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1

Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries Title Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Kerlau, Marie, Marek Marcinek, Venkat Srinivasan, and Robert Kostecki Journal Electrochimica Acta Volume 52 Pagination 5422-5429 Keywords cathode, degradation, li-ion battery, raman microscopy Abstract LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 and LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 composite cathodes were cycled in model cells to study interfacial phenomena that could lead to electrode degradation. Ex situ spectroscopic analysis of the tested cathodes, which suffered substantial power and capacity loss, showed that the state of charge (SOC) of oxide particles on the cathode surface was highly non-uniform despite the deep discharge of the Li-ion cell at the end of the test. The inconsistent kinetic behavior of individual oxide particles was attributed to the degradation of electronic pathways within the composite cathodes. A simple theoretical model based on a distributed network showed that an increase of the contact resistance between composite electrode particles may be responsible for non-uniform local kinetic behavior of individual oxide particles and the overall degradation of electrochemical performance of composite electrodes.

2

Reprint of "Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reprint of "Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes Reprint of "Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries" Title Reprint of "Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries" Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Kerlau, Marie, Marek Marcinek, Venkat Srinivasan, and Robert Kostecki Journal Electrochimica Acta Volume 53 Pagination 1385-1392 Keywords cathode, degradation, li-ion battery, raman microscopy Abstract LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 and LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 composite cathodes were cycled in model cells to study interfacial phenomena that could lead to electrode degradation. Ex situ spectroscopic analysis of the tested cathodes, which suffered substantial power and capacity loss, showed that the state of charge (SOC) of oxide particles on the cathode surface was highly non-uniform despite the deep discharge of the Li-ion cell at the end of the test. The inconsistent kinetic behavior of individual oxide particles was attributed to the degradation of electronic pathways within the composite cathodes. A simple theoretical model based on a distributed network showed that an increase of the contact resistance between composite electrode particles may be responsible for non-uniform local kinetic behavior of individual oxide particles and the overall degradation of electrochemical performance of composite electrodes.

3

Theory of localization and resonance phenomena in the quantum kicked rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analytic theory of quantum interference and Anderson localization in the quantum kicked rotor (QKR). The behavior of the system is known to depend sensitively on the value of its effective Planck's constant $\\he$. We here show that for rational values of $\\he/(4\\pi)=p/q$, it bears similarity to a disordered metallic ring of circumference $q$ and threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux. Building on that correspondence, we obtain quantitative results for the time--dependent behavior of the QKR kinetic energy, $E(\\tilde t)$ (this is an observable which sensitively probes the system's localization properties). For values of $q$ smaller than the localization length $\\xi$, we obtain scaling $E(\\tilde t) \\sim \\Delta \\tilde t^2$, where $\\Delta=2\\pi/q$ is the quasi--energy level spacing on the ring. This scaling is indicative of a long time dynamics that is neither localized nor diffusive. For larger values $q\\gg \\xi$, the functions $E(\\tilde t)\\to \\xi^2$ saturates (up to exponentially small corrections $\\sim\\exp(-q/\\xi)$), thus reflecting essentially localized behavior.

C. Tian; A. Altland

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Attoheat transport phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fascinating developments in optical pulse engineering over the last 20 years lead to the generation of laser pulses as short as few femtosecond, providing a unique tool for high resolution time domain spectroscopy. However, a number of the processes in nature evolve with characteristic times of the order of 1 fs or even shorter. Time domain studies of such processes require at first place sub-fs resolution, offered by pulse depicting attosecond localization. The generation, characterization and proof of principle applications of such pulses is the target of the attoscience. In the paper the thermal processes on the attosecond scale are described. The Klein-Gordon and Proca equations are developed. The relativistic effects in the heat transport on nanoscale are discussed. It is shown that the standard Fourier equation can not be valid for the transport phenomena induced by attosecond laser pulses. The heat transport in nanoparticles and nanotubules is investigated.

J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc; M. A. Kozlowski

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ion exchange phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Stress pulse phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

McGlaun, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Severe Degradation of BWR Fuel Failures: Coolant Activity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of coolant activities offers considerable insight into the phenomena leading to the degradation of failed BWR fuel. This report provides operational guidelines to help utilities manage failed fuel and mitigate the impact of degradation.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Complex fission phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex fission phenomena are studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle point) nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined.

D. N. Poenaru; R. A. Gherghescu; W. Greiner

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

A. BISHOP

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

Hwang, H.Y.

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Efficient rendering of atmospheric phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rendering of atmospheric bodies involves modeling the complex interaction of light throughout the highly scattering medium of water and air particles. Scattering by these particles creates many well-known atmospheric optical phenomena including rainbows, ...

Kirk Riley; David S. Ebert; Martin Kraus; Jerry Tessendorf; Charles Hansen

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

EPRI Materials Degradation Matrix, Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Degradation Matrix (MDM) identifies knowledge gaps associated with degradation phenomena that may detrimentally affect reactor operation, reactor safety, or regulatory climate. Where gaps are identified, the MDM assesses the status of research and development (R&D) needed to resolve the knowledge gap. In addition to a general update to address new operating experience and research results, specific objectives for this revision of the MDM ...

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Nuclear pairing: basic phenomena revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the phenomena associated with pairing in nuclear physics, most prominently the ubiquitous presence of odd-even mass differences and the properties of the excitation spectra, very different for even-even and odd-A nuclei. There are also significant dynamical effects of pairing, visible in the inertias associated with nuclear rotation and large-amplitude shape deformation.

Bertsch, G F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Quantum Phenomena Observed Using Electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron phase microscopy based on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect principle has been used to illuminate fundamental phenomena concerning magnetism and superconductivity by visualizing quantitative magnetic lines of force. This paper deals with confirmation experiments on the AB effect, the magnetization process of tiny magnetic heads for perpendicular recording, and vortex behaviors in high-Tc superconductors.

Tonomura, Akira [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0412 (Japan); Advanced Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama, 350-0395 (Japan); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

15

New phenomena searches at CDF  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, which is accumulating data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The new phenomena being explored include Higgs, Supersymmetry, and large extra dimensions. They also present the latest results of searches for heavy objects, which would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model.

Soha, Aron; /UC, Davis

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Exotic phenomena in spintronic nanostructures: from giant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Exotic phenomena in spintronic nanostructures: from giant spin dependent tunneling to unconventional ferromagnetism SSP Parkin 1,2 ...

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

Simulating the dynamics of auroral phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating natural phenomena has always been a focal point for computer graphics research. Its importance goes beyond the production of appealing presentations, since research in this area can contribute to the scientific understanding of complex natural ... Keywords: Atmospheric effects, natural phenomena, plasma phenomena, rendering

Gladimir V. G. Baranoski; Justin Wan; Jon G. Rokne; Ian Bell

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Data Clustering Reveals Climate Impacts on Local Wind Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate the utility of k-means clustering for identifying relationships between winds at turbine heights and climate oscillations, thereby developing a method suited for predicting the impacts of climate change on wind resources. ...

Andrew Clifton; Julie K. Lundquist

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Detecting vortical phenomena in vector data by medium-scale correlation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection of vortical phenomena in vector data is one of the key issues in many technical applications, in particular in flow visualization. Many existing approaches rely on purely local evaluation of the vector data. In order to overcome ...

H.-G. Pagendarm; B. Henne; M. Rütten

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modelling Surface Flows for Macroscopic Phenomena by Cellular Automata: An Application to Debris Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular automata are good candidates for modelling and simulating complex dynamical systems, whose evolution depends on the local interactions of their constituent parts. Many macroscopic phenomena have such features, but their complexity involves sometime ...

Donato D'Ambrosio; Salvatore Di Gregorio; Giulio Iovine; Valeria Lupiano; Rocco Rongo; William Spataro

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have compiled a topical reference on the phenomena, experiences, experiments, and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) with specific applications to SNFP process and situations. The purpose of the compilation is to create a reference to integrate and preserve this knowledge. Decades ago, uranium and zirconium fires were commonplace at Atomic Energy Commission facilities, and good documentation of experiences is surprisingly sparse. Today, these phenomena are important to site remediation and analysis of packaging, transportation, and processing of unirradiated metal scrap and spent nuclear fuel. Our document, bearing the same title as this paper, will soon be available in the Hanford document system [Plys, et al., 2000]. This paper explains general content of our topical reference and provides examples useful throughout the DOE complex. Moreover, the methods described here can be applied to analysis of potentially pyrophoric plutonium, metal, or metal hydride compounds provided that kinetic data are available. A key feature of this paper is a set of straightforward equations and values that are immediately applicable to safety analysis.

DUNCAN, D.R.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

COURSE NOTES: Transport Phenomena Teaching Archive - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... This resource offers a large number of undergraduate and graduate level exercises in transport phenomena, with a particular concentration in ...

23

High Field Phenomena of Qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron and nuclear spins are very promising candidates to serve as quantum bits (qubits) for proposed quantum computers, as the spin degrees of freedom are relatively isolated from their surroundings, and can be coherently manipulated e.g. through pulsed EPR and NMR. For solid state spin systems, impurities in crystals based on carbon and silicon in various forms have been suggested as qubits, and very long relaxation rates have been observed in such systems. We have investigated a variety of these systems at high magnetic fields in our multi-frequency pulsed EPR/ENDOR spectrometer. A high magnetic field leads to large electron spin polarizations at helium temperatures giving rise to various phenomena that are of interest with respect to quantum computing. For example, it allows the initialization of the both the electron spin as well as hyperfine-coupled nuclear spins in a well defined state by combining millimeter and RF radiation; it can increase the T2 relaxation times by eliminating decoherence due to dipolar interaction; and it can lead to new mechanisms for the coherent electrical readout of electron spins. We will show some examples of these and other effects in Si:P, SiC:N, and nitrogen-related centers in diamond.

J. van Tol; G. W. Morley; S. Takahashi; D. R. McCamey; C. Boehme; M. E. Zvanut

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modelling the mass migration phenomena in partially frozen heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point and with sink temperatures below the freezing temperature of the working fluid may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and not returning to the evaporator section. Eventually, sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate this phenomena. This paper presents an analytical model developed to describes this phenomena. The model provides for analytic determination of heat pipe temperature profiles, freeze-front locations and mass migration rates.

Keddy, M.D.; Merrigan, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Critchley, E. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

NEWTON: Determining Material Degradation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Material Degradation Determining Material Degradation Name: Hamish Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Summer 2013 Question: I am working on a science project about photo-degradation of plastic film. My question is how much degraded a plastic film should be to say that it was 100% photo-degraded? The plastic film I am photo-degrading is turning into dust when I touch it, what level of degradation is that? Replies: Hi Hamish, Thanks for the question. You will need to define what you mean by photo-degraded. 100% photo-degraded could be that the film becomes translucent and lets through only blurry images. Or it could mean that the film turns to dust when you touch it. As long as you clearly state in your science project what you mean by 100% photo-degraded, you will be doing a good job.

26

A technique for creating new visual phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper outlines a technique for creating new visual phenomena by proposing a systematic method of using existing media in novel manners. The technique involve s the random and purposeful manipulation of person-media ...

Ritter, Donald

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

201/span>3 Short Course Applied Fundamentals in Interfacial Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Fundamentals in Interfacial Phenomena Short Course held at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 201/span>3 Short Course Applied Fundamentals in Interfacial Phenomena Applied Fundamentals in Interfacial Phenomena Saturday •

28

Ranking significant phenomena in physical systems  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of any physical system requires a thorough understanding of the principal phenomena affecting the behavior of that system. In a complex application such as a nuclear reactor, identifying the principal phenomena in an accident transient can be a formidable task. This paper describes the use of the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) to assimilate engineering judgments that relate and rank the thermal-hydraulic phenomena affecting the response of a nuclear reactor. The AHP is described in this paper to acquaint the reader with the methodology. It is used to structure and simplify the decision-making process used to identify the most important phenomena affecting a reactor transient. The methodology is applied to a loss-of-feedwater transient in a nuclear reactor as an example, the objective of the example being to determine the most significant processes and phenomena in the reactor plant based on their impact on the ability of a primary system feed-and-bleed recovery to maintain a liquid level above the core.

Dimenna, R.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (USA)); Larson, T.K. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

2011 CNM Workshop: Emergent Interfacial Phenomena  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting, May 2-5, 2011 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting, May 2-5, 2011 Thematic Workshop B: Emergent Interfacial Phenomena Organizers: Tiffany Santos (formerly CNM, now Hitachi GST), Olle Heinonen (MSD), Paul Fenter (CSE), and Robert Klie (UIC) Sponsors: Argonne Photon Sciences Directorate, Argonne Physical Sciences and Engineering Directorate Heterostructures in which different materials are layered together display a range of emergent phenomena, which can be controlled through effects such as geometric confinement and interface structure. Both of these effects can lead to charge transfer and band structure modification giving rise to novel behavior. Understanding and control of these phenomena require advanced deposition and characterization methods, as well as state-of-the-art modeling

30

Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goldak, J.A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DebRoy, T.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rappaz, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Materials Degradation and Aging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 28, 2007 ... Improve plant capacity, reliability, and availability. Materials Degradation and Aging - An EPRI Nuclear Power Action Plan, Report No.

32

Damage Assessment Technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The PMMD program is examining LWR component materials and the degradation phenomena that affect them. Of particular interest is how such phenomena can be monitored to predict degradation and prevent component failure. Some forms of degradation, such as stress corrosion cracking, are characterized by a long initiation time followed by a rapid growth phase. Monitoring such long-term degradation will require new NDE methods and measurement procedures. A critical analysis of all reactor components is required to determine if new inspection strategies are required to effectively manage slow degradation mechanisms that may lead to component failure. As reactor lifetimes are extended, degradation mechanisms previously considered too long-term to be of consequence (such as concrete and wiring insulation degradation) may become more important. This paper includes a review of techniques with potential for sensing and monitoring degradation in its early stages and will concisely explain the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to in-service inspection, condition based maintenance, and advanced diagnostics and prognostics.

Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

2011-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Seismoelectric Phenomena in Fluid-Saturated Sediments  

SciTech Connect

Seismoelectric phenomena in sediments arise from acoustic wave-induced fluid motion in the pore space, which perturbs the electrostatic equilibrium of the electric double layer on the grain surfaces. Experimental techniques and the apparatus built to study this electrokinetic (EK) effect are described and outcomes for studies of seismoelectric phenomena in loose glass microspheres and medium-grain sand are presented. By varying the NaCl concentration in the pore fluid, we measured the conductivity dependence of two kinds of EK behavior: (1) the electric fields generated within the samples by the passage of transmitted acoustic waves, and (2) the electromagnetic wave produced at the fluid-sediment interface by the incident acoustic wave. Both phenomena are caused by relative fluid motion in the sediment pores--this feature is characteristic of poroelastic (Biot) media, but not predicted by either viscoelastic fluid or solid models. A model of plane-wave reflection from a fluid-sediment interface using EK-Biot theory leads to theoretical predictions that compare well to the experimental data for both sand and glass microspheres.

Block, G I; Harris, J G

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

34

Tilt Rotor Aeromechanics Phenomena in Low Speed Flight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work investigates important aeromechanics phenomena affecting the V-22 tilt rotor in low speed sideward flight or while hovering in quartering or crosswind conditions. These phenomena, such as pitch-up with sideslip and increased power required ...

Mark A. Potsdam; Mark J. Silva

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 2 SOLAR PROMINENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR FLARES Flare = sudden (solar disk. Energy release . #12;Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 2 Energy distribution of flares: Nanoflare heating? #12Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 2 SOLAR PROMINENCES History: 12th­18th century: sporadic

Petrovay, KristĂłf

36

Studies of Novel Quantum Phenomena in Ruthenates  

SciTech Connect

Strongly correlated oxides have been the subject of intense study in contemporary condensed matter physics, and perovskite ruthenates (Sr,Ca)n+1RunO3n+1 have become a new focus in this field. One of important characteristics of ruthenates is that both lattice and orbital degrees of freedom are active and are strongly coupled to charge and spin degrees of freedom. Such a complex interplay of multiple degrees of freedom causes the properties of ruthenates to exhibit a gigantic response to external stimuli under certain circumstances. Magnetic field, pressure, and chemical composition all have been demonstrated to be effective in inducing electronic/magnetic phase transitions in ruthenates. Therefore, ruthenates are ideal candidates for searching for novel quantum phenomena through controlling external parameters. The objective of this project is to search for novel quantum phenomena in ruthenate materials using high-quality single crystals grown by the floating-zone technique, and investigate the underlying physics. The following summarizes our accomplishments. We have focused on trilayered Sr4Ru3O10 and bilayered (Ca1-xSrx)3Ru2O7. We have succeeded in growing high-quality single crystals of these materials using the floating-zone technique and performed systematic studies on their electronic and magnetic properties through a variety of measurements, including resistivity, Hall coefficient, angle-resolved magnetoresistivity, Hall probe microscopy, and specific heat. We have also studied microscopic magnetic properties for some of these materials using neutron scattering in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have observed a number of unusual exotic quantum phenomena through these studies, such as an orbital selective metamagnetic transition, bulk spin valve effect, and a heavy-mass nearly ferromagnetic state with a surprisingly large Wilson ratio. Our work has also revealed underlying physics of these exotic phenomena. Exotic phenomena of correlated electron has been among central topics of contempary condensed matter physics. Ultrfast phase transitions accompanied by switching of conductivity or magnetization in stronly correlated materials are believed to be promising in developing next generation of transistors. Our work on layered ruthenates has remarkably advanced our understanding of how the exotic phenomena of correlated electrons is governed by the complex interplay between charge, spin, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. In addition to studies on ruthenates, we have also expanded our research to the emerging field of Fe-based superconductors, focusing on the iron chalcogenide Fe1+y(Te1-xSex) superconductor system. We first studied the superconductivity of this alloy system following the discovery of superconductivity in FeSe using polycrystalline samples. Later, we successfuly grew high-quality single crystals of these materials. Using these single crystals, we have determined the magnetic structure of the parent compound Fe1+yTe, observed spin resonance of superconducting state in optimally doped samples, and established a phase diagram. Our work has produced an important impact in this burgeoning field. The PI presented an invited talk on this topic at APS March meeting in 2010. We have published 19 papers in these two areas (one in Nature materials, five in Physical Review Letters, and nine in Physical Review B) and submitted two (see the list of publications attached below).

Mao, Zhiqiang

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

37

Diffractive phenomena in high energy processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the evolution of the studies of diffractive processes in the strong interaction over the last 60 years. First, we briefly outline the early developments of the theory based on analyticity and unitarity of the S-matrix, including the derivation and exploration of the Regge trajectories and related moving cuts. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Pomeron trajectory introduced for description of total, elastic and diffractive cross sections at high energies and to the emergence of the dynamics of multi-Pomeron interactions.The role of large longitudinal distances and color coherent phenomena for the understanding of inelastic diffraction in hadron-hadron scattering and deep inelastic scattering is emphasized. The connection of these phenomena to the cancellation of the contribution of the Glauber approximation in hadron-nucleus collisions and to the understanding of the Gribov-Glauber approximation is explained. The presence of different scales in perturbative QCD due to masses of heavy quarks has led to the emergence of numerous new phenomena including non-universality of the slopes of Regge trajectories made of light and heavy quarks and non-universal energy dependence of elastic cross sections. The application of the perturbative QCD techniques allowed us to calculate from the first principles the interaction of small transverse size color singlets with hadrons leading to the development of the quantitative theory of hard exclusive reactions and to the successful prediction of many regularities in hard large mass diffraction. It also led to the prediction of the phenomenon of complete transparency of nuclear matter in QCD in special processes. The conflict of perturbative QCD with probability conservation for high energy processes of virtual photon-nucleon scattering is explained. Some properties of the new QCD regime are outlined.

Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Susan Chi Gary T. Rochelle* (gtr@che.utexas.edu, 512-471-7230) The University of Texas at Austin Department of Chemical Engineering Austin, Texas 78712 Prepared for presentation at the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Abstract Oxidative degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA) was studied under typical absorber condition of 55°C. The rate of evolution of NH 3 , which was indicative of the overall rate of degradation, was measured continuously in a batch system sparged with air. Dissolved iron from 0.0001 mM to 1 mM yields oxidation rates from 0.37 to 2 mM/hr in MEA solutions loaded with 0.4 mole CO 2 / mole MEA. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N,N-bis(2- hydroxyethyl)glycine effectively decrease the rate of oxidation in the presence of iron by 40 to

39

Process for degrading hypochlorite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved means and method for the degradation of hypochlorite in alkali waste solutions. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a more effective and less costly method for the degradation of hypochlorite. The foregoing objects and others are accomplished in accordance with the present invention, generally speaking, by providing a process to degrade hypochlorite into chloride and oxygen which includes contacting an aqueous hypochlorite basic solution with a catalyst comprising about 1--10 w/w % cobalt oxide and about 1--15 w/w % molybdenum oxide on a suitable substrate. In another embodiment a similar process for degrading lithium hypochlorite is provided in which waste solution concentration is lowered in order to minimize carbonate precipitation. 6 tabs.

Huxtable, W.P.; Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.

1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

40

Physical phenomena of thin surface layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(solid line in figure 2.3) long wavelength fluctuations with 0 < q < qc = ? ??hpex/? are amplified and the film will become unstable, while short wavelength fluctuations are damped. The fastest growing mode qmax is given by the maximum of equation 2.17, q... 2max = ?1 2? ?hpex (2.18) 13 Physical phenomena of thin surface layers qc 0 q ? -1 Ampli#30;ed Damped qmax Figure 2.3: Graphical representation of the dispersion relation. In the absence of an applied external field, all fluctuations are damped...

Thomas, Katherine Ruth

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Surface-enhanced nonlinear optical phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large fluctuations of local electromagnetic fields on a metal surface of .... possible destructive interference of signals from different points of a surface. In Chap.

42

Interfacial phenomena on selected cathode materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have carried out a series of surface studies of selected cathode materials. Instrumental techniques such as Raman microscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and atomic force microscopy were used to investigate the cathode surfaces. The goal of this study was to identify detrimental processes which occur at the electrode/electrolyte interface and can lead to electrode degradation and failure during cycling and/or storage at elevated temperatures.

Kostecki, Robert; Matsuo, Yoshiaki; McLarnon, Frank

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

Critical phenomena in N=2* plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study finite temperature critical behaviour of mass deformed N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling, also known as N=2* gauge theory. For certain range of the mass parameters, N=2* plasma undergoes a second-order phase transition. We compute all the static critical exponents of the model and demonstrate that the transition is of the mean-field theory type. We show that the dynamical critical exponent of the model is z=0, with multiple hydrodynamic relaxation rates at criticality. We point out that the dynamical critical phenomena in N=2* plasma is outside the dynamical universality classes established by Hohenberg and Halperin.

A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Why sequence Xylan degraders?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Xylan degraders? Xylan degraders? Producing biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass is being investigated as a possible energy source to reduce the United States' dependence on foreign oil. One challenge researchers face is that plant cell walls are complex structures composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, pectin, and protein. Current methods of breaking down these plant cell walls are not cheap, making ethanol production expensive and not a realistic competitor to petroleum. The major component of hemicellulose is xylan, a five carbon sugar. Enzymes or bacteria could be used to break up the xylan in plant material, making cellulose more accessible to cellulases. The xylan can also be used to produce xylose, from which ethanol can be produced. In sequencing five xylan degrading microbes, researchers hope to identify protein sequences of

46

Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Detection of pump degradation  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Flow Phenomena in an Extra Wide CSP-mold-experimental ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Flow Phenomena in an Extra Wide CSP-mold-experimental Investigations. Author(s), Rüdiger Bahrmann, Antje Rückert, Herbert Pfeifer.

49

High-Speed Fracture Phenomena of Glass Bottle by Underwater ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High-Speed Fracture Phenomena of Glass Bottle by Underwater Shock Wave. Author(s), Hidetoshi Sakamoto, Shinjirou Kawabe, Yoshifumi ...

50

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site May 2011 April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety...

51

Rotary kilns - transport phenomena and transport processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rotary kilns and rotating industrial drying ovens are used for a wide variety of applications including processing raw minerals and feedstocks as well as heat-treating hazardous wastes. They are particularly critical in the manufacture of Portland cement. Their design and operation is critical to their efficient usage, which if done incorrectly can result in improperly treated materials and excessive, high fuel costs. This book treats all engineering aspects of rotary kilns, including thermal and fluid principles involved in their operation, as well as how to properly design an engineering process that uses rotary kilns. Chapter 1: The Rotary Kiln Evolution and Phenomenon Chapter 2: Basic Description of Rotary Kiln Operation Chapter 3: Freeboard Aerodynamic Phenomena Chapter 4: Granular Flows in Rotary Kilns Chapter 5: Mixing and Segregation Chapter 6: Combustion and Flame - includes section on types of fuels used in rotary kilns, coal types, ranking and analysis, petroleum coke combustion, scrap tire combustion, pulverized fuel (coal/coke) firing in kilns, pulverized fuel delivery and firing systems. Chapter 7: Freeboard Heat Transfer Chapter 8: Heat Transfer Processes in the Rotary Kiln Bed Chapter 9: Mass and Energy Balance Chapter 10: Rotary Kiln Minerals Process Applications.

Boateng, A.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Method of microbially degrading trinitrotoluene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of degrading trinitrotoluene (TNT) includes contacting the TNT with intra-amoebic isolate CR-1, ATCC 75528.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN); Vass, Arpad (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Available Technologies: Cellulose Degradation Using ...  

... enzymes. When combined with heat and acid pretreatments for cellulose, they can speed the degradation process, saving time and energy, ...

54

Detection of pump degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous spectral vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition: advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

Casada, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August 21, 2012 CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August 21, 2012 August 21, 2012 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility (HSS CRAD 45-54) The focus of this CRAD is on evaluating processes for identifying emergency response capabilities and maintaining them in a state of readiness in case a severe natural phenomena event occurs that exceeds the design basis of the Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facility. This CRAD is intended to ensure that the NNSA SRS Site Office (SRSO) plans, procedures, and performance identified in DOE Order 151.lC, Comprehensive Emergency Management System, and the Contractors Requirements Document (CRD)

56

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety, and to ensure that the SSCs will be able to effectively perform their intended safety functions under the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPHs). This Standard also provides criteria and guidance for the use of industry building codes and voluntary

57

Conceptual Framework to Enable Early Warning of Relevant Phenomena (Emerging Phenomena and Big Data)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphs are commonly used to represent natural and man-made dynamic systems such as food webs, economic and social networks, gene regulation, and the internet. We describe a conceptual framework to enable early warning of relevant phenomena that is based on an artificial time-based, evolving network graph that can give rise to one or more recognizable structures. We propose to quantify the dynamics using the method of delays through Takens Theorem to produce another graph we call the Phase Graph. The Phase Graph enables us to quantify changes of the system that form a topology in phase space. Our proposed method is unique because it is based on dynamic system analysis that incorporates Takens Theorem, Graph Theory, and Franzosi-Pettini (F-P) theorem about topology and phase transitions. The F-P Theorem states that the necessary condition for phase transition is a change in the topology. By detecting a change in the topology that we represent as a set of M-order Phase Graphs, we conclude a corresponding change in the phase of the system. The onset of this phase change enables early warning of emerging relevant phenomena.

Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Hively, Lee M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Outdoor PV Degradation Comparison  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output; may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined; accurately. At the Performance and Energy Rating Testbed (PERT) at the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) at the; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) more than 40 modules from more than 10 different manufacturers; were compared for their long-term outdoor stability. Because it can accommodate a large variety of modules in a; limited footprint the PERT system is ideally suited to compare modules side-by-side under the same conditions.

Jordan, D. C.; Smith, R. M.; Osterwald, C. R.; Gelak, E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Localization privacy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Location-aware technology and its applications are fundamental to ubiquitous computing. Essential to this technology is object localization and identification. RFID (radio frequency identification) technology has been shown to be very effective for identification ... Keywords: RFID, localization privacy, location privacy, location-aware applications, object localization

Mike Burmester

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

62

Observation of Dynamic Phenomena of Laser Peening with XFEL at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Phenomena of Laser Peening with XFEL at SACLA Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Yuji Sano, Toshiba Program Description...

63

Conference report for nuclear fusion phenomena in ionized gases  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases, held in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, is given. In particular, the format of the conference and the content of the review papers are summarized. (auth)

Porkolab, M.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

High speed imaging of transient non-Newtonian fluid phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I investigate the utility of high speed imaging for gaining scientific insight into the nature of short-duration transient fluid phenomena, specifically applied to the Kaye effect. The Kaye effect, noted ...

Gallup, Benjamin H. (Benjamin Hodsdon), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Use of Limited Surface Networks to Measure Mesoscale Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large mesonetworks have successfully demonstrated coupling of surface meteorological phenomena to convective activity. It is unrealistic however, to assume that such networks will be available for wide-area operational applications. This paper ...

James A. Heimbach Jr.; Thomas M. Engel

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Degradation of Steam Generator Internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Regulatory Perspective on Industry's Response to Generic Letter 97-06, " Degradation of Steam Generator Internals" by S. Coffin, M. Subudhi, ...

67

Renewal sequences, disordered potentials, and pinning phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an overview of the state of the art of the analysis of disordered models of pinning on a defect line. This class of models includes a number of well known and much studied systems (like polymer pinning on a defect line, wetting of interfaces on a disordered substrate and the Poland-Scheraga model of DNA denaturation). A remarkable aspect is that, in absence of disorder, all the models in this class are exactly solvable and they display a localization-delocalization transition that one understands in full detail. Moreover the behavior of such systems near criticality is controlled by a parameter and one observes, by tuning the parameter, the full spectrum of critical behaviors, ranging from first order to infinite order transitions. This is therefore an ideal set-up in which to address the question of the effect of disorder on the phase transition,notably on critical properties. We will review recent results that show that the physical prediction that goes under the name of Harris criterion is indeed fully correct for pinning models. Beyond summarizing the results, we will sketch most of the arguments of proof.

