beam is similar to that of a single instantaneous coherent realization of the beam.

  18. Nonlocal Phenomena from Noncommutative Pre-Planckian Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Heller; W. Sasin

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A model unifying general relativity with quantum mechanics is further developed. It is based on a noncommutative geometry which supposedly modelled the universe in its pre-Planckian epoch. The geometry is totally nonlocal with no time and no space in their usual meaning. They emerge only in the transition process from the noncommutative epoch to the standard space-time physics. Observational aspects of this model are discussed. It is shown that various nonlocal phenomena can be explained as remnants of the primordial noncommutative epoch. In particular, we explain the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment, the horizon problem in cosmology, and the appearance of singularities in general relativity.

  19. Computer simulation of mixing phenomena in AFBC boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Sha, W.T.; Petrill, E.M.; Howe, W.C.; Bass, J.W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model has been developed to investigate the detailed thermal-hydraulic mixing phenomena in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor. The model is three-dimensional and transient. The solution of the conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy as a boundary value problem in space and an initial value problem in time are embodied in the COMMIX computer code. The model has been applied to investigate several different over-fire air port configurations to assess the impact of the thermal mixing processes. The results show the usefulness of such analysis to design considerations. 8 refs., 17 figs.

  20. Lattice analysis for the energy scale of QCD phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arata Yamamoto; Hideo Suganuma

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a new framework in lattice QCD to study the relevant energy scale of QCD phenomena. By considering the Fourier transformation of link variable, we can investigate the intrinsic energy scale of a physical quantity nonperturbatively. This framework is broadly available for all lattice QCD calculations. We apply this framework for the quark-antiquark potential and meson masses in quenched lattice QCD. The gluonic energy scale relevant for the confinement is found to be less than 1 GeV in the Landau or Coulomb gauge.

  1. Local Universities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC)Department ofchampionshipLocal

  2. Local Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let usNucleartearing mode flows andPress)Local

  3. New Method to Characterize Degradation of First Surface Aluminum Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, F.; Heller, P.; Meyen, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Kennedy, C.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Schmucker, M.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the development of a new optical instrument capable of characterizing the aging process of enhanced first surface aluminum reflectors for concentrating solar power (CSP) application. Samples were exposed outdoors at different sites and in accelerated exposure tests. All samples exposed outdoors showed localized corrosion spots. Degradation originated from points of damage in the protective coating, but propagated underneath the protective coating. The degraded samples were analyzed with a microscope and with a newly designed space-resolved specular reflectometer (SR)2 that is capable of optically detecting and characterizing the corrosion spots. The device measures the specular reflectance at three acceptance angles and the wavelengths with spatial resolution using a digital camera's CMOS sensor. It can be used to measure the corrosion growth rate during outdoor and accelerated exposure tests. These results will allow a correlation between the degraded mirror surface and its specular reflectance.

  4. Squeezout phenomena and boundary layer formation of a model ionic liquid under confinement and charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Capozza; A. Vanossi; A. Benassi; E. Tosatti

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical charging of parallel plates confining a model ionic liquid down to nanoscale distances yields a variety of charge-induced changes in the structural features of the confined film. That includes even-odd switching of the structural layering and charging-induced solidification and melting, with important changes of local ordering between and within layers, and of squeezout behavior. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we explore this variety of phenomena in the simplest charged Lennard-Jones coarse-grained model including or excluding the effect a neutral tail giving an anisotropic shape to one of the model ions. Using these models and open conditions permitting the flow of ions in and out of the interplate gap, we simulate the liquid squeezout to obtain the distance dependent structure and forces between the plates during their adiabatic appraoch under load. Simulations at fixed applied force illustrate an effective electrical pumping of the ionic liquid, from a thick nearly solid film that withstands the interplate pressure for high plate charge to complete squeezout following melting near zero charge. Effective enthalpy curves obtained by integration of interplate forces versus distance show the local minima that correspond to layering, and predict the switching between one minimum and another under squeezing and charging.

  5. Final Report Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Ellingwood, B R [Georgia Institute of Technology; Oland, C Barry [ORNL

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program had primary objectives of (1) understanding the significant factors relating corrosion occurrence, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments; (2) providing the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins or estimating future residual structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; (3) providing recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by USNRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation; and (4) providing technical assistance to the USNRC (as requested) related to concrete technology. Primary program accomplishments have included development of a degradation assessment methodology; reviews of techniques and methods for inspection and repair of containment metallic pressure boundaries; evaluation of high-frequency acoustic imaging, magnetostrictive sensor, electromagnetic acoustic transducer, and multimode guided plate wave technologies for inspection of inaccessible regions of containment metallic pressure boundaries; development of a continuum damage mechanics-based approach for structural deterioration; establishment of a methodology for reliability-based condition assessments of steel containments and liners; and fragility assessments of steel containments with localized corrosion. In addition, data and information assembled under this program has been transferred to the technical community through review meetings and briefings, national and international conference participation, technical committee involvement, and publications of reports and journal articles. Appendix A provides a listing of program reports, papers, and publications; and Appendix B contains a listing of program-related presentations.

  6. Accelerated Degradation Tests: Modeling and Analysis William Q. Meeker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accelerated Degradation Tests: Modeling and Analysis William Q. Meeker Dept. of Statistics, degradation measures can be taken over time. A relationship between component failure and amount of degradation makes it possible to use degradation models and data to make inferences and predictions about

  7. Using Architectural Properties to Model and Measure Graceful Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    Using Architectural Properties to Model and Measure Graceful Degradation Charles Shelton, Philip, USA {cshelton, koopman}@cmu.edu Abstract. System-wide graceful degradation may be a viable approach degradation we present a system model that will explicitly define graceful degradation as a system property

  8. Methods For Planning Accelerated Repeated Measures Degradation Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methods For Planning Accelerated Repeated Measures Degradation Tests Brian P. Weaver Statistical repeated measures degradation tests can sometimes be used to assess product or component reliability when-variable accelerated repeated measures degradation test plan when the (possibly transformed) degradation is linear

  9. Thermal degradation chemistry of poly[bis(phenoxy)phosphazene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, Shawn Joseph

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the model compound studies and from the degradation of PBPP suggests that phenyl migration occurs at some stage during degradation. Some of these findings are in disagreement with previously reported studies. P solution-state and solid-state NMR... CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES Y ITA Dynamic degradation of PBPP samples ~othermal degradation of model compound samples. P Solution-State NMR characterization of PBPP samples. Isothermal degradation of PBPP samples Solution-State hydrolysis of PBPP samples...

  10. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  11. Understanding Degradation Pathways in Organic Photovoltaics (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, M. T.; Olson, D. C.; Garcia, A.; Kauvar, I.; Kopidakis, N.; Reese, M. O.; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs) recently attained power conversion efficiencies that are of interest for commercial production. Consequently, one of the most important unsolved issues facing a new industry is understanding what governs lifetime in organic devices and discovering solutions to mitigate degradation mechanisms. Historically, the active organic components are considered vulnerable to photo-oxidation and represent the primary degradation channel. However, we present several (shelf life and light soaking) studies pointing the relative stability of the active layers and instabilities in commonly used electrode materials. We show that engineering of the hole/electron layer at the electrode can lead to environmentally stable devices even without encapsulation.

  12. Prebreakdown and breakdown phenomena in large oil gaps under AC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saker, A.; Gournay, P.; Lesaint, O.; Tobazeon, R. [CNRS, Grenoble (France). Lab. d`Electrostatique et de Materiaux Dielectriques; Trinh, N.G. [Inst. de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Boisdon, C. [Jeumont-Schneider Transformateurs, Lyon (France)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of prebreakdown and breakdown phenomena under AC voltage in mineral oil in large gaps to 60 cm. The investigations presented concern the study of streamers and the measurement of breakdown voltages in rod-plane and sphere-plane gaps. Also, the influence of a contamination by solid particles in the oil has been considered. A specific breakdown mode under AC voltage is evidenced, where bursts of streamers lead to the lowest breakdown fields recorded. Numerical values of the mean field in oil required for direct or burst breakdown modes are derived from the experiments. As a consequence, the great sensitivity to the presence of particles on EHV transformers insulation with large oil gaps is pointed out.

  13. Magnetic Phenomena in Holographic Superconductivity with Lifshitz Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dector, Aldo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of Lifshitz dynamical critical exponent z on a family of minimal D=4+1 holographic superconducting models, with a particular focus on magnetic phenomena. We see that it is possible to have a consistent Ginzburg-Landau approach to holographic superconductivity in a Lifshitz background. By following this phenomenological approach we are able to compute a wide array of physical quantities. We also calculate the Ginzburg-Landau parameter for different condensates, and conclude that in systems with higher dynamical critical exponent, vortex formation is more strongly unfavored energetically and exhibit a stronger Type I behavior. Finally, following the perturbative approach proposed by Maeda, Natsuume and Okamura, we calculate the critical magnetic field of our models for different values of z.

  14. Some optical and dynamical phenomena in the Rindler model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Birsin; W. Hasse

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Rindler's model of a uniformly accelerated reference frame we analyze the apparent shape of rods and marked light rays for the case that the observers as well as the rods and the sources of light are at rest with respect to the Rindler observers. Contrary to the expectation suggested by the strong principle of equivalence, there is no apparent "bending down" of a light ray with direction transversal to the direction of acceleration, but a straight rod oriented orthogonal to the direction of acceleration appears bended "upwards". These optical phenomena are in accordance with the dynamical experience of observers guided by a straight track or a track curved in the same way as the marked light ray, respectively: While the former observer feels a centrifugal force directed "downwards", the centrifugal force for the latter vanishes. The properties of gyroscope transport along such tracks are correspondingly.

  15. Establishment of the new Ecuadorian solar physics phenomena division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Ericson D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crucial physical phenomena occur in the equatorial atmosphere and ionosphere, which are currently understudied and poorly understood. Then, scientific campaigns for monitoring equatorial region are required, which will provide the data for analyzing and creating adequate models. Ecuador is located in strategic geographical position where these studies can be performed, providing data for the scientific community working for understanding the nature of these physical systems. The Quito Astronomical Observatory of National Polytechnic School is working in this direction, promoting research in Space Sciences for studying the equatorial zone. With the participation and valuable collaboration of international initiatives like AWESOME, MAGDAS, SAVNET and CALLISTO, the Quito Observatory is creating a new space physics division on the basis of the International Space Weather Initiative. In this contribution, the aforementioned initiative is presented inviting leaders from others scientific projects to deploy their in...

  16. Experimental Studies of Light Emission Phenomena in Superconducting RF Cavitites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, P.L.; /SLAC; Delayen, J.R.; /Jefferson Lab; Fryberger, D.; /SLAC; Goree, W.S.; Mammosser, J.; /Jefferson Lab /SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Szalata, Z.M.; II, J.G.Weisend /SLAC

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from {approx} 1/2 to {approx} 2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects {le} 1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  17. Perchlorate Degradation in Fixed Bed Bioreactors-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perchlorate Degradation in Fixed Bed Bioreactors- 1 Bruce Logan (blogan@psu.edu) Department technologies · Emphasis here on AWWARF studies: ­ Bench scale bioreactors ­ Pilot scale studies in Redlands, CA bioreactor study-- Overview and introduction: Bruce Logan · 8:45 Review of perchlorate remediation

  18. Simultaneous Degradation of Organophosphorus Pesticides and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    of the most widely used classes of pesticide in industrialized countries. In the United States, over 40 Moraxella sp. degraded organophosphates as well as PNP rapidly, all within 10 h. The initial hydrolysis rate responses, leading to the pos- sibility of death. Repeated or prolonged exposure can cause delayed

  19. Degradation of entanglement in moving frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahpoor Moradi

    2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The distillability of bipartite entangled state as seen by moving observers has been investigated. It is found that the same initial entanglement for a state parameter $\\alpha$ and its "normalized partner" $\\sqrt{1-\\alpha^2}$ will be degraded as seen by moving observer. It is shown that in the ultra relativistic limit, the state does not have distillable entanglement for any $\\alpha$.

  20. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, D.L.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

  1. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

  2. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  3. Original article Variation in protein degradability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    represented by 1 to 16 cultivars, were studied: lucerne (Medicago sativa), white clover (Trifolium repens cultivars of lucerne harvested in the autumn of 1998 were incubated in nylon bags in 3 fistulated cows degradation. In a second experiment, lucerne (5), birdsfoot trefoil (5), white clover (4) and crownvetch (1

  4. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  5. Adhesion and degradation of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic light-emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momodu, D. Y.; Chioh, A. V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Federal Capital Territory, Abuja (Nigeria); Tong, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Zebaze Kana, M. G. [Physics Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex, Abuja (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Federal Capital Territory, Abuja (Nigeria); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical, computational, and experimental study of adhesion and degradation of Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLEDs). The adhesion between layers that are relevant to OLEDs is studied using an atomic force microscopy technique. The interfacial failure mechanisms associated with blister formation in OLEDs and those due to the addition of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles into the active regions are then elucidated using a combination of fracture mechanics, finite element modeling and experiments. The blisters observed in the models are shown to be consistent with the results from adhesion, interfacial fracture mechanics models, and prior reports of diffusion-assisted phenomena. The implications of the work are then discussed for the design of OLED structures with improved lifetimes and robustness.

  6. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kirchman

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (â??Methane in the Arctic Shelfâ?ť or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (â??metagenomesâ?ť). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation.

  7. Reasoning about Probabilistic Phenomena: Lessons Learned and Applied in Software Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hollylynne S; Lee, J. Todd

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Phenomena: Lessons Learned and Applied inand empirical data. The lessons learned from students’ worksome of the key lessons learned within each of these

  8. Degradative capacities and bioaugmentation potential of an anaerobic benzene-degrading bacterium strain DN11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuki Kasai; Yumiko Kodama; Yoh Takahata; Toshihiro Hoaki; Kazuya Watanabe [Marine Biotechnology Institute, Kamaishi (Japan)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Azoarcus sp. strain DN11 is a denitrifying bacterium capable of benzene degradation under anaerobic conditions. The present study evaluated strain DN11 for its application to bioaugmentation of benzene-contaminated underground aquifers. Strain DN11 could grow on benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and benzoate as the sole carbon and energy sources under nitrate-reducing conditions, although o- and p-xylenes were transformed in the presence of toluene. Phenol was not utilized under anaerobic conditions. Kinetic analysis of anaerobic benzene degradation estimated its apparent affinity and inhibition constants to be 0.82 and 11 {mu}M, respectively. Benzene-contaminated groundwater taken from a former coal-distillation plant site in Aichi, Japan was anaerobically incubated in laboratory bottles and supplemented with either inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and nitrate) alone, or the nutrients plus strain DN11, showing that benzene was significantly degraded only when DN11 was introduced. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, and quantitative PCR revealed that DN11 decreased after benzene was degraded. Following the decrease in DN11 16S rRNA gene fragments corresponding to bacteria related to Owenweeksia hongkongensis and Pelotomaculum isophthalicum, appeared as strong bands, suggesting possible metabolic interactions in anaerobic benzene degradation. Results suggest that DN11 is potentially useful for degrading benzene that contaminates underground aquifers at relatively low concentrations. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lykidis, Athanasios

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the TA-degrading bioreactor as revealed by 16S rRNA clonethermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified geneslaboratory-scale hybrid bioreactor (Fig. 1a) as described

  10. Temperature dependence of ssrA-tag mediated protein degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purcell, Oliver

    Building synthetic gene networks with highly transient dynamics requires rapid protein degradation. We show that the degradation conferred by two commonly used ssrA tags is highly temperature dependent. Synthetic gene ...

  11. DIAGNOSING VULNERABILITY, EMERGENT PHENOMENA, and VOLATILITY in MANMADE NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrowsmith, David

    : oil pipeline capacity ­ thickness of link #12;6 Local topology: GIS vs Map definition Swiss Laufenburg Tealing #12;8 Interconnected Networks - overlaying GIS gas and electricity networks #12;9 Network Cumulative frequency distribution The tail of the cumulative frequency distribution provides information

  12. EIT-related phenomena and their mechanical analogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Souza; L. Cabral; R. R. Oliveira; C. J. Villas-Boas

    2015-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems of interacting classical harmonic oscillators have received considerable attention in the last years as analog models for describing electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and associated phenomenona. We review these models and investigate their validity for a variety of physical systems using two and three coupled harmonic oscillators. From the simplest EIT-$\\Lambda$ configuration and two coupled single cavity modes we show that each atomic dipole-allowed transition and a single cavity mode can be represented by a damped harmonic oscillator. In this way, a one-to-one correspondence between the classical and quantum dynamical variables is established. We show the limiting conditions and what is the equivalent for the EIT dark state in the mechanical system. This correspondence is extended to other systems which present EIT-related phenomena such as two and three-level (cavity EIT) atoms interacting with a single mode of an optical cavity, and four-level atoms in a inverted-Y and tripod configurations. The achieved mechanical equivalence for the cavity EIT system, presented for the first time, is corroborated by experimental data. The analysis of the probe response of all these systems also brings to light a physical interpretation for the expectation value of the photon annihilation operator $\\left\\langle a\\right\\rangle$. We show it can be directly related to the electric susceptibility of systems which composition includes a driven cavity field mode.

  13. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  14. BIRC6 promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis: Interaction of BIRC6 with p53 facilitating p53 degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that BIRC6 could regulate the degradation of p53 rather thanp53 and facilitated its degradation by ubiquitination incantly promoted the degradation of p53 by ubiquitination (

  15. THERMAL DEGRADATION OF A BLACK CHROME SOLAR SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATING: SHORT TERM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    black show appreciable degradation ically or mechanically upGA, May ety THERMAL DEGRADATION A BLACK CHROME SOLARis ion, Ext. 781 THERMAL DEGRADATION OF A BLACK CHROME SOLAR

  16. Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Destaillats, Hugo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and degradation of filter media additives H. Destaillats, W.and Degradation of Filter Media Additives Hugo Destaillatsand degradation of filter media additives Hugo Destaillats

  17. Degradation versus self-assembly of block copolymer micelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Muratov; Vladimir A. Baulin

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of micelles self-assembled from block copolymers can be altered by the degradation of the blocks. Slow degradation shifts the equilibrium size distribution of block copolymer micelles and change their properties. Quasi-equilibrium scaling theory shows that the degradation of hydrophobic blocks in the core of micelles destabilize the micelles reducing their size, while the degradation of hydrophilic blocks forming coronas of micelles favors larger micelles and may, at certain conditions, induce the formation of micelles from individual chains.

  18. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Tunesi, Simonetta (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light.