Giambattista Giacomin

2008-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 4: High-Temperature Materials PIRTs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) technique was used to identify safety-relevant/safety-significant phenomena and assess the importance and related knowledge base of high-temperature structural materials issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The major aspects of materials degradation phenomena that may give rise to regulatory safety concern for the NGNP were evaluated for major structural components and the materials comprising them, including metallic and nonmetallic materials for control rods, other reactor internals, and primary circuit components; metallic alloys for very high-temperature service for heat exchangers and turbomachinery, metallic alloys for high-temperature service for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), other pressure vessels and components in the primary and secondary circuits; and metallic alloys for secondary heat transfer circuits and the balance of plant. These materials phenomena were primarily evaluated with regard to their potential for contributing to fission product release at the site boundary under a variety of event scenarios covering normal operation, anticipated transients, and accidents. Of all the high-temperature metallic components, the one most likely to be heavily challenged in the NGNP will be the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Its thin, internal sections must be able to withstand the stresses associated with thermal loading and pressure drops between the primary and secondary loops under the environments and temperatures of interest. Several important materials-related phenomena related to the IHX were identified, including crack initiation and propagation; the lack of experience of primary boundary design methodology limitations for new IHX structures; and manufacturing phenomena for new designs. Specific issues were also identified for RPVs that will likely be too large for shop fabrication and transportation. Validated procedures for on-site welding, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), and inspections will be required for the materials of construction. High-importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy sections; and the maintenance of high emissivity of the RPV materials over their service lifetime to enable passive heat rejection from the reactor core. All identified phenomena related to the materials of construction for the IHX, RPV, and other components were evaluated and ranked for their potential impact on reactor safety.

Corwin, William R [ORNL; Ballinger, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weaver, K. D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Modified Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) for Uncertainty Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a methodology of characterizing important phenomena, which is also part of a broader research by the authors called 'Modified PIRT'. The methodology provides robust process of phenomena identification and ranking process for more precise quantification of uncertainty. It is a two-step process of identifying and ranking methodology based on thermal-hydraulics (TH) importance as well as uncertainty importance. Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) has been used for as a formal approach for TH identification and ranking. Formal uncertainty importance technique is used to estimate the degree of credibility of the TH model(s) used to represent the important phenomena. This part uses subjective justification by evaluating available information and data from experiments, and code predictions. The proposed methodology was demonstrated by developing a PIRT for large break loss of coolant accident LBLOCA for the LOFT integral facility with highest core power (test LB-1). (authors)

Gol-Mohamad, Mohammad P.; Modarres, Mohammad; Mosleh, Ali [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

Mark Holbrook

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

72

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

73

TESTS OF COHERENT QCD PHENOMENA AND NUCLEON SUBSTRUCTURE AT CEBAF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of exclusive processes such as electroproduction, photoproduction, and Compton scattering are among the most sensitive probes of proton structure and coherent phenomena in quantum chromodynamics. The continuous electron beam at CEBAF, upgraded in laboratory energy to 10–12 GeV, will allow a systematic study of exclusive, semi-inclusive, and inclusive reactions in a kinematic range well-tuned to the study of fundamental nucleon and nuclear substructure. I also discuss the potential at CEBAF for studying novel QCD phenomena at the charm production threshold, including the possible production of nuclear-bound quarkonium.

Stanley J. Brodsky; Cebaf Workshop On Electroproduction; Stanley J. Brodsky

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

PHASE TRANSITIONS, CRITICAL PHENOMENA AND EXACTLY SOLVABLE LATTICE MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a pond change phase from a liquid state to solid ice. Lastly, if a horseshoe magnet is heated T100 C L G Figure 1. Schematic phase diagram of water showing the solid ice, liquid and gasPHASE TRANSITIONS, CRITICAL PHENOMENA AND EXACTLY SOLVABLE LATTICE MODELS Paul A. Pearce1

Pearce, Paul A.

75

Meteorological phenomena forecast using data mining prediction methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The occurrence of various meteorological phenomena, such as fog or low cloud cover, has significant impact on many human activities as air or ship transport operations. The management of air traffic at the airports was the main reason to design effective ... Keywords: decision trees, meteorological data, neural networks, prediction

František Babi?; Peter Bednár; František Albert; Ján Parali?; Juraj Bartók; Ladislav Hluchý

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Local Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local Information Local Information Local Information Welcome to Golden, Colorado, the location of the 2014 Electrical Safety Workshop. Visiting NREL The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has research facilities and offices at several locations in Golden, Colorado (near Boulder), and in Washington, D.C. In Golden, you'll find the NREL Education Center, along with many of our research laboratories and administrative offices. The National Wind Technology Center is a separate facility located about 5 miles south of Boulder. Read more » Transportation NREL is accessible via bus on the Regional Transportation District (RTD) Route 20 from Aurora and Denver. Route 20 travels along 20th Avenue and ends at the NREL Education Center. Visit the RTD Web site or call 303-299-6000 to plan your trip or for more

77

Degradation of polymers in scintillator solution  

SciTech Connect

It is reponted thai pantial degradation of high polymers takes place when subjected to liquid scintillation counting. Significant degradation was only observed in the fractions of highest molecular weight. The cause of degradation is uncertain though photochemical degradation appears to be the most probable mechanism. (UK)

Norris, J.F.; Peaker, F.W.

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Environmental Degradation Nuclear IX-Tours Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION OF MATERIALS IN NUCLEAR POWER SYSTEMS—WATER REACTORS ... PRA Destination Management. 150 Paularino.

79

Environmental Degradation Nuclear IX-Housing Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION OF MATERIALS IN NUCLEAR POWER SYSTEMS—WATER REACTORS. HOUSING. RESERVATION FORM.

80

Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

Manohar Motwani

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Natural phenomena evaluations of the K-25 site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards are used for the temporary storage of UF{sub 6} normal assay cylinders and long-term storage of other UF{sub 6} cylinders. The K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards consist of six on-site areas: K-1066-B, K-1066-E, K-1066-F, K-1066-J, K-1066-K and K-1066-L. There are no permanent structures erected on the cylinder yards, except for five portable buildings. The operating contractor for the K-25 Site is preparing a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) to examine the safety related aspects of the K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards. The SAR preparation encompasses many tasks terminating in consequence analysis for the release of gaseous and liquid UF{sub 6}, one of which is the evaluation of natural phenomena threats, such as earthquakes, floods, and winds. In support of the SAR, the six active cylinder storage yards were evaluated for vulnerabilities to natural phenomena, earthquakes, high winds and tornados, tornado-generated missiles, floods (local and regional), and lightning. This report summarizes those studies. 30 refs.

Fricke, K.E.

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796]).

E. Siegmann

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

83

Bayesian Inference in the Scaling Analysis of Critical Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To determine the universality class of critical phenomena, we propose a method of statistical inference in the scaling analysis of critical phenomena. The method is based on Bayesian statistics, most specifically, the Gaussian process regression. It assumes only the smoothness of a scaling function, and it does not need a form. We demonstrate this method for the finite-size scaling analysis of the Ising models on square and triangular lattices. Near the critical point, the method is comparable in accuracy to the least-square method. In addition, it works well for data to which we cannot apply the least-square method with a polynomial of low degree. By comparing the data on triangular lattices with the scaling function inferred from the data on square lattices, we confirm the universality of the finite-size scaling function of the two-dimensional Ising model.

Harada, Kenji

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fourth DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Conference: Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This conference allowed an interchange in the natural phenomena area among designers, safety professionals, and managers. The papers presented in Volume I of the proceedings are from sessions I - VIII which cover the general topics of: DOE standards, lessons learned and walkdowns, wind, waste tanks, ground motion, testing and materials, probabilistic seismic hazards, risk assessment, base isolation and energy dissipation, and lifelines and floods. Individual papers are indexed separately. (GH)

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Seismically-induced sloshing phenomena in LMFBR reactor tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled fluid-structure interaction solution procedure for analyzing seismically-induced sloshing phenomena in fluid-tank systems is presented. Both rigid and flexible tanks are considered. Surface-wave effects are also included. Results demonstrate that tank flexibility could affect the free surface-wave amplitude and the sloshing pressuare if the natural frequency of the fluid-structure system is below 5 Hz. Furthermore, the presence of higher sloshing modes do enhance the post-earthquake sloshing response.

Ma, D.C.; Liu, W.K.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Molecular Level Processes  

SciTech Connect

This was a grant to support travel for scientists to present data and interact with others in their field. Specifically, speakers presented their data in a session entitled “Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Macroscopic Properties: Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Structure and Reactivity of Mineral Surfaces”. The session ran across three ˝ day periods, March 30-31 2004. The session’s organizers were David J. Wesolowski andGordon E. Brown Jr. There were a total of 30 talks presented.

Jay A Brandes

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Plate-Out Phenomena in Direct-Cycle HTGRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plateout of condensable radionuclides in the primary coolant circuits of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) -- especially direct-cycle HTGRs -- has significant design, operations and maintenance (O&M), and safety implications. This report reviews and evaluates the available international information on plateout phenomena, specifically as it applies to the gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) and the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR).

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Complex (dusty) plasmas-kinetic studies of strong coupling phenomena  

SciTech Connect

'Dusty plasmas' can be found almost everywhere-in the interstellar medium, in star and planet formation, in the solar system in the Earth's atmosphere, and in the laboratory. In astrophysical plasmas, the dust component accounts for only about 1% of the mass, nevertheless this component has a profound influence on the thermodynamics, the chemistry, and the dynamics. Important physical processes are charging, sputtering, cooling, light absorption, and radiation pressure, connecting electromagnetic forces to gravity. Surface chemistry is another important aspect. In the laboratory, there is great interest in industrial processes (e.g., etching, vapor deposition) and-at the fundamental level-in the physics of strong coupling phenomena. Here, the dust (or microparticles) are the dominant component of the multi-species plasma. The particles can be observed in real time and space, individually resolved at all relevant length and time scales. This provides an unprecedented means for studying self-organisation processes in many-particle systems, including the onset of cooperative phenomena. Due to the comparatively large mass of the microparticles (10{sup -12}to10{sup -9}g), precision experiments are performed on the ISS. The following topics will be discussed: Phase transitions, phase separation, electrorheology, flow phenomena including the onset of turbulence at the kinetic level.

Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Thomas, Hubertus M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gamma-Ray Bursts: Super-Explosions in the Universe and Related High-Energy Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent progress in studies of gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and host galaxies is discussed. The emphasis is given to high-energy phenomena associated with gamma-ray burst explosions: high-energy cosmic rays, neutrinos, gravitational waves. We also show how the relativistic fireball model for GRBs can be used to constrain modern theories of large and infinite extra-dimensions. In particular, in the frame of 5D gravity with the Standard Model localized on 3D brane (Dvali et al. 2000), the very existence of relativistic fireballs of $\\sim 10^{53}$ ergs puts the lower bound on the quantum gravity scale $\\sim 0.1$ eV.

K. A. Postnov

2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fluid Flow Transport Phenomena in Steel Continuous Casting FC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ab Initio Local Energy and Local Stress Calculations: Applications to Materials ... Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experimental Results for the Horizontal .... Films and Applications to a New Generation of Multifunctional Devices/Systems.

92

Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peer Review Workshop III Peer Review Workshop III 18-20 October 2005 Jeffrey Bons BYU Z.J. Wang (3-D) Tom Shih (2-D) Iowa State University IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Aerospace Engineering Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance - 2-D/3-D CFD Simulations of Rough Surfaces- * Perform detailed CFD simulations to generate understanding of flow and heat transfer phenomena over rough surfaces. * Use understanding generated to develop engineering models to predict heat transfer and friction on rough surfaces. Objectives IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Aerospace Engineering Accomplishments * Performed 2-D and 3-D CFD simulations. * Generated a preliminary engineering model. 3-D CFD: Z.J. Wang * 1/6 -1/3 of the span (from Jeffrey Bons' experiment) selected for the computational domain; * 2 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm resolutions for coarse, medium and

93

DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL's test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. This model is under continued development. It shows that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, within the electrolyte. The chemical potential within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just under the oxygen electrode (anode)/electrolyte interface, leading to electrode delamination. This theory is being further refined and tested by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte.

M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. Virkar

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Methods of degrading napalm B  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of degrading napalm and/or trinitrotoluene involve contacting the waste with specific intra-amoebic isolates of ATCC 40908 and/or dispersants derived therefrom. Useful isolates include is deposited as ATCC 77529, NAP-1 deposited as ATCC 77526 and 13 deposited as ATCC 77527.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN); Vass, Arpad (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Methods of degrading napalm B  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of degrading napalm and/or trinitrotoluene involve contacting the waste with specific intra-amoebic isolates of ATCC 40908 and/or dispersants derived therefrom. Useful isolates are deposited as ATCC 77529, NAP-1 deposited as ATCC 77526 and 13 deposited as ATCC 77527.

Tyndall, R.L.; Vass, A.

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Degradation of degradable starch-polyethylene plastics in a compost environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradable plastics have differing degradation rates. Three types of degradation of polyethylene in the starch-polyethylene polymers can occur: chemical degradation, photodegradation, and biological degradation. This study examines all three types of degradation in 11 commercially produced degradable starch-polyethylene bags. Different rates for chemical and photo-degradation were found within a 20 day or an 8-week period. Results indicated that both the 70[degree]C oven and HT-HH film treatments were appropriate methods to evaluate oxidative degradation. In a compost environment, oxygen tension on the surface of the film appears to be the rate-limiting component for both chemical and biological degradation. Levels of starch in all bags was similar, so the prooxidant additive was critical in promoting the oxidative degradation of polyethylene. The Fe-Mn additive displayed the best catalytic activity. This study overall confirms degradation of starch-polyethylene plastics in a natural environment. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Johnson, K.E.; Pometto, A.L. III; Nikolov, Z.L. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Environmental Phenomena of the Beaufort Sea Observed during the Leads Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes unique environmental phenomena observed during LEADEX (Leads Experiment), a multidisciplinary investigation staged from an ice camp in the Beaufort Sea during March and April 1992. The paper focuses on phenomena observed by ...

Robert W. Fett; Stephen D. Burk; William T. Thompson; Thomas L. Kozo

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final Results V. July 2010 Event VI. Emergency Planning VII.What's Next Pantex The Pantex Plant, located 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas, in Carson County, is charged with maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Worked performed at Pantex supports three core missions. * Stockpile Stewardship * Nonproliferation and * Safeguards and Security Pantex (cont.) - Location Pantex (cont.) - Weather Patterns * Precipitation is typical for Southwest climate, mainly in the form of Spring and

99

Dynamical Lifshitz-type solutions and aging phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider time-dependent Lifshitz-type solutions in type IIB supergravity. The solutions describe a time evolution from Lifshitz spacetimes to AdS spaces. We argue the holographic relation of them to aging phenomena in condensed matter physics. The solutions have no time-translation invariance and possess the dynamical scaling symmetry with z_c=2. In addition, the time evolution corresponds to slow (nonexponential) dynamics from nonequilibrium states to the equilibrium. We also discuss a mechanism of quantum quench to generate nonequilibrium states.

Kunihito Uzawa; Kentaroh Yoshida

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

100

Steam Generator Management Program: Investigation of Steam Generator Secondary-Side Degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reviews and discusses age-related degradation that has occurred in the carbon steel internal components in the steam drums of Westinghouse steam generators (SGs), especially in original and early replacement SGs. The degradation is characterized by gradual thinning (loss of material) that is generally localized in the components as a result of exposure to high-velocity steam-water mixtures. Material loss from internal components has been noted during secondary-side visual inspections of ori...

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Used Fuel Degradation: Experimental and Modeling Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The report describes the strategy for coupling process level models to produce an integrated Used Fuel Degradation Model (FDM), and addresses fractional degradation rate, instant release fractions, other continuum modeling approaches, and experimental support.

102

PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project conducted fundamental studies of PEM MEA degradation. Insights gained from these studies were disseminated to assist MEA manufacturers in understanding degradation mechanisms and work towards DOE 2010 fuel cell durability targets.

Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Why Sequence Cellulose Degrading Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? One of the major DOE missions is the production of renewable fuels to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and also to take the place of petroleum-based fuels as these resources dwindle. Biologically produced ethanol is one possible replacement for fossil fuels. Currently, ethanol is produced from corn starch, but there is much research into using lignocellulosic materials (those containing cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) as the raw material for ethanol production. Ethanol production from cellulose requires several steps: pretreatment with steam, acid, or ammonia; digestion of cellulose to sugars; and fermentation of sugars to ethanol. The slowest and most expensive step is the breakdown of cellulose, chemically accomplished by cellulases. The second and third

104

Learner intuitions about energy degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A primary learning goal for energy in K-12 science instruction is that energy cannot be created or destroyed. However, learners' everyday ideas about energy often involve energy being "used up" or "wasted." In physics, the concept of energy degradation can connect those everyday ideas to the principle of energy conservation. Learners' spontaneous discussions of aspects of energy degradation and the second law of thermodynamics include ideas concerning the inaccessibility, usefulness and dispersion of energy. These ideas have motivated us to introduce new learning goals into our K-12 teacher professional development courses. We identify alignments between these learning goals and learners' informal ideas and discuss instructional implications created by these alignments. Our aim is to create stronger ties between formal physics knowledge and sociopolitical issues by making these learning goals a priority in our professional development.

Daane, Abigail R; Vokos, Stamatis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Concrete Degradation Modeling in the Evaluation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... as a Decommission Option by ... Page 2. Concrete Degradation Modeling in the Evaluation of Entombment as a Decommissioning Option ...

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Degradation Mechanism of SOFC Cathode Electrolyte Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Degradation Mechanism of SOFC Cathode Electrolyte Systems Incorporating Doped Lathanum Gallates. Author(s), Chuan Zhang, Anh T.

107

Environmental Degradation 2011 Conference: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental Degradation 2011 Conference: Technical Program August 7-11, 2011 * Cheyenne Mountain Resort * Colorado Springs, Colorado. The purpose ...

108

Evaluation of Fundamental Linkage Among Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many in-core components of stainless steels in light water reactors (LWRs) are susceptible to a degradation process known as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). This report describes the results of environmental testing on irradiated Type 304 stainless steel in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments to assess their susceptibility to IASCC. The work was sponsored by the Cooperative IASCC Research (CIR I) Program, an international research effort ma...

2002-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

2001-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Quantum Locality?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

Stapp, Henry

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

Degradation Modes of Alloy 22 in Yucca Mountain Repository Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear waste package design for Yucca Mountain (Nevada, USA), in its current configuration, consists of a double wall cylindrical container fabricated using a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 for the outer barrier and type 316 stainless steel for the inner structural vessel. A mailbox-shaped drip shield fabricated primarily using Ti Grade 7 will cover the waste packages. The environmental degradation of the relevant materials have been extensively studied and modeled for over ten years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation modes of Alloy 22 (N06022) due to its interaction with the predicted in-drift mountain conditions including temperature and types of electrolytes. Subjects discussed include thermal aging and phase stability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking.

Hua, F; Gordon, G M; Mon, K G; Rebak, R B

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

DEGRADATION MODES OF ALLOY 22 IN YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear waste package design for Yucca Mountain (Nevada, USA), in its current configuration, consists of a double wall cylindrical container fabricated using a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 for the outer barrier and type 316 stainless steel for the inner structural vessel. A mailbox-shaped drip shield fabricated primarily using Ti Grade 7 will cover the waste packages. The environmental degradation of the relevant materials have been extensively studied and modeled for over ten years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation modes of Alloy 22 (N06022) due to its interaction with the predicted in-drift mountain conditions including temperature and types of electrolytes. Subjects discussed include thermal aging and phase stability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking.

F. Hua; G.M. Gordon; R.B. Rebak

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE Standard Natural Phenomena Hazards Site Characterization Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-94 2-94 March 1994 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS SITE CHARACTERIZATION CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4376, Fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. DOE-STD-1022-94 ERRATA FOR DOE-STD-1022-94 REVISED FOREWORD ADDED REFERENCE TO DOE G 420.1-2

115

Parity of the Solar Magnetic Fields and Related Astrophysical Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cumulative contribution of odd (Bo) and even (BE) parity zonal magnetic multipoles to the solar magnetic fields is calculated using spherical harmonic coefficients of the photospheric magnetic field for the years 1959-1985. The dominant parity of the solar magnetic field is shown to change from odd to even during every sunspot cycle. The association of variations of Bo and BE with different astrophysical phenomena such as magnetic reversal of solar polar magnetic fields, north-south asymmetry in sunspot activity and strength of the interplanetary magnetic field will be also discussed. Using solar observations we could infer that dominant parity of the solar magnetic field is changing from even to odd during the past 12 solar cycles when the solar activity is showing an increasing trend during this period.

G. Gopkumar; T. E. Girish

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

116

Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visualization of the spin density from the excess electron cluster. Robert Visualization of the spin density from the excess electron cluster. Robert Harrison Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy Production and Storage with MADNESS and MPQC PI Name: Robert Harrison PI Email: harrisonrj@ornl.gov Institution: ORNL Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Chemistry Researchers propose to focus on the problems of catalysis and heavy element chemistry for fuel reprocessing-both of which are of immediate interest to the Department of Energy (DOE), are representative of a very broad class of problems in chemistry, and demand the enormous computational resources anticipated from the next generation of leadership computing facilities. Also common to both is the need for accurate electronic structure

117

Parity of the Solar Magnetic Fields and Related Astrophysical Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cumulative contribution of odd (Bo) and even (BE) parity zonal magnetic multipoles to the solar magnetic fields is calculated using spherical harmonic coefficients of the photospheric magnetic field for the years 1959-1985. The dominant parity of the solar magnetic field is shown to change from odd to even during every sunspot cycle. The association of variations of Bo and BE with different astrophysical phenomena such as magnetic reversal of solar polar magnetic fields, north-south asymmetry in sunspot activity and strength of the interplanetary magnetic field will be also discussed. Using solar observations we could infer that dominant parity of the solar magnetic field is changing from even to odd during the past 12 solar cycles when the solar activity is showing an increasing trend during this period.

Gopkumar, G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Thermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high temperature process heat. The overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. An overview of high temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic thermodynamics, experimental methods, heat and mass transfer phenomena, and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

James E. O'Brien

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

High frequency parametric wave phenomena and plasma heating: a review  

SciTech Connect

A survey of parametric instabilities in plasma, and associated particle heating, is presented. A brief summary of linear theory is given. The physical mechanism of decay instability, the purely growing mode (oscillating two-stream instability) and soliton and density cavity formation is presented. Effects of density gradients are discussed. Possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms are pointed out. Experimental evidence for the existence of parametric instabilities in both unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas is reviewed in some detail. Experimental observation of plasma heating associated with the presence of parametric instabilities is demonstrated by a number of examples. Possible application of these phenomena to heating of pellets by lasers and heating of magnetically confined fusion plasmas by high power microwave sources is discussed. (auth)

Porkolab, M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ELECTROKINETIC WAVE PHENOMENA IN FLUID-SATURATED GRANULAR MEDIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrokinetic (EK) phenomena in sediments arise from relative fluid motion in the pore space, which perturbs the electrostatic equilibrium of the double layer at the grain surface. We have developed EK techniques in the laboratory to monitor acoustic wave propagation in electrolyte-saturated, unconsolidated sediments. Our experimental results indicate that as an acoustic wave travels through electrolyte-saturated sand, it can generate electric potentials greater than 1 mV. A careful study of these potentials was performed using medium-grain sand and loose glass microspheres for a range of pore fluid salinities and ultrasonic frequencies. Experimental results are also shown to compare well with numerical and analytical modeling based on the coupled electrokinetic-Biot theory developed by Pride (1994).

Block, G

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Gurson's Model: ALE Formulation and Strain Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a brief review of Gurson's damage model, employed to describes the strength degradation in ductile metals submitted to large plastic deformations. The damage model is applied using finite elements and an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE), to ensure a better quality to the finite elements mesh. The study of the combined application of ALE and Gurson approach to damage modeling and strain localization is the object of this paper.

Cunda, Luiz A. B. da [Departamento de Materiais e Construcao, Fundacao Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Av. Italia, km 8, Campus Carreiros, 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Creus, Guillermo J. [Centro de Mecanica Aplicada e Computacional, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Osvaldo Aranha, 99, 3o andar, 90035-190, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

Degradation of Manganese Cobalt Spinel SOFC Interconnect ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Degradation of Manganese Cobalt Spinel SOFC Interconnect Coatings. Author(s), Jeffrey W. Fergus, Yingjia Liu, Yu Zhao. On-Site Speaker ...

123

Degradation of Chlorophenols in Swine Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Naturally occurring plant derived phenols can be degraded through bacteria in swine waste. Chlorinated phenols, which are not naturally present in the environment, are toxic… (more)

Gangula, Srilatha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database.

R. Schreiner

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Discontinuous Galerkin Methods and Local Time Stepping for Wave Propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Locally refined meshes impose severe stability constraints on explicit time-stepping methods for the numerical simulation of time dependent wave phenomena. To overcome that stability restriction, local time-stepping methods are developed, which allow arbitrarily small time steps precisely where small elements in the mesh are located. When combined with a discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretization in space, which inherently leads to a diagonal mass matrix, the resulting numerical schemes are fully explicit. Starting from the classical Adams-Bashforth multi-step methods, local time stepping schemes of arbitrarily high accuracy are derived. Numerical experiments validate the theory and illustrate the usefulness of the proposed time integration schemes.

Grote, M. J.; Mitkova, T. [University of Basel, Rheinsprung 21, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

JOM-e 0612: Transient Fluid-Flow Phenomena in the Continuous ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animations of some of these transient flow phenomena are presented from ... Animations of the transient flow pattern were presented previously.8 The current  ...

128

CRAD, Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events- November 17, 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Emergency Management Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry - Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events (HSS CRAD 45-51, Rev. 0)

129

CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events- January 3, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events for DOE/NNSA sites and nuclear facilities (HSS CRAD 45-56, Rev. O)

130

Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a functioninterfacial mass-transport resistance was established.

He, Qinggang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A comparison of thermoelectric phenomena in diverse alloy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of thermoelectric phenomena in solids provides a wealth of opportunity for exploration of the complex interrelationships between structure, processing, and properties of materials. As thermoelectricity implies some type of coupled thermal and electrical behavior, it is expected that a basic understanding of transport behavior in materials is the goal of such a study. However, transport properties such as electrical resistivity and thermal diffusivity cannot be fully understood and interpreted without first developing an understanding of the material's preparation and its underlying structure. It is the objective of this dissertation to critically examine a number of diverse systems in order to develop a broad perspective on how structure-processing-property relationships differ from system to system, and to discover the common parameters upon which any good thermoelectric material is based. The alloy systems examined in this work include silicon-germanium, zinc oxide, complex intermetallic compounds such as the half-Heusler MNiSn, where M = Ti, Zr, or Hf, and rare earth chalcogenides.

Cook, Bruce

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Kinetic phenomena in charged particle transport in gases and plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The key difference between equilibrium (thermal) and non-equilibrium (low temperature - a.k.a. cold) plasmas is in the degree in which the shape of the cross sections influences the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). In this paper we will discuss the issue of kinetic phenomena from two different angles. The first will be how to take advantage of the strong influence and use low current data to obtain the cross sections. This is also known as the swarm technique and the product of a ''swarm analysis'' is a set of cross sections giving good number, momentum and energy balances of electrons or other charged particles. At the same time understanding the EEDF is based on the cross section data. Nevertheless sometimes the knowledge of the cross sections and even the behaviour of individual particles are insufficient to explain collective behaviour of the ensemble. The resulting ''kinetic'' effects may be used to favour certain properties of non-equilibrium plasmas and even may be used as the basis of some new plasma applications.

Petrovic, Zoran Lj.; Dujko, Sasa; Sasic, Olivera; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Malovic, Gordana [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, POB 68 11080 Zemun (Serbia); Faculty of Traffic Engineering, University of Belgrade Belgrade (Serbia); Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, POB 68 11080 Zemun (Serbia)

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas  

SciTech Connect

In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Systematic investigation of NLTE phenomena in the limit of small departure from LTE  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we begin a systematic study of Non-Local Thermal Equilibrium (NLTE) phenomena in near equilibrium (LTE) high energy density, highly radiative plasmas. It is shown that the principle of minimum entropy production rate characterizes NLTE steady states for average atom rate equations in the case of small departures form LTE. With the aid of a novel hohlraum-reaction box thought experiment, we use the principles of minimum entropy production and detailed balance to derive Onsager reciprocity relations for the NLTE responses of a near equilibrium sample to non-Planckian perturbations in different frequency groups. This result is a significant symmetry constraint on the linear corrections to Kirchoffs law. We envisage applying our strategy to a number of test problems which include: the NLTE corrections to the ionization state of an ion located near the edge of an otherwise LTE medium; the effect of a monochromatic radiation field perturbation on an LTE medium; the deviation of Rydberg state populations from LTE in recombining or ionizing plasmas; multi-electron temperature models such as that of Busquet; and finally, the effect of NLTE populations shifts on opacity models.

Libby, S.B.; Graziani, F.R.; More, R.M.; Kato, T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Final PV module degradation-analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Visual and electrical degradation analyses were performed on 47 modules from: the Natural Bridges National Monument (NBNM) in Utah; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts; and the University of Nebraska at Mead, Nebraska. Such problems as discoloration, cracking, scratches, and electrical degradation were detected. (LEW)

Themelis, M P

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Site characterization and hazard assessment criteria for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly summarizes requirements for site characterization and hazard assessment of Natural Phenomena Hazards for compliance with DOE Order 5480.28. The site characterization criteria for NPH evaluation are provided in a draft DOE-STD-1022-XX and the assessment criteria of natural phenomena hazards are provided in draft DOE-STD-1023-XX.

Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction (FAI/00-39)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a topical reference on the phenomena and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project with specific applications to SNF Project processes and situations. Spent metallic uranium nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater at the K basins in the Hanford 100 area, and planned processing steps include: (1) At the basins, cleaning and placing fuel elements and scrap into stainless steel multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) holding about 6 MT of fuel apiece; (2) At nearby cold vacuum drying (CVD) stations, draining, vacuum drying, and mechanically sealing the MCOs; (3) Shipping the MCOs to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) on the 200 Area plateau; and (4) Welding shut and placing the MCOs for interim (40 year) dry storage in closed CSB storage tubes cooled by natural air circulation through the surrounding vault. Damaged fuel elements have exposed and corroded fuel surfaces, which can exothermically react with water vapor and oxygen during normal process steps and in off-normal situations, A key process safety concern is the rate of reaction of damaged fuel and the potential for self-sustaining or runaway reactions, also known as uranium fires or fuel ignition. Uranium metal and one of its corrosion products, uranium hydride, are potentially pyrophoric materials. Dangers of pyrophoricity of uranium and its hydride have long been known in the U.S. Department of Energy (Atomic Energy Commission/DOE) complex and will be discussed more below; it is sufficient here to note that there are numerous documented instances of uranium fires during normal operations. The motivation for this work is to place the safety of the present process in proper perspective given past operational experience. Steps in development of such a perspective are: (1) Description of underlying physical causes for runaway reactions, (2) Modeling physical processes to explain runaway reactions, (3) Validation of the method against experimental data, (4) Application of the method to plausibly explain operational experience, and (5) Application of the method to present process steps to demonstrate process safety and margin. Essentially, the logic above is used to demonstrate that runaway reactions cannot occur during normal SNF Project process steps, and to illustrate the depth of the technical basis for such a conclusion. Some off-normal conditions are identified here that could potentially lead to runaway reactions. However, this document is not intended to provide an exhaustive analysis of such cases. In summary, this report provides a ''toolkit'' of models and approaches for analysis of pyrophoricity safety issues at Hanford, and the technical basis for the recommended approaches. A summary of recommended methods appears in Section 9.0.

PLYS, M.G.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ab-initio calculations of the hydrogen-uranium system. Part I: Surface phenomena, absorption, transport and trapping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Density functional theory was applied to the initial steps of uranium hydriding: surface phenomena, absorption, bulk transport and trapping. H adsorbs exothermically to the (0 0 1) surface, yet H absorption into the bulk is endothermic, with off-center octahedral absorption having the lowest absorption energy of 0.39 eV, relative to molecular H{sub 2}. H absorption in interstitial sites causes a local softening of the bulk modulus. Diffusion of H in unstrained {alpha}-U has a barrier of 0.6 eV. The energy of H absorption adjacent to the chemical impurities C, S, Si was lowered by an amount proportional to the size of the impurity atom, and the resulting lattice strain Si > S > C. Thus, impurities may promote hydriding by providing surfaces or prestrained zones for H uptake.

Taylor, Christopher D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lillard, R Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Locality phase prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As computer memory hierarchy becomes adaptive, its performance increasingly depends on forecasting the dynamic program locality. This paper presents a method that predicts the locality phases of a program by a combination of locality profiling and run-time ... Keywords: dynamic optimization, locality analysis and optimization, phase hierarchy, program phase analysis and prediction, reconfigurable architecture

Xipeng Shen; Yutao Zhong; Chen Ding

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of commercial lithium-ion cells based on composite positive electrode for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle applications. Part II. Degradation mechanism under 2 C cycle aging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradation phenomena and inference of their underlying mechanisms during 2 C cycle aging in a cell design comprising {l_brace}LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 + LiMn2O4{r_brace} composite positive electrode are studied and reported in this work. We describe how aging phenomena in the cells were studied and incremental capacity analysis applied to infer cell degradation mechanisms in the cycle aging process. Two stages of degradation were observed in the life cycle under this aging regime. In the first stage, we conclude that loss of lithium inventory was the cause of capacity fade. As a result of such parasitic loss, the cell further suffered from loss of active materials in the second stage, in which the positive electrode kinetics was hampered and the capacity loss accelerated.

Matthieu Dubarry; Cyril Truchot; Bor Yann Liaw; Kevin Gering; Sergiy Sazhin; David Jamison; Christopher Michelbacher

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

Hazen, T.C.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

Why Sequence PAH-Degrading Burkholderia?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such organisms should enable researchers to determine how the degradation process works. Genome sequencing of strains Ch1-1 and Cs1-4 would also add much needed information about...

144

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Operation and Degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concepts of area specific resistance (ASR) and degradation are developed for different fuel cell operating modes. The concepts of exergetic efficiency and entropy production were applied to ASR and degradation. It is shown that exergetic efficiency is a time-dependent function useful describing the thermal efficiency of a fuel cell and the change in thermal efficiency of a degrading fuel cell. Entropy production was evaluated for the cases of constant voltage operation and constant current operation of the fuel cell for a fuel cell undergoing ohmic degradation. It was discovered that the Gaussian hypergeometric function describes the cumulative entropy and electrical work produced by fuel cells operating at constant voltage. The Gaussian hypergeometric function is found in many applications in modern physics. This paper builds from and is an extension of several papers recently published by the authors in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society (ECS), ECS Transactions, Journal of Power Sources, and the Journal of Fuel Cell Science and Technology.

Williams, Mark; Gemmen, Randall; Richards, George

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Materials Development and Degradation Management for Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Development and Degradation Management for Nuclear ... of zirconium alloys in reactor can lead to the presence of hydride precipitates, and can ... for the U.S. Department ofEnergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under ...

146

Thermal Degradation of Amines in Supercritical Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity and chemical control of water and steam are essential for ensuring fossil plant availability and reliability. An assessment of amines to address specific corrosion control issues (Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] report 1017475) identified eight amines as alternatives to ammonia for pH control. Previous research has limited the thermal degradation of the pH control agents to temperatures less than 300176C. This report presents an understanding of the high-temperature degradation of the...

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

BWR Failed Fuel Degradation: An EPRI Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to severe fuel degradation concerns within the nuclear fuel community, EPRI initiated a comprehensive program to investigate the phenomenon, propose operational guidelines for mitigating the effects of failed fuel rods during a reactor cycle, and develop a model to help predict the behavior of failed fuel rods. The understanding provided by EPRI's program, and others, has resulted in new fuel products expected to be more resistant to degradation. This report provides a convenient reference fo...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Investigation of tearing instability phenomena in ASTM A106 steel  

SciTech Connect

An experimental investigation was performed to evaluate tearing instability theory by varying the applied tearing modulus, T/sub applied/, so that fracture instability would be initiated at various levels of stable crack extension. This is an extension of past investigations of tearing instability theory in that crack extension was monitored continuously using the dc potential drop technique, enabling the applied and material tearing moduli to be calculated at the point of instability. The results of this investigation indicate that, in most cases, fracture instability occurred when the difference between the applied and material tearing moduli was on the order of 10%. Variations in the load versus displacement records of the specimens near maximum load due to local instabilities and friction in the load train precluded measurement of a smooth applied tearing modulus curve.

Link, R.E.; Hays, R.A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. The review includes all natural phenomena hazards with the exception of seismic/earthquake hazards, which are being addressed under a separate effort. It was determined that existing non-seismic NPH assessments are consistent with current design methodology and site specific data.

Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.; Sullivan, Robin S.

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the DOE Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the DOE's Hanford Site, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. This review is an update and expansion to the September 2010 review of PNNL-19751, Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic).

Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Biological and computational perspectives on the emergence of social phenomena: shared understanding and collective power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shared understanding and collective power are social phenomena that serve as a form of glue between individual persons. They easily emerge and often involve both cognitive and affective aspects. As the behaviour of each person is based on complex internal ...

Jan Treur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

An Automated System for the Analysis of Gravity Waves and Other Mesoscale Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated near-real-time system for the surface analysis of gravity waves and other mesoscale phenomena is developed, tested, and applied to several cases. Five-minute observations from the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) network ...

Steven E. Koch; Stephen Saleeby

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

An Analysis of Mesoscale Transport Phenomena during the Evening Transition Period near Sacramento, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical study of transport phenomena during the evening transition period in the vicinity of Sacramento, California is presented. The study is based on a network of double-theodolite wind stations, aircraft soundings and micrometeorological ...

L. O. Myrup; D. L. Morgan; R. Boomer

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Inexpensive Time-Lapse Digital Cameras for Studying Transient Meteorological Phenomena: Dust Devils and Playa Flooding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe the design and performance of inexpensive and compact time-lapse cameras suitable for field deployment in remote locations for long periods and their application to studying two time-variable meteorological phenomena in arid ...

Ralph D. Lorenz; Brian Jackson; Jason W. Barnes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Optical, electronic, and dynamical phenomena in the shock compression of condensed matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the study of shock wave compression of condensed matter for over 100 years, scant progress has been made in understanding the microscopic details. This thesis explores microscopic phenomena in shock compression of ...

Reed, Evan J. (Evan John), 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Final Report Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program.  

SciTech Connect

The Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program had primary objectives of (1) understanding the significant factors relating corrosion occurrence, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments; (2) providing the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins or estimating future residual structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; (3) providing recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by USNRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation; and (4) providing technical assistance to the USNRC (as requested) related to concrete technology. Primary program accomplishments have included development of a degradation assessment methodology; reviews of techniques and methods for inspection and repair of containment metallic pressure boundaries; evaluation of high-frequency acoustic imaging, magnetostrictive sensor, electromagnetic acoustic transducer, and multimode guided plate wave technologies for inspection of inaccessible regions of containment metallic pressure boundaries; development of a continuum damage mechanics-based approach for structural deterioration; establishment of a methodology for reliability-based condition assessments of steel containments and liners; and fragility assessments of steel containments with localized corrosion. In addition, data and information assembled under this program has been transferred to the technical community through review meetings and briefings, national and international conference participation, technical committee involvement, and publications of reports and journal articles. Appendix A provides a listing of program reports, papers, and publications; and Appendix B contains a listing of program-related presentations.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Ellingwood, B R [Georgia Institute of Technology; Oland, C Barry [ORNL

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Self-degradable Cementitious Sealing Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A self-degradable alkali-activated cementitious material consisting of a sodium silicate activator, slag, Class C fly ash, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) additive was formulated as one dry mix component, and we evaluated its potential in laboratory for use as a temporary sealing material for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells. The self-degradation of alkali-activated cementitious material (AACM) occurred, when AACM heated at temperatures of {ge}200 C came in contact with water. We interpreted the mechanism of this water-initiated self-degradation as resulting from the in-situ exothermic reactions between the reactants yielded from the dissolution of the non-reacted or partially reacted sodium silicate activator and the thermal degradation of the CMC. The magnitude of self-degradation depended on the CMC content; its effective content in promoting degradation was {ge}0.7%. In contrast, no self-degradation was observed from CMC-modified Class G well cement. For 200 C-autoclaved AACMs without CMC, followed by heating at temperatures up to 300 C, they had a compressive strength ranging from 5982 to 4945 psi, which is {approx}3.5-fold higher than that of the commercial Class G well cement; the initial- and final-setting times of this AACM slurry at 85 C were {approx}60 and {approx}90 min. Two well-formed crystalline hydration phases, 1.1 nm tobermorite and calcium silicate hydrate (I), were responsible for developing this excellent high compressive strength. Although CMC is an attractive, as a degradation-promoting additive, its addition to both the AACM and the Class G well cement altered some properties of original cementitious materials; among those were an extending their setting times, an increasing their porosity, and lowering their compressive strength. Nevertheless, a 0.7% CMC-modified AACM as self-degradable cementitious material displayed the following properties before its breakdown by water; {approx}120 min initial- and {approx}180 min final-setting times at 85 C, and 1825 to 1375 psi compressive strength with 51.2 to 55.0% porosity up to 300 C.

Sugama, T.; Butcher, T., Lance Brothers, Bour, D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Positioning using local maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is often useful to know the positions of nodes in a network. However, in a large network it is impractical to build a single global map. In this paper, we present a new approach for distributed localization called Positioning using Local Maps (PLM). ... Keywords: Localization, Multidimensional scaling, Multilateration, Relative position estimation

Yi Shang; Wheeler Ruml; Markus P. J. Fromherz

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Local Bézout Theorem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We give an elementary proof of what we call the Local Bezout Theorem. Given a system of n polynomials in n indeterminates with coefficients in a Henselian local domain, (V,m,k), which residually defines an isolated point in k^n of multiplicity r, we ... Keywords: Henselian rings, Local Bézout Theorem, Roots continuity, Stable computations

M. Emilia Alonso; Henri Lombardi

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are: (1) Develop a system capable of measuring current and voltage performance for each membrane in a Polymer Electrolyte Membranes (PEM) fuel cell stack and record the performance of each individual cell; (2) Develop a single cell PEM FC to allow in situ synchrotron x-ray measurements of the cell in operation and to perform spatially resolved x-ray measurements on fuel cell elements before and after degradation; and (3) Perform initial magnetic resonance microimaging experiments on membrane materials. The Montana State University PEM Membrane Degradation program is geared towards determining how and why membranes in fuel cells degrade and fail. By monitoring every individual membrane in a fuel cell 2000 times/sec while the cell is subjected to real-world type use, we hope to: (1) cause the types of degradation users see, but in a controlled environment; (2) determine an electrical signature that will identify what causes failure, or at least warns of impending failure; (3) allows us to perform advanced x-ray and MRI characterization of the degraded membranes to provide information that may result in improvements of the membrane material; and (4) perhaps allow design of electronic control systems that will prevent fuel cells from operating under conditions where damage is likely to occur.

Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the first 10,000-years after repository closure. This paper provides an overview of the degradation of the waste packages and drip shields in the repository after permanent closure of the facility. The degradation modes discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on the degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are considered. It is concluded that the materials and design adopted will provide sufficient safety margins for at least 10,000-years after repository closure.

K.G. Mon; F. Hua

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

163

Understanding Degradation Pathways in Organic Photovoltaics (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs) recently attained power conversion efficiencies that are of interest for commercial production. Consequently, one of the most important unsolved issues facing a new industry is understanding what governs lifetime in organic devices and discovering solutions to mitigate degradation mechanisms. Historically, the active organic components are considered vulnerable to photo-oxidation and represent the primary degradation channel. However, we present several (shelf life and light soaking) studies pointing the relative stability of the active layers and instabilities in commonly used electrode materials. We show that engineering of the hole/electron layer at the electrode can lead to environmentally stable devices even without encapsulation.

Lloyd, M. T.; Olson, D. C.; Garcia, A.; Kauvar, I.; Kopidakis, N.; Reese, M. O.; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Local quantum control of Heisenberg spin chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by some recent results of quantum control theory, we discuss the feasibility of local operator control in arrays of interacting qubits modeled as isotropic Heisenberg spin chains. Acting on one of the end spins, we aim at finding piecewise-constant control pulses that lead to optimal fidelities for a chosen set of quantum gates. We analyze the robustness of the obtained results for the gate fidelities to random errors in the control fields, finding that with faster switching between piecewise-constant controls the system is less susceptible to these errors. The observed behavior falls into a generic class of physical phenomena that are related to a competition between resonance- and relaxation-type behavior, exemplified by motional narrowing in NMR experiments. Finally, we discuss how the obtained optimal gate fidelities are altered when the corresponding rapidly varying piecewise-constant control fields are smoothened through spectral filtering.

Heule, Rahel; Bruder, C.; Stojanovic, Vladimir M. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Burgarth, Daniel [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom); QOLS, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA)); Short, S.A. (ABB Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA)); McDonald, J.R. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA)); McCann, M.W. Jr. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA)); Murray, R.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Process for degrading hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for degrading hypochlorite waste and lithium hypochlorite solutions uses a cobalt oxide/molybdenum oxide catalyst formed from about 1-10 w/w % cobalt oxide and 1-15 w/w % molybdenum oxide disposed on a suitable substrate. The major advantage of the catalyst lies in its high degree of effectiveness and its very low cost.

Huxtable, William P. (Concord, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Method of restoring degraded solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

Staebler, D.L.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Method of restoring degraded solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Local Incentives (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Massachusetts Office of Business Development helps companies to identify communities interested in offering locally-negotiated incentives, such as Tax Increment Financing (TIF), Special Tax...

170

Local Structure from Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials V: Centennial: Local .... we use both the high-flux neutrons at the Spallation Neutron Source ...

171

Natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria for DOE sites: DOE Standard DOE-STD-1023-95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes hazard assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95) for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. The DOE has established policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE sites and facilities using a graded approach by DOE Order 5480.28. The graded approach is implemented by five performance categories established for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) at DOE facilities based on criteria provided by DOE-STD-1021-93. In applying the design/evaluation criteria of DOE-STD-1020-94 for DOE facilities subjected to one of the natural phenomena hazards, the establishment of design basis load levels consistent with the corresponding performance category is required. This standard provides general criteria as well as specific criteria for natural phenomena hazard assessments to ensure that adequate design basis load levels are established for design and/or evaluation of DOE facilities.

Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Boissonnade, A.C. [and others

1995-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

172

Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water  

SciTech Connect

The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (â??Methane in the Arctic Shelfâ?ť or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (â??metagenomesâ?ť). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation.

David Kirchman

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Exclusive Processes: Tests of Coherent QCD Phenomena and Nucleon Substructure at CEBAF -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of exclusive processes such as electroproduction, photoproduction, and Compton scattering are among the most sensitive probes of proton structure and coherent phenomena in quantum chromodynamics. The continuous electron beam at CEBAF, upgraded in laboratory energy to 10--12 GeV, will allow a systematic study of exclusive, semi-inclusive, and inclusive reactions in a kinematic range well-tuned to the study of fundamental nucleon and nuclear substructure. I also discuss the potential at CEBAF for studying novel QCD phenomena at the charm production threshold, including the possible production of nuclear-bound quarkonium.

Stanley J. Brodsky; SLAC

1994-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media  

SciTech Connect

We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO{sub 2} saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occuning at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multi-physicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

Kang, Qinjin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Is degradation of the herbicide atrazine enhanced in turfgrass pond sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To further understand the fate of atrazine, a herbicide of public concern in the environment, this study was undertaken to determine if atrazine degradation potential is increased in turfgrass ponds having a history of repeated exposure to agrichemicals. Two sets of mesocosms (20 L) were established: one containing sediments from a pond at the Turfgrass Research Center on the Texas A&M campus, which had repeated exposure to agrichemicals, the other containing sediments from a pond on a local horse-farm that had no contact with agrichemicals in recent years. These mesocosms were fortified with atrazine (100 [u]g L?ą) and incubated under aerobic and hypoxic conditions, and the concentrations of atrazine in the water and sediment were monitored. In addition, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, and ammonium levels, and bacterial populations were monitored in the mesocosms. To determine the role of microbes in the degradation of atrazine, sterile controls were developed in a manner similar to the mesocosms. By monitoring the twelve mesocosms, it was possible to determine that the appropriate environments were maintained, and that the water chemistry was consistent with either an aerobic or hypoxic environment, as appropriate. The rates of atrazine degradation in both pond systems were very similar. Atrazine concentrations declined by about 65% in 160 days. Degradation was more rapid under aerobic conditions, but the difference was not statistically significant. Effects of prior exposure to agrichemicals on the rate of atrazine degradation were not detected. The most likely cause is that there was insufficient exposure to atrazine in the turfgrass pond to develop a population of rapid atrazine degraders.

Shourds, Shalyn Wayne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Isolation and identification of fuel-oil-degrading bacteria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to isolate and identify the crude oil-degrading bacteria from oil polluted soil. Their physiological characteristics and oil-degrading capability were… (more)

Yang, Wan-yu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

1990-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Why sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? Amanita thiersii is a white, sticky mushroom that obtains its carbon by decomposing grasses, playing a role in the terrestrial carbon cycle. The fungus is commonly found in grasslands throughout the central United States and grows in grassy areas away from trees, often seen on lawns after the rain. By sequencing A. thiersii's genome, researchers hope increase the list of fungi that might provide enzymes that can be used to commercialize the production of cellulosic biofuel, which falls in with the U.S. Department of Energy's mission to develop clean energy, by potentially offering a more cost-effective method of breaking down lignocellulose in plant cell walls. Because the fungus is found in regions where the biomass is high in

182

Characterization of Degradation for MLCC under Thermal and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and ... Characterization of Degradation for MLCC under Thermal and Electrical ...

183

Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Tunesi, Simonetta (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recapping the Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power ... The conference hosted utility engineers, reactor vendor engineers, plant architect ...

185

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems—Water ... problems associated with spent fuel storage and radioactive waste disposal.

186

Hydrogen- assisted degradation of steels used in various market ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Multiscale Approaches to Hydrogen-assisted Degradation of Metals.

187

Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation and Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) from structures, environmental media, and even personnel has become an area of particular interest in recent years due to increased homeland security concerns. In addition to terrorist attacks, scenarios such as accidental releases of CWA from U.S. stockpile sites or from historic, buried munitions are also subjects for response planning. To facilitate rapid identification of practical and effective decontamination approaches, this paper reviews pathways of CWA degradation by natural means as well as those resulting from deliberately applied solutions and technologies; these pathways and technologies are compared and contrasted. We then review various technologies, both traditional and recent, with some emphasis on decontamination materials used for surfaces that are difficult to clean. Discussion is limited to the major threat CWA, namely sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate), and the G-series nerve agents. The principal G-agents are GA (tabun, ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), GB (sarin, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and GD (soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate). The chemical decontamination pathways of each agent are outlined, with some discussion of intermediate and final degradation product toxicity. In all cases, and regardless of the CWA degradation pathway chosen for decontamination, it will be necessary to collect and analyze pertinent environmental samples during the treatment phase to confirm attainment of clearance levels.

Talmage, Sylvia Smith [ORNL; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Munro, Nancy B [ORNL; King, J. [U.S. Army Environmental Center

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site, April 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site May 2011 April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2

189

Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Hanford Site, September 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Hanford Site May 2011 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 3

190

NIL PHENOMENA IN TOPOLOGY (1415 APRIL 2007) VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY (NASHVILLE, TN U.S.A.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Consider the cartesian square Z[G] // Z[G]/ // /n. 1 #12;2 B. HUGHES, Q. KHAN (ORGANIZERS); I. HAMBLETONNIL PHENOMENA IN TOPOLOGY (14­15 APRIL 2007) VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY (NASHVILLE, TN U.S.A.) PROBLEM SESSION BRUCE HUGHES, QAYUM KHAN (ORGANIZERS) IAN HAMBLETON (MODERATOR) IO. (Ivonne Ortiz, Miami of Ohio

Hughes, Bruce

191

Fast relaxation phenomena and slow mode in extended thermodynamics of superfluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A macroscopic monofluid model of liquid helium II which is based on extended thermodynamics was formulated in previous works, both in the presence and in the absence of dissipative phenomena. In all these studies, the time evolution of the nonequilibrium ... Keywords: Extended thermodynamics, Liquid helium II, Superfluids

M. S. Mongioví; R. A. Peruzza

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

L to H mode transitions and associated phenomena in divertor tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for the research project titled L to H Mode Transitions and Associated Phenomena in Divertor Tokamaks.'' The period covered by this project is the fiscal year 1990. This report covers the development of Advanced Two Chamber Model.

Punjabi, A. (Hampton Univ., VA (United States))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A Tentative Modeling Study of the Effect of Wall Reactions on Oxidation Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature diagram of oxidation phenomena in the case of n-butane. Reactions which depend on the type-Ta ignition diagrams for equimolar n-butane/oxygen in an untreated silica vessel, a vessel internally coated Figure 1. Experimental p-Ta ignition diagrams for equimolar n-butane + oxygen mixtures (50 % n- butane

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

High efficient numerical techniques for the earthing design and the analysis of grounded phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" or "earthing" system of an electrical substation comprises all interconnected grounding fa- cilitiesHigh efficient numerical techniques for the earthing design and the analysis of grounded phenomena for the computational design of grounding systems of electrical installations in uniform and layered soils

Colominas, Ignasi

195

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site, April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site May 2011 April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 3

196

State and Local Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To help you make energy efficiency improvements in your commercial building, your state and/or local community might offer incentives or have special programs. See the following resources for more...

197

Severe Local Storms Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of severe local storms has been increasing rapidly in recent years as a result of both observational studies and numerical modeling experiments. This paper reviews that knowledge as it relates to development of new applications for ...

Robert H. Johns; Charles A. Doswell III

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Local entropy generation analysis  

SciTech Connect

Second law analysis techniques have been widely used to evaluate the sources of irreversibility in components and systems of components but the evaluation of local sources of irreversibility in thermal processes has received little attention. While analytical procedures for evaluating local entropy generation have been developed, applications have been limited to fluid flows with analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields. The analysis of local entropy generation can be used to evaluate more complicated flows by including entropy generation calculations in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The research documented in this report consists of incorporating local entropy generation calculations in an existing CFD code and then using the code to evaluate the distribution of thermodynamic losses in two applications: an impinging jet and a magnetic heat pump. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Wireless Local Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless local loop systems are available to provide both broadband and narrowband services to customers. Narrowband systems are generally either based on cordless or mobile standards, or a manufacturer‘s proprietary technology. They are generally ...

R. P. Merrett; P. V. E. Beastall; S. J. Buttery

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Localization and Tracking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Reliable obstacle detection and localization is a key issue for driver assistance systems, particularly in urban environments. In this study a multi-modal perception approach is investigated, the objective being to enhance vehicle localization and dynamic object tracking in a world-centric map. A 3D ego-localization is achieved by merging information from a stereo vision system and data obtained from vehicle sensors. Mobile objects are detected using a multi-layer lidar that is also used to identify a constrained search space within the multiple target tracking process. Object localization and tracking is then performed in the fixed frame, which facilitates analysis and understanding of the scene. Experimental results using real world data are performed to evaluate the performance of the multi-modal system, and these are presented to show the effectiveness of the approach. Index Terms—Multi-modal perception, visual odometry, object tracking, dynamic map, intelligent vehicles. I.

Sergio A. Rodríguez F; Vincent Frémont; Véronique Cherfaoui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Local quenches in frustrated quantum spin chains: Global versus subsystem equilibration  

SciTech Connect

We study the equilibration behavior following local quenches, using frustrated quantum spin chains as an example of interacting closed quantum systems. Specifically, we examine the statistics of the time series of the Loschmidt echo, the trace distance of the time-evolved local density matrix to its average state, and the local magnetization. Depending on the quench parameters, the equilibration statistics of these quantities show features of good or poor equilibration, indicated by Gaussian, exponential, or bistable distribution functions. These universal functions provide valuable tools to characterize the various time-evolution responses and give insight into the plethora of equilibration phenomena in complex quantum systems.

Diez, Mathias [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Chancellor, Nicholas; Haas, Stephan [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Venuti, Lorenzo Campos [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI), Viale S. Severo 65, I-10133 Torino (Italy); Zanardi, Paolo [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI), Viale S. Severo 65, I-10133 Torino (Italy)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sixteenth Quarterly Report Regulation of Coal Polymer Degradation by Fungi  

SciTech Connect

Three phenomena which concern coal solubilization and depolymerization were studied during this reporting period. Previous investigations have shown that lignin peroxidases mediate the oxidation of soluble coal macromolecule. Because it appears to be a substrate, soluble coal macromolecule is also an inhibitor of veratryl alcohol oxidation, a reaction that is mediated by these enzymes. The mechanism of inhibition is complex in that oxidation (as assayed by decolorization) of soluble coal macromolecule requires the presence of veratryl alcohol and veratryl alcohol oxidation occurs only after a substantial lag period during which the soluble coal macromolecule is oxidized. In a previous quarterly report we proposed a reaction mechanism by which this may occur. During the present reporting period we showed that our proposed reaction mechanism is consistent with classical enzyme kinetic theory describing enzyme activity in the presence of a potent inhibitor (i.e., an inhibitor with a very low KI ). The oxidative decolorization and depolymerization of soluble coal macromolecule was also studied. Because wood rotting fungi produce hydrogen peroxide via a variety of reactions, we studied the effect of hydrogen peroxide on soluble coal macromolecule decolorization and depolymerization. Results showed that substantial decolorization occurred only at hydrogen peroxide concentrations that are clearly non-physiological (i.e., 50 mM or greater). It was noted, however, that when grown on solid lignocellulosic substrates, wood rotting fungi, overtime, cumulatively could produce amounts of hydrogen peroxide that might cause significant oxidative degradation of soluble coal macromolecule. Thirdly, we have shown that during oxalate mediated solubilization of low rank coal, a pH increase is observed. During this reporting period we have shown that the pH of solutions containing only sodium oxalate also undergo an increase in pH, but to a lesser extent than that observed in mixtures containing sodium oxalate and low rank coal. It is our hypothesis that bicarbonate ion is formed during oxalate mediated solubilization of low rank coal and this is responsible for the increase in pH that is observed. A general reaction by which this occurs is proposed herein.

John A. Bumpus

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

CSNF WASTE FORM DEGRADATION: SUMMARY ABSTRACTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to describe the development and validation of models that can be used to calculate the release of radionuclides from commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) following a hypothetical breach of the waste package and fuel cladding in the repository. The purpose also includes describing the uncertainties associated with modeling the radionuclide release for the range of CSNF types, exposure conditions, and durations for which the radionuclide release models are to be applied. This document was developed in accordance with Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]). This document considers radionuclides to be released from CSNF when they are available for mobilization by gas-phase mass transport, or by dissolution or colloid formation in water that may contact the fuel. Because other reports address limitations on the dissolved and colloidal radionuclide concentrations (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944], Table 2-1), this report does not address processes that control the extent to which the radionuclides released from CSNF are mobilized and transported away from the fuel either in the gas phase or in the aqueous phase as dissolved and colloidal species. The scope is limited to consideration of degradation of the CSNF rods following an initial breach of the cladding. It considers features of CSNF that limit the availability of individual radionuclides for release into the gaseous or aqueous phases that may contact the fuel and the processes and events expected to degrade these CSNF features. In short, the purpose is to describe the characteristics of breached fuel rods and the degradation processes expected to influence radionuclide release.