  19. FUNCTIONAL DEGRADATION OF EXTRASTRIATE VISUAL CORTEX IN SENESCENT RHESUS MONKEYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yi-Feng

    FUNCTIONAL DEGRADATION OF EXTRASTRIATE VISUAL CORTEX IN SENESCENT RHESUS MONKEYS S. YU,a Y. WANG--The receptive field properties of striate cortical (V1) cells degrade in senescent macaque monkeys. We have now that both the orientation and direction selectivities of V2 cells in old monkeys degrade significantly

  20. SCIAMACHY'S ABSORBING AEROSOL INDEX AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF INSTRUMENT DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    SCIAMACHY'S ABSORBING AEROSOL INDEX AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF INSTRUMENT DEGRADATION L. G. Tilstra1 a strong increase in the AAI with time, which is found to be caused completely by degradation of the optics. This we conclude from straightforward calculation of the effect of instrument degradation based

  1. Estimation of Degradation-Based Reliability in Outdoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Degradation-Based Reliability in Outdoor Environments Victor Chan and William Q degradation of materials or products that are exposed to the outdoor environment. There is a growing need to obtain timely predictions of such degradation behaviors on the basis of accelerated laboratory tests

  2. "Reliability Inference Based on Multistate and Degradation Models"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    "Reliability Inference Based on Multistate and Degradation Models" Vijay Nair Department of extensive covariate information, and the use of multistate and degradation data when available. This talk common models for analyzing degradation data and then describe a class of models based on non

  3. Exosome-Mediated Recognition and Degradation of mRNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hoof, Ambro

    Exosome-Mediated Recognition and Degradation of mRNAs Lacking a Termination Codon Ambro van Hoof,1,2 * Pamela A. Frischmeyer,1,3 Harry C. Dietz,1,3 Roy Parker1,2 * One role of messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation is to maintain the fidelity of gene expression by degrading aberrant transcripts. Recent results show that m

  4. Shear-Induced Degradation of Linear Polyacrylamide Solutions during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shear-Induced Degradation of Linear Polyacrylamide Solutions during Pre-Electrophoretic Loading to minimize shear-induced degradation of the polymer molecules. Currently, the community lacks quan- titative data with which to gauge the range of flow rates that prevent polymer degradation. In this study

  5. Block Bootstrap Estimation of the Distribution of Cumulative Outdoor Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block Bootstrap Estimation of the Distribution of Cumulative Outdoor Degradation Victor Chan University Ames, IA 50011 October 28, 2003 Abstract An interesting prediction problem involving degradation cumulative degrada- tion using small- to moderate-size degradation data sets. This distribution, which

  6. Cometabolic Degradation of TCE Vapors in a Foamed Emulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cometabolic Degradation of TCE Vapors in a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor E U N S U N G K A N A N D M the experiments, 85-101% of the degraded TCE chlorine was recovered as chloride. Overall, the results suggest to complete degradation of TCE to harmless end products. Unfortunately, no microorganism can grow on TCE

  7. Degradation of ornithine decarboxylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is ubiquitin independentq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahana, Chaim

    Degradation of ornithine decarboxylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is ubiquitin independentq Shilpa in the polyamine biosynthesis is one of the most rapidly degraded proteins in eukaryotic cells. Mammalian ODC a protein to degradation by the 26S proteasome. However, while it is well established that in mammalian

  8. Parkin Binds to / Tubulin and Increases their Ubiquitination and Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jian

    Parkin Binds to / Tubulin and Increases their Ubiquitination and Degradation Yong Ren, Jinghui Zhao depolymerize microtubules and increase tubulin degradation. Microtu- bules are polymers of tubulin. Misfolded tubulin monomers are highly toxic and quickly degraded through a hitherto unknown mechanism. Here

  9. Accelerated Degradation Tests: Modeling and Analysis William Q. Meeker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accelerated Degradation Tests: Modeling and Analysis William Q. Meeker Dept. of Statistics reliability with traditional life tests that record only failure times. For some components, degradation measures can be taken over time. A relationship between component failure and amount of degradation makes

  10. Novel failure prognostics approach with dynamic thresholds for machine degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Novel failure prognostics approach with dynamic thresholds for machine degradation Kamran Javed-processing and prognostics modeling. To estimate RUL of a degrading machinery, prognostics modeling phase requires precise knowledge about failure thresh- old (FT) (or failure definition). Practically, degrading machinery can have

  11. Influence of maize genotype on rate of ruminal starch degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of maize genotype on rate of ruminal starch degradation B Michalet-Doreau1 M Champion2). These varying degradation rates in the rumen can be attributed not only to the chemical nature of the starch influence ruminal starch degradation. The trial was performed on two maize cultivars characterised

  12. Original article In situ and in vitro ruminal starch degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article In situ and in vitro ruminal starch degradation of untreated and formaldehyde (Received 28 August 1996; accepted 27 March 1997) Summary ― Ruminal starch degradation of untreated degradability was higher for wheat than for maize (82.1vs 52.3%), for untreated cereals than for cereals treated

  13. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  14. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  15. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  16. Elastomer degradation sensor using a piezoelectric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olness, Dolores U. (Livermore, CA); Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B. (late of Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for monitoring the degradation of elastomeric materials is provided. Piezoelectric oscillators are placed in contact with the elastomeric material so that a forced harmonic oscillator with damping is formed. The piezoelectric material is connected to an oscillator circuit,. A parameter such as the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q value of the oscillating system is related to the elasticity of the elastomeric material. Degradation of the elastomeric material causes changes in its elasticity which, in turn, causes the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q of the oscillator to change. These changes are monitored with a peak height monitor, frequency counter, Q-meter, spectrum analyzer, or other measurement circuit. Elasticity of elastomers can be monitored in situ, using miniaturized sensors.

  17. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  18. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1990-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  19. Degradation of Materials in Combustion Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, J. M.; Federer, J. I.; Parks, W. P. Jr.; Reid, J. S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and oxide structural ceramics materials. involved formation of new liquid,glass, and solid phases. which resulted in loss of structural This paper briefly reviews the contents of 23 integrity. Destructi ve stresses a!iSOc i ated wi th ORNL reports... furnaces are During the past decade workers at Oak Ridge being used to study the effects of specific chemical National Laboratory (ORNL) and elsewhere have species on metallic and ceramic materials. Tests investigated the degradation of refractory...

  20. Locally Led Conservation The Local Work Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grants ­ Conservation Stewardship Program ­ Environmental Quality Incentive Program ­ Farm & Ranch Lands1 Locally Led Conservation & The Local Work Group Mark Habiger NRCS #12;2 What Is "Locally Led Conservation"? · Community Stakeholders ­ 1. Assessing their natural resource conservation needs ­ 2. Setting

  1. Natural phenomena risk analysis - an approach for the tritium facilities 5480.23 SAR natural phenomena hazards accident analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappucci, A.J. Jr.; Joshi, J.R.; Long, T.A.; Taylor, R.P.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Tritium Facilities (TF) Safety Analysis Report (SAR) has been developed which is compliant with DOE Order 5480.23. The 5480.23 SAR upgrades and integrates the safety documentation for the TF into a single SAR for all of the tritium processing buildings. As part of the TF SAR effort, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) were analyzed. A cost effective strategy was developed using a team approach to take advantage of limited resources and budgets. During development of the Hazard and Accident Analysis for the 5480.23 SAR, a strategy was required to allow maximum use of existing analysis and to develop a cost effective graded approach for any new analysis in identifying and analyzing the bounding accidents for the TF. This approach was used to effectively identify and analyze NPH for the TF. The first part of the strategy consisted of evaluating the current SAR for the RTF to determine what NPH analysis could be used in the new combined 5480.23 SAR. The second part was to develop a method for identifying and analyzing NPH events for the older facilities which took advantage of engineering judgment, was cost effective, and followed a graded approach. The second part was especially challenging because of the lack of documented existing analysis considered adequate for the 5480.23 SAR and a limited budget for SAR development and preparation. This paper addresses the strategy for the older facilities.

  2. FINITE VOLUME METHODS APPLIED TO THE COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF WELDING PHENOMENA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gary

    1 FINITE VOLUME METHODS APPLIED TO THE COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF WELDING PHENOMENA Gareth A.Taylor@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT This paper presents the computational modelling of welding phenomena within a versatile numerical) and Computational Solid Mechanics (CSM). With regard to the CFD modelling of the weld pool fluid dynamics, heat

  3. Turbulent transport phenomena in a channel with periodic rib turbulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liou, T.M.; Hwang, J.J.; Chen, S.H. (National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu (Taiwan))

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodic fully developed turbulent flow in a 2D channel with rib turbulators on two opposite walls has been studied numerically and experimentally. In numerical predictions, an algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model is adopted, and a smoothed hybrid central/skew upstream difference scheme is developed. In experiments, the laser-Doppler velocimetry and laser holographic interferometry are employed to measure the local flow and heat transfer characteristics. The results are obtained with the ratio of pitch to rib height 5, 10, 15, and 20, for Reynolds number of 3.3 x 10 exp 4 and are presented in terms of the reattachment length, mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy profiles, isotherm patterns, and distributions of local pressure recovery and Nusselt number. A detailed comparison with experimental data shows that the present calculations have an improvement over the previous work in the prediction of periodic ribbed-wall flow and heat transfer. In addition, regions susceptible to hot spots are identified by examining the distributions of the local Nusselt number. Furthermore, the enhancement of mean Nusselt number is documented in terms of relative contributions of the increased turbulence intensity and surface area provided by the ribs. 32 refs.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

  5. An atomistic description of the high-field degradation of dielectric polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bealing, Clive R.; Ramprasad, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3136 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscopic mechanism governing the initiating step in the high-field aging of crystalline polyethylene is proposed, based on density functional calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is assumed that electrons, holes, and excitons are present in the system. While the additional individual electrons or holes are not expected to lead to significant degradation, the presence of triplet excitons are concluded to be rather damaging. The electron and hole states of the exciton localize on a distorted region of polyethylene, significantly weakening nearby C–H bonds and facilitating C–H bond scission. The barrier to cleavage of the weakened C–H bonds is estimated and is comparable to the thermal energy, suggesting that this mechanism may be responsible for the degradation of polyethylene when placed under electrical stress, e.g., in high-voltage cables.

  6. A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

  7. Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction (FAI/00-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PLYS, M.G.

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a topical reference on the phenomena and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project with specific applications to SNF Project processes and situations. Spent metallic uranium nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater at the K basins in the Hanford 100 area, and planned processing steps include: (1) At the basins, cleaning and placing fuel elements and scrap into stainless steel multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) holding about 6 MT of fuel apiece; (2) At nearby cold vacuum drying (CVD) stations, draining, vacuum drying, and mechanically sealing the MCOs; (3) Shipping the MCOs to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) on the 200 Area plateau; and (4) Welding shut and placing the MCOs for interim (40 year) dry storage in closed CSB storage tubes cooled by natural air circulation through the surrounding vault. Damaged fuel elements have exposed and corroded fuel surfaces, which can exothermically react with water vapor and oxygen during normal process steps and in off-normal situations, A key process safety concern is the rate of reaction of damaged fuel and the potential for self-sustaining or runaway reactions, also known as uranium fires or fuel ignition. Uranium metal and one of its corrosion products, uranium hydride, are potentially pyrophoric materials. Dangers of pyrophoricity of uranium and its hydride have long been known in the U.S. Department of Energy (Atomic Energy Commission/DOE) complex and will be discussed more below; it is sufficient here to note that there are numerous documented instances of uranium fires during normal operations. The motivation for this work is to place the safety of the present process in proper perspective given past operational experience. Steps in development of such a perspective are: (1) Description of underlying physical causes for runaway reactions, (2) Modeling physical processes to explain runaway reactions, (3) Validation of the method against experimental data, (4) Application of the method to plausibly explain operational experience, and (5) Application of the method to present process steps to demonstrate process safety and margin. Essentially, the logic above is used to demonstrate that runaway reactions cannot occur during normal SNF Project process steps, and to illustrate the depth of the technical basis for such a conclusion. Some off-normal conditions are identified here that could potentially lead to runaway reactions. However, this document is not intended to provide an exhaustive analysis of such cases. In summary, this report provides a ''toolkit'' of models and approaches for analysis of pyrophoricity safety issues at Hanford, and the technical basis for the recommended approaches. A summary of recommended methods appears in Section 9.0.

  8. CSNF WASTE FORM DEGRADATION: SUMMARY ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. CUNNANE

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the development and validation of models that can be used to calculate the release of radionuclides from commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) following a hypothetical breach of the waste package and fuel cladding in the repository. The purpose also includes describing the uncertainties associated with modeling the radionuclide release for the range of CSNF types, exposure conditions, and durations for which the radionuclide release models are to be applied. This document was developed in accordance with Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]). This document considers radionuclides to be released from CSNF when they are available for mobilization by gas-phase mass transport, or by dissolution or colloid formation in water that may contact the fuel. Because other reports address limitations on the dissolved and colloidal radionuclide concentrations (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944], Table 2-1), this report does not address processes that control the extent to which the radionuclides released from CSNF are mobilized and transported away from the fuel either in the gas phase or in the aqueous phase as dissolved and colloidal species. The scope is limited to consideration of degradation of the CSNF rods following an initial breach of the cladding. It considers features of CSNF that limit the availability of individual radionuclides for release into the gaseous or aqueous phases that may contact the fuel and the processes and events expected to degrade these CSNF features. In short, the purpose is to describe the characteristics of breached fuel rods and the degradation processes expected to influence radionuclide release.

  9. Amine Degradation in CO2 Capture. 2. New degradation products of MEA. Pyrazine and alkyl pyrazines: analysis, mechanism of formation and toxicity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Amine Degradation in CO2 Capture. 2. New degradation products of MEA. Pyrazine and alkyl pyrazines Degradation in CO2 Capture. 2. New degradation products of MEA. Pyrazine and alkyl pyrazines: analysis degradation products, and some of them could be potentially dangerous to humans or environment according

  10. Emergent Mesoscale Phenomena in Magnetized Accretion Disc Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Jacob B; Armitage, Philip J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how the structure and variability of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in accretion discs converge with domain size. Our results are based on a series of vertically stratified local simulations, computed using the Athena code, that have fixed spatial resolution, but varying radial and azimuthal extent (from \\Delta R = 0.5H to 16H, where H is the vertical scale height). We show that elementary local diagnostics of the turbulence, including the Shakura-Sunyaev {\\alpha} parameter, the ratio of Maxwell stress to magnetic energy, and the ratio of magnetic to fluid stresses, converge to within the precision of our measurements for spatial domains of radial size Lx \\geq 2H. We obtain {\\alpha} = 0.02-0.03, consistent with recent results. Very small domains (Lx = 0.5H) return anomalous results, independent of spatial resolution. The convergence with domain size is only valid for a limited set of diagnostics: larger spatial domains admit the emergence of dynamically important mesoscale structures. In our la...

  11. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meneghini, O., E-mail: meneghini@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, 120 Badger Ave, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Luna, C. J. [Arizona State University, 411 N. Central Ave, Phoenix, Arizona 85004 (United States); Smith, S. P.; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat flux profiles has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest fidelity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport profiles. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range of plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat flux profiles are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-defined, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport fluxes. The numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-?s per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.

  12. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the DOE's Hanford Site, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. This review is an update and expansion to the September 2010 review of PNNL-19751, Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic).

  13. Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900şC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

  14. Biocarrier composition for and method of degrading pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to biocarrier compositions that attract and bond pollutant-degrading antigens that will degrade the pollutants. Biocarriers are known generally as a variety of inert or semi-inert compounds or structures having the ability to sequester (attract), hold and biomagnify (enhance) specific microorganisms within their structure. Glass or polystyrene beads are the most well known biocarriers. The biocarrier, which is preferably in the form of glass microspheres, is coated with an antibody or group of antibodies that attract and react specifically with certain pollutant-degrading antigens. The antibody, once bonded to the biocarrier, is used by the composition to attract and bond those pollutant-degrading antigens. Each antibody is specific for an antigen that is specific for a given pollutant. The resulting composition is subsequently exposed to an environment contaminated with pollutants for degradation. In the preferred use, the degrading composition is formed and then injected directly into or near a plume or source of contamination.

  15. Skyshine And Groundshine Phenomena And Related Radiological quantities evaluated For The Environment Of A High Current Spallation Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zazula, J M; Cloth, P

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Skyshine And Groundshine Phenomena And Related Radiological quantities evaluated For The Environment Of A High Current Spallation Facility

  16. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. McCoy

    2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

  17. Ultrafast Cooperative Phenomena in Coherently Prepared Media: From Superfluorescence to Coherent Raman Scattering and Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gombojav, Ariunbold

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological progress in commercializing ultrafast lasers and detectors has allowed realization of cooperative processes on an ultrashort time scale, which demand a re-evaluation of the conventional cooperative phenomena with a new insight...

  18. Diagnostic Evaluation of Detrimental Phenomena in High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostecki, Robert; Lei, Jinglei; McLarnon, Frank; Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomena in High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries RobertAbstract A pouch-type lithium-ion cell, with graphite anodewith model pouch-type lithium-ion cells, with graphite

  19. Aggregation phenomena in telechelic star polymer solutions Federica Lo Verso,1,* Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulos,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Likos, Christos N.

    recently shown to assemble into interpenetrating networks, featuring mul- tiple critical points 5Aggregation phenomena in telechelic star polymer solutions Federica Lo Verso,1,* Athanassios Z Received 16 October 2008; published 16 January 2009 Telechelic star polymers are macromolecules

  20. Optical, electronic, and dynamical phenomena in the shock compression of condensed matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Evan J. (Evan John), 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the study of shock wave compression of condensed matter for over 100 years, scant progress has been made in understanding the microscopic details. This thesis explores microscopic phenomena in shock compression of ...

  1. Materials of the round table ``Phase transitions and critical phenomena: past, present, and future"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bakai; A. Ciach; A. Chalyi; R. Folk; Yu. Holovatch; M. Kozlovskii; M. Schick; W. Schröer; G. Stell; I. Yukhnovskii

    2000-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper contains materials of the discussion concerning phase transitions and critical phenomena which took place during the Workshop on modern problems of soft matter theory (Aug. 27 -- Aug. 31, 2000, Lviv, Ukraine).

  2. Nonlinear Phenomena Induced by Millijoule Femtosecond Laser Pulses at an Air-water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strycker, Benjamin

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond laser pulses with millijoule energy have the potential to be used in many applications for remote sensing in marine environments. In this dissertation, we investigate some of the basic phenomena involved when a loosely focused...

  3. Deciphering Active Estrogen-Degrading Microorganisms in Bioreactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roh, Hyung Keun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    in biological wastewater treatment processes. This dissertation investigated factors affecting estrogen biodegradation in bioreactors. Specifically, research efforts were placed on characterization of several bacterial estrogen degraders (model strains...

  4. Membrane degradation Accelerated Stress Test | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Membrane degradation Accelerated Stress Test Re-direct Destination: Abstract Not Provided times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current state Most recent...

  5. Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005.