J.C. CUNNANE

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hydrogen degradation of pipeline steels: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose of investigations conducted by Battelle Columbus Laboratories was to develop a research data base applicable to the problem of hydrogen degradation in pipeline steels. The findings would provide pipeline designers and operators with insight for developing specifications and procedures in the event available natural gas transmission/distribution systems are used for hydrogen transport. Fundamental investigations and data derived from sophisticated analytical and test procedures have been equated to practical field conditions and experiences as may be encountered should the hydrogen energy storage/transport option become an economic reality.

Holbrook, J.H.; Collings, E.W.; Cialone, H.J.; Drauglis, E.J.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources, and migration from condensation of atmospheric moisture. The general corrosion rate of steels under insulation is predictable (within a broad scatter band) on the basis of temperature and oxygen content. This relationship is presented graphically based on plant case histories. Rainwater, washwater and the insulation itself are compared as potential sources of chloride to promote external SCC of stainless steels. Preventative measures will be discussed.

McIntyre, D. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Studies of Intermittency-like Phenomena in Plasma turbulence at IPR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observation of intermittency in the turbulent scrape-off layer plasma of ADITYA tokamak was first reported about one and a half decade ago. In the last decade or so, several aspects of intermittency-like phenomena have been observed on tokamaks and other fusion devices throughout the world. A review of the research carried out at the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) is presented, which closely follow the research trend on intermittency-like phenomena in plasmas worldwide. We also present our analysis of particle flux data in order to test the recently proposed fluctuation theorem, which states that the probability of 'entropy consuming' flux events falls off exponentially with the averaging time. This theorem, proposed in the context of small systems, is applied to macroscopic system like tokamak edge plasma by invoking an 'effective temperature' of the bath of drift waves from which, plasma objects take energy and carry out work of transporting matter

Jha, R.; Das, A.; Bisai, N.; Kaw, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Near Indira Bridge, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

Progress in understanding of direct containment heating phenomena in pressurized light water reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is described in development of a mechanistic understanding of direct containment heating phemonena arising during high-pressure melt ejection accidents in pressurized water reactor systems. The experimental data base is discussed which forms the basis for current assessments of containment pressure response using current lumped-parameter containment analysis methods. The deficiencies in available methods and supporting data base required to describe major phenomena occurring in the reactor cavity, intermediate subcompartments and containment dome are highlighted. Code calculation results presented in the literature are cited which demonstrate that the progress in understanding of DCH phenomena has also resulted in current predictions of containment pressure loadings which are significantly lower than are predicted by idealized, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Current methods are, nonetheless, still predicting containment-threatening loadings for large participating melt masses under high-pressure ejection conditions. Recommendations for future research are discussed. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900şC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O' Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, July 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory May 2011 July 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2

212

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modeling of nonstationary phenomena in the MHD-channel-inverter-substation system  

SciTech Connect

A method for constructing a mathematical model of nonstationary phenomena in a system consisting of an MHD channel and an inverter substation, operating on a powerful ac grid, is examined. The variants of the realization of the model on a computer are discussed. Results of the solution of model problems with a diagonal MHD channel are presented. It is found that there is a significant coupling between the MHD channel and the inverter substation in transient processes.

Gusev, Y.P.; Zatelepin, V.N.; Kuznetsova, T.N.; Medin, S.A.; Pishchikov, V.I.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Plateout Phenomena in Direct-Cycle High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plateout of condensable radionuclides in the primary coolant circuits of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) -- particularly direct-cycle HTGRs -- has significant design, operations and maintenance (O&M), and safety implications. This report reviews and evaluates the available international information on plateout phenomena, specifically as it applies to the gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) and the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR).

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

215

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Palladium chloride to palladium metal two-dimensional nucleation and growth phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The reduction of a monolayer of surface-bound Pd(II) to Pd(0) on a palladium substrate reveals two-dimensional nucleation and growth phenomena. Using well-known 2D nucleation-growth theories, this reduction is shown to proceed by an instantaneous nucleation and growth mechanism. However, when a submonolayer of Pd(II) is present, this mechanism fails to account for the experimentally observed high cathodic currents seen at zero time. A model incorporating preexisting Pd(0) cylindrical sites on the partially oxidized Pd(0) surface has been successfully applied to account for the discrepancy between the experimental results and current 2D theories. Using this modified 2D model, values for the mathematical product of cylindrical growth rate and the square root of the nucleation site densities have been determined, and the overpotential dependence of the growth rate has been confirmed and quantified. These 2D nucleation-growth phenomena have practical consequences on the performance of the Pd(II)/Pd(0) system as a faradaic supercapacitor, and probably on the performance of other 2D faradaic supercapacitor systems. In addition, because many electrodes undergo monolayer surface oxidation-reduction reactions in other solvent systems, especially aqueous electrolytes, these 2D nucleation-growth phenomena may play a role in these important surface-modifying redox systems as well.

Long, H.C. de; Carlin, R.T. [Air Force Academy, CO (United States). Frank J. Seiler Research Lab.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Lithium Local Pseudopotential Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Local Pseudopotential Using DFT Sergio Orozco Student Advisor: Chen Huang Faculty Mentor Lithium LPS Test Lithium LPS #12;Density Functional Theory (DFT) Successful quantum mechanical approach (1979) #12;Building LPS for Lithium Create a LPS using NLPS density for Lithium Test LPS by comparing

Petta, Jason

218

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos S. L. Soares

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

219

PARTNERSHIP AMONG LOCAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) IN GENERAL- The term `qualified fuel cell property' means a fuel cell power plant which-- (i) has a nameplate 0.5 kilowatt of capacity of such property. (C) FUEL CELL POWER PLANT- The term `fuel cell powerA MODEL PARTNERSHIP AMONG LOCAL LEADERS SIMPLE, SMART REFORM TO PROMOTE JOB GROWTH The Fuel Cell

220

Chemical Plume Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the ... Keywords: Autonomous vehicles, Bayesian inference methods, chemical plume tracing, online mapping, online planning, plume source localization

Shuo Pang; J. A. Farrell

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mining Local Buffer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web mining employs the techniques of data mining to extract information from the Web for a variety of purposes. The usual sources of data are the log files of WWW or proxy servers. The paper examines the possibility of using the local browser buffer ... Keywords: Behavioural Targeting, Browser Cache, Cacheability, Data Mining, Heaps Law, Internet, Latency, Zipf Law

Andrzej Siemi?ski

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Elastic Relaxation and Correlation of Local Strain Gradients with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elastic Relaxation and Correlation Elastic Relaxation and Correlation of Local Strain Gradients with Ferroelectric Domains in (001) BiFeO3 Nanostructures Elastic Relaxation and Correlation of Local Strain Gradients with Ferroelectric Domains in (001) BiFeO3 Nanostructures Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory (MSD and CNM) have recently performed first worldwide studies of effects of nanopatterning on fundamental phenomena in mutiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) nanostructures, using the APS-CNM nanoprobe beam (50 nm diameter). Nano-focused x-ray diffraction microscopy provided new insights into the relationship between film strain and ferroelectric domains in nanostructures, namely: i) an out-of-plane strain enhancement of as much as -1.8% Δc/c in a BFO film-based nanostructure relative to a planar film; ii) out-of-plane BFO C-axis

223

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Biocarrier composition for and method of degrading pollutants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to biocarrier compositions that attract and bond pollutant-degrading antigens that will degrade the pollutants. Biocarriers are known generally as a variety of inert or semi-inert compounds or structures having the ability to sequester (attract), hold and biomagnify (enhance) specific microorganisms within their structure. Glass or polystyrene beads are the most well known biocarriers. The biocarrier, which is preferably in the form of glass microspheres, is coated with an antibody or group of antibodies that attract and react specifically with certain pollutant-degrading antigens. The antibody, once bonded to the biocarrier, is used by the composition to attract and bond those pollutant-degrading antigens. Each antibody is specific for an antigen that is specific for a given pollutant. The resulting composition is subsequently exposed to an environment contaminated with pollutants for degradation. In the preferred use, the degrading composition is formed and then injected directly into or near a plume or source of contamination.

Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Multiscale Approaches to Hydrogen-assisted Degradation of Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Srinivasan Rajagopalan, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company. Scope, Hydrogen-assisted degradation of metals is a serious and costly industrial ...

226

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Systems XII (2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 1, 2007 ... Print Book: Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems- Water Reactors IX (1999). Print Book: Fundamentals of ...

227

Removal and Degradation of Phorbol Esters during Pre-treatment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 10, 2008 ... degradation products in these fractions could not be ruled out. Keywords Phorbol esters Á Transesterification Á. Biodiesel Á Biofuel Á Jatropha.

228

Preparation and Degradation Orgnic of Tio2 Coated on Light ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel Current Activated Tip-based Sintering (CATS) of Advanced Materials · Preparation and Degradation Orgnic of Tio2 Coated on Light Ceramic Surface.

229

Modeling of Mechano-chemical Degradation of Polymer Membranes ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A transient, non-isothermal, two-dimensional (2D) model for the mechano-chemical degradation of a polymer membrane in a polymer electrolyte

230

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation-The Ohio State University Background When coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) is used in place of natural...

231

Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light. 3 figures.

Anderson, M.A.; Tunesi, S.; Xu, Q.

1991-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Outdoor PV Module Degradation of Current-Voltage Parameters: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) module degradation rate analysis quantifies the loss of PV power output over time and is useful for estimating the impact of degradation on the cost of energy. An understanding of the degradation of all current-voltage (I-V) parameters helps to determine the cause of the degradation and also gives useful information for the design of the system. This study reports on data collected from 12 distinct mono- and poly-crystalline modules deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Most modules investigated showed < 0.5%/year decrease in maximum power due to short-circuit current decline.

Smith, R. M.; Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... 133-140]Unique Primary Side Initiated Degradation in the Vicinity of the Upper Roll Transition in Once Through Steam Generators from Oconee ...

234

Electrical and capacitive methods for detecting degradation in wire insulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Motivated by a need within the aerospace industry to detect and characterize degradation in the insulation of onboard wires, this thesis reports testing of several… (more)

Sheldon, Robert Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Degradation of Monoethanolamine Used in Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

machinery 8 In order to compensate for this degradation, current facilities include distillation of the amine to remove byproducts while continuously adding fresh amine to the...

236

Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

237

Visiting Fermilab - Local Accommodations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local Accommodations Local Accommodations Aurora Fox Valley Inn 2450 North Farnsworth Avenue Aurora, Illinois (Approx. 4 miles from Fermilab Wilson Hall) Telephone: 630-851-2000 Baymont Inn & Suites 1585 Naperville-Wheaton Road Naperville, Illinois (Approx. 8 miles from Fermilab Wilson Hall) Telephone: 630-357-0022 Comfort Inn & Suites 1555 E. Fabyan Parkway Geneva, IL (Approx. 4 miles from Fermilab Wilson Hall) 630-208-8811 Courtyard by Marriott 1155 E. Diehl Road Naperville, Illinois (Approx. 8 miles from Fermilab Wilson Hall) Telephone: 630-505-0550 Extended Stay America (All rooms have kitchenettes) 1575 Bond Street (Route 59 & Diehl Road) Naperville, Illinois (Approx. 7 miles from Fermilab Wilson Hall) Telephone: 630-983-0000 Lisle Hilton 3303 Corporate West Drive Lisle, Illinois

238

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Locating illicit radiological sources using gamma ray or neutron detection is a key challenge for both homeland security and nuclear nonproliferation. Localization methods using an array of detectors or a sequence of observations in time and space must provide rapid results while accounting for a dynamic attenuating environment. In the presence of significant attenuation and scatter, more extensive numerical transport calculations in place of the standard analytical approximations may be required to achieve accurate results. Numerical adjoints based on deterministic transport codes provide relatively efficient detector response calculations needed to determine the most likely location of a true source. Probabilistic representations account for uncertainty in the source location resulting from uncertainties in detector responses, the approximations that are used, and the potential for nonunique solutions. A Bayesian approach improves on previous likelihood methods for source localization by allowing the incorporation of all available information to help constrain solutions.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Probabilistic Forecast Guidance for Severe Thunderstorms Based on the Identification of Extreme Phenomena in Convection-Allowing Model Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of convection-allowing NWP models (CAMs) comes the potential for new forms of forecast guidance. While CAMs lack the required resolution to simulate many severe phenomena associated with convection (e.g., large hail, downburst ...

Ryan A. Sobash; John S. Kain; David R. Bright; Andrew R. Dean; Michael C. Coniglio; Steven J. Weiss

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Transport Phenomena and Structuring in Shear Flow of Suspensions near Solid Walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we apply the lattice-Boltzmann method and an extension to particle suspensions as introduced by Ladd et al. to study transport phenomena and structuring effects of particles suspended in a fluid near sheared solid walls. We find that a particle free region arises near walls, which has a width depending on the shear rate and the particle concentration. The wall causes the formation of parallel particle layers at low concentrations, where the number of particles per layer decreases with increasing distance to the wall.

A. Komnik; J. Harting; H. J. Herrmann

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

Stress-related phenomena in transient radiation-induced absorption in optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

The optical properties of materials can be modified by exposure to radiation and research to investigate these radiation-induced phenomena has intensified over the last several decades. The advent of optical fiber technology and the many applications of optical fiber for information transmission have sharply increased the interest in these investigations. Optical fibers present a long optical transmission path and that path may traverse different adverse environments, including radiation areas. The long tranmission path provides increased potential for interactions between the optical information signal and the optical medium. 10 refs., 10 figs.

Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.; Kelly, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Accelerated Degradation Assessment of 18650 Lithium-Ion Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power fade of lithium cells due to accelerated factors of temperature and charging-discharging rate was assessed. A lithium-ion battery aging model for predicting the power fade of 18650-size cells was applied, and then statistically accelerated degradation ... Keywords: accelerated degradation test, lithium-ion battery aging, power fade, state of charge (SOC)

Kuan-Jung Chung; Chueh-Chien Hsiao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Study and modeling of methylorange degradation with the Fenton reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater from textile industries is not satisfactorily depolluted by conventional wastewater treatments because of their refractory composition. The use of Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) has shown to be very effective to degrade this type of wastewater. ... Keywords: Arrhenius law, Fenton reaction, degradation, methylorange, modeling, wastewater treatment

Orlando García-Rojas; Claudia Gómez-Quintero; Miguel Ríos-Bolívar; Abel Romero; Antonio Rodríguez

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Speaker verification under degraded condition: a perceptual study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the effect of degradation on human and automatic speaker verification (SV) tasks. The perceptual test is conducted by the subjects having knowledge about speaker verification. An automatic SV system is developed using the Mel-frequency ... Keywords: Degraded condition, Human vs automatic, Speaker information, Speaker verification

Gayadhar Pradhan; S. R. Prasanna

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Impact of desiccant degradation on desiccant cooling system performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of open-cycle desiccant cooling systems depends on several factors, some of which can change beyond manufacturers' specifications. For example, the desiccant sorption process may degrade with time on exposure to airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. Desiccant degradation can reduce the performance of a dehumidifier and thus the performance of desiccant cooling systems. Using computer simulations and recent experimental data on silica gel, the impact of degradation was evaluated. Hypothetical degradations of desiccants with Type 1 moderate isotherms were also simulated. Depending on the degree and type of desiccant degradation, the decrease in thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and cooling capacity of the system was 10% to 35%. The 35% loss in system performance occurs when desiccant degradation is considered worst case. The simulations showed that the COP, and to a lesser degree the cooling capacity of these degraded systems, could be improved by increasing the rotational speed of the dehumidifier. It is shown that easy engineering solutions might be available for some types of degradations. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Capacity degradation of field-tested silica gel samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) have begun preliminary studies to quantify the effect of contamination of silica gel used in dehumidification processes of desiccant cooling systems. Sorption capacity degradation of field tested samples was measured, and the source of degradation was quantified using surface analysis experimental methods.

Penney, T.R.; Pesaran, A.A.; Thomas, T.M.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Rate-based degradation modeling of lithium-ion cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accelerated degradation testing is commonly used as the basis to characterize battery cell performance over a range of stress conditions (e.g., temperatures). Performance is measured by some response that is assumed to be related to the state of health of the cell (e.g., discharge resistance). Often, the ultimate goal of such testing is to predict cell life at some reference stress condition, where cell life is defined to be the point in time where performance has degraded to some critical level. These predictions are based on a degradation model that expresses the expected performance level versus the time and conditions under which a cell has been aged. Usually, the degradation model relates the accumulated degradation to the time at a constant stress level. The purpose of this article is to present an alternative framework for constructing a degradation model that focuses on the degradation rate rather than the accumulated degradation. One benefit of this alternative approach is that prediction of cell life is greatly facilitated in situations where the temperature exposure is not isothermal. This alternative modeling framework is illustrated via a family of rate-based models and experimental data acquired during calendar-life testing of high-power lithium-ion cells.

E.V. Thomas; I. Bloom; J.P. Christophersen; V.S. Battaglia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Desiccant degradation in desiccant cooling systems: A system study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors predict the impact of desiccant degradation on the performance of an open-cycle desiccant cooling system in ventilation mode using the degradation data on silica gel obtained from a previous study. The degradation data were based on thermal cycling desiccant samples and exposing them to ambient or contaminated air. Depending on the degree of desiccant degradation, the decrease in the thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and the cooling capacity of the system for low-temperature regeneration was 10 percent to 35 percent. The 35 percent loss occurred based on the worst-case desiccant degradation scenario. Under more realistic conditions the loss in system performance is expected to be lower.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

Manohar Sohal

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The characterisation of two different degradable polyethylene (PE) sacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compostability of two different polyethylene (PE) products on the UK market under open-windrow composting conditions is explored within this paper. Chemical analysis of the PE bags has established their constituents in order to examine how the PE bags have an increased degradability depending on additives. Weight loss of the two different PE products within open-windrow composting conditions was recorded in order to establish the percentage weight loss as an indication of the degradability of the two products and their relative suitability for open-windrow composting. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the PE products over the composting duration established the degradation processes for the PE products within the compost. These analyses concluded that one of the PE product mixes was more degradable than the other. However, neither product completed degraded within the timeframe of 12-14 weeks generally accepted for open-windrow composting in the UK.

Davis, G. [Engineering Management Group, University of Bristol (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gudavis@cytanet.com.cy

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Degradation Analysis of Weathered Crystalline-Silicon PV Modules: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the results of a solar weathering program that found a linear relationship between maximum power degradation and the total UV exposure dose for four different types of commercial crystalline Si modules. The average degradation rate for the four modules types was 0.71% per year. The analysis showed that losses of short-circuit current were responsible for the maximum power degradation. Judging by the appearance of the undegraded control modules, it is very doubtful that the short-circuit current losses were caused by encapsulation browning or obscuration. When we compared the quantum efficiency of a single cell in a degraded module to one from an unexposed control module, it appears that most of the degradation has occurred in the 800 - 1100 nm wave-length region, and not the short wavelength region.

Osterwald, C. R.; Anderberg, A.; Rummel, S.; Ottoson, L.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Group Migration of Dictyostelium Cells Is Regulated by Extracellular Chemoattractant Degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starvation of Dictyostelium induces a developmental program in which cells form an aggregate that eventually differentiates into a multicellular structure. The aggregate formation is mediated by directional migration of individual cells that quickly transition to group migration in which cells align in a head-to-tail manner to form streams. Cyclic AMP acts as a chemoattractant and its production, secretion, and degradation are highly regulated. A key protein is the extracellular phosphodiesterase PdsA. In this study we examine the role and localization of PdsA during chemotaxis and streaming. We find that pdsA ? cells respond chemotactically to a narrower range of chemoattractant concentrations compared with wild-type (WT) cells. Moreover, unlike WT cells, pdsA ? cells do not form streams at low cell densities and form unusual thick and transient streams at high cell densities. We find that the intracellular pool of PdsA is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, which may provide a compartment for storage and secretion of PdsA. Because we find that cAMP synthesis is normal in cells lacking PdsA, we conclude that signal degradation regulates the external cAMP gradient field generation and that the group migration behavior of these cells is compromised even though their signaling machinery is intact. This article was published online ahead of print in MBC in Press

Gene L. Garcia; Erin C. Rericha; Christopher D. Heger; Paul K. Goldsmith; Carole A. Parent; Jean E. Schwarzbauer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Heavy-metal toxicity phenomena in laboratory-scale ANFLOW bioreactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An energy-conserving wastewater treatment system was developed based on an anaerobic, upflow (ANFLOW) bioreactor. Since many applications of the ANFLOW process could involve the treatment of wastewaters containing heavy metals, the potentially toxic effects of these metals on the biological processes occurring in ANFLOW columns (primarily acetogenesis and methanogenesis) were investigated. Both step and pulse inputs of zinc ranging from 100 to 1000 mg/L were added to synthetic wastewaters being treated in ANFLOW columns with 0.057-m/sup 3/ volumes. Column responses were used to develop descriptive models for toxicity phenomena in such systems. It was found that an inhibition function could be defined and used to modify a model based on plugflow with axial dispersion and first-order kinetics for soluble substrate removal. The inhibitory effects of zinc on soluble substrate removal were found to be predominantly associated with its sorption by biosolids. Sorption initially occurred in the lower regions of the column, but was gradually observed in higher regions as the sorption capacity of the lower regions was exhausted. Sorption phenomena could be described with the Freundlich equation. Sorption processes were accompanied by shifts of biological processes to regions higher in the columns. A regenerative process was observed when feeding of wastewaters without zinc was resumed. It was postulated that regeneration could be based on sloughing of layers of biofilms, or other biosolids involved in zinc sorption, followed by continued growth of lower layers of biofilms not involved in heavy-metal sorption.

Rivera, A.L.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Two-stage-type electrostatic precipitator re-entrainment phenomena under diesel flue gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the applications of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is the cleaning of air to increase the visibility index in highway tunnels. Particles floating in air in highway tunnels are mainly carbon. Collection efficiency of a large particle diameter in an ESP often decreases when the ESP collects carbon particles which have low electric resistance. Collection efficiency often becomes negative in an experimental ESP. The negative collection efficiency means that the particle concentration flowing downstream is greater than that upstream in the ESP. The negative collection efficiency means that the particle concentration flowing downstream is greater than that upstream in the ESP. This phenomenon is explained as the re-entrainment of particles. In this paper, experiments were carried out to investigate the cause of the decrease in efficiency of particle collection of the ESP. The time characteristic of the collection efficiency and the distribution of particle size on the collection electrodes were studied. Experimental results showed that the decrease in the collection efficiency and the distribution of particle size on the collection electrodes were studied. Experimental results showed that the decrease in the collection efficiency was caused by re-entrainment of particles during the ESP operation. The effect of gas-flow velocity on the collection efficiency of the ESP was also investigated to study the cause of re-entrainment phenomena. The result showed that the re-entrainment phenomena depended on the gas-flow velocity.

Zukeran, Akinori; Ehara, Yoshiyasu; Ito, Tairo; Matsuyama, M. [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, Yasushi; Kawakami, Hitomi; Takahashi, Takeo; Takamatsu, Takeshi [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Single channel flow blockage accident phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) for the advanced Candu reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACRTM) is an evolutionary advancement of the current Candu 6{sup R} reactor, aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and at a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current reactor designs. The ACR retains the modular concept of horizontal fuel channels surrounded by a heavy water moderator, as with all Candu reactors. However, ACR uses slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel, compared to the natural uranium used in Candu 6. This achieves the twin goals of improved economics (e.g., via reductions in the heavy water requirements and the use of a light water coolant), as well as improved safety. This paper documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) results for a very limited frequency, beyond design basis event of the ACR design. This PIRT is developed in a highly structured process of expert elicitation that is well supported by experimental data and analytical results. The single-channel flow blockage event in an ACR reactor assumes a severe flow blockage of one of the reactor fuel channels, which leads to a reduction of the flow in the affected channel, leading to fuel cladding and fuel temperature increase. The paper outlines the design characteristics of the ACR reactor that impact the PIRT process and computer code applicability. It also describes the flow blockage phenomena, lists all components and systems that have an important role during the event, discusses the PIRT process and results, and presents the finalized PIRT tables. (authors)

Popov, N.K.; Abdul-Razzak, A.; Snell, V.G.; Langman, V. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada); Sills, H. [Consultant, Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Evaluation of natural phenomena hazards as part of safety assessments for nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continued operation of existing US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and laboratories requires a safety reassessment based on current criteria and guidelines. This also includes evaluations for the effects of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH), for which these facilities may not have been designed. The NPH evaluations follow the requirements of DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation (1993) which establishes NPH Performance Categories (PCs) for DOE facilities and associated target probabilistic performance goals. These goals are expressed as the mean annual probability of exceedance of acceptable behavior for structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to NPH effects. The assignment of an NPH Performance Category is based on the overall hazard categorization (low, moderate, high) of a facility and on the function of an SSC under evaluation (DOE-STD-1021, 1992). Detailed guidance for the NPH analysis and evaluation criteria are also provided (DOE-STD-1020, 1994). These analyses can be very resource intensive, and may not be necessary for the evaluation of all SSCs in existing facilities, in particular for low hazard category facilities. An approach relying heavily on screening inspections, engineering judgment and use of NPH experience data (S. J. Eder et al., 1993), can minimize the analytical effort, give reasonable estimates of the NPH susceptibilities, and yield adequate information for an overall safety evaluation of the facility. In the following sections this approach is described in more detail and is illustrated by an application to a nuclear laboratory complex.

Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Shin, Y.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs  

SciTech Connect

The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

260

Silicon detectors for the next generation of high energy physics experiments: expected degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There exists an enormous interest for the study of very high energy domain in particle physics, both theoretically and experimentally, in the aim to construct a general theory of the fundamental constituents of matter and of their interactions. Until now, semiconductor detectors have widely been used in modern high energy physics experiments. They are elements of the high resolution vertex and tracking system, as well as of calorimeters. The main motivation of this work is to discuss how to prepare some possible detectors - only silicon option being considered, for the new era of HEP challenges because the bulk displacement damage in the detector, consequence of irradiation, produces effects at the device level that limit their long time utilisation, increasing the leakage current and the depletion voltage, eventually up to breakdown, and thus affecting the lifetime of detector systems. In this paper, physical phenomena that conduce to the degradation of the detector are discussed and effects are analysed at the device level (leakage current and effective carrier concentration) in the radiation environments expected in the next generation of hadron colliders after LHC, at the next lepton and gamma-gamma colliders, as well as in astroparticle experiments, in conditions of long time continuum irradiations, for different technological options. The predicted results permit a better decision to obtain devices with harder parameters to radiation.

I. Lazanu; S. Lazanu

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

State and Local Baldrige Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State, local, and regional Baldrige-based award programs use the ... organizational excellence and competitiveness in their states and regions. ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Local Option - Local Improvement Districts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Local Improvement Districts Local Option - Local Improvement Districts Local Option - Local Improvement Districts < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Program Info State Oregon Program Type PACE Financing Provider Oregon Department of Energy '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period

263

Robust Algorithms for Object Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model-based localization, the task of estimating an object‘s pose from sensed and corresponding model features, is a fundamental task in machine vision. Exact constant time localization algorithms have been developed for the case where the sensed ... Keywords: object localization, object registration, resultants

Aaron Wallack; Dinesh Manocha

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Investigation of the Photocatalytic Degradation of Ethanol and Acetone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-situ transmission Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the photocatalytic oxidation of acetone, ethanol and the interaction between acetone and ethanol. Compared with the degradation of acetone alone, it cannot be described by Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation in presence of ethanol. The presence of ethanol reduces the initial degradation rate of acetone and the inhibition increases with increasing of ethanol in the system. Acetone also inhibits the degradation of ethanol but it still can be described by the L-H equation. Acetaldehyde in the system comes from the degradation of ethanol, the behavior of production and consumption of which is affected by the amount of ethanol and acetone in the mixture. Temperature significantly affects the degradation of organic compounds in the mixture. Increasing the temperature accelerates the degradation of ethanol and acetone as well as the degradation of acetaldehyde, an intermediate produced in the system. The flux of the reaction system has little effect on the photocatalytic process of organic matter.

Liu, Y.; Ding, B.; Dong, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Aharonov-Bohm effect, local field interaction, and Lorentz invariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect [1,2], known as a milestone in our understanding of electromagnetic interactions, describes a quantum interference of a charged particle moving under the influence of a potential. In sharp contrast with classical theory of electrodynamics, AB effect qualifies potential as a physical reality, rather than as a mere mathematical tool, because the interference is affected by a potential even when a charged particle moves in a field-free region. Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect [3], dual to the AB phenomenon, shows a phase shift of a fluxon moving around a charge (in two-dimensional case). It has been shown that AC effect is also free of force [4,5], but standard view draws a clear distinction between the two phenomena in that the fluxon moves under a nonvanishing field generated by the charge in the case of AC effect [6]. Despite the fact that the observable phenomena depend only on the relative motion of a charge and a fluxon, a unified picture, fully consistent with the principle of relativity, is lacking. Here, we provide a unified theory which resolves the question of relativity, based on a Lorentz-invariant field-interaction between a charge and a localized flux. The AB effect can be understood in this fully relativistic viewpoint. The AB phase shift is derived from the Lorentz-covariant interaction Lagrangian, and the force-free nature of the effect is also confirmed.

Kicheon Kang

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Entanglement quantification by local unitaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invariance under local unitary operations is a fundamental property that must be obeyed by every proper measure of quantum entanglement. However, this is not the only aspect of entanglement theory where local unitaries play a relevant role. In the present work we show that the application of suitable local unitary operations defines a family of bipartite entanglement monotones, collectively referred to as "shield entanglement". They are constructed by first considering the (squared) Hilbert- Schmidt distance of the state from the set of states obtained by applying to it a given local unitary. To the action of each different local unitary there corresponds a different distance. We then minimize these distances over the sets of local unitaries with different spectra, obtaining an entire family of different entanglement monotones. We show that these shield entanglement monotones are organized in a hierarchical structure, and we establish the conditions that need to be imposed on the spectrum of a local unitary f...

Monras, A; Giampaolo, S M; Gualdi, G; Davies, G B; Illuminati, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Attacks on Local Searching Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Google Desktop Search is an indexing tool, currently in beta testing, designed to allow users fast, intuitive, searching for local files. The principle interface is provided through a local web server which supports an interface similar to Google.com's normal web page. Indexing of local files occurs when the system is idle, and understands a number of common file types. A optional feature is that Google Desktop can integrate a short summary of a local search results with Google.com web searches. This summary includes 30-40 character snippets of local files. We have uncovered a vulnerability that would release private local data to an unauthorized remote entity. Using two different attacks, we expose the small snippets of private local data to a remote third party.

Nielson, Seth James; Wallach, Dan S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Adequacy of DOE Natural Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective Jeff Kimball Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Staff Department of Energy NPH Conference October 26, 2011 The views expressed are solely those of the author and no official support or endorsement of this presentation by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board or the federal government is intended or should be inferred. 1 OBJECTIVE: Assess whether the DOE NPH performance goal concept as used in the Documented Safety Analysis process is adequate or needs additional guidance Background * ANS Standard 2.26 and the concept of Seismic Design Categories (SDC) and Limit States (LS) * ASCE Standard 43-05 and the concept of Design Categories

270

Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-2002 0-2002 January 2002 Superseding DOE-STD-1020-94 April 1994 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS DESIGN AND EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1020-2002 iii Foreword This revision provides information to help meet the requirements of 10 CFR Part 830, "Nuclear

271

DOE-STD-1023-95; Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-95 3-95 March 1995 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS ASSESSMENT CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4376, Fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. DOE-STD-1023-95 i ERRATA FOR DOE-STD-1023-95 S FOREWORD RE-WRITTEN S ADDED REFERENCE TO 10 CFR PART 830, SSHAC (1997) AND UCRL-ID-140922

272

The on-orbit measurements of single event phenomena by ETS-V spacecraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the on-orbit data of single event phenomena which were obtained for the CMOS static RAMs equipped in Engineering Test Satellite-V (ETS-V) in a geostationary orbit. The single event latchup and single event upset data were acquired for a period of about 3 years, and the effects of solar flares were observed. A comparison with the data (single event upset) of TTL SRAMs by Marine Observation Satellite-1 (MOS-1: a medium-altitude satellite) was also conducted. The Poisson distribution and the extreme-value theory (doubly exponential distribution) were adopted to analyze the data. From this analysis a decrease of the number of single events could be found during the solar maximum.

Goka, T. (High-Reliability Components Corp., 2-5-8 Daimon, Minato-ku, Tokyo (JP)); Kuboyama, S.; Shimano, Y.; Kawanishi, T. (National Space Development Agency, Tokyo (Japan))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Evaluation of concrete masonry unit walls for lateral natural phenomena hazards loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Older single-story facilities (Pre-1985 vintage) are commonly constructed of structural steel framing with concrete masonry unit (CMU) walls connected to columns and roof girders of the steel framing system. The CMU walls are designed for lateral wind and seismic loads (perpendicular to the wall) and transmit shear loads from the roof diaphragm to the foundation footings. The lateral loads normally govern their design. The structural framing system and the roof diaphragm system are straight forward when analyzing or upgrading the structure for NPH loads. Because of a buildings design vintage, probable use of empirical methodology, and poor design basis documentation (and record retention); it is difficult to qualify or upgrade CMU walls for lateral Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) loads in accordance with References 1, 2 and 3. This paper discusses three analytical approaches and/or techniques (empirical, working stress and yield line) to determine the collapse capacity of a laterally loaded CMU wall, and compares their results

Faires, W.E. Jr.

1996-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Natural phenomena hazards performance categorization guidelines for structures, systems, and components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) requires in DOE 5480.23 the use of a ``graded approach`` in performing safety analysis and evaluation of DOE facilities for normal operating and accident conditions, including accidents caused by natural phenomena hazard (NPH) events. DOE 5480.28 uses this graded approach and requires, for the purpose of NPH design and evaluation, placing the structures, systems, and components (SSCs) comprising the DOE facilities into five performance categories. This standard is a revision to DOE-STD-1021-92, December 1992, and provides guidelines to be used for such categorization of SSCs, and recommends systematic procedures to implement these guidelines. It applies to all DOE facilities that are covered by DOE 5480.28. (JDB)

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Natural phenomena hazards performance categorization guidelines for structures, systems, and components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) requires in DOE 5480.23 the use of a graded approach'' in performing safety analysis and evaluation of DOE facilities for normal operating and accident conditions, including accidents caused by natural phenomena hazard (NPH) events. DOE 5480.28 uses this graded approach and requires, for the purpose of NPH design and evaluation, placing the structures, systems, and components (SSCs) comprising the DOE facilities into five performance categories. This standard is a revision to DOE-STD-1021-92, December 1992, and provides guidelines to be used for such categorization of SSCs, and recommends systematic procedures to implement these guidelines. It applies to all DOE facilities that are covered by DOE 5480.28. (JDB)

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geothermal Casimir phenomena for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the nontrivial interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. At low temperature, the thermal contribution to the Casimir force is dominated by this interplay, implying that standard approximation techniques such as the PFA are inapplicable even in the limit of small surface separation. Thermal fluctuations on scales of the thermal wavelength lead to a delocalization of the thermal force density at low temperatures. As a consequence, the temperature dependence strongly differs from naive expectations. Most prominently, thermal forces can develop non-monotonic behavior below a critical temperature. We perform a comprehensive study of such geothermal phenomena in these Casimir geometries, using analytical and numerical worldline techniques for Dirichlet scalar fluctuations.

Alexej Weber; Holger Gies

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

Geothermal Casimir phenomena for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the nontrivial interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. At low temperature, the thermal contribution to the Casimir force is dominated by this interplay, implying that standard approximation techniques such as the PFA are inapplicable even in the limit of small surface separation. Thermal fluctuations on scales of the thermal wavelength lead to a delocalization of the thermal force density at low temperatures. As a consequence, the temperature dependence strongly differs from naive expectations. Most prominently, thermal forces can develop non-monotonic behavior below a critical temperature. We perform a comprehensive study of such geothermal phenomena in these Casimir geometries, using analytical and numerical worldline techniques for Dirichlet scalar fluctuations.

Weber, Alexej

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Binaries, cluster dynamics and population studies of stars and stellar phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of binaries on population studies of stars and stellar phenomena have been investigated over the past 3 decades by many research groups. Here we will focus mainly on the work that has been done recently in Brussels and we will consider the following topics: the effect of binaries on overall galactic chemical evolutionary models and on the rates of different types of supernova, the population of point-like X-ray sources where we distinguish the standard high mass X-ray binaries and the ULXs, a UFO-scenario for the formation of WR+OB binaries in dense star systems. Finally we critically discuss the possible effect of rotation on population studies.

Vanbeveren, D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Binaries, cluster dynamics and population studies of stars and stellar phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of binaries on population studies of stars and stellar phenomena have been investigated over the past 3 decades by many research groups. Here we will focus mainly on the work that has been done recently in Brussels and we will consider the following topics: the effect of binaries on overall galactic chemical evolutionary models and on the rates of different types of supernova, the population of point-like X-ray sources where we distinguish the standard high mass X-ray binaries and the ULXs, a UFO-scenario for the formation of WR+OB binaries in dense star systems. Finally we critically discuss the possible effect of rotation on population studies.

D. Vanbeveren

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

280

SNFP detonation phenomena of hydrogen/oxygen in spent fuel containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Movement of spent nuclear fuels from the Hanford K Basins near the Columbia River to dry interim storage facility on the Hanford plateau will require repackaging the fuel in the basin into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), drying of the fuel, transporting the contained fuel, hot conditioning, and finally interim storage. Each of these functions will be accomplished while the fuel is contained in the MCOs. Hydrogen and oxygen can be generated within the MCOs by several mechanisms. The principal source of hydrogen and oxygen within the MCOs is residual water from the vacuum drying and hot conditioning operations. This document assesses the detonation phenomena of hydrogen and oxygen in the spent fuel containers. Several process scenarios have been identified that could generate detonation pressures that exceed the nominal 10 atmosphere design limit of the MCOs. Only 42 grams of radiolized water are required to establish this condition.

Cooper, T.D.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Spent nuclear fuel project detonation phenomena of hydrogen/oxygen in spent fuel containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Movement of Spent N Reactor fuels from the Hanford K Basins near the Columbia River to Dry interim storage facility on the Hanford plateau will require repackaging the fuel in the basins into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), drying of the fuel, transporting the contained fuel, hot conditioning, and finally interim storage. Each of these functions will be accomplished while the fuel is contained in the MCOs by several mechanisms. The principal source of hydrogenand oxygen within the MCOs is residual water from the vacuum drying and hot conditioning operations. This document assesses the detonation phenomena of hydrogen and oxygen in the spent fuel containers. Several process scenarios have been identified that could generate detonation pressures that exceed the nominal 10 atmosphere design limit ofthe MCOS. Only 42 grams of radiolized water are required to establish this condition.

Cooper, T.D.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-93 1-93 July 1993 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS PERFORMANCE CATEGORIZATION GUIDELINES FOR STRUCTURES, SYSTEMS, AND COMPONENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1021-93 ERRATA FOR DOE-STD-1021-93 ADDED REFERENCE TO 10 CFR PART 830

283

Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular activated carbon canisters to remove VOCs (Figure x). Following solar treatment, ground water containing approximately 46 mg/L of nitrate and 13 {micro}g/L of perchlorate is gravity-fed continuously into two parallel series of two-1,900 liter tank bioreactors. Each bioreactor contains coarse, aquarium-grade gravel and locally-obtained plant species such as cattails (Typha spp.), sedges (Cyperus spp.), and indigenous denitrifying microorganisms. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Sodium acetate is added to the first bioreactor in each of the two series to promote growth and metabolic activity of rhizome microorganisms. The split flow from each series is combined, and flows through two back-up ion exchange columns to assure complete perchlorate removal. Effluent from the ground water treatment system is monitored and discharged an infiltration trench in accordance with the Substantive Requirements for Waste Discharge issued by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board.

Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

285

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman July 30, 2010 - 10:51am Addthis Joshua DeLung Matthew Coapman sat behind a computer for six years after college, selling advertising space across the country for major brands. When his company starting shutting down, he wasn't defeated - he saw an opportunity to reinvent himself and help his community as well. Changing Charlotte "I realized the biggest need in our community was energy conservation in the places we live and work," says Coapman, now two years into starting his business - Energy Tight. "I knew it would take getting dirty to do it, but having an experience with customers where we can give them a combination of comfort and value in their homes makes it worth it."

286

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman July 30, 2010 - 10:51am Addthis Joshua DeLung Matthew Coapman sat behind a computer for six years after college, selling advertising space across the country for major brands. When his company starting shutting down, he wasn't defeated - he saw an opportunity to reinvent himself and help his community as well. Changing Charlotte "I realized the biggest need in our community was energy conservation in the places we live and work," says Coapman, now two years into starting his business - Energy Tight. "I knew it would take getting dirty to do it, but having an experience with customers where we can give them a combination of comfort and value in their homes makes it worth it."

287

Some Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Study (The Yucca Mountain Project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safe disposal of radioactive waste requires that the waste be isolated from the environment until radioactive decay has reduced its toxicity to innocuous levels for plants, animals, and humans. All of the countries currently studying the options for disposing of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) have selected deep geologic formations to be the primary barrier for accomplishing this isolation. In U.S.A., the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) designated Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site to be characterized for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal. Long-term containment of waste and subsequent slow release of radionuclides into the geosphere will rely on a system of natural and engineered barriers including a robust waste containment design. The waste package design consists of a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 cylindrical barrier surrounding a Type 316 stainless steel inner structural vessel. The waste package is covered by a mailbox-shaped drip shield composed primarily of Ti Grade 7 with Ti Grade 24 structural support members. The U.S. Yucca Mountain Project has been studying and modeling the degradation issues of the relevant materials for some 20 years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes based on the past 20 years studies on Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) materials degradation issues with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the 10,000 years regulatory period. This paper provides an overview of the current understanding of the likely degradation behavior of the waste package and drip shield in the repository after the permanent closure of the facility. The degradation scenario discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, calcium ions, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are further considered. It is concluded that, as far as materials degradation is concerned, the materials and design adopted in the U.S. Yucca Mountain Project will provide sufficient safety margins within the 10,000-years regulatory period.

F. Hua; P. Pasupathi; N. Brown; K. Mon

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

288

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the

289

Microbial Induced Degradation of Cement-Solidified Waste Forms ...  

test is due mainly to the initial high acidity (pH<2.0) in the pre-test microbial broth, and not due to microbial induced degradation. zThe ...

290

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the

291

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Aging and Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Components serving in a nuclear reactor plant must withstand a very harsh environment including extended time at temperature, neutron irradiation, stress, and/or corrosive media. The many modes of degradation are complex and vary depending on location and material. However, understanding and managing materials degradation is a key for the continued safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. Extending reactor service to beyond 60 years will increase the demands on materials and components. Therefore, an early evaluation of the possible effects of extended lifetime is critical. The recent NUREG/CR-6923 gives a

292

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE DEGRADATION OF PROPYLENE CARBONATE BY CHLORINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF PROPYLENE CARBONATE BY CHLORINE Suen-Man G. Yu, Philip N.of Propylene Carbonate by Chlorine Suen-Man G. Yu, Philip N.94720 November 1979 ABSTRACT Chlorine was found to degrade a

Yu, Suen-Man G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A framework for estimating NBTI degradation of microarchitectural components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradation of device parameters over the lifetime of a system is emerging as a significant threat to system reliability. Among the aging mechanisms, wearout resulting from NBTI is of particular concern in deep submicron technology generations. To facilitate ...

Michael DeBole; K. Ramakrishnan; Varsha Balakrishnan; Wenping Wang; Hong Luo; Yu Wang; Yuan Xie; Yu Cao; N. Vijaykrishnan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

On the Security and Degradability of Gaussian Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the notion of canonical attacks, which are the cryptographic analog of the canonical forms of a one-mode Gaussian channel. Using this notion, we explore the connections between the degradability properties of ...

Pirandola, Stefano

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Microstructural Degradation of CMSX-4: Kinetics and Effect on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

secondary creep, which corresponds to 1800 h for these degradation conditions. Number of cycles to failure N. 1e+2. 1e+3. 1e+4. 1e+5. S train a m plitude ??/2.

296

JGI - Lean and Mean Biomass-Degrading Fungus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production WALNUT CREEK, CA-The bane of military quartermasters may soon be a boon to biofuels producers. The genome analysis of a champion biomass-degrading fungus has revealed a...

297

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Rot's Unique Wood Degrading Machinery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 5, 2009 Rot's Unique Wood Degrading Machinery to be Harnessed for Better Biofuels Production WALNUT CREEK, CA-An international team led by scientists from the U.S....

298

Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(3-D) Tom Shih (2-D) Iowa State University IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Aerospace Engineering Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance - 2-D3-D CFD...

299

An Insect Herbivore Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity Garretbioprocessing of cellulosic biomass. Bioresour Technol 100:of bacteria with high plant biomass-degrading capacity.

Suen, Garret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Parameters that Influence the Aging and Degradation of Overhead Conductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been investigating degradation mechanisms, inspection methods, and condition assessment methods for overhead line conductors for a few years. This report identifies conductor failure modes and discusses the associated degradation mechanisms. It further discusses methods of inspection and assessment that may be used to establish the current condition of conductors. Finally, it discusses how this data can be used to develop end-of-life criteria and estimate remaining useful life for conductors.

2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Technology and Climate Trends in PV Module Degradation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) technology it is vital to know how power output decreases with time. Unfortunately, it can take years to accurately measure the long-term degradation of new products, but past experience on older products can provide a basis for prediction of degradation rates of new products. An extensive search resulted in more than 2000 reported degradation rates with more than 1100 reported rates that include some or all IV parameters. In this presentation we discuss how the details of the degradation data give clues about the degradation mechanisms and how they depend on technology and climate zones as well as how they affect current and voltage differently. The largest contributor to maximum power decline for crystalline Si technologies is short circuit current (or maximum current) degradation and to a lesser degree loss in fill factor. Thin-film technologies are characterized by a much higher contribution from fill factor particularly for humid climates. Crystalline Si technologies in hot & humid climates also display a higher probability to show a mixture of losses (not just short circuit current losses) compared to other climates. The distribution for the module I-V parameters (electrical mismatch) was found to change with field exposure. The distributions not only widened but also developed a tail at the lower end, skewing the distribution.

Jordan, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Technology and Climate Trends in PV Module Degradation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) technology it is vital to know how power output decreases with time. Unfortunately, it can take years to accurately measure the long-term degradation of new products, but past experience on older products can provide a basis for prediction of degradation rates of new products. An extensive search resulted in more than 2000 reported degradation rates with more than 1100 reported rates that include some or all IV parameters. In this paper we discuss how the details of the degradation data give clues about the degradation mechanisms and how they depend on technology and climate zones as well as how they affect current and voltage differently. The largest contributor to maximum power decline for crystalline Si technologies is short circuit current (or maximum current) degradation and to a lesser degree loss in fill factor. Thin-film technologies are characterized by a much higher contribution from fill factor particularly for humid climates. Crystalline Si technologies in hot & humid climates also display a higher probability to show a mixture of losses (not just short circuit current losses) compared to other climates. The distribution for the module I-V parameters (electrical mismatch) was found to change with field exposure. The distributions not only widened but also developed a tail at the lower end, skewing the distribution.

Jordan, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Local phase transformation in alloys during charged-particle irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the various mechanisms and processes by which energetic irradiation can alter the phase stability of alloys, radiation-induced segregation is one of the most important phenomena. Radiation-induced segregation in alloys occurs as a consequence of preferential coupling between persistent fluxes of excess defects and solute atoms, leading to local enrichment or depletion of alloying elements. Thus, this phenomenon tends to drive alloy systems away from thermodynamic equilibrium, on a local scale. During charged-particle irradiations, the spatial nonuniformity in the defect production gives rise to a combination of persistent defect fluxes, near the irradiated surface and in the peak-damage region. This defect-flux combination can modify the alloy composition in a complex fashion, i.e., it can destabilize pre-existing phases, causing spatially- and temporally-dependent precipitation of new metastable phases. The effects of radiation-induced segregation on local phase transformations in Ni-based alloys during proton bombardment and high-voltage electron-microscope irradiation at elevated temperatures are discussed.

Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Sample State and Local Ballots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sample State and Local Ballots. ... We thank the election officials who have contributed to this effort. State, County/Municipality, Ballot, Election, Date, ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

305

Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential and Commercial Consumers by Local Distribution and Marketers in Selected States (Dollars per ...

306

Computational model of local intravascular drug delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drug-eluting stents (DES) virtually eradicate the clinical phenomena of vessel restenosis; yet, they also increase the short and long term risks for stent thrombosis. To improve their safety and efficacy, it is critical ...

Balakrishnan, Brinda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells Title Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hwang, Gi Suk, Hyoungchul Kim, Roger Lujan, Rangachary Mukundan, Dusan Spernjak, Rodney L. Borup, Massoud Kaviany, Moo Hwan Kim, and Adam Z. Weber Journal Electrochimica Acta Volume 95 Pagination 29 - 37 Date Published 4/2013 ISSN 00134686 Keywords degradation, Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), Freeze/thaw cycle, Membrane electrode assembly (MEA), Nanostructured thin film (NSTF), Pt/C dispersion Abstract Understanding and optimizing water and thermal management in the catalyst layer of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells is crucial for performance and durability improvements. This is especially the case at low temperatures, where liquid water and even ice may exist. In this article, the durability of a traditional Pt/C dispersed and a nanostructure thin film (NSTF) membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) are examined under wet/dry and freeze/thaw cycles using both in situ and ex situ experiments. Multiple isothermal cold starts result in a performance degradation for the dispersed MEA, while no such a degradation is found in the NSTF. The results are consistent with stand-alone MEA tests, wherein the dispersed catalyst layer results in an exponential increase in the number and size of cracks until it delaminates from the membrane due to the impact of the freeze/thaw process within the catalyst-layer pores. The NSTF catalyst layer shows minimal crack generation without delamination since the ice forms on top of the layer. The results are useful for understanding degradation due to phase-change containing cycles.

308

FM-based indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major challenge for accurate fingerprint-based indoor localization is the design of robust and discriminative wireless signatures. Even though WiFi RSSI signatures are widely available indoors, they vary significantly over time and are susceptible ... Keywords: fingerprinting, fm, localization, mobile systems, wireless

Yin Chen; Dimitrios Lymberopoulos; Jie Liu; Bodhi Priyantha

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ionomer Degradation in Electrodes of PEM Fuel Cell  

SciTech Connect

Although PEMFC Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) durability related studies have increased dramatically since 2004, studies on ionomer degradation of the composite electrodes has received far less attention than that of the proton exchange membranes, electrocatalysts, and catalyst supports. The catalyst layer ionomer unavoidably gets involved in other components degradation processes since it is subjected to exposure to different operating effects, including the presence of the catalyst, catalyst support, and the porous nature of the electrode layer which includes 2-phase flow. PEMFC durability issues cannot be fully resolved without understanding the contribution of ionomer degradation in electrode to the performance decay in life time. However, addressing the impact of changes to the catalyst layer ionomer during durability tests is experimentally difficult mainly because of the need to separate the ionomer in the electrode from other components during chemical, electrical and materials characterization. The catalyst layer ionomer is essentially chemically identical to the membrane ionomeric material, and is composed of low atomic number elements, making characterization difficult. In the present work, MEAs with different Nafion ionomer types: stabilized and non-stablized ionomer in the electrode layer (Type I) and mixed membrane/ionomer MEAs (Type II) were designed to separate ionomer degradation from membrane degradation, as shown in Figure (1a) and (b) respectively. Stabilized and non stabilized ionomers were 5% Nafion{reg_sign} solutions (Ion Power, New Castle, Delaware). The non-stabilized version is the typical Nafion chemical structure with carboxylic acid (-COOH) end groups; these end groups are thought to be a susceptible point of degradative peroxide attack. The stabilized version replaces the -COOH end groups with -CF{sub 3} end groups to prevent peroxide attack at the end groups. Type I MEAs were designed to compare ionomer degradation and its effect on performance decay. Since F{sup -} ions are released only from PFSA based membranes, and not from non-PFSA based membranes, Type II MEAs use a hydrocarbon membrane with no fluorine with a PFSA (Nafion{reg_sign}) ionomer in the catalyst layer for FER measurements. Any F{sup -} ions measured will then have come only for the catalyst layer ionomer during degradation experiments. Type II MEAs allow more detailed chemical characterization exclusively of the catalyst layer ionomer to better understand its degradation.

Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Preprint submitted to Elsevier Science 1 May 2006 Simulating the Charge Dispersion Phenomena in Micro Pattern Gas Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preprint submitted to Elsevier Science 1 May 2006 Simulating the Charge Dispersion Phenomena in Micro Pattern Gas Detectors with a Resistive Anode M. S. Dixit*a, b and A. Rankina a Department the capability of the conventional proportional wire/cathode pad TPC and Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGD

311

An Introduction to Fuel Cells and Related Transport Phenomena Matthew M. Mench, Chao-Yang Wang and Stefan T. Thynell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be dried by hot inlet flow, ideally saturated near the middle of the cell, and experiencing flooding near1 An Introduction to Fuel Cells and Related Transport Phenomena Matthew M. Mench, Chao-Yang Wang of fuel cell systems for primary or auxiliary power for stationary, portable, and automotive systems has

Wang, Chao-Yang

312

Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Evens at the Y-12 National Security Complex, February 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 February 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 2

313

PIV Experiments to Measure Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a VHTR Lower Plenum  

SciTech Connect

A report of experimental data collected at the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Laboratory in support of contract DE-AC07-05ID14517 and the INL Standard Problem on measurements of flow phenomena occurring in a lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR concept reactor to assess CFD code is presented. Background on the experimental setup and procedures is provided along with several samples of data obtained from the 3-D PIV system and an assessment of experimental uncertainty is provided. Data collected in this study include 3-dimensional velocity-field descriptions of the flow in all four inlet jets and the entire lower plenum with inlet jet Reynolds numbers (ReJet) of approximately 4300 and 12,400. These investigations have generated over 2 terabytes of data that has been processed to describe the various velocity components in formats suitable for external release and archived on removable hard disks. The processed data from both experimental studies are available in multi-column text format.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Richard R. Schultz; Daniel Christensen; Robert J. Pink; Ryan C. Johnson

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established an Extreme Drilling Lab to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 feet. This paper details the challenges of ultra-deep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL’s Research and Development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Their physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480 °F around a single drill cutter. This simulator will not yet be operational by the planned conference dates; therefore, the results will be limited to identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL’s test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Lab’s studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established the Extreme Drilling Laboratory to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 ft. This paper details the challenges of ultradeep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL's research and development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Its physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480°F around a single drill cutter. This simulator is not yet operational; therefore, the results will be limited to the identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL's test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Laboratory's studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T.H.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Solvation Phenomena in Dilute Solutions: Formal, Experimental Evidence, and Modeling Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the fundamentals underlying a general molecular-based formalism for the microscopic interpretation of the solvation phenomena involving sparingly soluble solutes in compressible media, an approach that hinges around the unambiguous splitting of the species correlation function integrals into short-(finite) and long-ranged (diverging) contributions at infinite dilution, where this condition is taken as the reference system for the derivation of composition expansions. Then, we invoke the formalism (a) to illustrate the well-behaved nature of the solvation contributions to the mechanical partial molecular properties of solutes at infinite dilution, (b) to guide the development of, and provide molecular-based support to, the macroscopic modeling of high-temperature dilute aqueous-electrolyte solutions, (c) to study solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near-critical solvents in an attempt to understand from a microscopic perspective the macroscopic evidence regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects, and (d) to interpret the microscopic mechanism behind synergistic solvation effects involving either co-solutes or co-solvents, and provide a molecular argument on the unsuitability of the van der Waals one-fluid (vdW-1f) mixing rules for the 2 description of weakly attractive solutes in compressible solvents. Finally, we develop thermodynamically consistent perturbation expansions, around the infinite dilution reference, for the species residual properties in binary and ternary mixtures, and discuss the theoretical and modeling implications behind ad hoc first-order truncated expansions.

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Present understanding of MHD and heat transfer phenomena for liquid metal blankets  

SciTech Connect

A review of experimental work on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and heat transfer (HT) characteristics of liquid metal flows in fusion relevant conditions is presented. Experimental data on MHD flow pressure drop in straight channels of round and rectangular cross-section with electroconducting walls in a transverse magnetic field show good agreement with theoretical predictions, and simple engineering formulas are confirmed. Less data are available on velocity distribution and HT characteristics, and even less data are available for channels with electroinsulating walls or artificially made self-heating electroinsulating coatings. Some experiments show an interesting phenomena of HT increase in the presence of a transverse or axial magnetic field. For channels of complex geometry -- expansions, contractions, bends, and manifolds -- few experimental data are available. Future efforts should be directed toward investigation of MHD/HT in straight channels with perfect and nonperfect electroinsulated walls, including walls with controlled imperfections, and in channels of complex geometry. International cooperation in manufacturing and operating experimental facilities with magnetic fields at, or even higher than, 5--7 T with comparatively large volumes may be of great help.

Kirillov, I.R. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (Russia); Barleon, L. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Reed, C.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Miyazaki, K. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Walkthrough screening evaluation field guide. Natural phenomena hazards at Department of Energy facilities: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a large inventory of existing facilities. Many of these facilities were not designed and constructed to current natural phenomena hazard (NPH) criteria. The NPH events include earthquakes, extreme winds and tornadoes, and floods. DOE Order 5480.28 establishes policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE facilities. DOE is conducting a multiyear project to develop evaluation guidelines for assessing the condition and determining the need for upgrades at DOE facilities. One element of the NPH evaluation guidelines` development involves the existing systems and components at DOE facilities. This effort is described in detail in a cited reference. In the interim period prior to availability of the final guidelines, DOE facilities are encouraged to implement an NPH walk through screening evaluation process by which systems and components that need attention can be rapidly identified. Guidelines for conducting the walk through screening evaluations are contained herein. The result of the NPH walk through screening evaluation should be a prioritized list of systems and components that need further action. Simple and inexpensive fixes for items identified in the walk through as marginal or inadequate should be implemented without further study. By implementing an NPH walk through screening evaluation, DOE facilities may realize significant reduction in risk from NPH in the short term.

Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Salmon, M.W. [EQE Engineering Consultants, Irvine, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Environmental impacts and sustainability of degraded water reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greater urban demand for finite water resources to meet domestic, agricultural, industrial, and recreational needs; increased frequency of drought resulting from erratic weather; and continued degradation of available water resources from point and nonpoint sources of pollution have focused attention on the reuse of degraded waters as a potential water source. However, short- and long-term detrimental environmental impacts and sustainability of degraded water reuse are not well known or understood. These concerns led to the organization of the 2007 ASA-CSSA-SSSA Symposium entitled Environmental Impacts and Sustainability of Degraded Water Reuse. Out of this symposium came a special collection of 4 review papers and 12 technical research papers focusing on various issues associated with the reuse of agricultural drainage water, well water generated in the production of natural gas from coalbeds, municipal wastewater and biosolids, wastewater from confined animal operations, urban runoff, and food-processing wastewater. Overviews of the papers, gaps in knowledge, and future research directions are presented. The future prognosis of degraded water reuse is promising, provided close attention is paid to managing constituents that pose short- and long-term threats to the environment and the health of humankind.