  6. Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA) Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

  7. Colour Analysis of Degraded Parchment Lindsay MACDONALD, Alejandro GIACOMETTI,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weyrich, Tim

    Colour Analysis of Degraded Parchment Lindsay MACDONALD, Alejandro GIACOMETTI, Tim WEYRICH, Melissa TERRAS and Adam GIBSON University College London ABSTRACT Multispectral imaging was employed to collect

  8. Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

  9. Outdoor PV Module Degradation of Current-Voltage Parameters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. M.; Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) module degradation rate analysis quantifies the loss of PV power output over time and is useful for estimating the impact of degradation on the cost of energy. An understanding of the degradation of all current-voltage (I-V) parameters helps to determine the cause of the degradation and also gives useful information for the design of the system. This study reports on data collected from 12 distinct mono- and poly-crystalline modules deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Most modules investigated showed < 0.5%/year decrease in maximum power due to short-circuit current decline.

  10. High-Resolution Crack Imaging Reveals Degradation Processes in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reveals Degradation Processes in Nuclear Reactor Structural Materials. Abstract: Corrosion and cracking represent critical failure mechanisms for structural materials in many...

  11. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Tunesi, S.; Xu, Q.

    1991-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light. 3 figures.

  12. Experimental study on bubble collapse phenomena in subcooled water with three-dimensional particle image velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yu-Hsiang

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON BUBBLE COLLAPSE PHENOMENA IN SUBCOOLED WATER WITH THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY A Thesis by YU-HSIANG YANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1998 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON BUBBLE COLLAPSE PHENOMENA IN SUBCOOLED WATER WITH THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY A Thesis by YU-HSIANG YANG Submitted...

  13. Comparison of the Phenomena of Light Refraction and Gravitational Bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert J. Buenker

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of light in the presence of electromagnetic and gravitational fields are compared. Once one takes account of the fact that clock rates vary with distance from a massive object, it is argued that in an absolute sense light frequencies remain constant in both interactions. It is also pointed out that the criterion used by Einstein for the angle of curvature of light rays passing close to the sun is not their actual trajectory but rather Huygens' Principle. The latter only requires that the speed of light vary with distance from a gravitational source in order to produce a measurable effect. As a result, the observed displacement of star images during solar eclipses can be explained on the basis of a rotation of the wave front of light without assuming that individual photons are actually deflected by the sun. A calculation reported by Schiff in 1960 based on the assumption that light travels in a straight line for all local observers obtains the same closed expression for the angle of displacement of star images as in Einstein's original work, in support of this interpretation. Since light is believed to follow a straight-line trajectory within any given homogeneous transparent medium, it is argued that light refraction and gravitational bending have more in common than is generally realized.

  14. Local Vote Decision Fusion for Target Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michailidis, George

    1 Local Vote Decision Fusion for Target Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks Natallia Katenka by a wireless sensor network. Sensors acquire measurements emitted from the target that are corrupted by noise Wireless sensor networks are widely used for monitoring natural phenomena in space and over time, as well

  15. System Performances under Automation Degradation E. Hollnagel3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    System Performances under Automation Degradation (SPAD) E. Hollnagel3 , C. Martinie1 , P. Palanque1 of the project objectives augmented by some early findings. Abstract - Increased automation is one of the main changes foreseen by SESAR in ATM. This will pose new challenges including possible automation degradation

  16. Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol With Enhanced Degradation and Power Generation From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol With Enhanced Degradation and Power Generation From Air to completely mineralize pentachlorophenol (PCP; 5 mg/L), in the pres- ence of acetate or glucose. Degradation; mineralization Introduction Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is one of many recalcitrant and toxic compounds found

  17. Computational Modelling of Particle Degradation in Dilute Phase Pneumatic Conveyors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christakis, Nikolaos

    the calculation of degradation propensity is coupled with a flow model of the solids and gas phases in the pipeline. Numerical results are presented for degradation of granulated sugar in an industrial scale handling, because of the change in particle properties such as particle size distribution, shape and

  18. Scleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    . Wildsoet, O.D., Ph.D.1 Enzymatically degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) were Polymer Network James Su, M.Eng.,1 Samuel T. Wall, Ph.D.,2 Kevin E. Healy, Ph.D.,2,3 and Christine FScleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable Semi-Interpenetrating

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND DEGRADATION PROCESSES USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco, Shmuel "Shmulik"

    CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND DEGRADATION PROCESSES USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING Sagi Filin1 , Amit@tau.ac.il Commission VIII/8 KEY WORDS: Airborne laser scanning, Geomorphology, Dead Sea, Land Degradation, Sinkholes of collapse sinkholes in high resolution using airborne laser scanning technology. As a study case, we use

  20. Rate-based degradation modeling of lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.V. Thomas; I. Bloom; J.P. Christophersen; V.S. Battaglia

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerated degradation testing is commonly used as the basis to characterize battery cell performance over a range of stress conditions (e.g., temperatures). Performance is measured by some response that is assumed to be related to the state of health of the cell (e.g., discharge resistance). Often, the ultimate goal of such testing is to predict cell life at some reference stress condition, where cell life is defined to be the point in time where performance has degraded to some critical level. These predictions are based on a degradation model that expresses the expected performance level versus the time and conditions under which a cell has been aged. Usually, the degradation model relates the accumulated degradation to the time at a constant stress level. The purpose of this article is to present an alternative framework for constructing a degradation model that focuses on the degradation rate rather than the accumulated degradation. One benefit of this alternative approach is that prediction of cell life is greatly facilitated in situations where the temperature exposure is not isothermal. This alternative modeling framework is illustrated via a family of rate-based models and experimental data acquired during calendar-life testing of high-power lithium-ion cells.

  1. DEGRADATION OF TRANSPARENT CONDUCTIVE OXIDES: MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS AND INTERFACIAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    DEGRADATION OF TRANSPARENT CONDUCTIVE OXIDES: MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS AND INTERFACIAL ENGINEERING;Degradation of Transparent Conductive Oxides: Mechanistic insights and Interfacial engineering Case Western;Dedicated to the science and engineering of photovoltaics, in an effort to make a better world. #12;Table

  2. Effects of TNT and its metabolites on anaerobic TNT degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, D.J. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Pendharkar, S. [Computron, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Ahmad, F. [Booz, Allen and Hamilton, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the presence of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene on the anaerobic treatment procedure developed for munitions-contaminated soil were examined. When 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene was spiked in increasing levels into cultures containing TNT, inhibition of the rate of TNT degradation was observed. The degradation of 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene did not proceed while TNT was present in the cultures. When 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene was spiked into cultures that also contained TNT, TNT degradation rates were inhibited, and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene were not degraded at all. When 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene was spiked into cultures containing 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, degradation of 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene was not effected but 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene was not degraded. These results suggest that the rapid removal of TNT from the treatment system, before the intermediates have a chance to accumulate, or the rapid removal of the intermediates of TNT degradation is of utmost importance during the remediation of TNT-contaminated soils. If these intermediates are allowed to accumulate above inhibitory levels, the degradation of TNT will be slowed and the removal of the intermediates will halt completely.

  3. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  4. Electrical Degradation of InAlAs/InGaAs Metamorphic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    Electrical Degradation of InAlAs/InGaAs Metamorphic High-Electron Mobility Transistors S. D · Introduction · Electrical Degradation of mHEMTs · Degradation of TLMs · Degradation Mechanisms #12;Metamorphic Degradation of InAlAs/InGaAs mHEMTs Little known about reliability of mHEMTs Observations in InP HEMTs

  5. Local Energy Landscape in a Simple Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuya Iwashita; Takeshi Egami

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is difficult to relate the properties of liquids and glasses directly to their structure because of complexity in the structure which defies precise definition. The potential energy landscape (PEL) approach is a very insightful way to conceptualize the structure-property relationship in liquids and glasses, particularly on the effect of temperature and history. However, because of the highly multi-dimensional nature of the PEL it is hard to determine, or even visualize, the actual details of the energy landscape. In this article we introduce a modified concept of the local energy landscape (LEL) which is limited in phase space, and demonstrate its usefulness using molecular dynamics simulation on a simple liquid at high temperatures. The local energy landscape is given as a function of the local coordination number, the number of the nearest neighbor atoms. The excitations in the LEL corresponds to the so-called beta-relaxation process. The LEL offers a simple but useful starting point to discuss complex phenomena in liquids and glasses.

  6. US Department of Energy natural phenomena design/evaluation guidelines/lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spring of 1988, DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria (1), was issued for use. This document references UCRL-15910, Design and Evaluation Guidelines for DOE Facilities Subjected to Natural Phenomena Hazards (2), which is to be used as the basis for the design and evaluation of new and existing facilities to natural phenomena loading. Rather than use the historical deterministic methods for computing structural and component loading from potential natural phenomena, UCRL-15910 incorporated the years of hazards studies conducted throughout the US Department of Energy complex into probabilistic-based methods. This paper describes the process used to incorporate US Department of Energy natural phenomena design guidelines into the Hanford Plant Standards -- Standard Design Criteria for Architectural and Civil Standards (3). It also addresses the subsequent use of these criteria during structural assessments of facilities, systems, and components of various vintage in support of updating safety analysis reports. The paper includes comparison of results using these most recent probabilistic-based natural phenomena loading criteria to those obtained from previous assessments, and it addresses the lessons learned from the many structural evaluations of 1940--1960 vintage buildings.

  7. US Department of Energy natural phenomena design/evaluation guidelines/lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spring of 1988, DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria [1], was issued for use. This document references UCRL-15910, Design and Evaluation Guidelines for DOE Facilities Subjected to Natural Phenomena Hazards [2], which is to be used as the basis for the design and evaluation of new and existing facilities to natural phenomena loading. Rather than use the historical deterministic methods for computing structural and component loading from potential natural phenomena, UCRL-15910 incorporated the years of hazards studies conducted throughout the US Department of Energy complex into probabilistic-based methods. This paper describes the process used to incorporate US Department of Energy natural phenomena design guidelines into the Hanford Plant Standards -- Standard Design Criteria for Architectural and Civil Standards [3]. It also addresses the subsequent use of these criteria during structural assessments of facilities, systems, and components of various vintage in support of updating safety analysis reports. The paper includes comparison of results using these most recent probabilistic-based natural phenomena loading criteria to those obtained from previous assessments, and it addresses the lessons learned from the many structural evaluations of 1940--1960 vintage buildings.

  8. Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA)); Short, S.A. (ABB Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA)); McDonald, J.R. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA)); McCann, M.W. Jr. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA)); Murray, R.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

  9. Degradation of a quantum reference frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen D. Bartlett; Terry Rudolph; Robert W. Spekkens; Peter S. Turner

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the degradation of reference frames, treated as dynamical quantum systems, and quantify their longevity as a resource for performing tasks in quantum information processing. We adopt an operational measure of a reference frame's longevity, namely, the number of measurements that can be made against it with a certain error tolerance. We investigate two distinct types of reference frame: a reference direction, realized by a spin-j system, and a phase reference, realized by an oscillator mode with bounded energy. For both cases, we show that our measure of longevity increases quadratically with the size of the reference system and is therefore non-additive. For instance, the number of measurements that a directional reference frame consisting of N parallel spins can be put to use scales as N^2. Our results quantify the extent to which microscopic or mesoscopic reference frames may be used for repeated, high-precision measurements, without needing to be reset - a question that is important for some implementations of quantum computing. We illustrate our results using the proposed single-spin measurement scheme of magnetic resonance force microscopy.

  10. Microbial degradation of natural rubber vulcanizates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuchii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Takeda, K.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An actinomycete, Nocardia sp. strain 835A, grows well on unvulcanized natural rubber and synthetic isoprene rubber, but not on other types of synthetic rubber. Not only unvulcanized but also various kinds of vulcanized natural rubber products were more or less utilized by the organism as the sole source of carbon and energy. The thin film from a latex glove was rapidly degraded, and the weight loss reached 75% after a 2-week cultivation period. Oligomers with molecular weights from 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 3/ were accumulated during microbial growth on the latex glove. The partially purified oligomers were examined by infrared and /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the spectra were those expected of cis-1, 4-polyisoprene with the structure, OHC-CH/sub 2/-(-CH/sub 2/-C(-CH/sub 3/)=CH-CH/sub 2/-)/sub n/-CH/sub 2/-C(=O)-CH/sub 3/, with average values of n of about 114 and 19 for the two oligomers.

  11. SURVEY OF MODELS FOR CONCRETE DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Benjamin W [Idaho National Laboratory; Huang, Hai [Idaho Nation Laboratory

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of two primary properties: its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. Concrete structures have been known to last for hundreds of years, but they are also known to deteriorate in very short periods of time under adverse conditions. The use of concrete in nuclear facilities for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. The goal of this report is to review and document the main aging mechanisms of concern for concrete structures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the models used in simulations of concrete aging and structural response of degraded concrete structures. This is in preparation for future work to develop and apply models for aging processes and response of aged NPP concrete structures in the Grizzly code. To that end, this report also provides recommendations for developing more robust predictive models for aging effects of performance of concrete.

  12. Generic Degraded Congiguration Probability Analysis for DOE Codisposal Waste Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.F.A. Deng; M. Saglam; L.J. Gratton

    2001-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the technical work plan, ''Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c), this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is developed for the purpose of screening out degraded configurations for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) types. It performs the degraded configuration parameter and probability evaluations of the overall methodology specified in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000, Section 3) to qualifying configurations. Degradation analyses are performed to assess realizable parameter ranges and physical regimes for configurations. Probability calculations are then performed for configurations characterized by k{sub eff} in excess of the Critical Limit (CL). The scope of this document is to develop a generic set of screening criteria or models to screen out degraded configurations having potential for exceeding a criticality limit. The developed screening criteria include arguments based on physical/chemical processes and probability calculations and apply to DOE SNF types when codisposed with the high-level waste (HLW) glass inside a waste package. The degradation takes place inside the waste package and is long after repository licensing has expired. The emphasis of this AMR is on degraded configuration screening and the probability analysis is one of the approaches used for screening. The intended use of the model is to apply the developed screening criteria to each DOE SNF type following the completion of the degraded mode criticality analysis internal to the waste package.

  13. Effect of metal chlorides on thermal degradation of (waste) polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, S.-J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, MingChi University of Technology, 243, Taishan, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: sjchiu@ns1.mit.edu.tw; Chen, S.-H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, MingChi University of Technology, 243, Taishan, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, C.-T. [Department of Biochemical Engineering, MingChi University of Technology, 243, Taishan, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we investigated how to treat (waste) polycarbonate efficiently to reduce its degraded residue. The study was carried out in an isothermal reactor under continuous nitrogen flow at atmospheric pressure to pyrolyze polycarbonate (PC) alone and in the presence of metal chloride. Some metal chlorides were shown to be catalytic active for the degradation of PC at 400 deg. C, which increased degradation conversion from 8.5% to more than 58.3%. Among those active metal chlorides, ZnCl{sub 2} and SnCl{sub 2} can produce higher liquid product yields. Effects such as particle size of PC, temperature, the weight ratio of metal chloride/PC, and degradation time on the degradation conversion of PC without and with these two most active metal chlorides were studied. Results of the liquid product analysis by GC/MS demonstrated the product composition of PC degradation over the metal chlorides is much simpler than that of degradation alone. The main liquid product is phenol, p-isopropylphenol, diphenyl carbonate, and bisphenol A for all cases.

  14. Generation of Learning Samples for Historical Handwriting Recognition Using Image Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Generation of Learning Samples for Historical Handwriting Recognition Using Image Degradation of image degradation to generate synthetic learning sam- ples for historical handwriting recognition. With respect to three image degradation models, we report significant im- provements in accuracy

  15. Permafrost degradation and its environmental effects on the Tibetan Plateau: A review of recent research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permafrost degradation and its environmental effects on the Tibetan Plateau: A review of recent Tibetan Plateau Permafrost Climate warming Permafrost degradation A significant portion of the Tibetan recent Chinese investigations on permafrost degradation and its environmental effects in the Tibetan

  16. Effect of degradation rates of resorbable phosphate invert glasses on in vitro osteoblast proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brauer, Delia S; Rüssel, Christian; Li, Wu; Habelitz, Stefan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over 24 h and 72 h Effect of degradation rates of resorbableDr. Matthias Schnabelrauch for degradation experiments usingand R21-DE015416. Effect of degradation rates of resorbable

  17. Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Kirk Steven

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    67/11) 1. D. Enviro. Degradation pc 2. D. Energy ConsumptionD. Trade % 8. Lag Enviro. Degradation pc Mean SD*** KentorN/n =112/23) 1. D. Enviro. Degradation pc 2. D. Energy

  18. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  19. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using palladized iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Holden, W.L. [and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a persistent problem within the Department of Energy complex, as well as in numerous industrial sites around the US. To date, commercially available technologies for destroying these highly stable compounds involve degradation at elevated temperatures either through incineration or base-catalyzed dehalogenation at 300{degrees}C. Since the heating required with these processes substantially increases the costs for treatment of PCB-contaminated wastes, there is a need for finding an alternative approach where PCB can be degraded at ambient temperatures. This report describes the degradation of PCB`s utilizing the bimetallic substrate of iron/palladium.

  20. Mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Qinjin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO{sub 2} saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occuning at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multi-physicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

  1. The Dynamics of Internet Traffic: Self-Similarity, Self-Organization, and Complex Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Internet is the most complex system ever created in human history. Therefore, its dynamics and traffic unsurprisingly take on a rich variety of complex dynamics, self-organization, and other phenomena that have been researched for years. This paper is a review of the complex dynamics of Internet traffic. Departing from normal treatises, we will take a view from both the network engineering and physics perspectives showing the strengths and weaknesses as well as insights of both. In addition, many less covered phenomena such as traffic oscillations, large-scale effects of worm traffic, and comparisons of the Internet and biological models will be covered.

  2. Exclusive Processes: Tests of Coherent QCD Phenomena and Nucleon Substructure at CEBAF -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley J. Brodsky; SLAC

    1994-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of exclusive processes such as electroproduction, photoproduction, and Compton scattering are among the most sensitive probes of proton structure and coherent phenomena in quantum chromodynamics. The continuous electron beam at CEBAF, upgraded in laboratory energy to 10--12 GeV, will allow a systematic study of exclusive, semi-inclusive, and inclusive reactions in a kinematic range well-tuned to the study of fundamental nucleon and nuclear substructure. I also discuss the potential at CEBAF for studying novel QCD phenomena at the charm production threshold, including the possible production of nuclear-bound quarkonium.

  3. Fermi coordinates and modified Franklin transformation : A comparative study on rotational phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Nouri-Zonoz; H. Ramezani-Aval

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a relativistic rotational transformation to study and analyze rotational phenomena, instead of the rotational transformations based on consecutive Lorentz transformations and Fermi coordinates, leads to different predictions. In this article, after a comparative study between Fermi metric of a uniformly rotating eccentric observer and the spacetime metric in the same observer's frame obtained through the modified Franklin transformation, we consider rotational phenomena including transverse Doppler effect and Sagnac effect in both formalisms and compare their predictions. We also discuss length measurements in the two formalisms.

  4. Local Incentives (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Office of Business Development helps companies to identify communities interested in offering locally-negotiated incentives, such as Tax Increment Financing (TIF), Special Tax...

  5. State and Local Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To help you make energy efficiency improvements in your commercial building, your state and/or local community might offer incentives or have special programs.