Corwin, D.L.; Bradford, S.A. [USDA ARS, Riverside, CA (United States). US Salin Laboratory

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Microbial petroleum degradation enhancement by oil spill bioremediation products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradation of an artificially weathered crude oil (Alaska North Slope) was compared using 13 different oil spill bioremediation agents. All products were evaluated under identical conditions emulating a marine environment. The research was conducted using unpolluted, natural seawater. The products were tested in triplicate using 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and evaluated over a 28 day period to determine the products' capabilities based on the extent of petroleum degradation. Toxicity and petroleum chemistry data were used to assess the products' degrading capabilities. Total petroleum hydrocarbons analyses were completed on all the products. GC-MS analyses of the petroleum fractions helped to determine the concentration of target compounds for the products. Six products showed a significant extent of microbial degradation, however only one met the toxicity criteria. A total of 68 analytes were quantified from the six successful products. The petroleum hydrocarbons were significantly degraded by six treatments as compared with the nutrient and non-nutrient control. The saturate resolved hydrocarbons were reduced an average of 90% of the original weight, while the aromatic resolved hydrocarbons were degraded approximately 60%. The toxicity criteria reduced the initial number of products to one product only. Biodegradation to a lesser extent was also achieved by the indigenous microbial population with the addition of nutrients alone. Further research should be completed before considering any of these products for application in the field.

Lee, Salvador Aldrett

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Understanding the Interaction Between Localized Deformation in Materials and Environmentally Assisted Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report sets out to develop an understanding of the interaction between localized mechanical deformation in reactor structural materials (such as nickel-base alloys, austenitic stainless steels, or carbon and low-alloy steels) and their susceptibility to degradation by environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) after long-term exposure to light water reactor coolant. The main emphasis is on stress corrosion cracking (SCC), with and without the influence of irradiation, in the pressurized water reactor (...

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

Why Sequence a Benzene-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Benzene-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium? a Benzene-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium? As recently as the 1990's, aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene and toluene were thought to be resistant to degradation under anaerobic conditions. It is now appreciated that biodegradation in the absence of oxygen contributes significantly to the attenuation of hydrocarbons and other pollutants in the environment. Unravelling the yet unknown pathways and mechanisms of anaerobic benzene metabolism is a critical milestone for hydrocarbon bioremediation. While many pathways have been suggested, none has been proven, and no genes or enzymes are known. The elucidation of this pathway, including the identification of the genes and enzymes involved, is vital for the demonstration, validation, and regulatory acceptance of in-situ

324

Statistical Modeling of Photovoltaic Reliability Using Accelerated Degradation Techniques (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We introduce a cutting-edge life-testing technique, accelerated degradation testing (ADT), for PV reliability testing. The ADT technique is a cost-effective and flexible reliability testing method with multiple (MADT) and Step-Stress (SSADT) variants. In an environment with limited resources, including equipment (chambers), test units, and testing time, these techniques can provide statistically rigorous prediction of lifetime and other interesting parameters, such as failure rate, warranty time, mean time to failure, degradation rate, activation energy, acceleration factor, and upper limit level of stress. J-V characterization can be used for degradation data and the generalized Eyring model can be used for the thermal-humidity stress condition. The SSADT model can be constructed based on the cumulative damage model (CEM), which assumes that the remaining test united are failed according to cumulative density function of current stress level regardless of the history on previous stress levels.

Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Jones, W.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

JGI - Why Sequence Terephthalate-Degrading Microbial Community?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Terephthalate-Degrading Microbial Community? a Terephthalate-Degrading Microbial Community? Every year, enormous amounts of high-strength terephthalate-containing wastewater are produced as a byproduct of the plastics industry. The wastewater is currently treated by using anaerobic biological treatment processes that involve mesophilic (moderate-temperature-loving) microbes growing at 35-37°C. Recently, a thermophilic (heating-loving) terephthalate-degrading community growing at around 55°C has been developed in a lab-scale bioreactor as a more efficient alternative to the mesophilic process. Metagenomic characterization of the thermophilic bioreactor community, followed by perturbation studies, may lead to an optimized process, which will have significant impact on the plastic production industry in terms of wastewater treatment costs and operational

326

Primary System Corrosion Research Program: EPRI Materials Degradation Matrix, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Materials Degradation Matrix (MDM) is a key part of the industrys Materials Degradation and Issue Management Initiative. The MDM provides a comprehensive review of degradation mechanisms applicable to the nuclear steam supply system components in light water reactor plants and assesses the extent to which these degradation mechanisms are understood. The MDM also evaluates the state of industry knowledge worldwide associated with mitigation of applicable degradation mechanisms.

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Flexible, durable proton energy degraders for the GE PETtrace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to limit the formation of radioisotopic impurities during proton bombardments of solid targets, two methods of introducing degrader foils into the beam upstream of the target were tested. The first design uses a 445 {mu}m thick fixed degrader machined from a single piece of aluminum. The second design permits introduction of foils made of any material and was tested with foils as thick as 635 {mu}m (also aluminium). In both cases, the foils are cooled with by water flowing through an annular channel outside the radius of the beam. Both designs proved durable and tolerated proton beam currents in excess of 80 {mu}A.

Engle, J. W.; Gagnon, K.; Severin, G. W.; Valdovinos, H. F.; Nickles, R. J.; Barnhart, T. E. [Chemistry Division - Isotopes, Inorganics and Actinides, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hevesy Laboratory, Danish Technical University, Risoe (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, WI, Madison (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Materials Degradation and Detection (MD2): Deep Dive Final Report  

SciTech Connect

An effort is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a fundamental and general framework to foster the science and technology needed to support real-time monitoring of early degradation in materials used in the production of nuclear power. The development of such a capability would represent a timely solution to the mounting issues operators face with materials degradation in nuclear power plants. The envisioned framework consists of three primary and interconnected “thrust” areas including 1) microstructural science, 2) behavior assessment, and 3) monitoring and predictive capabilities. A brief state-of-the-art assessment for each of these core technology areas is discussed in the paper.

McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Henager, Charles H.; Johnson, Bradley R.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Role of Transport Phenomena in the Evolution of Geometry, Composition and Structure  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Fusion welding is used extensively in industries that support the nation's energy supply, defense, infrastructure, and standard of living. Safety and reliability of the welded joints are affected by their geometry, composition and structure. This report provides an account of the significant advances made in quantitative understanding of the geometry, composition and various aspects of the weldment structure with financial support from DOE/BES. In particular, this report provides an account of the research conducted under the grant DE-FG02-84ER45158 in this important area and lists all the publications that document the details of the technical accomplishments that resulted from the work. Investigations of heat transfer, fluid flow and alloying element vaporization during laser welding resulted in a new technique for the determination of the peak temperature in the weld pool and provided a new method to estimate weld metal composition. Studies on the interfacial phenomena in fusion welding resulted in quantitative understanding of the interrelationship between the weld metal composition and geometry and provided new knowledge as to when the surface active elements would affect the weldment geometry and when these elements would have no effect on the geometry. Partitioning of oxygen nitrogen and hydrogen between the welding environment and the weld metal was affected by the extent of the dissociation of diatomic gaseous species which depended on the nature of the plasma formed during welding. The interfacial tension of the liquid metal was also affected by the plasma and the properties of the plasma affected the concentrations of oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen in the weld metal. Apart from the understanding of the evolution of composition and geometry of the weldments, application of transport phenomena provided useful information about various features of the weldment structure. Quantitative understanding of microstructure of the fusion zone and heat affected zone and grain structure in both steels and titanium alloys could be achieved starting with numerical heat transfer and fluid flow calculations. In addition, the evolution of inclusion composition and structure in steels during welding could also be understood from fundamental principles. The positions of the students supported by the grant are indicated since an important component of the work was the education of many outstanding students who now occupy leadership positions in major organizations in the US. The research sponsored by the Basic Energy Sciences has been recognized by many major scholastic awards. These are listed because they testify to the quality of the curiosity and the commitment of the students that were supported by the grant. Our collaborations with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory are indicated because many outstanding scientists from these laboratories shared our goals in advancing quantitative understanding of fusion welding processes and the geometry, composition and structure of welded materials.

Tarasankar DebRoy

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHENOMENA IN ADVANCED GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

INL LDRD funded research was conducted at MIT to experimentally characterize mixed convection heat transfer in gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) core channels in collaboration with INL personnel. The GFR for Generation IV has generated considerable interest and is under development in the U.S., France, and Japan. One of the key candidates is a block-core configuration first proposed by MIT, has the potential to operate in Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime or in the transition between the DTHT and normal forced or laminar convection regime during post-loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. This is contrary to most industrial applications where operation is in a well-defined and well-known turbulent forced convection regime. As a result, important new need emerged to develop heat transfer correlations that make possible rigorous and accurate predictions of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) during post LOCA in these regimes. Extensive literature review on these regimes was performed and a number of the available correlations was collected in: (1) forced laminar, (2) forced turbulent, (3) mixed convection laminar, (4) buoyancy driven DTHT and (5) acceleration driven DTHT regimes. Preliminary analysis on the GFR DHR system was performed and using the literature review results and GFR conditions. It confirmed that the GFR block type core has a potential to operate in the DTHT regime. Further, a newly proposed approach proved that gas, liquid and super critical fluids all behave differently in single channel under DTHT regime conditions, thus making it questionable to extrapolate liquid or supercritical fluid data to gas flow heat transfer. Experimental data were collected with three different gases (nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide) in various heat transfer regimes. Each gas unveiled different physical phenomena. All data basically covered the forced turbulent heat transfer regime, nitrogen data covered the acceleration driven DTHT and buoyancy driven DTHT, helium data covered the mixed convection laminar, acceleration driven DTHT and the laminar to turbulent transition regimes and carbon dioxide data covered the returbulizing buoyancy driven DTHT and non-returbulizing buoyancy induced DTHT. The validity of the data was established using the heat balance and the uncertainty analysis. Based on experimental data, the traditional threshold for the DTHT regime was updated to account for phenomena observed in the facility and a new heat transfer regime map was proposed. Overall, it can be stated that substantial reduction of heat transfer coefficient was observed in DTHT regime, which will have significant impact on the core and DHR design of passive GFR. The data were compared to the large number of existing correlations. None of the mixed convection laminar correlation agreed with the data. The forced turbulent and the DTHT regime, Celeta et al. correlation showed the best fit with the data. However, due to larger ratio of the MIT facility compared to the Celeta et al. facility and the returbuliziation due to the gas characteristics, the correlation sometimes under-predicts the heat transfer coefficient. Also, since Celeta et al. correlation requires the information of the wall temperature to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient, it is difficult to apply this correlation directly for predicting the wall temperature. Three new sets of correlation that cover all heat transfer regimes were developed. The bas

INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHE

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DZero (D0) Experiment Results for New Phenomena from the Fermilab Tevatron  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The D0 (DZero) Experiment consists of a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the world's premier high-energy accelerator, the Tevatron Collider, at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, USA. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons at the highest available energies. It involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe.[From D0 Experiment homepage at http://www-d0.fnal.gov/]

This web page provides access to Run II research results of the New Phenomena Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers. In addition, the user can see live event displays from the current Run II for both the CDF and the DZero experiments at http://www.fnal.gov/pub/now/live_events/index.html. Another interesting offering from the D0 groups at Fermilab is the large collection of "Plain English Summaries" of their published reports and papers. These Summaries are excellent for layman's understanding of the high energy physics research done at Fermilab and can serve as introductions to the published papers themselves. The Summaries are at http://www-d0.fnal.gov/public/pubs/d0_physics_summaries.html for Run I and http://www-d0.fnal.gov/Run2Physics/WWW/results/summary.htm for Run II.

DZero New Phenomena Group, Fermilab; The DZero Collaboration

332

Ionospheric VLF waves and optical phenomena over active thunderstorms. Ph.D. Thesis  

SciTech Connect

In 1987 and 1988, two campaigns, the Wave Induced Particle Precipitation campaign and the Thunderstorm 2 campaign, were conducted to investigate lightning-generated effects in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Two rockets (apogees 420km and 330km) and 6 balloons (float altitudes 30km) were launched near thunderstorms in these campaigns. Optical and electric signals from hundreds of lightning strokes were recorded by both the rockets and balloons. Using the data obtained in these two campaigns, the author has been able to study some problems about lightning-generated VLF waves in the ionosphere which have not been well investigated previously. In this dissertation, the author reports the following: the downward-looking optical detector on the rocket recorded some anomalous characteristic optical phenomena which had not been reported previously. This study shows that they occurred above the balloon altitude (30km), and the results are interpreted in terms of discharges at high altitudes. The author studied the relation between the amplitude of lightning-generated VLF waves in the ionosphere and the lightning current recorded by the SUNYA lightning network. This study shows that the amplitude of waves at frequencies below 5 kHz has linear response to the lightning current. Above 5 kHz, there is not a significant linear correlation between the wave amplitude and the lightning current. The author has been able to determine the propagation path of the lightning-generated VLF waves from the source to the rocket. The path is consistent with the leaky waveguide hypothesis in which waves travel in the waveguide to the vicinity of the rockets, and then propagate vertically through the ionosphere. The author has found that the amplitude of lightning generated VLF waves have maxima and minima at different altitudes instead of being attenuated monotonically with altitude as expected.

Li, Y.Q.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Ionospheric VLF waves and optical phenomena over active thunderstorms. [VLF (very low frequency)  

SciTech Connect

In 1987 and 1988, two campaigns, the Wave Induced Particle Precipitation campaign and the Thunderstorm II campaign, were conducted to investigate lightning-generated effects in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Two rockets and 6 balloons were launched near thunderstorms in these campaigns. Optical and electrical signals from hundreds of lightning strokes were recorded. The author has been able to study some problems about lightning-generated VLF waves in the ionosphere which have not been well investigated previously. This dissertation reports the following: (1) The downward-looking optical detector on the rocket recorded some anomalous characteristic optical phenomena. (2) The author studied the relation between the amplitude of lightning-generated VLF waves in the ionosphere and the lightning current recorded by the SUNYA lightning network. This study shows that the amplitude of waves at frequencies below 5 kHz has linear response to the lightning current. (3) The author has been able to determine the propagation path of the lightning-generated VLF waves from the source to the rocket. The path is consistent with the leaky waveguide hypothesis. (4) The amplitude of lightning-generated VLF waves has been found to have maxima and minima at different altitudes, instead of being attenuated monotonically with altitude as expected. A theoretical model has been proposed which shows that the wave amplitude profiles are the result of interference between waves from an aperture area below the rocket. (5) The author numerically calculated the absorption of VLF waves at the bottom of the ionosphere. The electron density gradient of the ionosphere was taken into account. The characteristics of the absorption, such as the frequency dependence, were investigated. The author deduced that significant heating of the ionosphere is caused by lightning-generated VLF waves.

Li, Y.Q.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fundamental Understanding of Ambient and High-Temperature Plasticity Phenomena in Structural Materials in Advanced Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research project is to develop the methods and tools necessary to link unit processes analyzed using atomistic simulations involving interaction of vacancies and interstitials with dislocations, as well as dislocation mediation at sessile junctions and interfaces as affected by radiation, with cooperative influence on higher-length scale behavior of polycrystals. These tools and methods are necessary to design and enhance radiation-induced damage-tolerant alloys. The project will achieve this goal by applying atomistic simulations to characterize unit processes of: 1. Dislocation nucleation, absorption, and desorption at interfaces 2. Vacancy production, radiation-induced segregation of substitutional Cr at defect clusters (point defect sinks) in BCC Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels 3. Investigation of interaction of interstitials and vacancies with impurities (V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Al, Si, P, S) 4. Time evolution of swelling (cluster growth) phenomena of irradiated materials 5. Energetics and kinetics of dislocation bypass of defects formed by interstitial clustering and formation of prismatic loops, informing statistical models of continuum character with regard to processes of dislocation glide, vacancy agglomeration and swelling, climb and cross slip This project will consider the Fe, Fe-C, and Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic material system, accounting for magnetism by choosing appropriate interatomic potentials and validating with first principles calculations. For these alloys, the rate of swelling and creep enhancement is considerably lower than that of face-centered cubic (FCC) alloys and of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mo alloys. The team will confirm mechanisms, validate simulations at various time and length scales, and improve the veracity of computational models. The proposed research?s feasibility is supported by recent modeling of radiation effects in metals and alloys, interfacial dislocation transfer reactions in nano-twinned copper, and dislocation reactions at general boundaries, along with extensive modeling cooperative effects of dislocation interactions and migration in crystals and polycrystals using continuum models.

Deo, Chaitanya; Zhu, Ting; McDowell, David

2013-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fermion localization on thick branes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider chiral fermion confinement in scalar thick branes, which are known to localize gravity, coupled through a Yukawa term. The conditions for the confinement and their behavior in the thin-wall limit are found for various different BPS branes, including double walls and branes interpolating between different AdS{sub 5} spacetimes. We show that only one massless chiral mode is localized in all these walls, whenever the wall thickness is keep finite. We also show that, independently of wall's thickness, chiral fermionic modes cannot be localized in dS{sub 4} walls embedded in a M{sub 5} spacetime. Finally, massive fermions in double wall spacetimes are also investigated. We find that, besides the massless chiral mode localization, these double walls support quasilocalized massive modes of both chiralities.

Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela); Tempo, Jose David [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela); Centro de Estudios Cientificos CECS, Casilla 1469, Valdivia (Chile)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMERGENCY PLANNING HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMERGENCY PLANNING HANDBOOK April 2004 PUBLICATION.....................................................................................................................2 SECTION II: HOW TO PREPARE THE PLAN Step 1: Designate an Energy Emergency Coordinator.......................................................................................................12 SECTION III: EXAMPLES OF OPERATING GUIDELINES Energy Emergency Coordinator

337

Entanglement quantification by local unitaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invariance under local unitary operations is a fundamental property that must be obeyed by every proper measure of quantum entanglement. However, this is not the only aspect of entanglement theory where local unitaries play a relevant role. In the present work we show that the application of suitable local unitary operations defines a family of bipartite entanglement monotones, collectively referred to as "mirror entanglement". They are constructed by first considering the (squared) Hilbert-Schmidt distance of the state from the set of states obtained by applying to it a given local unitary. To the action of each different local unitary there corresponds a different distance. We then minimize these distances over the sets of local unitaries with different spectra, obtaining an entire family of different entanglement monotones. We show that these mirror entanglement monotones are organized in a hierarchical structure, and we establish the conditions that need to be imposed on the spectrum of a local unitary for the associated mirror entanglement to be faithful, i.e. to vanish on and only on separable pure states. We analyze in detail the properties of one particularly relevant member of the family, the "stellar mirror entanglement" associated to traceless local unitaries with nondegenerate spectrum and equispaced eigenvalues in the complex plane. This particular measure generalizes the original analysis of [Giampaolo and Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 76, 042301 (2007)], valid for qubits and qutrits. We prove that the stellar entanglement is a faithful bipartite entanglement monotone in any dimension, and that it is bounded from below by a function proportional to the linear entropy and from above by the linear entropy itself, coinciding with it in two- and three-dimensional spaces.

A. Monras; G. Adesso; S. M. Giampaolo; G. Gualdi; G. B. Davies; F. Illuminati

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

338

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.2: UV Degradation Prevention on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Use of wind energy has expanded very quickly because of the energy prices, environmental concerns and improved efficiency of wind generators. Rather than using metal and alloy based wind turbine blades, larger size fiber (glass and carbon) reinforced composite blades have been recently utilized to increase the efficiency of the wind energy in both high and low wind potential areas. In the current composite manufacturing, pre-preg and vacuum-assisted/heat sensitive resin transfer molding and resin infusion methods are employed. However, these lighter, stiffer and stronger composite blades experience ultraviolet (UV) light degradation where polymers (epoxies and hardeners) used for the blades manufacturing absorb solar UV lights, and cause photolytic, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative reactions resulting in breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds, polymer degradation and internal and external stresses. One of the main reasons is the weak protective coatings/paints on the composite blades. This process accelerates the aging and fatigue cracks, and reduces the overall mechanical properties of the blades. Thus, the lack of technology on coatings for blade manufacturing is forcing many government agencies and private companies (local and national windmill companies) to find a better solution for the composite wind blades. Kansas has a great wind potential for the future energy demand, so efficient wind generators can be an option for continuous energy production. The research goal of the present project was to develop nanocomposite coatings using various inclusions against UV degradation and corrosion, and advance the fundamental understanding of degradation (i.e., physical, chemical and physiochemical property changes) on those coatings. In pursuit of the research goal, the research objective of the present program was to investigate the effects of UV light and duration on various nanocomposites made mainly of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoflakes, contribute the valuable information to this emerging field of advanced materials and manufacturing and advance the Kansas economy through creation of engineering knowledge and products in the wind energy. The proposed work was involved in a multidisciplinary research program that incorporates nanocomposite fabrication, advanced coating, characterization, surface and colloidal chemistry, physicochemistry, corrosion science, and analysis with a simple and effective testing methodology. The findings were closely related to our hypothesis and approaches that we proposed in this proposal. The data produced in the study offered to advance the physical understanding of the behavior of nanostructured materials for the prevention of UV light at different exposure time and salt fogging. Founding of this proposal enabled the first UV resistive nanocomposite corrosion coating effort in Kansas to impact the local and national wind mill industry. Results of this program provided valuable opportunities for the multidisciplinary training of undergraduate and graduate students at Wichita State University (WSU), as well as a number of aircraft companies (e.g., Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier/Learjet) and other local and regional industries.

Janet M. Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Task 4.2: UV Degradation Prevention on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Use of wind energy has expanded very quickly because of the energy prices, environmental concerns and improved efficiency of wind generators. Rather than using metal and alloy based wind turbine blades, larger size fiber (glass and carbon) reinforced composite blades have been recently utilized to increase the efficiency of the wind energy in both high and low wind potential areas. In the current composite manufacturing, pre-preg and vacuum-assisted/heat sensitive resin transfer molding and resin infusion methods are employed. However, these lighter, stiffer and stronger composite blades experience ultraviolet (UV) light degradation where polymers (epoxies and hardeners) used for the blades manufacturing absorb solar UV lights, and cause photolytic, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative reactions resulting in breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds, polymer degradation and internal and external stresses. One of the main reasons is the weak protective coatings/paints on the composite blades. This process accelerates the aging and fatigue cracks, and reduces the overall mechanical properties of the blades. Thus, the lack of technology on coatings for blade manufacturing is forcing many government agencies and private companies (local and national windmill companies) to find a better solution for the composite wind blades. Kansas has a great wind potential for the future energy demand, so efficient wind generators can be an option for continuous energy production. The research goal of the present project was to develop nanocomposite coatings using various inclusions against UV degradation and corrosion, and advance the fundamental understanding of degradation (i.e., physical, chemical and physiochemical property changes) on those coatings. In pursuit of the research goal, the research objective of the present program was to investigate the effects of UV light and duration on various nanocomposites made mainly of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoflakes, contribute the valuable information to this emerging field of advanced materials and manufacturing and advance the Kansas economy through creation of engineering knowledge and products in the wind energy. The proposed work was involved in a multidisciplinary research program that incorporates nanocomposite fabrication, advanced coating, characterization, surface and colloidal chemistry, physicochemistry, corrosion science, and analysis with a simple and effective testing methodology. The findings were closely related to our hypothesis and approaches that we proposed in this proposal. The data produced in the study offered to advance the physical understanding of the behavior of nanostructured materials for the prevention of UV light at different exposure time and salt fogging. Founding of this proposal enabled the first UV resistive nanocomposite corrosion coating effort in Kansas to impact the local and national wind mill industry. Results of this program provided valuable opportunities for the multidisciplinary training of undergraduate and graduate students at Wichita State University (WSU), as well as a number of aircraft companies (e.g., Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier/Learjet) and other local and regional industries.

Janet M. Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Coupled polynomial field approach for elimination of flexure and torsion locking phenomena in the Timoshenko and Euler-Bernoulli curved beam elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The curvature related locking phenomena in the out-of-plane deformation of Timoshenko and Euler-Bernoulli curved beam elements are demonstrated and a novel approach is proposed to circumvent them. Both flexure and Torsion locking phenomena are noticed ... Keywords: Coupled polynomial field, Curved beam, Euler-Bernoulli beam, Finite elements, Flexure locking, Shear locking, Timoshenko beam, Torsion locking

Md. Ishaquddin; P. Raveendranath; J. N. Reddy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Degradation of ITO/silicon solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research under this contract investigated the degradation mechanisms and projected lifetime of indium tin oxide (ITO/P-silicon) solar cells. Both single and polycrystalline silicon cells were investigated. Thermal degradation of the cells was shown to proceed by the growth of an interfacial SiO/sub 2/ which resulted from oxygen diffusion through the ITO. The growth of the interfacial SiO/sub 2/ causes reduction in fill factor but not V/sub oc/ or I/sub sc/ until the degradation is severe. While thermal degradation occurs, it proceeds very slowly at 50/sup 0/C and the cell efficiency is projected to remain above 50% of its original value for 10/sup 5/ years at this temperature. Cells subjected to illuminated load testing at room temperature for 840 hours showed no reduction in output. However, some changes were noted in the dark characteristics. The mechanism causing the change is not known. Preliminary noise spectral density reliability tests were conducted but the results were inconclusive.

Wilmsen, C.W. (ed.)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Maintenance policy: degradation laws versus Hidden Markov Model availability indicator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry). Keywords: diagnosis, maintenance management, assessment, degradation laws, Hidden Markov Model 1 to manager strategies. In case of preventive maintenance, different strategies should be used like planned of the system. They use stochastic Petri nets and Markov chains to implement various maintenance strategies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

343

RECOVERY OF DEGRADED HEAVY WATER AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented on purification and reconcentration of heavy water at the Savannah River Plant. Process and equipment descriptions, typical operating costs, procedures for control of health hazards, standard analytical methods, and specifications for receipt of degraded heavy water for recovery at the Savannah River Plant are included. (auth)

Scotten, W.C.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield  

SciTech Connect

The recommended waste package (WP) design is described in BSC (2001a). The design includes a double-wall WP underneath a protective drip shield (DS) (BSC 2003a). The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation (DOX), general corrosion (GC) and localized corrosion (LC) of the DS plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. The DS design also includes structural supports fabricated from Ti Grade 24. Degradation of Ti Grade 24 is not considered in this report. The DS provides protection for the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. This Model Report (MR) serves as a feed to the Integrated Waste Package Degradation Model (IWPD) analyses, and was developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (BSC 2002a). The models contained in this report serve as a basis to determine whether or not the performance requirements for the DS can be met.

F. Hua; K. Mon

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Influence of Impurities in Module Packaging on Potential-Induced Degradation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compounds were added into crystalline silicon cell mini modules, including in the encapsulant, interfaces, and glass, to determine their effect on potential-induced degradation (PID). Fe, either in the glass or at the glass/encapsulant interface, was found to be correlated with increased PID, but the difference in module power loss was not statistically significant compared to controls. Additions of Cu, Cr, Pb, Sn, Ag, and Na compounds to either the encapsulant or at the glass/encapsulant interface did not appear correlated with PID. Lock-in thermography on bare cells affected by PID removed from the mini modules show highly localized areas of junction breakdown, and SIMS analysis indicates localized impurities as well, though a spatial relation between the two was not established. Deposition of a conductive layer on the front surface of the cell, either with semitransparent Ta or Poly 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT), eliminated PID when the cells were stressed at -1000 V bias, 50 degrees C, with the glass face grounded for 140 h.

Hacke, P.; Glick, S.; Johnston, S.; Reedy, R.; Pankow, J.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, November 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 2

348

Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate geometry scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean bulk velocity) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analyses and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions is also presented.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Doanld M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Measurement of Turbulent Flow Phenomena for the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean velocity field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics design (Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor). The datawere obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered as a benchmark for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The primary objective of this paper is to document the experiment and present a sample of the data set that has been established for this standard problem. Present results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flowin the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined crossflow—with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. Posts, side walls and end walls are fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet-jet Reynolds numbers (based on the hydraulic diameter of the jet and the timemean average flow rate) are approximately 4300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal complicated flow patterns that include several large recirculation zones, reverse flow near the simulated reflector wall, recirculation zones in the upper portion of the plenum and complex flow patterns around the support posts. Data include three-dimensional PIV images of flow planes, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. This paper reviews the experimental apparatus and procedures, presents a sample of the data set, and reviews the INL Standard Problem. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions are also presented.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hierarchy of local chemical reactivity indices originated from a local energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The traditional way of defining a local measure of chemical hardness has several drawbacks, which undermine the applicability of that local hardness concept. We propose a new approach to this problem, by originating a local chemical potential, a corresponding local hardness, and local hyperhardnesses, from a local energy concept. A chemical potential kernel is also defined, by which a recently proposed alternative local chemical potential and local hardness concept can also be incorporated into this scheme of local reactivity indices.

Gal, Tamas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The local deflection of light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have derived the relationship between the radial proper distance, h, and the polar angle, phi, for a light ray that is emitted and travels in the neighborhood of the Earth's surface. General relativity predicts that, even locally, the equation which relates these two physical magnitudes differs from the one stated by the principle of equivalence. More precisely, we have proved that, in the weak field limit, the local physical trajectory, h=h(phi), is the one that would correspond to a massive Newtonian particle in a field two times greater. Therefore, and contrary to the generally accepted fact, the principle of equivalence gives only 1/2 part of the general relativity local deflection of light.

Eduardo Díaz-Miguel

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Local Dimension of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

 expensive for one entity to consider it alone. In  Sweden during the early  1970s,  DH  networks  were  heavily  dependent  on  fossil  fuels  but  now  over  seventy  percent of fuel for DH comes from renewable feedstocks such as biomass and municipal  waste. In Finland, aside from a small... made by successful local governments can be narrowed to three key factors. First, they have all recognised the co-benefits of a local energy strategy: a reduction in fuel poverty, increased employment, improved quality of life and mitigation...

Kelly, Scott

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

State and Local Solution Center: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars to someone by E-mail Share State and Local Solution Center: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about State and Local Solution Center: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark State and Local...

355

State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) is a state- and local-led effort facilitated by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental...

356

Electrometallurgical treatment of degraded N-reactor fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

N-Reactor fuel constitutes almost 80% of the entire mass of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) spent fuel inventory. The current plan for disposition of this fuel calls for interim dry storage, followed by direct repository disposal. However, this approach may not be viable for the entire inventory of N-Reactor fuel. The physical condition and chemical composition of much of the fuel have changed during the period that it has been in storage. The cladding of many of the fuel elements has been breached, allowing the metallic uranium fuel to react with water in the storage pools producing uranium oxides (U{sub x}O{sub y}) and uranium hydride (UH{sub 3}). Even if the breached fuel is placed in dry storage, it may continue to undergo significant changes caused by the reaction of exposed uranium with any remaining water in the container. Uranium oxides, uranium hydride, and hydrogen gas are expected to form as a result of this reaction. The presence of potentially explosive hydrogen and uranium hydride, which under certain conditions is pyrophoric, raises technical concerns that will need to be addressed. The electrometallurgical treatment process developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has potential for conditioning degraded N-Reactor fuel for long-term storage or disposal. The first step in evaluating the applicability of this process is the preparation of degraded fuel that is similar to the actual degraded N-Reactor fuel. Subsequently, the simulated degraded fuel can be introduced into an electrorefiner to examine the effect of corrosion products on the electrorefining process. Some of the technical issues to be resolved include the viability of direct electrorefining without a head-end reduction step, the effect of adherent corrosion products on the electrorefining kinetics, and the recovery and treatment of loose corrosion products that pull away from the degraded fuel. This paper presents results from an experimental study of the preparation, characterization, and subsequent electrometallurgical treatment of samples of simulated degraded N-Reactor fuel.

Gourishankar, K. V.; Karell, E. J.; Everhart, R. E.; Indacochea, E.

2000-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Local Option - Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Locally Determined Program Information Utah Program Type State Bond Program Rebate Amount Locally Determined Under the Utah...

358

Local Option - Energy Improvement Financing Programs (Minnesota...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

payments Interest rates locally determined, but must be sufficient to cover program costs. Program Administrator Programs administered locally Website http:mn.govcommerce...

359

Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modeling the Impact of Land Surface Degradation on the Climate of Tropical North Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradation of the land surface has been suggested as a cause of persistent drought in tropical north Africa. A general circulation model is used to assess the impact of degradation of five regions within tropical north Africa. Idealized ...

Douglas B. Clark; Yongkang Xue; Richard J. Harding; Paul J. Valdes

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Transcription-dependent nucleolar cap localization and possible nuclear function of DExH RNA helicase RHAU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RHAU (RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element) is a DExH protein originally identified as a factor accelerating AU-rich element-mediated mRNA degradation. The discovery that RHAU is predominantly localized in the nucleus, despite mRNA degradation occurring in the cytoplasm, prompted us to consider the nuclear functions of RHAU. In HeLa cells, RHAU was found to be localized throughout the nucleoplasm with some concentrated in nuclear speckles. Transcriptional arrest altered the localization to nucleolar caps, where RHAU is closely localized with RNA helicases p68 and p72, suggesting that RHAU is involved in transcription-related RNA metabolism in the nucleus. To see whether RHAU affects global gene expression transcriptionally or posttranscriptionally, we performed microarray analysis using total RNA from RHAU-depleted HeLa cell lines, measuring both steady-state mRNA levels and mRNA half-lives by actinomycin D chase. There was no change in the half-lives of most transcripts whose steady-state levels were affected by RHAU knockdown, suggesting that these transcripts are subjected to transcriptional regulation. We propose that RHAU has a dual function, being involved in both the synthesis and degradation of mRNA in different subcellular compartments.

Iwamoto, Fumiko; Stadler, Michael; Chalupnikova, Katerina; Oakeley, Edward [Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Maulbeerstrasse 66, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Nagamine, Yoshikuni [Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Maulbeerstrasse 66, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: yoshikuni.nagamine@fmi.ch

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jeffrey Bons Jeffrey Bons Co-PIs: Iowa State University - Drs. Tom Shih and ZJ Wang University of Cincinnati - Drs. Tafi Hamed and Widen Tabakoff Air Force Research Lab - Dr. Richard Rivir SCIES Project 02- 01- SR104 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (06/01/02, 36 Month Duration) $563,712 Total Contract Value Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance Brigham Young University JPB/BYU/29Oct2003 BYU-UTSR-Oct03, 29 Oct 2003, JPB The Gas Turbine Community NEEDS adequate tools to estimate the associated loss in engine performance with service time. ROUGH! ARE TURBINES Surface Degradation - Increases Heat Transfer - Reduces Efficiency GAS TURBINE NEED

363

Challenges in Modeling the Degradation of Ceramic Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We identify the state of the art, gaps in current understanding, and key research needs in the area of modeling the long-term degradation of ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste disposition. The directed purpose of this report is to define a roadmap for Waste IPSC needs to extend capabilities of waste degradation to ceramic waste forms, which overlaps with the needs of the subconsinuum scale of FMM interests. The key knowledge gaps are in the areas of (i) methodology for developing reliable interatomic potentials to model the complex atomic-level interactions in waste forms; (ii) characterization of water interactions at ceramic surfaces and interfaces; and (iii) extension of atomic-level insights to the long time and distance scales relevant to the problem of actinide and fission product immobilization.

Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Materials Degradation Studies for High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments are currently in progress to assess the high temperature degradation behavior of materials in solid oxide electrolysis systems. This research includes the investigation of various electrolysis cell components and balance of plant materials under both anodic and cathodic gas atmospheres at temperatures up to 850°C. Current results include corrosion data for a high temperature nickel alloy used for the air-side flow field in electrolysis cells and a commercial ferritic stainless steel used as the metallic interconnect. Three different corrosion inhibiting coatings were also tested on the steel material. The samples were tested at 850şC for 500 h in both air and H2O/H2 atmospheres. The results of this research will be used to identify degradation mechanisms and demonstrate the suitability of candidate materials for long-term operation in electrolysis cells.

Paul Demkowicz; Pavel Medvedev; Kevin DeWall; Paul Lessing

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Role of proteolytic enzymes in degradation of plant tissues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Strain SR 394 of Erwinia carotovora (Ecc) produced proteases constitutively in all media tested. Growth of Ecc and production of protease were enhanced significantly by the presence of poetic materials and/or plant call walls in the test media. After electrofocusing, one major and one minor protease bands, at PI 4.8 and PI 5.1, respectively, were detected. Only one band of 43 kDa was detected on SDS gels. Only one protease band was detected in SDS gels of infected plant extracts. This protease was purified to homogeneity. It in a highly thermostable metal protease; it degrades gelatin, soluble collagen and hide powderazure, shows weak activity on casein and azocasein, but does not degrade insoluble collagen or elastin.

Lewosz, J.; Kelman, A.; Sequeira, L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

An Investigation of the effect of graphite degradation on irreversible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Investigation of the effect of graphite degradation on irreversible An Investigation of the effect of graphite degradation on irreversible capacity in lithium-ion cells. Title An Investigation of the effect of graphite degradation on irreversible capacity in lithium-ion cells. Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Hardwick, Laurence J., Marek Marcinek, Leanne Beer, John B. Kerr, and Robert Kostecki Journal Electrochemical Society Volume 155 Start Page A442 Issue 6 Pagination A442-A447 Keywords chromatography, electrochemical electrodes, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Fourier transform spectra, graphite, infrared spectra, lithium, mass spectra, Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy, secondary cells, sputtering, surface structure Abstract The effect of surface structural damage on graphitic anodes, commonly observed in tested Li-ion cells, was investigated. Similar surface structural disorder was artificially induced in Mag-10 synthetic graphite anodes using argon-ion sputtering. Raman microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements confirmed that Ar-ion sputtered Mag-10 electrodes display a similar degree of surface degradation as the anodes from tested Li-ion cells. Artificially modified Mag-10 anodes showed double the irreversible charge capacity during the first formation cycle compared to fresh unaltered anodes. Impedance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on surface-modified graphite anodes indicated the formation of a thicker and slightly more resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis of solvent extracts from the electrodes detected the presence of new compounds with Mw on the order of 1600gmol-1 for the surface-modified electrode with no evidence of elevated Mw species for the unmodified electrode. The structural disorder induced in the graphite during long-term cycling may be responsible for the slow and continuous SEI layer reformation, and consequently, the loss of reversible capacity due to the shift of lithium inventory in cycled Li-ion cells.

367

Degradation mechanisms and accelerated testing in PEM fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Although there has been recent progress in improving durability, further improvements are needed to meet the commercialization targets. Past improvements have largely been made possible because of the fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms. By investigating component and cell degradation modes; defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions new materials can be designed to improve durability. Various factors have been shown to affect the useful life of PEM fuel cells. Other issues arise from component optimization. Operational conditions (such as impurities in either the fuel and oxidant stream), cell environment, temperature (including subfreezing exposure), pressure, current, voltage, etc.; or transient versus continuous operation, including start-up and shutdown procedures, represent other factors that can affect cell performance and durability. The need for Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) can be quickly understood given the target lives for fuel cell systems: 5000 hours ({approx} 7 months) for automotive, and 40,000 hrs ({approx} 4.6 years) for stationary systems. Thus testing methods that enable more rapid screening of individual components to determine their durability characteristics, such as off-line environmental testing, are needed for evaluating new component durability in a reasonable turn-around time. This allows proposed improvements in a component to be evaluated rapidly and independently, subsequently allowing rapid advancement in PEM fuel cell durability. These tests are also crucial to developers in order to make sure that they do not sacrifice durability while making improvements in costs (e.g. lower platinum group metal [PGM] loading) and performance (e.g. thinner membrane or a GDL with better water management properties). To achieve a deeper understanding and improve PEM fuel cell durability LANL is conducting research to better define fuel cell component degradation mechanisms and correlate AST measurements to component in 'real-world' situations.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

McInerney, M.J.

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

Degradation Modes of Composite Crossarms and Poles, Desk Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lighting poles made entirely of Fiberglass Reinforced Polymer (FRP) material have been used since the 1960s; composite crossarm products are a relatively recent development for distribution circuits. This report provides background on various Fiberglass Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite utility poles and crossarms, listing the available products and their associated attributes and identifying the causes of the degradation of these components. Product data and testing information for specific FRP ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Diffusion based degradation mechanisms in giant magnetoresistive spin valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spin valve systems based on the giant magnetoresistive effect as used, for example, in hard disks and automotive applications consist of several functional metallic thin film layers. We have identified by secondary ion mass spectrometry two main degradation mechanisms: one is related to oxygen diffusion through a protective cap layer and the other one is interdiffusion directly at the functional layers of the giant magnetoresistive stack. By choosing a suitable material as cap layer (TaN), the oxidation effect can be suppressed.

Hawraneck, Matthias [Department of Sense and Control, Infineon Technologies AG, 85579 Neubiberg (Germany); Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Zimmer, Juergen; Raberg, Wolfgang; Pruegl, Klemens; Schmitt, Stephan; Bever, Thomas [Department of Sense and Control, Infineon Technologies AG, 85579 Neubiberg (Germany); Flege, Stefan; Alff, Lambert [Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

Fliermans, C.B.

1988-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Plant Support Engineering: Degradation Research for Nuclear Service Level I Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants have experienced degradation of the protective coating systems (nuclear Service Level I coatings) inside reactor containment. The degradation is a matter of concern, but the history of degradation and its causes have not been thoroughly documented. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Utilities Coating Council (NUCC) began a research project designed to gain an understanding of the degradation and the potential influence of aging on the qualified ...

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Thermal/chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Specific objectives of this program are to (1) quantify the extent of the degradation process for the three most detrimental mechanisms by performing laboratory-scale experiments, and (2) develop a predictive model for membrane degradation under operating conditions. At present, no inorganic membranes are commercially available for application in the high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas environments encountered in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC), and direct coal fired turbine (DCFT) applications. Most of the inorganic membrane development efforts have focused on hydrogen separation membranes which may be used in an IGCC system for maximizing hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition of these contaminants. The candidate inorganic membranes may be grouped as follows: dense metallic membranes; silica based membranes; alumina based membranes; and carbon based membranes. Results are reported for membrane characterization done so far.

Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Damle, A.S.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene in a bubble column bioscrubber  

SciTech Connect

A bubble column bioreactor was used as bioscrubber to carry out a feasibility study for the cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE). Phenol was used as cosubstrate and inducer. The bioreactor was operated like a conventional chemostat with regard to the cosubstrate and low dilution rates were used to minimize the liquid outflow. TCE degradation measurements were carried out using superficial gas velocities between 0.47 and 4.07 cm s{sup {minus}1} and TCE gas phase loads between 0.07 and 0.40 mg L{sup {minus}1}. Depending on the superficial gas velocity used, degrees of conversion between 30% and 80% were obtained. A simplified reactor model using plug flow for the gas phase, mixed flow for the liquid phase, and pseudo first order reaction kinetics for the conversion of TCE was established. The model is able to give a reasonable approximation of the experimental data. TCE degradation at the used experimental conditions is mainly limited by reaction rate rather than by mass transfer rate. The model can be used to calculate the reactor value and the biomass concentration for a required conversion.

Hecht, V.; Brebbermann, D.; Bremer, P.; Deckwer, W.D. [Bereich Bioverfahrenstechnik, Braunschweig (Germany). Gesellschaft fuer Biotechnologische Forschung mbH

1995-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

FINAL REPORT on Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Generation IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification & validation are of very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air ingress will occur through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. This study indicates that depending on the location and the size of the pipe break, the air ingress phenomena are different. In an effort to estimate the proper safety margin, experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model are required. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation, eventually. This 3-year project (FY 2008–FY 2010) is focused on various issues related to the VHTR air-ingress accident, including (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) structural tests of the oxidized core bottom structures, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Hee C. NO; Nam Z. Cho

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Localized Quantum Vacuum Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for the localized quantum vacuum is proposed in which the zero-point energy of the quantum electromagnetic field originates in energy- and momentum-conserving transitions of material systems from their ground state to an unstable state with negative energy. These transitions are accompanied by emissions and re-absorptions of real photons, which generate a localized quantum vacuum in the neighborhood of material systems. The model could help resolve the cosmological paradox associated to the zero-point energy of electromagnetic fields, while reclaiming quantum effects associated with quantum vacuum such as the Casimir effect and the Lamb shift; it also offers a new insight into the Zitterbewegung of material particles.

Daniela Dragoman

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Women in Contemporary Philippine Local Politics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fund” from their internal revenue allotments (IRA), and ato local governments from internal revenue tax collections,

Tapales, Proserpina D. Ph.D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Isotropic non-locality cannot be distilled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate non-locality distillation protocols for isotropic correlations. These correlations are the hardest instances which respect to distillability and only partial results are known about their behaviour under non-locality distillation protocols. We completely resolve this issue by proving that non-locality distillation is impossible for all non-local isotropic correlations.

Dejan D. Dukaric

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

Preliminary phenomena identification and ranking tables for simplified boiling water reactor Loss-of-Coolant Accident scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For three potential Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenarios in the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactors (SBWR) a set of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) is presented. The selected LOCA scenarios are typical for the class of small and large breaks generally considered in Safety Analysis Reports. The method used to develop the PIRTs is described. Following is a discussion of the transient scenarios, the PIRTs are presented and discussed in detailed and in summarized form. A procedure for future validation of the PIRTs, to enhance their value, is outlined. 26 refs., 25 figs., 44 tabs.

Kroeger, P.G.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, J.H.; Slovik, G.C.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

Alex J. Dragt

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

Chen, J.C.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Boissonnade, A.C.

1995-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

386

State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions to someone by E-mail Share State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Facebook Tweet about State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Twitter Bookmark State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Google Bookmark State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Delicious Rank State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Digg Find More places to share State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on AddThis.com... Strategic Energy Planning Energy Policies & Programs Financing Financing Overview Financing Program Market Segments Energy Data Management Energy Technologies

387

Whole-Genome Analysis of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by pure cultures of butane-degrading bacteria. Appl.of K s values for MTBE by butane- degrading bacteria (52).

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Non-local equilibrium two-phase flow model with phase change in porous media and its application to reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized non local-equilibrium, three-equation model was developed for the macroscopic description of two-phase flow heat and mass transfer in porous media subjected to phase change. Six pore-scale closure problems were proposed to determine all the effective transport coefficients for representative unit cells. An improved model is presented in this paper with the perspective of application to intense boiling phenomena. The objective of this paper is to present application of this model to the simulation of reflooding of severely damaged nuclear reactor cores. In case of accident at a nuclear power plant, water sources may not be available for a long period of time and the core heats up due to the residual power. Any attempt to inject water during core degradation can lead to quenching and further fragmentation of the core material. The fragmentation of fuel rods and melting of reactor core materials may result in the formation of a {sup d}ebris bed{sup .} The typical particle size in a debris bed might reach few millimeters (characteristic length-scale: 1 to 5 mm), which corresponds to a high permeability porous medium. The proposed two-phase flow model is implemented in the ICARECATHARE code, developed by IRSN to study severe accident scenarios in pressurized water reactors. Currently, the French IRSN has set up two experimental facilities to study debris bed reflooding, PEARL and PRELUDE, with the objective to validate safety models. The PRELUDE program studies the complex two phase flow of water and steam in a porous medium (diameter 180 mm, height 200 mm), initially heated to a high temperature (400 deg. C or 700 deg. C). The series of PRELUDE experiments achieved in 2010 constitute a significant complement to the database of high temperature bottom reflood experimental data. They provide relevant data to understand the progression of the quench front and the intensity of heat transfer. Modeling accurately these experiments required improvements to the reflooding model, especially in terms of the existence of various saturation regimes. The improved two-phase flow model shows a good agreement with PRELUDE experimental results.

Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Quintard, M.; Repetto, G.; Fleurot, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Universite de Toulouse (France); INPT, UPS (France); IMFT - Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France) and CNRS (France); IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Characterization of a compost biofiltration system degrading dichloromethane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of acclimatization of microbial populations, compound concentration, and media pH on the biodegradation of low concentration dichloromethane emissions in biofiltration systems was evaluated. Greater than 98% removal efficiency was achieved for dichloromethane at superficial velocities from 1 to 15 m[sup 3]/m[sup 2][center dot]min and inlet concentrations of 3 and 50 ppm[sub v]. Although acclimatization of microbial populations to toluene occurred within 2 weeks of operation start-up, initial dichloromethane acclimatization took place over a period of 10 weeks. This period was shortened to 10 days when a laboratory grown consortium of dichloromethane degrading organisms, isolated from a previously acclimatized column, was introduced into fresh biofilter media. The mixed culture consisted of 12 members, which together were able to degrade dichloromethane at concentrations up to 500 mg/L. Only one member of the consortium was able to degrade dichloromethane in pure culture, and the presence of the other members did not affect the rate of biodegradation in solution culture. Although high removal efficiencies for dichloromethane were sustained for more than 4 months in a biofilter column receiving an inlet gas stream with 3 ppm[sub v] of dichloromethane, acidification of the column and resulting decline in performance occurred when a 50-ppm[sub v] inlet concentration was used. A biofilm model incorporating first order biodegradation kinetics provided a good fit to observed concentration profiles, and may prove to be a useful tool for designing biofiltration systems for low concentration VOC emissions.

Ergas, S.J. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Kinney, K.; Fuller, M.E.; Scow, K.M. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States))

1994-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

Local Emergency Plans, Physics Department Safety & Training Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local Emergency Plans Building 510 Local Emergency Plan (pdf) Building 510 Abbreviated Local Emergency Plan (pdf) Building 355 Local Emergency Plan (pdf) Building 355 Abbreviated...

391

Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hobbs, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Hobbs, D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Gamma radiation induced degradation in PE-PP block copolymer  

SciTech Connect

In the present investigation, effect of gamma irradiation on the PP-PE block copolymer has been studied. The polymer has been subjected to gamma irradiation from 100 to 500 Mrad dosages. Characterization of the polymer using XRD and FTIR was done both before irradiation and after irradiation in each step. Effect of irradiation on the electrical properties of the material has also been studied. FTIR study shows that the sample loses C - C stretching mode of vibration but gains C=C stretching mode of vibration after irradiation. Present investigation clearly indicates that though the electrical conductivity increases in the material, it undergoes degradation and shows brittleness due to irradiation.

Ravi, H. R.; Sreepad, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Govindaiah, T. N. [P.G. Department of Physics, Government College (Autonomous), Mandya - 571401, Karnataka State (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Materials for RSOFC Dual Operation with Low Degradation  

SciTech Connect

Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (RSOFCs) are energy conversion devices. They are capable of operating in both power generation mode (SOFC) and electrolysis modes (SOEC). RSOFC can integrate renewable production of electricity and hydrogen when power generation and steam electrolysis are coupled in a system, which can turn intermittent solar and wind energy into "firm power." In this DOE EERE project, VPS continuously advanced RSOFC cell stack technology in the areas of endurance and performance. Over 20 types of RSOFC cells were developed in the project. Many of those exceeded performance (area specific resistance less than 300 mohmcm2) and endurance (degradation rate less than 4% per 1000 hours) targets in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes at 750C. One of those cells, RSOFC-7, further demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Ultra high current electrolysis over 3 A/cm2 at 75% water electrolysis efficiency voltage of 1.67 V. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of over 600 days with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Over 6000 SOFC/SOEC cycles in an accelerated 20-minute cycling with degradation less than 3% per 1000 cycles. In RSOFC stack development, a number of kW-class RSOFC stacks were developed and demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis operation of over 5000 hours. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of 100 cycles. Scale up capability of using large area cells with 550 cm2 active area showing the potential for large-scale RSOFC stack development in the future. Although this project is an open-ended development project, this effort, leveraging Versa Power Systems' years of development experience, has the potential to bring renewable energy RSOFC storage systems significantly closer to commercial viability through improvements in RSOFC durability, performance, and cost. When unitized and deployed in renewable solar and wind installations, an RSOFC system can enable higher availability for intermittent renewable resources, thereby improving the commercial viability of these types of energy resources.

Eric, Tang; Tony, Wood; Sofiane, Benhaddad; Casey, Brown; Hongpeng, He; Jeff, Nelson; Oliver, Grande; Ben, Nuttall; Mark, Richards; Randy, Petri

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Syntrophic Degradation of Lactate in Methanogenic Co-cultures  

SciTech Connect

In environments where the amount of the inorganic electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, sulfur oroxidized metal ions (Fe3+;Mn4+) is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic associations of fermenting, acetogenic bacteria (e.g., sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as"secondary fermenters") and methanogenic archaea. In these consortia, the conversion of lactate to acetate, CO2 and methane depends on the cooperating activities of both metabolically distinct microbial groups that are tightly linked by the need to maintain the exchanged metabolites (hydrogenandformate) at very low concentrations.

Meyer, Birte; Stahl, David

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

Degradation problems with the solvent extraction organic at Roessing uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roessing Uranium Ltd recovers uranium from a low-grade ore in Namibia. Uranium is recovered and purified from an ion-exchange eluate in a solvent-extraction plant. The solvent-extraction plant uses Alamine 336 as the extractant for uranium, with isodecanol used as a phase modifier in Sasol SSX 210, an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent. Since the plant started in the mid 1970's, there have been a few episodes where the tertiary amine has been quickly and severely degraded when the plant was operated outside certain operating parameters. The Rossing experience is discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

Munyungano, Brodrick [Roessing Uranium Ltd, Private Bag 5005, Swakopmund (Namibia); Feather, Angus [Cognis, P. O. Box 361, Honeydew, 2040 (South Africa); Virnig, Michael [Cognis Corporation, 2430 N. Huachuca Dr, Tucson, Az (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Chapter 52.1, Local Contract Clauses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2.1, Local Contract Clauses 2.1, Local Contract Clauses [Reference: FAR 52, DEAR 952] Overview This section addresses the use of local clauses in DOE solicitations and contracts, and provides model local clauses that Contracting Officers may use when drafting their contracts. Background A local clause is a solicitation provision or contract clause that is not prescribed by either the FAR or the DEAR and is developed by a local DOE office for use in solicitations issued and contracts awarded by that office. Local clauses can be used for the following kinds of subject matter: Administrative contract issues. Local DOE site practices and procedures that affect the contract. Local DOE office solicitation procedures. Practices and procedures that implement FAR and DEAR policies.

398

Equivalence of Local Potential Approximations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent papers it has been noted that the local potential approximation of the Legendre and Wilson-Polchinski flow equations give, within numerical error, identical results for a range of exponents and Wilson-Fisher fixed points in three dimensions, providing a certain ``optimised'' cutoff is used for the Legendre flow equation. Here we point out that this is a consequence of an exact map between the two equations, which is nothing other than the exact reduction of the functional map that exists between the two exact renormalization groups. We note also that the optimised cutoff does not allow a derivative expansion beyond second order.

Tim R. Morris

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode  

SciTech Connect

The degradation of the ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells was studied under an accelerated stress test of catalyst support (potential hold at 1.2 V). Electrochemical behaviors of the cathode based on graphitic mesoporous carbon supported Pt catalyst were examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Impedance data were plotted and expressed in the complex capacitance form to determine useful parameters in the transmission line model: the double-layer capacitance, peak frequency, and ionic resistance. Electrochemical surface area and hydrogen crossover current through the membrane were estimated from cyclic voltammogram, while cathode Faradaic resistance was compared with ionic resistance as a function of test time. It was observed that during an accelerated stress test of catalyst support, graphitic mesoporous carbon becomes hydrophilic which increases interfacial area between the ionomer and the catalyst up to 100 h. However, the ionic resistance in the catalyst layer drastically increases after 100 h with further carbon support oxidation. The underlying mechanism has been studied and it was found that significant degradation of ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer due to catalyst support corrosion induces uneven hydration and mechanical stress in the ionomer.

Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

2011-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

400

Genetics and chemistry of lignin degradation by Streptomyces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research goal was to define the involvement of lignin peroxidases and other extracellular enzymes in lignin degradation by Streptomyces. We examined the biochemistry and genetics of lignin degrading enzyme production by several strains of Streptomyces. The lignin peroxidase ALiP-P3 of S. viridosporus was characterized kinetically and its activity optimized for oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and vanillyl-acetone. Sensitive spectrophotometric assays were developed for monitoring oxidation of these substrates. ALiP-P3 reaction chemistry was examined using both spectrophotometric assays and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Results showed that the enzyme oxidizes phenolic lignin substructure models in strong preference to nonphenolic ones. The peroxidase was also shown to depolymerize native lignin. We also cloned the ALip-P3 gene S. lividans in plasmid vector pIJ702. The cloned gene was partially sequenced, We also immunologically characterized the lignin peroxidase of S. viridosporus T7A and showed it to be structurally related to peroxidases produced by other lignin-solubilizing Streptomyces, but not the the H8 lignin peroxidase of P. chrysosporium. Studies with peroxidase deficient mutants of strain T7A showed that lignin peroxidases of S. viridosporus are directly involved in the solubilization of lignin. Additional research showed that other enzymes are also probably involved in lignin solubilization, possibly including extracellular esterases.

Crawford, D.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Data Filtering Impact on PV Degradation Rates and Uncertainty (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaics (PV) it becomes vital to know how power output decreases with time. In order to predict power delivery, degradation rates must be determined accurately. Data filtering, any data treatment assessment of long-term field behavior, is discussed as part of a more comprehensive uncertainty analysis and can be one of the greatest sources of uncertainty in long-term performance studies. Several distinct filtering methods such as outlier removal and inclusion of only sunny days on several different metrics such as PVUSA, performance ratio, DC power to plane-of-array irradiance ratio, uncorrected, and temperature-corrected were examined. PVUSA showed the highest sensitivity while temperature-corrected power over irradiance ratio was found to be the least sensitive to data filtering conditions. Using this ratio it is demonstrated that quantification of degradation rates with a statistical accuracy of +/- 0.2%/year within 4 years of field data is possible on two crystalline silicon and two thin-film systems.

Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Simulation of substrate degradation in composting of sewage sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To simulate the substrate degradation kinetics of the composting process, this paper develops a mathematical model with a first-order reaction assumption and heat/mass balance equations. A pilot-scale composting test with a mixture of sewage sludge and wheat straw was conducted in an insulated reactor. The BVS (biodegradable volatile solids) degradation process, matrix mass, MC (moisture content), DM (dry matter) and VS (volatile solid) were simulated numerically by the model and experimental data. The numerical simulation offered a method for simulating k (the first-order rate constant) and estimating k{sub 20} (the first-order rate constant at 20 {sup o}C). After comparison with experimental values, the relative error of the simulation value of the mass of the compost at maturity was 0.22%, MC 2.9%, DM 4.9% and VS 5.2%, which mean that the simulation is a good fit. The k of sewage sludge was simulated, and k{sub 20}, k{sub 20s} (first-order rate coefficient of slow fraction of BVS at 20 {sup o}C) of the sewage sludge were estimated as 0.082 and 0.015 d{sup -1}, respectively.