  6. Local regulation of immigration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appleby, Clare A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kristina M. 2007. “Local Illegal Immigration Relief ActPennsylvania. 2006. “Illegal Alien Immigration Relief Act. ”The Bill of Rights Protects Illegal Aliens” In Immigration

  7. Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krim, Jacqueline

    Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding degradation of the contact interface of a fluorocarbon monolayer-coated polycrystalline silicon microdevice

  8. Free Energies for Degradation Reactions of 1,2,3-Trichloropropane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Degradation Reactions of 1,2,3-Trichloropropane from ab initio Electronic Structure Theory. Free Energies for Degradation Reactions of 1,2,3-Trichloropropane from ab initio...

  9. Silicon detectors for the next generation of high energy physics experiments: expected degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Lazanu; S. Lazanu

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists an enormous interest for the study of very high energy domain in particle physics, both theoretically and experimentally, in the aim to construct a general theory of the fundamental constituents of matter and of their interactions. Until now, semiconductor detectors have widely been used in modern high energy physics experiments. They are elements of the high resolution vertex and tracking system, as well as of calorimeters. The main motivation of this work is to discuss how to prepare some possible detectors - only silicon option being considered, for the new era of HEP challenges because the bulk displacement damage in the detector, consequence of irradiation, produces effects at the device level that limit their long time utilisation, increasing the leakage current and the depletion voltage, eventually up to breakdown, and thus affecting the lifetime of detector systems. In this paper, physical phenomena that conduce to the degradation of the detector are discussed and effects are analysed at the device level (leakage current and effective carrier concentration) in the radiation environments expected in the next generation of hadron colliders after LHC, at the next lepton and gamma-gamma colliders, as well as in astroparticle experiments, in conditions of long time continuum irradiations, for different technological options. The predicted results permit a better decision to obtain devices with harder parameters to radiation.

  10. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF A TPB DEGRADATION RATE MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C; Tommy Edwards, T; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tetraphenylborate (TPB) degradation model for use in aggregating Tank 48 material in Tank 50 is developed in this report. The influential factors for this model are listed as the headings in the table below. A sensitivity study of the predictions of the model over intervals of values for the influential factors affecting the model was conducted. These intervals bound the levels of these factors expected during Tank 50 aggregations. The results from the sensitivity analysis were used to identify settings for the influential factors that yielded the largest predicted TPB degradation rate. Thus, these factor settings are considered as those that yield the ''worst-case'' scenario for TPB degradation rate for Tank 50 aggregation, and, as such they would define the test conditions that should be studied in a waste qualification program whose dual purpose would be the investigation of the introduction of Tank 48 material for aggregation in Tank 50 and the bounding of TPB degradation rates for such aggregations.

  11. Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance Nicholas R. Wheeler, Laura data from Underwriter Labs, featuring measurements taken on 18 identical photovoltaic (PV) modules in modules and their effects on module performance over lifetime. Index Terms--photovoltaics, statistical

  12. Computational Modeling of Degradation of Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, H.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation of cations on the alkaline exchange membranes is the major challenge for alkaline membrane fuel cells. In this paper, we investigated the degradation barriers by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations, which is one of the most commonly used cations for alkaline exchange membranes. We found that substituted cations with electron-releasing substituent groups at meta-position of the benzyl ring could result in improved degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations with ten different substituent groups, the largest improvement of degradation barriers is only 1.6 kcal/mol. This implies that the lifetime of alkaline membrane fuel cells could increase from a few months to a few years by using substituted BTMA+ cations, an encouraging but still limited improvement for real-world applications.

  13. Microbial petroleum degradation enhancement by oil spill bioremediation products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Salvador Aldrett

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was conducted using unpolluted, natural seawater. The products were tested in triplicate using 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and evaluated over a 28 day period to determine the products' capabilities based on the extent of petroleum degradation. Toxicity...

  14. Degradation of Perchloroethylene and Dichlorophenol by Pulsed-Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    cycles) followed by bio- degradation of the dechlorinated products with a recom- binant toluene o to the nervous, epidermal, and skeletal systems are some of the effects observed in humans and animals exposed

  15. Mixed Hydrologic Recovery of a Degraded Mesquite Rangeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukenbach, Maxwell

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Land degradation and anthropogenic change is widespread on rangelands in Texas. Over the last 150 years, noticeable change has occurred as a direct result of agricultural practices and human activity. As novel ecosystems and permanently altered...

  16. Seismic Fragility Analysis of a Degraded Condensate Storage Tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Kim, M.K.; Choi, I-K.

    2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory are conducting a collaborative research project to develop seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the goals of this collaboration endeavor is to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The essential part of this collaboration is aimed at achieving a better understanding of the effects of aging on the performance of SSCs and ultimately on the safety of NPPs. A recent search of the degradation occurrences of structures and passive components (SPCs) showed that the rate of aging related degradation in NPPs was not significantly large but increasing, as the plants get older. The slow but increasing rate of degradation of SPCs can potentially affect the safety of the older plants and become an important factor in decision making in the current trend of extending the operating license period of the plants (e.g., in the U.S. from 40 years to 60 years, and even potentially to 80 years). The condition and performance of major aged NPP structures such as the containment contributes to the life span of a plant. A frequent misconception of such low degradation rate of SPCs is that such degradation may not pose significant risk to plant safety. However, under low probability high consequence initiating events, such as large earthquakes, SPCs that have slowly degraded over many years could potentially affect plant safety and these effects need to be better understood. As part of the KAERI-BNL collaboration, a condensate storage tank (CST) was analyzed to estimate its seismic fragility capacities under various postulated degradation scenarios. CSTs were shown to have a significant impact on the seismic core damage frequency of a nuclear power plant. The seismic fragility capacity of the CST was developed for five cases: (1) a baseline analysis where the design condition (undegraded) is assumed, (2) a scenario with degraded stainless steel tank shell, (3) a scenario with degraded anchor bolts, (4) a scenario with anchorage concrete cracking, and (5) a perfect correlation of the above three degradation scenarios. This paper will present the methodology for the time-dependent fragility calculation and discuss the insights drawn from this study. To achieve a better understanding of the effects of aging on the performance of structures and passive components (SPCs) in nuclear power plants (NPPs), the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are collaborating to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider age-related degradation of SPCs. The rate of age-related degradation of SPCs was not found to be significantly large, but increasing as the plants get older. The slow but increasing rate of degradation of SPCs can potentially affect the safety of the older plants and become an important factor in decision making in the current trend of extending the operating license period of the plants (e.g., in the U.S. from 40 years to 60 years, and even potentially to 80 years). In this paper, a condensate storage tank (CST) was analyzed to estimate its seismic fragility capacities under various postulated degradation scenarios. This paper will present the methodology for the time-dependent fragility calculation and discuss the insights drawn from this study.

  17. Unravelling the Performance Degradation Mechanisms in High-voltage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unravelling the Performance Degradation Mechanisms in High-voltage Lithium-ion Battery Composite Oxide Electrodes Apr 11 2014 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM Debasish Mohanty, ORNL, Oak Ridge...

  18. Investigation of the Photocatalytic Degradation of Ethanol and Acetone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y.; Ding, B.; Dong, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ transmission Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the photocatalytic oxidation of acetone, ethanol and the interaction between acetone and ethanol. Compared with the degradation of acetone alone, it cannot...

  19. Microbial petroleum degradation enhancement by oil spill bioremediation products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Salvador Aldrett

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was conducted using unpolluted, natural seawater. The products were tested in triplicate using 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and evaluated over a 28 day period to determine the products' capabilities based on the extent of petroleum degradation. Toxicity...

  20. Identifying Efficiency Degrading Faults in Split Air Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrill, T. J.; Brown, M. L.; Cheyne, R. W. Jr.; Cousins, A. J.; Daniels, B. P.; Erb, K. L.; Garcia, P. A.; Leutermann, M. J.; Nel, A. J.; Robert, C. L.; Widger, S. B.; Williams, A. G.; Rasmussen, B. P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies estimate that as much as 50% of packaged air conditioning systems operate in faulty conditions that degrade system efficiency. Common faults include: under- and over-charged systems (too much or too little refrigerant), faulty expansions...

  1. Wigner-PDC description of photon entanglement can still be made completely local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allegedly, a realistic theory for the process of detection within the Wigner description of PDC-generated (Parametric Down Conversion) photon-entanglement cannot be formulated as entirely local-realistic. Here we show the falseness of such an assertion, at least when based, as customarily is, on the unavoidable appearance of negative probabilities. Yet, locality is not guaranteed: it simply is not excluded, either. On the other hand, the immediacy with which the so-called phenomena of "enhancement" arises in this framework would also suggest that the Wigner-PDC theory may be the right track if Quantum Mechanics and local realism are to be, after all, reconciled.

  2. Petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the Galveston Bay system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schropp, Steven James

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) (Membge' ) I, (Member) December, 1979 ABSTRACT Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria in the Galveston Bay System {December 1979) Steven James Schropp: B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. John R. Schwarz... about the distribution and abundance of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrad- ing bacteria in the Galveston Bay system. Several parts of the Galveston Bay system were sampled during this study. Petroleum input to the study area ranged from relatively small...

  3. Investigation of the Photocatalytic Degradation of Ethanol and Acetone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y.; Ding, B.; Dong, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ Vol. I-3-4 Investigation of the Photocatalytic Degradation of Ethanol and Acetone Yanhua Liu Bo Ding Shuping Dong Professor Master... the reactants and products. The valve No.5 is closed while No. 4 and No. 6 are open for air to go into FTIR monitoring system during experiment. The fan in the system is used to control the flux of the air. Key words: photocatalytic degradation...

  4. Petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the Galveston Bay system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schropp, Steven James

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETROLEUM HYDRQCARBOiV-DEGRADING BACTERIA IN THE GALVESTON BAY SYSTEM A Thesis by STEVEN JAMES SCHROPP Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Biology PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA IN THE GALVESTON BAY SYSTEM A Thesis by STEVEN JAMES SCHROPP Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of Committee) '( ~CA. ( -Chairman of Committee) (Head...

  5. MISPAR: Mitigating Stealthy Packet Dropping in Locally-Monitored Multi-hop Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagchi, Saurabh

    partial neighborhood communication to detect misbehavior such as packet drop or delay. However, local-constrained, not only on energy but on bandwidth and computation as well. This limitation presents an additional loss of data or degradation of network functionality, say through disrupting network connectivity

  6. Technology and Climate Trends in PV Module Degradation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) technology it is vital to know how power output decreases with time. Unfortunately, it can take years to accurately measure the long-term degradation of new products, but past experience on older products can provide a basis for prediction of degradation rates of new products. An extensive search resulted in more than 2000 reported degradation rates with more than 1100 reported rates that include some or all IV parameters. In this presentation we discuss how the details of the degradation data give clues about the degradation mechanisms and how they depend on technology and climate zones as well as how they affect current and voltage differently. The largest contributor to maximum power decline for crystalline Si technologies is short circuit current (or maximum current) degradation and to a lesser degree loss in fill factor. Thin-film technologies are characterized by a much higher contribution from fill factor particularly for humid climates. Crystalline Si technologies in hot & humid climates also display a higher probability to show a mixture of losses (not just short circuit current losses) compared to other climates. The distribution for the module I-V parameters (electrical mismatch) was found to change with field exposure. The distributions not only widened but also developed a tail at the lower end, skewing the distribution.

  7. Technology and Climate Trends in PV Module Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) technology it is vital to know how power output decreases with time. Unfortunately, it can take years to accurately measure the long-term degradation of new products, but past experience on older products can provide a basis for prediction of degradation rates of new products. An extensive search resulted in more than 2000 reported degradation rates with more than 1100 reported rates that include some or all IV parameters. In this paper we discuss how the details of the degradation data give clues about the degradation mechanisms and how they depend on technology and climate zones as well as how they affect current and voltage differently. The largest contributor to maximum power decline for crystalline Si technologies is short circuit current (or maximum current) degradation and to a lesser degree loss in fill factor. Thin-film technologies are characterized by a much higher contribution from fill factor particularly for humid climates. Crystalline Si technologies in hot & humid climates also display a higher probability to show a mixture of losses (not just short circuit current losses) compared to other climates. The distribution for the module I-V parameters (electrical mismatch) was found to change with field exposure. The distributions not only widened but also developed a tail at the lower end, skewing the distribution.

  8. Three-Dimensional Computational Analysis of Transport Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Three-Dimensional Computational Analysis of Transport Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell by Torsten or other means, without permission of the author. #12;Supervisor: Dr. N. Djilali Abstract Fuel cells-isothermal computational model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The model was developed to improve

  9. Eurographics Workshop on Natural Phenomena (2009) E. Galin and J. Schneider (Editors)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumhold, Stefan

    phenomenon able to evoke great beauty in all kinds of scenes. However, there still does not exist an all.g. smoke as in [SB08], or water [IGLF06] or plants [DL05]). However, there are many phenomena where innovation is our model's founda- tion on real snow observations. We condensed these obser- vations

  10. Ultrafast Phenomena XIV, pp. 650-654 , Springer, Berlin (2005). 650 Ultrafast Dynamics of Light Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    of ultrafast pulse propagation through nano-hole arrays reported a 10-fs delay in transmission [6 of ultrafast light propagation through plasmonic nano-crystals using light pulses much shorter than the SPPUltrafast Phenomena XIV, pp. 650-654 , Springer, Berlin (2005). 650 Ultrafast Dynamics of Light

  11. Modeling of elasto-capillary phenomena David L. Henann*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy, driving a uid body to minimize its surface area in an effort to minimize free energy.1 However, and surface area A. Surface energy will scale as gA, while volumetric strain energy scales as GV. DeningModeling of elasto-capillary phenomena David L. Henann*a and Katia Bertoldi*bc Surface energy

  12. Report on the Implementation of Periodic Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Reviews at Department of Energy Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides the results of a review conducted by the Office of Nuclear Safety (AU-30) of the implementation of periodic Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) assessment reviews by sites reporting to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the Offices of Environmental Management, Nuclear Energy, and Science.

  13. Computer modelling and natural phenomena Author: Giuseppe Longo Ecole Normale Suparieure, Paris et CREA, Ecole Polytechnique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longo, Giuseppe

    CREA, Ecole Polytechnique Published in: ESEC/FSE-11 Proceedings of the 9th European software engineering conference held jointly with 11th ACM SIGSOFT international symposium on Foundations of software projection of our fantastic machine onto Biological and Cognitive phenomena. The conference lecture

  14. Transport phenomena in metal-halide lamps a poly-diagnostic study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Nimalasuriya, Tanya Transport phenomena in metal-halide lamps : a poly-diagnostic study / by Tanya Nimalasuriya. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2007. Proefschrift. ISBN 978 aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van

  15. An Analysis of Heat and Fluid Flow Phenomena 1n Electroslag Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    and temperature distri- bution~ are given for several idealized models of the electroslag welding process) ) An Analysis of Heat and Fluid Flow Phenomena 1n Electroslag Welding Two physical models created and fluid flow phenom- ena in metals processing operations have been applied to electroslag weld- ing

  16. Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

  17. Atomization and Sprays 20(4), 297310 (2010) SPLASHING PHENOMENA DURING LIQUID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    sound speed in liquid, m/s Tsat saturation temperature of droplet at 1 atm, C F force, N V droplet number (V µ/) tc characteristic spreading time, s Cg sound speed in ambient gas, m/s T temperature, C ClAtomization and Sprays 20(4), 297­310 (2010) SPLASHING PHENOMENA DURING LIQUID DROPLET IMPACT Jie

  18. Photoelectric phenomena in polymer-based composites H. Ruda, and E. H. Sargent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photoelectric phenomena in polymer-based composites A. Shik,a) H. Ruda, and E. H. Sargent. The effect is observed experimentally in a wide range of polymer-based composites with disparate inclusions. © 2000 American Institute of Physics. S0021-8979 00 03719-1 I. INTRODUCTION Conducting polymers provide

  19. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF THERMAL-ELECTRICAL PHENOMENA IN SPARK PLASMA SINTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    NUMERICAL MODELLING OF THERMAL-ELECTRICAL PHENOMENA IN SPARK PLASMA SINTERING P. Mondaleka , L'Etudes Structurales), France c Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France Abstract. Spark Plasma Sintering belongs: Finite element method, Spark plasma sintering, powder compaction. INTRODUCTION Spark Plasma Sintering

  20. Paradoxical games, ratchets, and related phenomena Juan M.R. Parrondo Luis Dinis Javier Buceta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindenberg, Katja

    Paradoxical games, ratchets, and related phenomena Juan M.R. Parrondo Luis Din´is Javier Buceta states in spatially extended systems [2, 3, 4]. Brownian ratchets show that noise can be rectified a Brownian ratchet. In fact, the paradox came up as a translation to gambling games of the flashing ratchet

  1. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 125424 (2012) Probing biological light-harvesting phenomena by optical cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saikin, Semion

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . INTRODUCTION Plants and some types of bacteria can efficiently process solar light by converting photonsPHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 125424 (2012) Probing biological light-harvesting phenomena by optical Fiorentino, Italy 3 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street

  2. Theory of thermoelectric phenomena in superconductors Y. M. Galperin,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Theory of thermoelectric phenomena in superconductors Y. M. Galperin,1,2 V. L. Gurevich,2 V. I 2000; revised manuscript received 26 March 2001; published 24 January 2002 The theory of thermoelectric of the present paper is to discuss some as- pects of the kinetic approach to the thermoelectric properties

  3. Simulation of Heat Exchange Phenomena and Water Regime in Green Roof Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    187 Simulation of Heat Exchange Phenomena and Water Regime in Green Roof Substrates S. Charpentier UR EPHor Agrocampus-Ouest Centre d'Angers 2, rue Le Nôtre, F49045 Angers France Keywords: green roof roofs increases in Western European and North American cities. It is estimated that 12% of all flat

  4. Critical phenomena of nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical phenomena of nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model K. Miyazaki Abstract in nuclear multifragmentation reactions and the critical temperature has been derived as TC = 20 3 MeV in Ref] to estimate the critical temperature for in...nite nuclear matter, that is, TC = 16:6 0:86 Me

  5. Abstract --In electromagnetic applications, hysteresis phenomena in magnetic materials are responsible of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    rotation. Furthermore, based on the balance of chemical equation analogies, this model has the advantage13. M M Abstract -- In electromagnetic applications, hysteresis phenomena in magnetic materials the implementation proceeding used for some hysteresis material models and how they are applied in a sensor study

  6. Bull. Astr. Soc. India (2010) 38, 147163 Comparison of energies between eruptive phenomena and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Tim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bull. Astr. Soc. India (2010) 38, 147­163 Comparison of energies between eruptive phenomena the energy carried away by a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the radiative energy loss in associated flare plasma, with the decrease in magnetic free energy during a release in active region NOAA 10930

  7. Threshold phenomena and complexity: a statistical physics analysis of the random

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duxbury, Phillip M.

    Threshold phenomena and complexity: a statistical physics analysis of the random Satis#12;ability problem. R#19;emi Monasson 1 Laboratoire de Physique Th#19;eorique de l'ENS, 75005 Paris. Abstract designed by physicists to deal with optimization or decision problems in an accessible language

  8. Transport phenomena in stochastic magnetic mirrors Leonid Malyshkin 1 and Russell Kulsrud 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transport phenomena in stochastic magnetic mirrors Leonid Malyshkin 1 and Russell Kulsrud 2 as the electron­proton collision term. Finally, we obtain the four plasma transport coefficients and the effective magnetic field lines, and as a result, they have to go larger distances between hot and cold regions

  9. Separation phenomena in the tritium source and numerical simulations of turbo-molecular pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharipov, Felix

    Separation phenomena in the tritium source and numerical simulations of turbo-molecular pumps Felix In the previous works [1, 2], the results of numerical calculations of tritium flow from the buffer vessel up to the first vacuum system were reported. Two values of the tritium source temperature were considered, i.e. 27

  10. Experimental studies of the transfer phenomena of tritium in an isotope exchange column for recovery tritium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental studies of the transfer phenomena of tritium in an isotope exchange column for recovery tritium Anisia Bornea, Ion Cristescu, Marius Zamfirache, Carmen Varlam National Institute of R processes for tritium separation, is the catalyst isotope exchange water-hydrogen. The main problem

  11. Fluid Mechanics and Tt.ansDOrtPhenomena A Mathematical Model for a Dissolving Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, David A.

    Fluid Mechanics and Tt.ansDOrtPhenomena A Mathematical Model for a Dissolving Polymer David A boundary-value problem. The boundary separates the polymer into two distinct states: glassy and rub- bery- ablefront speed and a self-regulatingmass uptake. Introduction In the last few years, new uses for polymers

  12. Building and Environment 44 (2009) 216226 Effect of volumetric heat sources on hysteresis phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phenomena in natural and mixed-mode ventilation M.R. Flynna,1 , C.P. Caulfieldb,Ă a Department of Mechanical this methodology may be extended to the converse problem of winter-time heating wherein hot, buoyant air is purposefully supplied to the interior space using a coupled ventilation scheme. A ``blocked'' flow regime

  13. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  14. INTERFACIAL AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN CLOSED-CELL FOAMS Submitted to the Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    INTERFACIAL AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN CLOSED-CELL FOAMS A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty Sylvania, Techneglas, and Owens Corning provided the glass samples as well as help- ful criticisms the Purdue Glass Laboratory for sharing his expertise on glass and for letting me use his laboratory

  15. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

  16. Quantitative Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (QPIRT) for Bayesian uncertainty quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurko, J. P.; Buongiorno, J. [MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagating parameter uncertainty for a nuclear reactor system code is a challenging problem due to often non-linear system response to the numerous parameters involved and lengthy computational times; issues that compound when a statistical sampling procedure is adopted, since the code must be run many times. The number of parameters sampled must therefore be limited to as few as possible that still accurately characterize the uncertainty in the system response. A Quantitative Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (QPIRT) was developed to accomplish this goal. The QPIRT consists of two steps: a 'Top-Down' step focusing on identifying the dominant physical phenomena controlling the system response, and a 'Bottom-Up' step which focuses on determining the correlations from those key physical phenomena that significantly contribute to the response uncertainty. The Top-Down step evaluates phenomena using the governing equations of the system code at nominal parameter values, providing a 'fast' screening step. The Bottom-Up step then analyzes the correlations and models for the phenomena identified from the Top-Down step to find which parameters to sample. The QPIRT, through the Top-Down and Bottom-Up steps thus provides a systematic approach to determining the limited set of physically relevant parameters that influence the uncertainty of the system response. This strategy was demonstrated through an application to the RELAP5-based analysis of a PWR Total Loss of main Feedwater Flow (TLOFW) accident, also known as feed and bleed' scenario, . Ultimately, this work is the first component in a larger task of building a calibrated uncertainty propagation framework. The QPIRT is an essential piece because the uncertainty of those selected parameters will be calibrated to data from both Separate and Integral Effect Tests (SETs and IETs). Therefore the system response uncertainty will incorporate the knowledge gained from the database of past large IETs. (authors)

  17. Preubiquitinated chimeric ErbB2 is constitutively endocytosed and subsequently degraded in lysosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuong, Tram Thu [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway)] [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)] [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Bertelsen, Vibeke; Rřdland, Marianne Skeie [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway)] [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)] [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene, E-mail: i.h.madshus@medisin.uio.no [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The oncoprotein ErbB2 is endocytosis-deficient, probably due to its interaction with Heat shock protein 90. We previously demonstrated that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of ErbB2 is induced upon incubation of cells with Ansamycin derivatives, such as geldanamycin and its derivative 17-AAG. Furthermore, we have previously demonstrated that a preubiquitinated chimeric EGFR (EGFR-Ub{sub 4}) is constitutively endocytosed in a clathrin-dependent manner. We now demonstrate that also an ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} chimera is endocytosed constitutively and clathrin-dependently. Upon expression, the ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was further ubiquitinated, and by Western blotting, we demonstrated the formation of both Lys48-linked and Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was constitutively internalized and eventually sorted to late endosomes and lysosomes where the fusion protein was degraded. ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was not cleaved prior to internalization. Interestingly, over-expression of Ubiquitin Interaction Motif-containing dominant negative fragments of the clathrin adaptor proteins epsin1 and Eps15 negatively affected endocytosis of ErbB2. Altogether, this argues that ubiquitination is sufficient to induce clathrin-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the otherwise plasma membrane localized ErbB2. Also, it appears that C-terminal cleavage is not required for endocytosis. -- Highlights: ? A chimera containing ErbB2 and a tetra-Ubiquitin chain internalizes constitutively. ? Receptor fragmentation is not required for endocytosis of ErbB2. ? Ubiquitination is sufficient to induce endocytosis and degradation of ErbB2. ? ErbB2-Ub4 is internalized clathrin-dependently.

  18. MAPPING FLOW LOCALIZATION PROCESSES IN DEFORMATION OF IRRADIATED REACTOR STRUCTURAL ALLOYS - FINAL REPORT. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program No. MSF99-0072. Period: August 1999 through September 2002. (ORNL/TM-2003/63)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, K.

    2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Metals that can sustain plastic deformation homogeneously throughout their bulk tend to be tough and malleable. Often, however, if a metal has been hardened it will no longer deform uniformly. Instead, the deformation occurs in narrow bands on a microscopic scale wherein stresses and strains become concentrated in localized zones. This strain localization degrades the mechanical properties of the metal by causing premature plastic instability failure or by inducing the formation of cracks. Irradiation with neutrons hardens a metal and makes it more prone to deformation by strain localization. Although this has been known since the earliest days of radiation damage studies, a full measure of the connection between neutron irradiation hardening and strain localization is wanting, particularly in commercial alloys used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Therefore, the goal of this project is to systematically map the extent of involvement of strain localization processes in plastic deformation of three reactor alloys that have been neutron irradiated. The deformation processes are to be identified and related to changes in the tensile properties of the alloys as functions of neutron fluence (dose) and degree of plastic strain. The intent is to define the role of strain localization in radiation embrittlement phenomena. The three test materials are a tempered bainitic A533B steel, representing reactor pressure vessel steel, an annealed 316 stainless steel and annealed Zircaloy-4 representing reactor internal components. These three alloys cover the range of crystal structures usually encountered in structural alloys, i.e. body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and close-packed hexagonal (cph), respectively. The experiments were conducted in three Phases, corresponding to the three years duration of the project. Phases 1 and 2 addressed irradiations and tensile tests made at near-ambient temperatures, and covered a wide range of neutron fluences. Phase 3 was aimed at a higher irradiation and test temperature of about 288 C, pertinent to the operating temperature of commercial reactor pressure vessel steels. Phase 3 explored a narrower fluence range than Phases 1 and 2, and it included an investigation of the strain rate dependence of deformation.

  19. Development of a phenomena identification and ranking table for thermal-hydraulic phenomena during a double-ended guillotine break LOCA in an SRS production reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.G.; Ortiz, M.G.; Bolander, M.A.; Wilson, G.E.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rising level of scrutiny is being directed toward the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors. Improved calculational capabilities are being developed to provide a best estimate analytical process to determine the safe operating margins of the reactors. The Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) methodology, developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support best estimate simulations, is being applied to the best estimate limits analysis for the SRS production reactors. One of the foundational parts of the method is the identification and ranking of all the processes that occur during the specific limiting scenario. The phenomena ranking is done according to their importance to safety criteria during the transient and is used to focus the uncertainty analysis on a sufficient, yet cost effective scope of work. This report documents the thermal-hydraulic phenomena that occur during a limiting break in an SRS production reactor and their importance to the uncertainty in simulations of the reactor behavior. 9 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. ROBUST THRESHOLDING BASED ON WAVELETS AND THINNING ALGORITHMS FOR DEGRADED CAMERA IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Stéphane

    Copernic, 7000 Mons, Belgium ABSTRACT This paper describes a thresholding method for degraded docu- ments

  1. Flexible Regions within I B Create the Ubiquitin-independent Degradation Signal*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komives, Elizabeth A.

    Flexible Regions within I B Create the Ubiquitin-independent Degradation Signal* Received anditsrapiddegradationbytheproteasomethrough a ubiquitin-independent pathway. We previously showed that the ubiquitin-independent degradation with slower degradation rates of unbound I B . We have further identified a degradation signal located within

  2. Evaluating Software Degradation through Entropy Alessandro Bianchi, Danilo Caivano, Filippo Lanubile, Giuseppe Visaggio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanubile, Filippo

    1 Evaluating Software Degradation through Entropy Alessandro Bianchi, Danilo Caivano, Filippo by degradation as an effect of continuous change. Since late interventions are too much onerous, software degradation should be detected early in the software lifetime. Software degradation is currently detected

  3. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Maximum Allowable Gasket Seating Surface Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Degradation Overview Westinghouse applies a conservative approach when evaluating degradation on a gasket evaluation. The team was tasked with collecting this data to determine when degradation endangers the pressure seal. Objectives The team's objectives were to determine the maximum degradation which the gasket

  4. Fabrication and mechanical properties of PLA/HA composites: A study of in vitro degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fabrication and mechanical properties of PLA/HA composites: A study of in vitro degradation J perspective, the in vitro degradation behavior of such composites manufactured using a simple hot due to the degradation of the polymer phase. The degradation is more pronounced in samples with larger

  5. Adhesion degradation and water diffusion in nanoporous organosilicate glass thin film stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Adhesion degradation and water diffusion in nanoporous organosilicate glass thin film stacks adhesion degradation of the capping layer on top of the NPOSG. We have used this adhesion degradation degradation; Thin films --------------- Correspondence should be sent to Joost J. Vlassak, vlassak

  6. March 4, 16, and 18 Chapter 6: Habitat Degradation and Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    March 4, 16, and 18 Chapter 6: Habitat Degradation and Loss Chapter 7: Habitat Fragmentation Chapter 12: Landscape Ecology and Management #12;· What constitutes habitat degradation? When is habitat habitat degradation · Pollution as a form of habitat degradation · Protect what's left · Conservation

  7. Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and NonNuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides guidance in implementing the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation requirements of DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.4, "Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation." This Guide does not establish or invoke any new requirements. Any apparent conflicts arising from the NPH guidance would defer to the requirements in DOE O 420.1. No cancellation.

  8. Fractals in geophysics Geophysical phenomena of interest to geoscientists include both atmospheric and terrestrial related processes, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, Govindan

    Preface Fractals in geophysics Geophysical phenomena of interest to geoscientists include both-fractal type. Recently, there has been much interdisciplinary interest in the application of geophysical of the spatio-temporal organization of geophysical phenomena from micro to macro levels [1­6]. Wider application

  9. Analysis and understanding of unique cryogenic phenomena in state-of-the-art SiGe HBTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieh, Jae-Sung

    Analysis and understanding of unique cryogenic phenomena in state-of-the-art SiGe HBTs Qingqing.E. Thompson Abstract A group of novel device phenomena are reported in state-of-the-art SiGe HBTs operating are observed in the forced-IB output characteristics of 350 GHz SiGe HBTs at cryogenic temperatures. Unlike

  10. Local Public Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1959. The Theory of Public Finance. New York: McGraw-Hill.T. 2003. School finance, spatial income segregation, and theJohn M. "local public finance." The New Palgrave Dictionary

  11. Local Public Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24. How to cite this article Quigley, John M. "local publicEW P ALGRAVE ) By John M. Quigley May 2008 These papers arelocal public finance John M. Quigley From The New Palgrave

  12. Local Public Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cite this article Quigley, John M. "local public finance."HE N EW P ALGRAVE ) By John M. Quigley May 2008 These paperslocal public finance John M. Quigley From The New Palgrave

  13. Local entropy generation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second law analysis techniques have been widely used to evaluate the sources of irreversibility in components and systems of components but the evaluation of local sources of irreversibility in thermal processes has received little attention. While analytical procedures for evaluating local entropy generation have been developed, applications have been limited to fluid flows with analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields. The analysis of local entropy generation can be used to evaluate more complicated flows by including entropy generation calculations in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The research documented in this report consists of incorporating local entropy generation calculations in an existing CFD code and then using the code to evaluate the distribution of thermodynamic losses in two applications: an impinging jet and a magnetic heat pump. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Self-Organization, Plasticity, and Low-level Visual Phenomena in a Laterally Connected Map Model of the Primary Visual Cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a Hebbian adaptation process, the afferent and lateral connections in the RF-LISSOM model organize simultaneously and cooperatively, and form structures such as those observed in the primary visual cortex. The neurons in the model develop local receptive fields that are organized into orientation, ocular dominance, and size selectivity columns. At the same time, patterned lateral connections form between neurons that follow the receptive field organization. This structure is in a continuously-adapting dynamic equilibrium with the external and intrinsic input, and can account for reorganization of the adult cortex following retinal and cortical lesions. The same learning processes may be responsible for a number of low-level functional phenomena such as tilt aftereffects, and combined with the leaky integrator model of the spiking neuron, for segmentation and binding. The model can also be used to verify quantitatively the hypothesis that the visual cortex forms a sparse, redun...

  15. Recent progress in degradation and stabilization of organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Huanqi; He, Weidong; Mao, Yiwu; Lin, Xiao; Ishikawa, Ken; Dickerson, James H.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stability is of paramount importance in organic semiconductor devices, especially in organic solar cells (OSCs). Serious degradation in air limits wide applications of these flexible, light-weight and low-cost power-generation devices. Studying the stability of organic solar cells will help us understand degradation mechanisms and further improve the stability of these devices. There are many investigations into the efficiency and stability of OSCs. The efficiency and stability of devices even of the same photoactive materials are scattered in different papers. In particular, the extrinsic degradation that mainly occurs near the interface between the organic layer and the cathode is a major stability concern. In the past few years, researchers have developed many new cathodes and cathode buffer layers, some of which have astonishingly improved the stability of OSCs. In this review article, we discuss the recent developments of these materials and summarize recent progresses in the study of the degradation/stability of OSCs, with emphasis on the extrinsic degradation/stability that is related to the intrusion of oxygen and water. The review provides detailed insight into the current status of research on the stability of OSCs and seeks to facilitate the development of highly-efficient OSCs with enhanced stability.

  16. Enhanced regeneration of degraded polymer solar cells by thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pankaj, E-mail: pankaj@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); Bilen, Chhinder; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); Feron, Krishna [Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); CSIRO Energy Technology, P. O. Box 330, Newcastle NSW 2300 (Australia)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation and thermal regeneration of poly(3-hexylethiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and P3HT:indene-C{sub 60} bisadduct (ICBA) polymer solar cells, with Ca/Al and Ca/Ag cathodes and indium tin oxide/poly(ethylene-dioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate anode have been investigated. Degradation occurs via a combination of three primary pathways: (1) cathodic oxidation, (2) active layer phase segregation, and (3) anodic diffusion. Fully degraded devices were subjected to thermal annealing under inert atmosphere. Degraded solar cells possessing Ca/Ag electrodes were observed to regenerate their performance, whereas solar cells having Ca/Al electrodes exhibited no significant regeneration of device characteristics after thermal annealing. Moreover, the solar cells with a P3HT:ICBA active layer exhibited enhanced regeneration compared to P3HT:PCBM active layer devices as a result of reduced changes to the active layer morphology. Devices combining a Ca/Ag cathode and P3HT:ICBA active layer demonstrated ?50% performance restoration over several degradation/regeneration cycles.

  17. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

  18. Recent results and open questions on collective type phenomena from A-A to pp collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Petrovici; C. Andrei; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; A. Herghelegiu; A. Pop

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the main results on the collective type expansion of the compressed and hot fireball formed in heavy ion collisions and some remarks to be considered when comparing multiplicity wise phenomena taking place in A-A, p-A and pp collisions, are followed by a discussion of the experimental results which seem to evidence collective type phenomena in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV at high charged particle multiplicity. Correlations among the kinetic freeze-out temperature, the average transverse expansion velocity and its profile, as a function of centrality and multiplicity, extracted from the fits of experimental transverse momentum spectra with an expression inspired by hydrodynamical models, estimates on Bjorken energy densities and perspectives in selecting soft and close to azimuthal isotropic events in pp collisions are presented.

  19. Effects of upper-plenum steam condensation phenomena on heat transfer in a rod bundle. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chon, W.Y.; Addabbo, C.; Liao, N.S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System performance and thermohydraulic response to simultaneous bottom and top water injection were investigated in a 3 x 3 rod bundle Reflood Test Facility. An extensive series of tests, encompassing both simple bottom and combined injection reflooding, were carried out. A number of phenomenological events governing the thermodynamic coupling between the bottom reflood updraft and the top deluge were identified. Due to the countercurrent motion of the upflowing steam and water injected in the upper plenum counter current flow limiting phenomena hindered the penetration of water from inventory in the upper plenum into the bundle section. Consequently, condensation phenomena in the upper plenum and in the venting pipework characterized the thermohydraulic response of the bundle to simultaneous bottom and top water injection.

  20. From human mobility to renewable energies: Big data analysis to approach worldwide multiscale phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raischel, Frank; Lind, Pedro G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We address and discuss recent trends in the analysis of big data sets, with the emphasis on studying multiscale phenomena. Applications of big data analysis in different scientific fields are described and two particular examples of multiscale phenomena are explored in more detail. The first one deals with wind power production at the scale of single wind turbines, the scale of entire wind farms and also at the scale of a whole country. Using open source data we show that the wind power production has an intermittent character at all those three scales, with implications for defining adequate strategies for stable energy production. The second example concerns the dynamics underlying human mobility, which presents different features at different scales. For that end, we analyze $12$-month data of the Eduroam database within Portuguese universities, and find that, at the smallest scales, typically within a set of a few adjacent buildings, the characteristic exponents of average displacements are different from...

  1. Studies of Intermittency-like Phenomena in Plasma turbulence at IPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, R.; Das, A.; Bisai, N.; Kaw, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Near Indira Bridge, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The observation of intermittency in the turbulent scrape-off layer plasma of ADITYA tokamak was first reported about one and a half decade ago. In the last decade or so, several aspects of intermittency-like phenomena have been observed on tokamaks and other fusion devices throughout the world. A review of the research carried out at the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) is presented, which closely follow the research trend on intermittency-like phenomena in plasmas worldwide. We also present our analysis of particle flux data in order to test the recently proposed fluctuation theorem, which states that the probability of 'entropy consuming' flux events falls off exponentially with the averaging time. This theorem, proposed in the context of small systems, is applied to macroscopic system like tokamak edge plasma by invoking an 'effective temperature' of the bath of drift waves from which, plasma objects take energy and carry out work of transporting matter

  2. Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  3. Progress in understanding of direct containment heating phenomena in pressurized light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is described in development of a mechanistic understanding of direct containment heating phemonena arising during high-pressure melt ejection accidents in pressurized water reactor systems. The experimental data base is discussed which forms the basis for current assessments of containment pressure response using current lumped-parameter containment analysis methods. The deficiencies in available methods and supporting data base required to describe major phenomena occurring in the reactor cavity, intermediate subcompartments and containment dome are highlighted. Code calculation results presented in the literature are cited which demonstrate that the progress in understanding of DCH phenomena has also resulted in current predictions of containment pressure loadings which are significantly lower than are predicted by idealized, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Current methods are, nonetheless, still predicting containment-threatening loadings for large participating melt masses under high-pressure ejection conditions. Recommendations for future research are discussed. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

  5. Investigations of internal resonance phenomena and related nonlinear pathologies in aeroelastic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilliatt, Heather Colleen

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) December 1997 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering ABSTRACT Investigations of Internal Resonance Phenomena and Related Nonlinear Pathologies in Aeroelastic Systems. (December 1997) Heather Colleen Gilliatt, B. S. , University of California... for an auto- formatting thesis. I also want to say thank you to Haiming Huang for putting up with my "weird'* personality and listening to Dr. Laura day-in and day-out in the office. He always tested my knowledge of U. S. history and had an eager attitude...

  6. Robust emergent climate phenomena associated with the high-sensitivity tail.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Levy, Michael Nathan; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because the potential effects of climate change are more severe than had previously been thought, increasing focus on uncertainty quantification is required for risk assessment needed by policy makers. Current scientific efforts focus almost exclusively on establishing best estimates of future climate change. However, the greatest consequences occur in the extreme tail of the probability density functions for climate sensitivity (the 'high-sensitivity tail'). To this end, we are exploring the impacts of newly postulated, highly uncertain, but high-consequence physical mechanisms to better establish the climate change risk. We define consequence in terms of dramatic change in physical conditions and in the resulting socioeconomic impact (hence, risk) on populations. Although we are developing generally applicable risk assessment methods, we have focused our initial efforts on uncertainty and risk analyses for the Arctic region. Instead of focusing on best estimates, requiring many years of model parameterization development and evaluation, we are focusing on robust emergent phenomena (those that are not necessarily intuitive and are insensitive to assumptions, subgrid-parameterizations, and tunings). For many physical systems, under-resolved models fail to generate such phenomena, which only develop when model resolution is sufficiently high. Our ultimate goal is to discover the patterns of emergent climate precursors (those that cannot be predicted with lower-resolution models) that can be used as a 'sensitivity fingerprint' and make recommendations for a climate early warning system that would use satellites and sensor arrays to look for the various predicted high-sensitivity signatures. Our initial simulations are focused on the Arctic region, where underpredicted phenomena such as rapid loss of sea ice are already emerging, and because of major geopolitical implications associated with increasing Arctic accessibility to natural resources, shipping routes, and strategic locations. We anticipate that regional climate will be strongly influenced by feedbacks associated with a seasonally ice-free Arctic, but with unknown emergent phenomena.

  7. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

  8. 1.Classical and Modern Topology. 2.Topological Phenomena in Real World Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey P. Novikov

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Hystory of topology is discussed uncluding the Golden Age Period (1950-1970), the Period of Decay (1970-1980) and the Period of Recovery in 80s and 90s based on the ideas borrowed from physics community. In the second part recent result of the present author, A.Malcev, I Dynnikov and A.Zorich concerning new observable topological phenomena in normal metals and topology of quasiperiodic functions on the plane are presented

  9. Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiderich, Melissa E [ORNL] [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL] [ORNL; Peterman, D. R. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marc, Philippe L [ORNL] [ORNL; Klaehn, John D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study a significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. With small amounts of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

  10. Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melissa E. Freiderich; Dean R. Peterman; John R. Klaehn; Philippe Marc; Laetitia H. Delmau

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3 all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. In the presence of a small concentration of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

  11. Identifying Suitable Degradation Parameters for Individual-Based Prognostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Hines, Wes

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate goal of most prognostic systems is accurate prediction of the remaining useful life of individual systems or components based on their use and performance. Traditionally, individual-based prognostic methods use a measure of degradation to make lifetime estimates. Degradation measures may include sensed measurements, such as temperature or vibration level, or inferred measurements, such as model residuals or physics-based model predictions. Often, it is beneficial to combine several measures of degradation into a single parameter. Parameter features such as trendability, monotonicity, and prognosability can be used to compare candidate prognostic parameters to determine which is most useful for individual-based prognosis. By quantifying these features for a given parameter, the metrics can be used with any traditional optimization technique to identify an appropriate parameter. This parameter may be used with a parametric extrapolation model to make prognostic estimates for an individual unit. The proposed methods are illustrated with an application to simulated turbofan engine data.

  12. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,???

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase susceptibility for most components and may introduce new degradation modes. While all components (except perhaps the reactor vessel) can be replaced, it may not be economically favorable. Therefore, understanding, controlling, and mitigating materials degradation processes are key priorities for reactor operation, power uprate considerations, and life extensions. This document is written to give an overview of some of the materials degradation issues that may be key for extend reactor service life. A detailed description of all the possible forms of degradation is beyond the scope of this short paper and has already been described in other documents (for example, the NUREG/CR-6923). The intent of this document is to present an overview of current materials issues in the existing reactor fleet and a brief analysis of the potential impact of extending life beyond 60 years. Discussion is presented in six distinct areas: (1) Reactor pressure vessel; (2) Reactor core and primary systems; (3) Reactor secondary systems; (4) Weldments; (5) Concrete; and (6) Modeling and simulations. Following each of these areas, some research thrust directions to help identify and mitigate lifetime extension issues are proposed. Note that while piping and cabling are important for extended service, these components are discussed in more depth in a separate paper. Further, the materials degradation issues associated with fuel cladding and fuel assemblies are not discussed in this section as these components are replaced periodically and will not influence the overall lifetime of the reactor.

  13. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylaska, Eric J.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many different degradation reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons are possible in natural ground waters. In order to identify which degradation reactions are important, a large number of possible reaction pathways must be sorted out. Recent advances in ab initio electronic structure methods have the potential to help identify relevant environmental degradation reactions by characterizing the thermodynamic properties of all relevant contaminant species and intermediates for which experimental data is usually not available, as well as provide activation energies for relevant pathways. In this paper, strategies based on ab initio electronic structure methods for estimating thermochemical and kinetic properties of reactions with chlorinated hydrocarbons are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies that are computationally fast and can be used for large organochlorine compounds such as 4,4?-DDT.

  14. Statistical Modeling of Photovoltaic Reliability Using Accelerated Degradation Techniques (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Jones, W.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a cutting-edge life-testing technique, accelerated degradation testing (ADT), for PV reliability testing. The ADT technique is a cost-effective and flexible reliability testing method with multiple (MADT) and Step-Stress (SSADT) variants. In an environment with limited resources, including equipment (chambers), test units, and testing time, these techniques can provide statistically rigorous prediction of lifetime and other interesting parameters, such as failure rate, warranty time, mean time to failure, degradation rate, activation energy, acceleration factor, and upper limit level of stress. J-V characterization can be used for degradation data and the generalized Eyring model can be used for the thermal-humidity stress condition. The SSADT model can be constructed based on the cumulative damage model (CEM), which assumes that the remaining test united are failed according to cumulative density function of current stress level regardless of the history on previous stress levels.

  15. Towards understanding junction degradation in cadmium telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nardone, Marco, E-mail: marcon@bgsu.edu [Department of Environment and Sustainability, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A degradation mechanism in cadmium telluride (CdTe/CdS) solar cells is investigated using time-dependent numerical modeling to simulate various temperature, bias, and illumination stress conditions. The physical mechanism is based on defect generation rates that are proportional to nonequilibrium charge carrier concentrations. It is found that a commonly observed degradation mode for CdTe/CdS solar cells can be reproduced only if defects are allowed to form in a narrow region of the absorber layer close to the CdTe/CdS junction. A key aspect of this junction degradation is that both mid-gap donor and shallow acceptor-type defects must be generated simultaneously in response to photo-excitation or applied bias. The numerical approach employed here can be extended to study other mechanisms for any photovoltaic technology.

  16. Final report, BWR drywell debris transport Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boyack, B.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leonard, M.T.; Williams, K.A.; Wolf, L.T.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a Regulatory Bulletin and accompanying Regulatory Guide (1.82, Rev. 2) which requires licensees of boiling water reactors to develop a specific plan of action (including hardware backfits, if necessary) to preclude the possibility of early emergency core cooling system strainer blockage following a postulated loss-of-coolant-accident. The postulated mechanism for strainer blockage is destruction of piping insulation in the vicinity of the break and subsequent transport of fragmented insulation to the wetwell. In the absence of more definitive information, the Regulatory Guide recommends that licensees assume a drywell debris transport fraction of 1.0. Accordingly, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research focused toward developing a technical basis to provide insights useful to regulatory oversight of licensee submittals associated with resolution of the postulated strainer blockage issue. Part of this program was directed towards experimental and analytical research leading to a more realistic specification of the debris transport through the drywell to the wetwell. To help focus this development into a cost effective effort, a panel, with broad based knowledge and experience, was formed to address the relative importance of the various phenomena that can be expected in plant response to postulated accidents that may produce strainer blockage. The resulting phenomena identification and ranking tables reported herein were used to help guide research. The phenomena occurring in boiling water reactors drywells was the specific focus of the panel, although supporting experimental data and calculations of debris transport fractions were considered.

  17. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

  18. Palladium chloride to palladium metal two-dimensional nucleation and growth phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, H.C. de; Carlin, R.T. [Air Force Academy, CO (United States). Frank J. Seiler Research Lab.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reduction of a monolayer of surface-bound Pd(II) to Pd(0) on a palladium substrate reveals two-dimensional nucleation and growth phenomena. Using well-known 2D nucleation-growth theories, this reduction is shown to proceed by an instantaneous nucleation and growth mechanism. However, when a submonolayer of Pd(II) is present, this mechanism fails to account for the experimentally observed high cathodic currents seen at zero time. A model incorporating preexisting Pd(0) cylindrical sites on the partially oxidized Pd(0) surface has been successfully applied to account for the discrepancy between the experimental results and current 2D theories. Using this modified 2D model, values for the mathematical product of cylindrical growth rate and the square root of the nucleation site densities have been determined, and the overpotential dependence of the growth rate has been confirmed and quantified. These 2D nucleation-growth phenomena have practical consequences on the performance of the Pd(II)/Pd(0) system as a faradaic supercapacitor, and probably on the performance of other 2D faradaic supercapacitor systems. In addition, because many electrodes undergo monolayer surface oxidation-reduction reactions in other solvent systems, especially aqueous electrolytes, these 2D nucleation-growth phenomena may play a role in these important surface-modifying redox systems as well.

  19. Effects of sediment resuspension on the degradation of phenanthrene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlanc, L.A.; Gulnick, J.; Brownawell, B.J.; Taylor, G.T. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Marine Sciences Research Center

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation of bulk organic matter in sediments is enhanced by oxic/anoxic cycling, a feature common in coastal sediments which are resuspended into overlying waters. The authors are examining the effect of periodic cycling of sediment between an oxic water column and a reducing sediment bed on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation by altering resuspension frequency in controlled laboratory exposures. Rates of initial degradation in coastal sediment have been studied for {sup 14}C-labeled phenanthrene in sediments that were suspended at the following frequencies: 12/day, 6/day, 1/day, 0.25/day and 0/day in liter-sized flow through chambers. Results to date show that degradation rates are initially log linear, with the greatest initial rates (2.4--2.7%/day) occurring in the first three treatments. In treatments resuspended less frequently, this rate decreases with time and is followed at 10--12 days, by another rate increase, which may indicate the stimulation of a bacterial subpopulation. Rates of PAH mineralization are tied to the lability and mineralization of other pools of sediment organic matter, that in turn are also affected also by oxic/anoxic cycling. Addition of fresh diatom detritus stimulated the rates of phenanthrene degradation in resuspension experiments where labile organic matter had already been consumed and microbial activity was low; in contrast diatom addition depressed phenanthrene degradation in sediment exposures with more labile organic matter remaining. The authors are further addressing the behavior of phenanthrene in exposures where they vary the concentration of initial phenanthrene and the concentration and nature of co-substrates.

  20. Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

  1. Materials Degradation and Detection (MD2): Deep Dive Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Henager, Charles H.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effort is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a fundamental and general framework to foster the science and technology needed to support real-time monitoring of early degradation in materials used in the production of nuclear power. The development of such a capability would represent a timely solution to the mounting issues operators face with materials degradation in nuclear power plants. The envisioned framework consists of three primary and interconnected “thrust” areas including 1) microstructural science, 2) behavior assessment, and 3) monitoring and predictive capabilities. A brief state-of-the-art assessment for each of these core technology areas is discussed in the paper.

  2. Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however. (authors)

  3. Preventing light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindroos, J., E-mail: jeanette.lindroos@aalto.fi; Boulfrad, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H. [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is currently dominating the silicon solar cell market due to low ingot costs, but its efficiency is limited by transition metals, extended defects, and light-induced degradation (LID). LID is traditionally associated with a boron-oxygen complex, but the origin of the degradation in the top of the commercial mc-Si brick is revealed to be interstitial copper. We demonstrate that both a large negative corona charge and an aluminum oxide thin film with a built-in negative charge decrease the interstitial copper concentration in the bulk, preventing LID in mc-Si.

  4. Neural Network Modeling of Degradation of Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Himanshu; Ghosh, Bahniman [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, 208016 (India); Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78758 (United States)

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Neural network modeling has been used to predict the degradation in conversion efficiency of solar cells in this work. The model takes intensity of light, temperature and exposure time as inputs and predicts the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Backpropagation algorithm has been used to train the network. It is found that the neural network model satisfactorily predicts the degradation in efficiency of the solar cell with exposure time. The error in the computed results, after comparison with experimental results, lies in the range of 0.005-0.01, which is quite low.

  5. Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Local Coastal Programs Section provides technical assistance, guidance, and management to parishes in the development, approval, and implementation of local coastal programs (LCP). Once an LCP...

  6. 'Long-Cell Action' Corrosion: A Basic Mechanism Hidden Behind Components Degradation Issues in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genn Saji [Ex-Secretariate of Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (Japan)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of industries' effort over the last 40 years, corrosion-related issues continue to be one of the largest unresolved problems for nuclear power plants worldwide. There are several types of strange corrosion phenomena from the point of view of our current understanding of corrosion science established in other fields. Some of these are IGSCC, PWSCC, AOA, and FAC (Erosion-Corrosion). Through studying and coping with diverse corrosion phenomena, the author believes that they share a common basis with respect to the assumed corrosion mechanism (e.g., 'local cell action' hypothesis). In general, local cell action is rarely severe since it produces a fairly uniform corrosion. The 'long cell action' that transports electrons through structures far beyond the region of local cell corrosion activities has been identified as a basic mechanism in soil corrosion. If this mechanism is assumed in nuclear power plants, the structure becomes anodic in the area where the potential is less positive and cathodic where this potential is more positive. Metallic ions generated at anodic corrosion sites are transported to remote cathodic sites through the circulation of water and deposits as corrosion products. The SCC, FAC (E-C) and PWSCC occur in the anodic sites as the structure itself acts as a short-circuiting conductor between the two sites, the action is similar to a galvanic cell but in a very large scale. This situation is the same as a battery that has been short-circuited at the terminals. No apparent external potential difference exists between the two electrodes, but an electrochemical reaction is still taking place inside the battery cell with a large internal short current. In this example what is important is the potential difference between the local coolant and the surface of the structural material. Long cell action corrosion is likely enhancing the local cell action's anodic corrosion activities, such as SCC, FAC/E-C, and PWSCC. It tends to be more hazardous because of its localized nature compared with the local cell action corrosion. There exist various mechanisms (electrochemical cell configurations) that induce such potential differences, including: ionic concentration, aeration, temperature, flow velocity, radiation and corrosion potentials. In this paper, the author will discuss these potential differences and their relevance to the un-resolved corrosion issues in nuclear power plants. Due to the importance of this potential mechanism the author is calling for further verification experiments as a joint international project. (author)

  7. Development Of An Experiment For Measuring Flow Phenomena Occurring In A Lower Plenum For VHTR CFD Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; K.G. Condie; G. E. Mc Creery; H. M. Mc Ilroy

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the present report is to document the design of our first experiment to measure generic flow phenomena expected to occur in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In the process, fabrication sketches are provided for the use of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysts wishing to employ the data for assessment of their proposed codes. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. One aspect of the complex flow in a prismatic VHTR is being addressed: flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue). Current prismatic VHTR concepts were examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses were applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentum-dominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other.

  8. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.2: UV Degradation Prevention on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet M. Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Use of wind energy has expanded very quickly because of the energy prices, environmental concerns and improved efficiency of wind generators. Rather than using metal and alloy based wind turbine blades, larger size fiber (glass and carbon) reinforced composite blades have been recently utilized to increase the efficiency of the wind energy in both high and low wind potential areas. In the current composite manufacturing, pre-preg and vacuum-assisted/heat sensitive resin transfer molding and resin infusion methods are employed. However, these lighter, stiffer and stronger composite blades experience ultraviolet (UV) light degradation where polymers (epoxies and hardeners) used for the blades manufacturing absorb solar UV lights, and cause photolytic, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative reactions resulting in breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds, polymer degradation and internal and external stresses. One of the main reasons is the weak protective coatings/paints on the composite blades. This process accelerates the aging and fatigue cracks, and reduces the overall mechanical properties of the blades. Thus, the lack of technology on coatings for blade manufacturing is forcing many government agencies and private companies (local and national windmill companies) to find a better solution for the composite wind blades. Kansas has a great wind potential for the future energy demand, so efficient wind generators can be an option for continuous energy production. The research goal of the present project was to develop nanocomposite coatings using various inclusions against UV degradation and corrosion, and advance the fundamental understanding of degradation (i.e., physical, chemical and physiochemical property changes) on those coatings. In pursuit of the research goal, the research objective of the present program was to investigate the effects of UV light and duration on various nanocomposites made mainly of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoflakes, contribute the valuable information to this emerging field of advanced materials and manufacturing and advance the Kansas economy through creation of engineering knowledge and products in the wind energy. The proposed work was involved in a multidisciplinary research program that incorporates nanocomposite fabrication, advanced coating, characterization, surface and colloidal chemistry, physicochemistry, corrosion science, and analysis with a simple and effective testing methodology. The findings were closely related to our hypothesis and approaches that we proposed in this proposal. The data produced in the study offered to advance the physical understanding of the behavior of nanostructured materials for the prevention of UV light at different exposure time and salt fogging. Founding of this proposal enabled the first UV resistive nanocomposite corrosion coating effort in Kansas to impact the local and national wind mill industry. Results of this program provided valuable opportunities for the multidisciplinary training of undergraduate and graduate students at Wichita State University (WSU), as well as a number of aircraft companies (e.g., Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier/Learjet) and other local and regional industries.

  9. Robust Design of Reliability Test Plans Using Degradation Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Crowder, Stephen V.; Crowder, Stephen V.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With short production development times, there is an increased need to demonstrate product reliability relatively quickly with minimal testing. In such cases there may be few if any observed failures. Thus, it may be difficult to assess reliability using the traditional reliability test plans that measure only time (or cycles) to failure. For many components, degradation measures will contain important information about performance and reliability. These measures can be used to design a minimal test plan, in terms of number of units placed on test and duration of the test, necessary to demonstrate a reliability goal. Generally, the assumption is made that the error associated with a degradation measure follows a known distribution, usually normal, although in practice cases may arise where that assumption is not valid. In this paper, we examine such degradation measures, both simulated and real, and present non-parametric methods to demonstrate reliability and to develop reliability test plans for the future production of components with this form of degradation.

  10. Production and degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production and degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste environment Sang Yup Lee*, Jong of their similar material properties to conventional plastics and complete biodegradability under natural environ the global environ- ment have created much interest in the development of biodegradable polymers [9]. Among

  11. Ris-R-1261(EN) Fatigue Degradation and Failure of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Such applications are for instance rotor blades in wind turbines, helicopter rotor blades, flywheels for energyRisř-R-1261(EN) Fatigue Degradation and Failure of Rotating Composite Structures ­ Materials Characterisation and Underlying Mechanisms E. Kristofer Gamstedt and Svend Ib Andersen Materials Research

  12. Selective Degradation of Accumulated Secretory Proteins in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Robert

    Selective Degradation of Accumulated Secretory Proteins in the Endoplasmic Reticulum A POSSIBLE was not se- creted, nor was there an intracellular accumulation of the protein. In contrast, fibronectin accumulated within the cells in the presence of BFA. Northern analysis of mRNA levels in FCL cells showed

  13. The Relationship between Economic Growth and Environmental Degradation: Exploring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    and Questioning the Existence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve Advisor Brian Blais, PhD Professor of Science Kuznets Curve Turning Point Environmental Degradation Environmental Improvement Real GDP per capita://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2346173 Figure 1 in Paper #12;Literature · Kuznets curve first developed

  14. RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach M.J. Wildman and P was enhanced by anaerobic bacteria that feed on cathodic hydrogen (i.e., H2 produced during anaerobic Fe(0) corrosion by water). Apparently, the hydrogenotrophic consortium that exploits Fe(0) corrosion

  15. Original article Sorption and degradation of tebutam in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ), and nearly 41% was mineralized in the same interval. Non-extractable residues reached 46% of initial applied the mineralization process. Degradation products were formed from the fourth incubation day and three of them. The sorption process was evaluated by adsorption kinetics, adsorption and desorption isotherms using a batch

  16. Land degradation and climate change: a sin of omission?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    not solely responsible for the lack of awareness of the impacts of poor management practices, but we do play temperatures and the consequent increase in evaporative demand. During large rainfall events, land degradation a contributing role. At best, our increasing focus on climate change has an opportunity cost: there is less time

  17. Original article Degradation in the rumen of treated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Degradation in the rumen of treated and untreated soya bean meal proteins Jocelyne both for a control soya bean meal (cSBM) and a treated one (tSBM) to assess simultaneously the kinetics % control meal (cSBM 40 % and cSBM 20 %), 40 % treated meal (tSBM) and a control diet based on hay alone

  18. OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN FOR MODELING BATTERY DEGRADATION Joel C. Forman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    , battery health dependence on voltage, and a lack of power fade under the cy- cling conditions. The useOPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN FOR MODELING BATTERY DEGRADATION Joel C. Forman Mechanical Engineering.edu ABSTRACT Accurate battery health modeling allows one to make better design decisions, enables health

  19. Original article Degradation in the rumen of proteins from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Degradation in the rumen of proteins from fresh lucerne forage in various stages lucerne forages. These forages included fresh lucerne cut at the vegetative or bud stage, fresh lucerne from lucerne at the bud stage, with or without formic acid were also given. The hay was dried

  20. Reinforcement and environmental degradation of nylon-6/clay nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    2000; accepted 6 December 2000 Abstract Hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites are being developedReinforcement and environmental degradation of nylon-6/clay nanocomposites J.S. Shelleya , P their processing characteristics. One such nanocomposite developed by Toyota and commercialized by Ube Industries

  1. Biocide evaluation against sessile xanthan polymer-degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, W.B.; Boivin, J.W.; Dasinger, B.L.; Beck, D.; Goldman, I.M.; Wernau, W.C.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper supports the use of formaldehyde at economically feasible concentrations as a biocide for EOR processes that use xanthan biopolymer. Its biocidal action against anaerobic sessile xanthan-degrading field organisms was clearly superior to three other biocides tested when 100% kill was used as the criterion for effectiveness.

  2. Construction Local engineering.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction Structures Geotech Local engineering. World-class engineers. World-class results. Constructed Facilities Division tti.tamu.edu #12;Expertise & Equipment ExpErtisE & EquipmEnt Created in 2005. The Texas Transportation Institute's (TTI's) Constructed Facilities Division represents a collaboration

  3. Local Safety Committee Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Minutes Local Safety Committee Name of Committee Engineering Worksite Mailing Address & Postal Code. Ventilation fume hoods V. Bendig and FMD report that an uninterrupted power supply will be attached to the ventilation control panel the week of Dec. 9. Action: T. Zintel and L. Harder will conduct a test the first

  4. Local microwave background radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domingos Soares

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  5. Lithium Local Pseudopotential Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Lithium Local Pseudopotential Using DFT Sergio Orozco Student Advisor: Chen Huang Faculty Mentor Lithium LPS Test Lithium LPS #12;Density Functional Theory (DFT) Successful quantum mechanical approach (1979) #12;Building LPS for Lithium Create a LPS using NLPS density for Lithium Test LPS by comparing

  6. Degradation of CYANEX 301 in Contact with Nitric Acid Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philippe Marc; Radu Custelcean; Gary S. Groenewold; John R. Klaehn; Dean R. Peterman; Laetitia H. Delmau

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the degradation product obtained upon contacting CYANEX 301 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid) with nitric acid has been elucidated and found to be a disulfide derivative. The first step to the degradation of CYANEX 301 in toluene has been studied using 31P{1H} NMR after being contacted with nitric acid media. The spectrum of the degradation product exhibits a complex multiplet around dP = 80 ppm. A succession of purifications of CYANEX 301 has resulted in single crystals of the acidic form and the corresponding ammonium salt. Unlike the original CYANEX 301, which consists of a complex diastereomeric mixture displaying all possible combinations of chiral orientations at the 2-methyl positions, the purified crystals were shown by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to be racemates, containing 50:50 mixtures of the [R;R] and [S;S] diastereomers. The comparison between the 31P {1H} NMR spectra of the degradation products resulting from the diastereomerically pure CYANEX 301 and the original diastereomeric mixture has elucidated the influence of the isomeric composition on the multiplicity of the 31P {1H} NMR peak. These NMR data indicate the initial degradation leads to a disulfide-bridged condensation product displaying multiple resonances due to phosphorus–phosphorus coupling, which is caused by the inequivalence of the two P atoms as a result of their different chirality. A total of nine different NMR resonances, six of which display phosphorus–phosphorus coupling, could be assigned, and the identity of the peaks corresponding to phosphorus atoms coupled to each other was confirmed by 31P {1H} homodecoupled NMR analysis.

  7. Hydrodynamic and transport phenomena at the interface between flow and aquatic vegetation : from the forest to the blade scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the canopy scale to the blade scale, interactions between fluid motion and kelp produce a wide array of hydrodynamic and scalar transport phenomena. At the kilometer scale of the kelp forest, coastal currents transport ...

  8. Influence of Impurities in Module Packaging on Potential-Induced Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Glick, S.; Johnston, S.; Reedy, R.; Pankow, J.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical compounds were added into crystalline silicon cell mini modules, including in the encapsulant, interfaces, and glass, to determine their effect on potential-induced degradation (PID). Fe, either in the glass or at the glass/encapsulant interface, was found to be correlated with increased PID, but the difference in module power loss was not statistically significant compared to controls. Additions of Cu, Cr, Pb, Sn, Ag, and Na compounds to either the encapsulant or at the glass/encapsulant interface did not appear correlated with PID. Lock-in thermography on bare cells affected by PID removed from the mini modules show highly localized areas of junction breakdown, and SIMS analysis indicates localized impurities as well, though a spatial relation between the two was not established. Deposition of a conductive layer on the front surface of the cell, either with semitransparent Ta or Poly 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT), eliminated PID when the cells were stressed at -1000 V bias, 50 degrees C, with the glass face grounded for 140 h.

  9. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  10. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for New Phenomena from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the New Phenomena Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers.

  11. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

  12. Signatures of wave packet revival phenomena in the expectation values of observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sudheesh; S. Lakshmibala; V. Balakrishnan

    2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave packet revivals and fractional revivals are striking quantum interference phenomena that can occur under suitable conditions in a system with a nonlinear spectrum. In the framework of a specific model (the propagation of an initially coherent wave packet in a Kerr-like medium), it is shown that distinctive signatures of these revivals and fractional revivals are displayed by the time evolution of the expectation values of physical observables and their powers, i.e., by experimentally measurable quantities. Moreover, different fractional revivals can be selectively identified by examining appropriate higher moments.

  13. Monotonic Local Decay Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avy Soffer

    2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Hamiltonian operator H = -{\\Delta}+V(x) of the Schr\\"odinger Equation with a repulsive potential, the problem of local decay is considered. It is analyzed by a direct method, based on a new, L^2 bounded, propagation observable. The resulting decay estimate, is in certain cases monotonic in time, with no "Quantum Corrections". This method is then applied to some examples in one and higher dimensions. In particular the case of the Wave Equation on a Schwarzschild manifold is redone: Local decay, stronger than the known ones are proved (minimal loss of angular derivatives and lower order of radial derivatives of initial data). The method developed here can be an alternative in some cases to the Morawetz type estimates, with L^2-multipliers replacing the first order operators. It provides an alternative to Mourre's method, by including thresholds and high energies.

  14. Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

  15. Enhanced local tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katsevich, Alexander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramm, Alexander G. (Manhattan, KS)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Local tomography is enhanced to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. In a first method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, the relative attenuation data is inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA. to define the location S of the density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA. is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA.. In a second method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, a gradient value for a mollified local tomography function .gradient..function..sub..LAMBDA..epsilon. (x.sub.ij) is determined along the discontinuity; and the value of the jump of the density across the discontinuity curve (or surface) S is estimated from the gradient values.

  16. Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments by providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments to simulate the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic contaminated sediments was investigated as the sole electron acceptor. Providing graphite electrodes as an electron acceptor in hydrocarbon

  17. The effects of degraded oil and pre-frying treatments on the quality of tortilla chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yi-Chang

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refined soybean oils were degraded at 190C for 60 hours. It was observed that degradation time correlated well with free fatty acid contents, total polar materials, convective heat transfer coefficient, color, specific gravity, viscosity...

  18. PPPL3248 May 1997, UC420 Correlation between excitation of Alfvn modes and degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL­3248 ­ May 1997, UC­420 Correlation between excitation of Alfvén modes and degradation of ICRF. In this regime, confinement is clearly degraded. The dynamics of the process which culminates in the fast ion

  19. PPPL-3248 -May 1997, UC-420 Correlation between excitation of Alfvn modes and degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL-3248 - May 1997, UC-420 Correlation between excitation of Alfvén modes and degradation of ICRF. In this regime, confinement is clearly degraded. The dynamics of the process which culminates in the fast ion

  20. Degradation Study of the Peel Strength of Mini-Modules Under...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Degradation Study of the Peel Strength of Mini-Modules Under Damp Heat Condition Degradation Study of the Peel Strength of Mini-Modules Under Damp Heat Condition Presented at the...

  1. Corrosion-induced degradation of GaAs PHEMTs under operation in high humidity conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisaka, Takayuki

    We have comprehensively investigated the degradation mechanism of AlGaAs/InGaAs pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (PHEMTs) under operation in high humidity conditions. PHEMTs degradation under high humidity ...

  2. Understanding and harnessing energy-dependent proteolysis for controlled protein degradation in bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Joseph H. (Joseph Harry), III

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulated intracellular protein degradation is critical for cellular viability. In many organisms, degradation controls cell-cycle progression, executes responses to stress-inducing environmental changes, and enables the ...

  3. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  4. Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    produce high-activity modified green rusts (HMGRs) that demonstrate higher degradation rates. Methods of modifying GRs to obtain high reactivity for degradation of PCE and nitrate were developed and reduction kinetics of PCE and nitrate by HMGRs were...

  5. Pichia pastoris Rppa09976 is a peroxisomal membrane- associated ACBP domain-containing protein, delivered to peroxisomes from the ER, and is required for their selective degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozeki, Katharine

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in selective peroxisome degradation in Hansenula polymorpha.and M. Osumi. 1983. Degradation and turnover of peroxisomesperoxisomes for their degradation. The overexpression of

  6. SGTA Recognizes a Noncanonical Ubiquitin-like Domain in the Bag6-Ubl4A-Trc35 Complex to Promote Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yue; Cai, Mengli; Yang, Yingying; Huang, Lan; Ye, Yihong

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reticulum-associated degradation. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol.ER-associated protein degradation/ERAD/retrotranslocation;Ufd1-Npl4 ATPase complex for degradation by the proteasome (

  7. Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

  8. Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects on Inverter Performance and MOSFETEffects on Inverter Performance and MOSFET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    1 Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects--Thin GateThin Gate Oxide DegradationOxide Degradation #12;2 AcknowledgmentsAcknowledgments University), ECE Miles Wiscombe (UG), ECE #12;3 Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3

  9. Complexity Phenomena and ROMA of the Magnetospheric Cusp, Hydrodynamic Turbulence, and the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Chang; Cheng-chin Wu; Marius Echim; Herve Lamy; Mark Vogelsberger; Lars Hernquist; Debora Sijacki

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic Complexity is a phenomenon exhibited by a nonlinearly interacting system within which multitudes of different sizes of large scale coherent structures emerge, resulting in a globally nonlinear stochastic behavior vastly different from that could be surmised from the underlying equations of interaction. The hallmark of such nonlinear, complex phenomena is the appearance of intermittent fluctuating events with the mixing and distributions of correlated structures at all scales. We briefly review here a relatively recent method, ROMA (rank-ordered multifractal analysis), explicitly constructed to analyze the intricate details of the distribution and scaling of such types of intermittent structures. This method is then applied to the analyses of selected examples related to the dynamical plasmas of the cusp region of the magnetosphere, velocity fluctuations of classical hydrodynamic turbulence, and the distribution of the structures of the cosmic gas obtained through large scale, moving mesh simulations. Differences and similarities of the analyzed results among these complex systems will be contrasted and highlighted. The first two examples have direct relevance to the geospace environment and are summaries of previously reported findings. The third example on the cosmic gas, though involving phenomena much larger in spatiotemporal scales, with its highly compressible turbulent behavior and the unique simulation technique employed in generating the data, provides direct motivations of applying such analysis to studies of similar multifractal processes in various extreme environments. These new results are both exciting and intriguing.

  10. Evaluation of natural phenomena hazards as part of safety assessments for nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Shin, Y.W.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continued operation of existing US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and laboratories requires a safety reassessment based on current criteria and guidelines. This also includes evaluations for the effects of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH), for which these facilities may not have been designed. The NPH evaluations follow the requirements of DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation (1993) which establishes NPH Performance Categories (PCs) for DOE facilities and associated target probabilistic performance goals. These goals are expressed as the mean annual probability of exceedance of acceptable behavior for structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to NPH effects. The assignment of an NPH Performance Category is based on the overall hazard categorization (low, moderate, high) of a facility and on the function of an SSC under evaluation (DOE-STD-1021, 1992). Detailed guidance for the NPH analysis and evaluation criteria are also provided (DOE-STD-1020, 1994). These analyses can be very resource intensive, and may not be necessary for the evaluation of all SSCs in existing facilities, in particular for low hazard category facilities. An approach relying heavily on screening inspections, engineering judgment and use of NPH experience data (S. J. Eder et al., 1993), can minimize the analytical effort, give reasonable estimates of the NPH susceptibilities, and yield adequate information for an overall safety evaluation of the facility. In the following sections this approach is described in more detail and is illustrated by an application to a nuclear laboratory complex.

  11. Resonant and nonresonant new phenomena of four-fermion operators for experimental searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    She-Sheng Xue

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fermion content and gauge symmetry of the standard model (SM), we study the four-fermion operators in the torsion-free Einstein-Cartan theory. The collider signatures of irrelevant operators are suppressed by the high-energy cutoff (torsion-field mass) $\\Lambda$, and cannot be experimentally accessible at TeV scales. Whereas the dynamics of relevant operators accounts for (i) the SM symmetry-breaking in the domain of infrared-stable fixed point with the energy scale $v\\approx 239.5$ GeV and (ii) composite Dirac particles restoring the SM symmetry in the domain of ultraviolet-stable fixed point with the energy scale ${\\mathcal E}\\gtrsim 5$ TeV. To search for the resonant phenomena of composite Dirac particles with peculiar kinematic distributions in final states, we discuss possible high-energy processes: multi-jets and dilepton Drell-Yan process in LHC $p\\,p$ collisions, the resonant cross-section in $e^-e^+$ collisions annihilating to hadrons and deep inelastic lepton-hadron $e^-\\,p$ scatterings. To search for the nonresonant phenomena due to the form-factor of Higgs boson, we calculate the variation of Higgs-boson production and decay rate with the CM energy in LHC. We also present the discussions on four-fermion operators in the lepton sector and the mass-squared differences for neutrino oscillations in short baseline experiments.

  12. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

  13. Heavy-metal toxicity phenomena in laboratory-scale ANFLOW bioreactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, A.L.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy-conserving wastewater treatment system was developed based on an anaerobic, upflow (ANFLOW) bioreactor. Since many applications of the ANFLOW process could involve the treatment of wastewaters containing heavy metals, the potentially toxic effects of these metals on the biological processes occurring in ANFLOW columns (primarily acetogenesis and methanogenesis) were investigated. Both step and pulse inputs of zinc ranging from 100 to 1000 mg/L were added to synthetic wastewaters being treated in ANFLOW columns with 0.057-m/sup 3/ volumes. Column responses were used to develop descriptive models for toxicity phenomena in such systems. It was found that an inhibition function could be defined and used to modify a model based on plugflow with axial dispersion and first-order kinetics for soluble substrate removal. The inhibitory effects of zinc on soluble substrate removal were found to be predominantly associated with its sorption by biosolids. Sorption initially occurred in the lower regions of the column, but was gradually observed in higher regions as the sorption capacity of the lower regions was exhausted. Sorption phenomena could be described with the Freundlich equation. Sorption processes were accompanied by shifts of biological processes to regions higher in the columns. A regenerative process was observed when feeding of wastewaters without zinc was resumed. It was postulated that regeneration could be based on sloughing of layers of biofilms, or other biosolids involved in zinc sorption, followed by continued growth of lower layers of biofilms not involved in heavy-metal sorption.

  14. Simulation of the degradation of a concrete/clay interface: influence of temperature, unsaturated conditions and porosity variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnol, A.; Dupros, F.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATION OF THE DEGRADATION OF A CONCRETE/CLAY INTERFACE:transport models applied to degradation of a concrete/clayused by the simulation of degradation of the concrete/clay

  15. The Metabolic Degradation in the Mouse of Dibenzanthracene Labeled in the 9 and 10 Positions with Carbon 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidelberger, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Noted by Date THE MErABOLIC DEGRADATION IN TEE MOUSE OFas to the sites of this degradation have been advanced. Thisin Cancer TF~ UCRL-45 METABOLIC DEGRADATION IN THE MOUSE OF

  16. Whole-Genome Analysis of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ethyl-tert butyl ether (ETBE), occurs via a cytochrome P450protein complexes involved in ETBE degradation from R. rubernot been shown to degrade ETBE. Many pollutant degradation

  17. Local Field Topology behind Light Localization and Metamaterial Topological Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Jonathan K.

    We revisit the mechanisms governing the sub-wavelength spatial localization of light in surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes by investigating both local and global features in optical powerflow at SPP frequencies. Close ...

  18. A framework for modeling the consequences of the propagation of automation degradation: application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A framework for modeling the consequences of the propagation of automation degradation: application of automation degradation in the context of a socio-technical network. This modelling approach involves two integrating these two views for describing the evolution of system performances under automation degradation

  19. A study on failure prediction and design criteria for fiber composites under fire degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, Ming

    A study on failure prediction and design criteria for fiber composites under fire degradation Ming Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA Abstract Polymer matrix composites can be severely degraded/damaged under thermal loading caused by fire. Fire degradation of fiber composites is a serious concern in large load

  20. Degradation of 4 tropical forages in the rumen in cows P Cerneau, A Xand, G Aumont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Degradation of 4 tropical forages in the rumen in cows P Cerneau, A Xandé, G Aumont INRA, Antilles decumbens hay ad libitum. Nitrogen degradation (Michalet Doreau et al, 1987) of King Grass (stems or leaves were washed (cold water and ul- trasonic bath), then dried. Nitrogen degradation kinetics were

  1. Studies on protein degradation and carbohydrate fermentation of the grasses from the winter pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Studies on protein degradation and carbohydrate fermentation of the grasses from the winter of the winter grasses. The purpose of this research was to investigate the protein and carbohydrate degradation Anim Sci, 58, 714). The degradation parameters were calculated using equations: in which «a

  2. Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria Chung-ha O. Davisa,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eric A.

    Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria Chung-ha O. Davisa,b , Keun-Young Kimc , Eric A (received for review March 12, 2014) It is generally accepted that healthy cells degrade their own head (ONH), and that these mitochondria are internalized and degraded by adja- cent astrocytes. EM

  3. A clean start: degradation of maternal proteins at the oocyte-to-embryo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seydoux, Geraldine

    A clean start: degradation of maternal proteins at the oocyte-to-embryo transition Cynthia De studies suggest that the degradation of maternal proteins by the ubiquitin­proteasome pathway is also that the coordinated degradation of germline proteins is essential for remodeling the oocyte into a totipotent zygote

  4. Staring, a Novel E3 Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase That Targets Syntaxin 1 for Degradation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Lian

    Staring, a Novel E3 Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase That Targets Syntaxin 1 for Degradation* Received and memory. However, the molecular events that control the degradation of syntaxin 1 remain undefined. Here UbcH8 to syntaxin 1 and facilitates the ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation

  5. In-flight degradation correction of SCIAMACHY UV reflectances and Absorbing Aerosol Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    In-flight degradation correction of SCIAMACHY UV reflectances and Absorbing Aerosol Index L. G) derived from the observed Earth reflectance. Instrument degradation of the Scanning Imaging Absorption mean should be more or less constant when instrument degradation is absent. The analysis reveals

  6. Global RNA Half-Life Analysis in Escherichia coli Reveals Positional Patterns of Transcript Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Degradation Douglas W. Selinger,1,3 Rini Mukherjee Saxena,2,3 Kevin J. Cheung,1 George M. Church,1 and Carsten to study global RNA degradation in wild-type Escherichia coli MG1655. RNA chemical half-lives were measured of operons degrade, on average, more quickly than the rest of the transcript, with stability increasing

  7. Site-selective chemical protein glycosylation protects from autolysis and proteolytic degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    Site-selective chemical protein glycosylation protects from autolysis and proteolytic degradation of degradation. We present here a model study on an autolytic protease that has been chemically glycosylated autolytic degradation and that by other proteases. Kinetic parameters for protease activity with respect

  8. Using Architectural Properties to Model and Measure System-Wide Graceful Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    Using Architectural Properties to Model and Measure System-Wide Graceful Degradation ABSTRACT System-wide graceful degradation may be a viable approach to improving dependability in computer systems. In order to evaluate and improve system-wide graceful degradation we present initial work on a component

  9. Ruminal N degradation of browse and temperate forages, and partition of N into carbohydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ruminal N degradation of browse and temperate forages, and partition of N into carbohydrates B and acid- detergent-soluble and -insoluble portions may explain ruminal N degradability. Our objective was to examine the latter hypoth- esis. In the rumen the in situ N and cell wall N (NDFN, ADFN) degradability

  10. Out with the old, in with the new? Comparing methods for measuring protein degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicchitta, Chris

    Out with the old, in with the new? Comparing methods for measuring protein degradation Jonathan W, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84112, U.S.A. Abstract Protein degradation is a critical factor in controlling cellular protein abundance. Here, we compare classical methods for determining protein degradation

  11. Ambient induced degradation and chemically activated recovery in copper phthalocyanine thin film transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Ambient induced degradation and chemically activated recovery in copper phthalocyanine thin film 2009 The electrical degradation aging of copper phthalocyanine CuPc organic thin film transistors OTFTs layer.6,17,18 A systematic approach to iso- lating the cause of device degradation "aging" in copper

  12. Kinetics of degradation during fatigue and aging of fused silica optical fiber M. John Matthewson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Kinetics of degradation during fatigue and aging of fused silica optical fiber M. John Matthewson; degradation proceeds at an accelerated rate beyond the knee. This behavior leads to shorter lifetimes than predicted from short term data and to strength degradation even in the absence of an applied stress which

  13. Impact of Interconnect Length on BTI and HCI Induced Frequency Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chris H.

    Impact of Interconnect Length on BTI and HCI Induced Frequency Degradation Xiaofei Wang Pulkit Jain Instability (BTI) and Hot Carrier Injection (HCI) induced frequency degradation on interconnect length has degradation due to BTI decreases monotonically with longer wires because of the shorter effective stress time

  14. Rumen microbial degradation of modified lignin plants observed by electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rumen microbial degradation of modified lignin plants observed by electron microscopy C Mign6, E-Genčs-Champanelle, France The microbial degradation of modified lignin tobacco (Samson variety) plants (homozygous line 40 introduced in the rumen for 4 h, 8 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. As from the first hours of degradation (8 h

  15. Supply Voltage Degradation Aware Analytical Placement Andrew B. Kahng Bao Liu Qinke Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Bao

    Supply Voltage Degradation Aware Analytical Placement Andrew B. Kahng Bao Liu Qinke Wang Computer@cs.ucsd.edu} Abstract Increasingly significant power/ground supply voltage degradation in nanometer VLSI designs leads to system per- formance degradation and even malfunction. Existing tech- niques focus on design

  16. Degradation of polymer/substrate interfaces an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degradation of polymer/substrate interfaces ­ an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform degradation of the polymer near the interface. However, such changes were not observed when PVB coated Zn for the observed structural deterioration. Liquid water uptake kinetics for the degraded PVB monitored using ATR

  17. Complementary use of in sacco and in vitro studies to investigate ruminal forage degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Complementary use of in sacco and in vitro studies to investigate ruminal forage degradation) degradation, was determined in sacco in three sheep for two periods and the results were adjusted according with the degraded DM of incubated samples (r = -0.92 ; P:S0.01) and was higher in TO and T4 (51 ml ± 2) than in T12

  18. Decomposing Noise in Biochemical Signaling Systems Highlights the Role of Protein Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miekisz, Jacek

    Decomposing Noise in Biochemical Signaling Systems Highlights the Role of Protein Degradation Micha degradation on the overall variability for a range of molecular processes and signaling systems. With our are able to show how regulated protein degradation can be employed to reduce the noise in biochem- ical

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Spatial analysis of the driving factors of grassland degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Spatial analysis of the driving factors of grassland degradation under conditions November 2011 Ó Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract In recent years, steppe degradation in North China has become a serious environmental problem. Most research on steppe degradation is conducted at the level

  20. Original article Degradation in the rumen of proteins of 2 legumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Degradation in the rumen of proteins of 2 legumes: soybean meal and field pea J July 1994) Summary ― Ruminal protein degradation of soybean meal and field pea were compared Strep- tomyces griseus. The degradation of total nitrogen in nylon bags of the feeds was measured

  1. Effects of natural and synthetic plant oestrogens on rumen fluid degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effects of natural and synthetic plant oestrogens on rumen fluid degradation of some feedstuffs. V interfere with the rumen degradation of feeds, an extract from SC was prepared, purified, freeze-dried and utilized for in vitro trials of rumen degradability on several feeds: wheat straw (WS), cocksfoot hay (DH

  2. Rapid degradation of CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots exposed to gamma irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Rapid degradation of CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots exposed to gamma irradiation Nathan J. Withers are reported. Optical degradation is evaluated by tracking the dependence of photoluminescence intensity on irradiation dose. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots show poor radiation hardness, and severely degrade after less than 20

  3. Degradation of PEO in the Solid State: A Theoretical Kinetic Model Pascal de Sainte Claire*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Degradation of PEO in the Solid State: A Theoretical Kinetic Model Pascal de Sainte Claire of the inner mechanisms that play a key role in the natural oxidative degradation (photoinduced and thermal grasps the complexity of the degradation mechanism, results depend mainly on the reactivity of peroxy

  4. Image degradation due to surface scatter in the presence of aberrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, James E.

    Image degradation due to surface scatter in the presence of aberrations Narak Choi and James E- tions. For multielement imaging systems degraded by both surface scatter and aberrations, the compo. Introduction Image degradation due to conventional aberrations has become well understood over the past century

  5. Difference of Degradation Schemes among Operating Systems --Experimental analysis for web application servers --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiba, Shigeru

    Difference of Degradation Schemes among Operating Systems -- Experimental analysis for web degradation is critical ability of highly avail- able middleware such as a web application server but naive graceful degradation is often unsatisfactory. If a web appli- cation server provides multiple services

  6. Conjoint Degradation Model of Disablement for Survival and Longitudinal Data Measured with Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPb. Math. Society Preprint 2003­02 30 Jul 2003 Conjoint Degradation Model of Disablement the semiparametric analysis of several new degradation and failure time regression models without and with time be applied in studies of longevity, aging and degradation in survival analysis, biostatistics, epidemiology

  7. Degradation of Antizyme Inhibitor, an Ornithine Decarboxylase Homologous Protein, Is Ubiquitin-dependent and Is Inhibited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahana, Chaim

    Degradation of Antizyme Inhibitor, an Ornithine Decarboxylase Homologous Protein, Is Ubiquitin, Israel Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the most notable example of a protein degraded by the 26I is also a short-lived protein that undergoes proteasomal degradation. However, in contrast to ODC

  8. In sacco degradation of eight tropical forages BP Widyobroto, S Padmowijoto, R Utomo M Soejono

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In sacco degradation of eight tropical forages BP Widyobroto, S Padmowijoto, R Utomo M Soejono was conducted to compare the protein degradation of eight Indonesian tropical forages in the rumen. Three adult degradation of Pueraria phase- oloides (Pp), Centrosema pubescens (Cp),), Calopogonium muconoides (Cm

  9. Guidelines for MOSFET Device Optimization accounting for L-dependent Mobility Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Guidelines for MOSFET Device Optimization accounting for L-dependent Mobility Degradation G. Bidal1 to monitor L-dependent mobility degradation based on empirical modeling of experimental results. This method allows benchmarking the impact on mobility degradation of different technological modules, thus giving

  10. SCIAMACHY MONITORING FACTORS: OBSERVATION AND END-TO-END CORRECTION OF INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    DEGRADATION Klaus Bramstedt1 , Stefan No¨el1 , Heinrich Bovensmann1 , John P. Burrows1 , Christophe Lerot2-factors. Key words: SCIAMACHY; m-factors; degradation; mon- itoring. 1. INTRODUCTION SCIAMACHY [1] is now seven's precursor Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), the performance of the instrument is degrading

  11. Quality control of MATa1 splicing and exon skipping by nuclear RNA degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    Quality control of MATa1 splicing and exon skipping by nuclear RNA degradation Defne E. Egecioglu that unspliced and partially spliced forms of the MATa1 mRNA are degraded by the nuclear exonuclease Rat1p has skipped exon2 and generated exon1­exon3 products are degraded by the nuclear 50 ­30 exo- nuclease

  12. Temperature-aware NBTI modeling and the impact of input vector control on performance degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    Temperature-aware NBTI modeling and the impact of input vector control on performance degradation performance degradation in dig- ital circuits by affecting PMOS threshold voltage, is emerging as one devices and propose a novel temporal performance degradation model for digital cir- cuits considering

  13. A compact physical model for morphology induced intrinsic degradation of organic bulk heterojunction solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Muhammad A.

    for an intrinsic degradation concern for bulk heterojunction type organic photovoltaic (BH-OPV) cells that involveA compact physical model for morphology induced intrinsic degradation of organic bulk-induced degradation in Si-based cell (Staebler-Wronski effect), Cu diffusion in thin film (copper indium gallium

  14. Rheological investigation of the influence of molecular structure on natural and accelerated UV degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    place. Chain scission dominated the degradation at high levels of short chain branching (SCB) and long a higher degradation rate than ZN-LLDPE of similar Mw and average SCB. ZN-LLDPE was found to be more stable]. Many studies [2,4e10] shown that degradation initiated by UV radiation follows different complex routes

  15. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  16. Challenges in Modeling the Degradation of Ceramic Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify the state of the art, gaps in current understanding, and key research needs in the area of modeling the long-term degradation of ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste disposition. The directed purpose of this report is to define a roadmap for Waste IPSC needs to extend capabilities of waste degradation to ceramic waste forms, which overlaps with the needs of the subconsinuum scale of FMM interests. The key knowledge gaps are in the areas of (i) methodology for developing reliable interatomic potentials to model the complex atomic-level interactions in waste forms; (ii) characterization of water interactions at ceramic surfaces and interfaces; and (iii) extension of atomic-level insights to the long time and distance scales relevant to the problem of actinide and fission product immobilization.

  17. Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

  18. Rubber-degrading enzyme from a bacterial culture. [Xanthomonas sp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuchii, A.; Takeda, K. (Fermentation Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber-degrading activity was found in the extracellular culture medium of Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y which was grown on natural rubber latex. Natural rubber in the latex state was degraded by the crude enzyme, and two fractions were separately observed by gel permeation chromatography of the reaction products. One fraction was of higher molecular weight (HMW) with a very wide MW distribution from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5}, and the other fraction was of lower molecular weight (LMW) with a MW of a few hundred. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the partially purified fractions were those expected of cis-1,4-polyisoprene mixtures with the structure OHC-CH{sub 2}-(-CH{sub 2}-C(-CH{sub 3})=CH-CH{sub 2}-){sub n}-CH{sub 2}-C(=O)-CH{sub 3}, with average values of n of about 113 and 2 for HMW and LMW fractions, respectively. The LMW fraction consisted mostly of one component in gas-liquid chromatography as well as in gel permeation chromatography, and the main component was identified as 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (acetonyl diprenyl acetoaldehyde, A{sub L}P{sub 2}A{sub t}) by {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectra. Not only the lattices of natural and synthetic isoprene rubber, but also some kinds of low-MW polyisoprene compounds of cis-1,4 type, were degraded by the crude enzyme. The rubber-degrading reaction was found to be at least partly oxygenase catalyzed from the incorporation of {sup 18}O into A{sub L}P{sub 2}A{sub t} under an {sup 18}O{sub 2} atmosphere.

  19. EJC-independent degradation of nonsense immunoglobulin-m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mühlemann, Oliver

    NMD factors Upf1, Upf2 and Upf3 (also called SMG2, SMG3 and SMG4, respectively) are conserved from with the stalled ribosome via the Upf trans-acting factors, which ultimately leads to degradation of the mRNA (ref 40 20 0 120 Rel.µmRNA(%) 100 80 60 40 20 0 WT ter310 ter440 ter452 WT Upf1 k.d.: ­ + ­ + ­ + eIF4AIII

  20. Degradation mechanisms and accelerated testing in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Although there has been recent progress in improving durability, further improvements are needed to meet the commercialization targets. Past improvements have largely been made possible because of the fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms. By investigating component and cell degradation modes; defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions new materials can be designed to improve durability. Various factors have been shown to affect the useful life of PEM fuel cells. Other issues arise from component optimization. Operational conditions (such as impurities in either the fuel and oxidant stream), cell environment, temperature (including subfreezing exposure), pressure, current, voltage, etc.; or transient versus continuous operation, including start-up and shutdown procedures, represent other factors that can affect cell performance and durability. The need for Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) can be quickly understood given the target lives for fuel cell systems: 5000 hours ({approx} 7 months) for automotive, and 40,000 hrs ({approx} 4.6 years) for stationary systems. Thus testing methods that enable more rapid screening of individual components to determine their durability characteristics, such as off-line environmental testing, are needed for evaluating new component durability in a reasonable turn-around time. This allows proposed improvements in a component to be evaluated rapidly and independently, subsequently allowing rapid advancement in PEM fuel cell durability. These tests are also crucial to developers in order to make sure that they do not sacrifice durability while making improvements in costs (e.g. lower platinum group metal [PGM] loading) and performance (e.g. thinner membrane or a GDL with better water management properties). To achieve a deeper understanding and improve PEM fuel cell durability LANL is conducting research to better define fuel cell component degradation mechanisms and correlate AST measurements to component in 'real-world' situations.