Zhang Jun [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Gao Ding, E-mail: gaod@igsnrr.ac.c [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Chen Tongbin; Zheng Guodi; Chen Jun; Ma Chuang; Guo Songlin [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Du Wei [Beijing GreenTech Environmental Engineering Company, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Identifying Efficiency Degrading Faults in Split Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies estimate that as much as 50% of packaged air conditioning systems operate in faulty conditions that degrade system efficiency. Common faults include: under- and over-charged systems (too much or too little refrigerant), faulty expansions valves (stuck valves, valve hunting, poorly tuned valve controllers), and fouled evaporators and condensers. Furthermore, air conditioning systems can often be adjusted to improve efficiency while continuing to meet cooling loads (adjusting system pressures, decreasing superheat setpoints). This study presents the design of a low cost device that can non-invasively measure system operating conditions, diagnose faults, estimate potential energy savings, and provide recommendations on how the system should be adjusted or repaired. Using eight external temperature measurements, the device potentially can detect and diagnose up to ten faults commonly found in HVAC systems. Steady state temperatures are compared to threshold values obtained from literature and HVAC manufacturers to detect and determine the severity of faults and subsequent reductions in coefficient of performance. Preliminary tests reveal the potential for the device to detect and diagnose common efficiency-degrading faults in HVAC systems.

Terrill, T. J.; Brown, M. L.; Cheyne, R. W. Jr.; Cousins, A. J.; Daniels, B. P.; Erb, K. L.; Garcia, P. A.; Leutermann, M. J.; Nel, A. J.; Robert, C. L.; Widger, S. B.; Williams, A. G.; Rasmussen, B. P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

DEGRADATION EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER DRUMS AND TANKS  

SciTech Connect

Heavy water with varying chemistries is currently being stored in over 6700 drums in L- and K-areas and in seven tanks in L-, K-, and C-areas. A detailed evaluation of the potential degradation of the drums and tanks, specific to their design and service conditions, has been performed to support the demonstration of their integrity throughout the desired storage period. The 55-gallon drums are of several designs with Type 304 stainless steel as the material of construction. The tanks have capacities ranging from 8000 to 45600 gallons and are made of Type 304 stainless steel. The drums and tanks were designed and fabricated to national regulations, codes and standards per procurement specifications for the Savannah River Site. The drums have had approximately 25 leakage failures over their 50+ years of use with the last drum failure occurring in 2003. The tanks have experienced no leaks to date. The failures in the drums have occurred principally near the bottom weld, which attaches the bottom to the drum sidewall. Failures have occurred by pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and are attributable, in part, to the presence of chloride ions in the heavy water. Probable degradation mechanisms for the continued storage of heavy water were evaluated that could lead to future failures in the drum or tanks. This evaluation will be used to support establishment of an inspection plan which will include susceptible locations, methods, and frequencies for the drums and tanks to avoid future leakage failures.

Mickalonis, J.; Vormelker, P.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Herring, S. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Pickard, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Each county is encouraged to develop and implement a local water management plan. This section sets the specifications that must be met by local plans. The status of county water plans is shown...

407

Local Energy Generation in Barotropic Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local growth of disturbances to a steady, nondivergent shear flow is investigated in the context of the barotropic vorticity equation (BVE). A new expression for the instantaneous energy generation rate is derived by using a local coordinate ...

R. Iacono

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Department of Energy Idaho - State & Local  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

links > State & Local State & Local City of Idaho Falls State of Idaho Home Page Idaho State Police Links to Idaho Sites Idaho Media Idaho Newspapers Television KIDK Idaho Falls -...

409

Method for localizing heating in tumor tissue  

SciTech Connect

A method for a localized tissue heating of tumors is disclosed. Localized radio frequency current fields are produced with specific electrode configurations. Several electrode configurations are disclosed, enabling variations in electrical and thermal properties of tissues to be exploited.

Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM); McCabe, Charles W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Mobile sensor network localization in harsh environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The node localization problem in mobile sensor networks has recently received significant attention. Particle filters, adapted from robotics, have produced good localization accuracies in conventional settings, but suffer significantly when used in challenging ...

Harsha Chenji; Radu Stoleru

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Local Option - Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, Local Government Eligible Technologies Boilers, Building Insulation, CaulkingWeather-stripping, Central Air conditioners, Chillers,...

412

Localized light absorption by nanoscale semiconducting tips ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Localized light absorption ... constructive interference between transmitted light and internal reflections at resonant radii Page 14. ...

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

Localized Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Polymer Nanocomposites. Presentation Title, Localized Characterization of ...

414

Radioimmune localization of occult carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Patients with a rising serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and no clinical or roentgenographic evidence of recurrent or metastatic cancer present a treatment dilemma. Eleven such patients, 10 with a previously treated colorectal carcinoma and 1 with a previously treated breast carcinoma, received an injection of the anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 labeled with the radioisotope indium 111. Nuclear scintigraphy was performed on days 3 and 5 through 7 to detect potential sites of tumor recurrence. The monoclonal antibody scan accurately predicted the presence or absence of occult malignancy in 7 (64%) patients. Second-look laparotomy confirmed the monoclonal antibody scan results in the patients with colorectal cancer, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed metastatic breast cancer. This study demonstrates that In-ZCE-025 can localize occult carcinoma and may assist the surgeon in facilitating the operative exploration. In-ZCE-025 assisted in the initiation of adjuvant therapy for the patient with breast cancer.

Duda, R.B.; Zimmer, A.M.; Rosen, S.T.; Gilyon, K.A.; Webber, D.; Spies, S.; Spies, W.; Merchant, B. (Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Entangling capacity with local ancilla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the entangling capacity of a dynamical operation with access to local ancilla. A comparison is made between the entangling capacity with and without the assistance of prior entanglement. An analytic solution is found for the log-negativity entangling capacity of two-qubit gates, which equals the entanglement of the Choi matrix isomorphic to the unitary operator. Surprisingly, the availability of prior entanglement does not affect this result; a property we call resource independence of the entangling capacity. We prove several useful upper-bounds on the entangling capacity that hold for general qudit dynamical operations, and for a whole family of entanglement measures including log-negativity and log-robustness. The log-robustness entangling capacity is shown to be resource independent for general dynamics. We provide numerical results supporting a conjecture that the log-negativity entangling capacity is resource independence for all two-qudit unitaries.

Campbell, Earl T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Experimental and Computational Studies of Fluid Flow Phenomena in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine and Oil Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA IN CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE AND OIL FIELDS Chuang Ji ( chuang.ji@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Goodarz Ahmadi ( ahmadi@clarkson.edu ) BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Duane H. Smith ( duane.smith@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 2 INTRODUCTION Sequestration of CO 2 by injection into deep geological formations is a method to reduce CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, when CO 2 is injected underground, it forms fingers extending into the rock pores saturated with brine or petroleum. This flow

417

California's Transition To Local Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California's Transition To Local Renewable Energy: 12,000 Megawatts By 2020 A Report on the Governor's Conference on Local Renewable Energy June 7, 2012 #12;This report was made possible. #12;California's Transition To Local Renewable Energy: 12,000 Megawatts By 2020 A Report

Kammen, Daniel M.

418

Simultaneous Localization, Mapping and Moving Object Tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous localization, mapping and moving object tracking (SLAMMOT) involves both simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) in dynamic environments and detecting and tracking these dynamic objects. In this paper, a mathematical framework is ... Keywords: detection, localization, mapping, mobile robotics, robotic perception, tracking

Chieh-Chih Wang; Charles Thorpe; Sebastian Thrun; Martial Hebert; Hugh Durrant-Whyte

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Secure localization with phantom node detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an adversarial environment, various kinds of attacks become possible if malicious nodes could claim fake locations that are different from their physical locations. In this paper, we propose a secure localization mechanism that detects existence of ... Keywords: Decentralized algorithm, Localization, Location verification, Secure localization, Sensor networks, Speculative algorithm

Joengmin Hwang; Tian He; Yongdae Kim

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Kinetic viscoelasticity modeling applied to degradation during carbon–carbon composite processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetic viscoelasticity modeling has been successfully utilized to describe phenomena during cure of thermoset based carbon fiber reinforced matrices. The basic difference from classic viscoelasticity is that the fundamental ...

Drakonakis, Vassilis M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbon deposition during brittle rock deformation: Changes in electrical properties of fault zones and potential geoelectric phenomena during earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate potential mechanisms for geoelectric phenomena accompanying earthquakes, we have deformed hollow cylinders of Sioux quartzite to failure in the presence of carbonaceous pore fluids and investigated the resulting changes in electrical conductivity and carbon distribution. Samples were loaded at room temperature or 400 C by a hydrostatic pressure at their outer diameter, increasing pressure at a constant rate to {approx}290 MPa. Pore fluids consisted of pure CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and a 1:1 mixture of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, each with pore pressures of 2.0 to 4.1 MPa. Failure occurred by the formation of mode II shear fractures transecting the hollow cylinder walls. Radial resistivities of the cylinders fell to 2.9 to 3.1 M{Omega}-m for CO tests and 15.2 to 16.5 M{Omega}-m for CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} tests, compared with >23 M{Omega}-m for dry, undeformed cylinders. Carbonaceous fluids had no discernable influence on rock strength. Based on mapping using electron microprobe techniques, carbon occurs preferentially as quasi-continuous films on newly-formed fracture surfaces, but these films are absent from pre-existing surfaces in those same experiments. The observations support the hypothesis that electrical conductivity of rocks is enhanced by the deposition of carbon on fracture surfaces and imply that electrical properties may change in direct response to brittle deformation. They also suggest that the carbon films formed nearly instantaneously as the cracks formed. Carbon film deposition may accompany the development of microfracture arrays prior to and during fault rupture and thus may be capable of explaining precursory and coseismic geoelectric phenomena.

Mathez, E A; Roberts, J J; Duba, A G; Kronenberg, A K; Karner, S L

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

Why sequence genome closure of lignocellulosic degrader Verrucomicrobium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome closure of lignocellulosic genome closure of lignocellulosic degrader Verrucomicrobium sp. strain TAV2? Wood-feeding termites have microbial communities in their guts that are capable of converting cellulose and hemicellulose into sugars, hydrogen and methane. They can break down as much as a billion tons of raw plant biomass annually, and are of interest to bioenergy researchers hoping to harness these abilities for commercial biofuel production. To better understand the interactions and roles within the gut microbial community, the project focuses on sequencing a Termite Associated Verrucomicrobium (TAV) bacterial strain of Verrucomicrobium known as TAV2. Members of the Verrucomicrobia phylum are found in a number of environments both in water and in soils. As members of the soil microbial community,

423

ITP Materials: Development of Materials Resistant to Metal Dustiing Degradation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Degradation of metallic structural compo- nents by metal dusting is a major issue in plants such as those involved in hydrogen production, ammonia synthesis, methanol reforming, and syngas (H 2 /CO mixtures) pro- duction. Metal dusting is also experienced at high temperatures in the oxidizing-carbur- izing environments that are prevalent in the heat-treating industry and in processes that involve direct reduction in the production of iron. While experiments have proved that metal dusting does occur, industries could not develop an approach to combat this problem because of a lack of understanding

424

Thermochemical Degradation Mechanisms of SiC/BN/SiC Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermochemical Degradation Mechanisms of SiC/BN/SiC ... Modeling Framework and Associated Simulation Tools for the Prediction of ...

425

FCV Learning Demonstration: First-Generation Vehicle Results and Factors Affecting Fuel Cell Degradation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentaion on the FCV Learning Demonstration and factors affecting fuel cell degradation given at the Fuel Cell Seminar on October 17, 2007 in San Antonio, TX.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Thomas, H.; Garbak, J.

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

An adaptive modeling and simulation environment for combined-cycle data reconciliation and degradation estimation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Performance engineers face the major challenge in modeling and simulation for the after-market power system due to system degradation and measurement errors. Currently, the majority… (more)

Lin, TsungPo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts ___ an in situ XAS Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the major challenges in the development of clean energy fuel cells is the performance degradation of the electrocatalyst, which, apart from poisoning effects, can suffer from corrosion due to its exposure to a harsh environment under high potentials. In this communication, we demonstrate how interactions of Pt with a transition metal support affect not only, as commonly intended, the catalytic activity, but also the reactivity of Pt towards oxide formation or dissolution. We use two well-defined single-crystal model systems, Pt/Rh(111) and Pt/Au(111) and a unique x-ray spectroscopy technique with enhanced energy resolution to monitor the potential-dependent oxidation state of Pt, and find two markedly different oxidation mechanisms on the two different substrates. This information can be of great significance for future design of more active and more stable catalysts. We have studied the potential-induced degradation of Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on Rh(111) and Au(111) single-crystal substrates. The anodic formation of Pt oxides was monitored using in situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection x-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS). Although Pt was deposited on both substrates in a three-dimensional island growth mode, we observed remarkable differences during oxide formation that can only be understood in terms of strong Pt-substrate interactions throughout the Pt islands. Anodic polarization of Pt/Rh(111) up to +1.6 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) leads to formation an incompletely oxidized passive layer, whereas formation of PtO2 and partial Pt dissolution is observed for Pt/Au(111).

Friebel, Daniel

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Think Spring, Think Local... | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Think Spring, Think Local... Think Spring, Think Local... Think Spring, Think Local... April 25, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis Eating locally grown produce is healthy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/CDH_Design Eating locally grown produce is healthy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/CDH_Design Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs How can I participate? Visit your local farmers' market or join a CSA to get your fruits and vegetables this summer. Are you getting excited thinking about how you plan to support your local economy, your larger environment and also your health this spring? I know I am! The nicer weather the eastern regions have been experiencing lately has got

429

Pettisville Local Schools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pettisville Local Schools Pettisville Local Schools Jump to: navigation, search Name Pettisville Local Schools Facility Pettisville Local Schools Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Pettisville Local Schools Developer Pettisville Local Schools Energy Purchaser Pettisville Local Schools Location Wauseon OH Coordinates 41.52792917°, -84.22510743° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.52792917,"lon":-84.22510743,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

General and Localized Corrosion of Outer Barrier of High-Level Waste Container in Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As described in the License Application Design Selection Report, the recommended waste, package design is Engineering Design Alternative II (CRWMS M&O 1999). This design includes a double-wall waste package (WP) underneath a protective drip shield (DS). purpose and scope of the process-level model described here is to account for both general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB), which assumed to be Alloy 22 (UNS N06022-21Cr-13Mo-4Fe-3W-2C-Ni) (ASTM 1997a). This model will include several sub-models, which will account for dry oxidation (DOX), humid air corrosion (HAC), general corrosion (GC) in the aqueous phase, and localized corrosion (LC) the aqueous phase. This model serves as a feed to the waste package degradation (WAPDEG) code for performance, assessment.

Farmer, J.; McCright, D.; Gdowski, G.; Wang, F.; Summers, T.; Bedrossian, P.; Horn, J.; Lian, T.; Estill, J.; Lingenfelter, A.; Halsey, W.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

431

Fingerprints of a Local Supernova  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of precise analysis of elements and isotopes in meteorites, comets, the Earth, the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, solar flares, and the solar photosphere since 1960 reveal fingerprints of a local supernova (SN), undiluted by interstellar material. Heterogeneous SN debris formed the planets. The Sun formed on the neutron (n) rich SN core. The ground-state masses of nuclei reveal repulsive n-n interactions that trigger n-emission and a series of nuclear reactions that generate solar luminosity, the solar wind, and the measured flux of solar neutrinos. The location of the Sun's high-density core shifts relative to the solar surface as gravitational forces exerted by the major planets cause the Sun to experience abrupt acceleration and deceleration, like a yoyo on a string, in its orbit about the ever-changing centre-of-mass of the solar system. Solar cycles (surface magnetic activity, solar eruptions, and sunspots) and major climate changes arise from changes in the depth of the energetic SN co...

Manuel, Oliver

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fingerprints of a Local Supernova  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of precise analysis of elements and isotopes in meteorites, comets, the Earth, the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, solar flares, and the solar photosphere since 1960 reveal fingerprints of a local supernova (SN), undiluted by interstellar material. Heterogeneous SN debris formed the planets. The Sun formed on the neutron (n) rich SN core. The ground-state masses of nuclei reveal repulsive n-n interactions that trigger n-emission and a series of nuclear reactions that generate solar luminosity, the solar wind, and the measured flux of solar neutrinos. The location of the Sun's high-density core shifts relative to the solar surface as gravitational forces exerted by the major planets cause the Sun to experience abrupt acceleration and deceleration, like a yoyo on a string, in its orbit about the ever-changing centre-of-mass of the solar system. Solar cycles (surface magnetic activity, solar eruptions, and sunspots) and major climate changes arise from changes in the depth of the energetic SN core remnant in the interior of the Sun.

Oliver Manuel; Hilton Ratcliffe

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

Interspecies acetate transfer influences the extent of anaerobic benzoate degradation by syntrophic consortia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Benzoate degradation by an anaerobic, syntrophic bacterium, strain SB, in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G-11 reached a threshold value which depended on the amount of acetate added, and ranged from about 2.5 to 29.9 {mu}M. Increasing acetate concentrations also uncompetitively inhibited benzoate degradation. The apparent V{sub max} and K{sub m} for benzoate degradation decreased with increasing acetate concentration, but the benzoate degradation capacity (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of cell suspensions remained comparable. The addition of an acetate-using bacterium to cocultures after the threshold was reached resulted in the degradation of benzoate to below the detection limit. Mathematical simulations showed that the benzoate threshold was not predicted by the inhibitory effect of acetate on benzoate degradation kinetics. With nitrate instead of sulfate as the terminal electron acceptor, no benzoate threshold was observed in the presence of 20 mM acetate even though the degradation capacity was lower with nitrate than with sulfate. When strain SB was grown with a hydrogen-using partner that had a 5-fold lower hydrogen utilization capacity, a 5 to 9-fold lower the benzoate degradation capacity was observed compared to SB/G-11 cocultures. The Gibb`s free energy for benzoate degradation was less negative in cell suspensions with threshold compared to those without threshold. These studies showed that the threshold was not a function of the inhibition of benzoate degradation capacity by acetate, or the toxicity of the undissociated form of acetate. Rather a critical or minimal Gibb`s free energy may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation.

Warikoo, V.; McInerney, M.J.; Suflita, J.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Techniques to evaluate the importance of common cause degradation on reliability and safety of nuclear weapons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the nuclear weapon stockpile ages, there is increased concern about common degradation ultimately leading to common cause failure of multiple weapons that could significantly impact reliability or safety. Current acceptable limits for the reliability and safety of a weapon are based on upper limits on the probability of failure of an individual item, assuming that failures among items are independent. We expanded the current acceptable limits to apply to situations with common cause failure. Then, we developed a simple screening process to quickly assess the importance of observed common degradation for both reliability and safety to determine if further action is necessary. The screening process conservatively assumes that common degradation is common cause failure. For a population with between 100 and 5000 items we applied the screening process and conclude the following. In general, for a reliability requirement specified in the Military Characteristics (MCs) for a specific weapon system, common degradation is of concern if more than 100(1-x)% of the weapons are susceptible to common degradation, where x is the required reliability expressed as a fraction. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon subsystem if more than 0.1% of the population is susceptible to common degradation. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon component or overall weapon system if two or more components/weapons in the population are susceptible to degradation. Finally, we developed a technique for detailed evaluation of common degradation leading to common cause failure for situations that are determined to be of concern using the screening process. The detailed evaluation requires that best estimates of common cause and independent failure probabilities be produced. Using these techniques, observed common degradation can be evaluated for effects on reliability and safety.

Darby, John L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Towards local electromechanical probing of cellular and biomolecular systems in a liquid environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromechanical coupling is ubiquitous in biological systems with examples ranging from simple piezoelectricity in calcified and connective tissues to voltage-gated ion channels, energy storage in mitochondria, and electromechanical activity in cardiac myocytes and outer hair cell stereocilia. Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has originally emerged as a technique to study electromechanical phenomena in ferroelectric materials, and in recent years, has been employed to study a broad range of non-ferroelectric polar materials, including piezoelectric biomaterials. At the same time, the technique has been extended from ambient to liquid imaging on model ferroelectric systems. Here, we present results on local electromechanical probing of several model cellular and biomolecular systems, including insulin and lysozyme amyloid fibrils, breast adenocarcinoma cells, and bacteriorhodopsin in a liquid environment. The specific features of SPM operation in liquid are delineated and bottlenecks on the route towards nanometer-resolution electromechanical imaging of biological systems are identified.

Sergei V. Kalinin; Brian J. Rodriguez; Stephen Jesse; Katyayani Seal; Roger Proksch; Sophia Hohlbauch; Irene Revenko; Gary Lee Thompson; Alexey A. Vertegel

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2  

SciTech Connect

Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent with the inherent complexity associated with correct heme insertion and acylation of MtrC that occurs in the periplasm prior to its targeting to the outer membrane. These latter results suggest that MtrC protein trafficking to the outer membrane and its subsequent degradation are tightly regulated, which is consistent with cellular processing pathways that target MtrC to extracellular structures and their possible role in promoting electron transfer from Shewanella to extracellular acceptors.

Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

437

General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

F. Hua

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Momentum in General Relativity: Local versus Quasilocal Conservation Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a general relativistic conservation law for linear and angular momentum for matter and gravitational fields in a finite volume of space that does not rely on any spacetime symmetries. This work builds on our previous construction of a general relativistic energy conservation law with the same features. Our approach uses the Brown and York quasilocal stress-energy-momentum tensor for matter and gravitational fields, plus the concept of a rigid quasilocal frame (RQF) introduced in previous work. The RQF approach allows us to construct, in a generic spacetime, frames of reference whose boundaries are rigid (their shape and size do not change with time), and that have precisely the same six arbitrary time-dependent degrees of freedom as the accelerating and tumbling rigid frames we are familiar with in Newtonian mechanics. These RQFs, in turn, give rise to a completely general conservation law for the six components of momentum (three linear and three angular) of a finite system of matter and gravitational fields. We compare in detail this quasilocal RQF approach to constructing conservation laws with the usual local one based on spacetime symmetries, and discuss the shortcomings of the latter. These RQF conservation laws lead to a deeper understanding of physics in the form of simple, exact, operational definitions of gravitational energy and momentum fluxes, which in turn reveal, for the first time, the exact, detailed mechanisms of gravitational energy and momentum transfer taking place in a wide variety of physical phenomena, including a simple falling apple. As a concrete example, we derive a general relativistic version of Archimedes' law that we apply to understand electrostatic weight and buoyant force in the context of a Reissner-Nordstrom black hole.

Richard J. Epp; Paul L. McGrath; Robert B. Mann

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

439

FY-09 Report: Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Gen-IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have identified that an air ingress event following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization is a very important incident. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. If this accident occurs, the oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will eventually cause the release of fission products. The potential collapse of the core bottom structures causing the release of CO and fission products is one of the concerns. Therefore, experimental validation with the analytical model and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model developed in this study is very important. Estimating the proper safety margin will require experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods Research and Development project. The second year of this three-year project (FY-08 to FY-10) was focused on (a) the analytical, CFD, and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow; (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments and modeling; (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) implementation of advanced graphite oxidation models into the GAMMA code, and (f) air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses of the whole air-ingress scenario.

Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

R-local Delaunay inhibition Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let us consider the local specification system of Gibbs point process with inhibition pairwise interaction acting on some Delaunay subgraph specifically not containing the edges of Delaunay triangles with circumscribed circle of radius greater than some fixed positive real value R. Even if we think that there exists at least a stationary Gibbs state associated to such system, we do not know yet how to prove it mainly due to some uncontrolled “negative ” contribution in the expression of the local energy needed to insert any number of points in some large enough empty region of the space. This is solved by introducing some subgraph, called the R-local Delaunay graph, which is a slight but tailored modification of the previous one. This kind of model does not inherit the local stability property but satisfies some new extension called R-local stability. This weakened property combined with the local property provides the existence of Gibbs state.

Etienne Bertin; Jean-michel Billiot; Rémy Drouilhet; In Memory Of Etienne Bertin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "local degradation phenomena" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Genome Sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus Strain T7A ATCC 39115, a Lignin-Degrading Actinomycete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We announce the availability of the genome sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus strain T7A ATCC 39115, a plant biomass- degrading actinomycete. This bacterium is of special interest because of its capacity to degrade lignin, an underutilized compo- nent of plants in the context of bioenergy. It has a full complement of genes for plant biomass catabolism.

Davis, Jennifer R. [Brown University; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wei, Chia-Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Sello, Jason K. [Brown University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Recursive support vector censored regression for monitoring product quality based on degradation profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-consuming evaluation of a product's lifetime or quality often prevents manufacturers from meeting market requirements within the time allotted for product development. Degradation profiles obtained from harsh testing environments have been widely ... Keywords: Accelerated test, Cycle-life evaluation, Degradation profile, Genetic algorithm, Machine learning and data mining, Nonlinear censored regression, Recursive support vector censored regression, Secondary rechargeable battery

Jong In Park; Myong K. Jeong

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Materials Reliability Program: PWR Internals Material Aging Degradation Mechanism Screening and Threshold Values (MRP-175)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides screening criteria and their technical bases for age-related degradation evaluation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) internals component items. It is a key element in an overall strategy that uses knowledge of internals design, materials, and material properties and applies screening methodologies for known age-related degradation mechanisms to manage the effects of aging in PWR internals.

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

444

Complete Genome Sequence of the Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Cellulosilyticum lentocellum  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosilyticum lentocellum DSM 5427 is an anaerobic, endospore-forming member of the Firmicutes. We describe the complete genome sequence of this cellulose-degrading bacterium; originally isolated from estuarine sediment of a river that received both domestic and paper mill waste. Comparative genomics of cellulolytic clostridia will provide insight into factors that influence degradation rates.

Miller, David A [Cornell University; Suen, Garret [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Fox, Brian G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Angert, Esther R. [Cornell University; Currie, Cameron [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Study on Isolation, Identification and the Biodegradation Characteristics of Crude Oil Degrading Strain SY1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A crude oil degrading strain SY1 was isolated from the soil contaminated by crude oil. The strain SY1 could utilize crude oil as the sole carbon source. The strain was identified as a member in Zoogloea species (Zoogloea sp. Strain SY1). After the domestication ... Keywords: crude oil degrading strain, Zoogloea species, kinetic model

Yu Liu; Zhengyao Li; Cunyi Song; Li Wang; Huishang Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Degradation Rates of the AVHRR Visible Channel for the NOAA 6, 7, and 9 Spacecraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AVHRR channel 1 (0.57–0.69 µm) degradations were determined by comparing desert models with 68 months of observations of the Libyan Desert (20° to 30°N, 201 to 30°E). The comparisons revealed that the degradation rates were 0, 3.5% and 6.0% per ...

W. Frank Staylor

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Fully localized two-dimensional embedded solitons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the prediction of fully localized two-dimensional embedded solitons. These solitons are obtained in a quasi-one-dimensional waveguide array which is periodic along one spatial direction and localized along the orthogonal direction. Under appropriate nonlinearity, these solitons are found to exist inside the Bloch bands (continuous spectrum) of the waveguide and thus are embedded solitons. These embedded solitons are fully localized along both spatial directions. In addition, they are fully stable under perturbations.

Yang Jianke [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Transcriptome and Biochemical Analyses of Fungal Degradation of Wood  

SciTech Connect

Lignocellulosic accounts for a large percentage of material that can be utilized for biofuels. The most costly part of lignocellulosic material processing is the initial hydrolysis of the wood which is needed to circumvent the lignin barrier and the crystallinity of cellulose. Enzymes will play an increased role in this conversion in that they potentially provide an alternative to costly and caustic high temperature and acid treatment. The increasing use of enzymes in biotechnology is facilitated by both continued improvements in enzyme technology but also in the discovery of new and novel enzymes. The present proposal is aimed at identifying the enzymes which are known to depolymerize woody biomass. Fundamental understanding of how nature gains access to cellulose and hemicellulose will impact all applications. Because fungi are the only known microbes capable of circumventing the lignin barrier, knowledge of the enzyme they use is of great potential for biofuel processing. Nature has evolved different fungal mechanisms for enzymatic hydrolysis of wood. Most notable are the white-rot fungi (wrf) and the brown-rot fungi (brf). This proposed research aims at determining the complete transcriptome of three wrf and two brf to determine the enzymes involved in lignocellulose degradation. The transcriptome work will be supported by enzyme characterization (and zymograms) and finally analysis of the lignin component to determine the mode of lignin modification. In this proposed research, we hypothesize that: 1) Determination of the complete transcriptome of closely related white and brown rot fungi will lead to knowledge of the relevant enzymes involved in wood degradation. 2) Knowledge of the extracellular transcriptome and the mechanism of wood decay can only be obtained if the products of the decay are known. As such, characterization of the lignin oxidation products will correlate the enzymes involved (obtained from the transcriptome) to the lignin oxidation products. The Department of Energy has sequenced the P. chrysosporium genome and has approved the sequencing of the genome of the closely-related brown rot fungus P. placenta. This comparative genomics approach will yield important information on differences between these two fungi. Analysis of gene unique to each fungus (which have been lost or gained) can potentially lead to determining the enzymes which are responsible for each type of decay. This comparison, however, would not be complete without comparing the transcriptome and the proteome/enzymes. Comparative genomics may tell us which genes may be important, but it will not tell us when these genes are expressed, at what levels and will not necessarily tell us what these genes do.

Tien, Ming

2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The deposition of carbon from carbonaceous gaseous environments is prevalent in many chemical and petrochemical processes such as, hydrogen-, ammonia-, and methanol-reforming systems, syngas production systems, and iron-ore reduction plants. One of the major consequences of carbon deposition is the degradation of structural materials by a phenomenon known as ''metal dusting''. There are two major issues of importance in metal dusting. First is formation of coke and subsequent deposition of coke on metallic structural components. Second is the initiation and subsequent propagation of metal dusting degradation of the structural alloy. In the past, we reported on the mechanism for metal dusting of Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present metal dusting data on both Fe- and Ni-base alloys after exposure in high and atmospheric pressure environments that simulate the gas chemistry in operating hydrogen reformers. We have also measured the progression of pits by measuring the depth as a function of exposure time for a variety of Fe- and Ni-base structural alloys. We have clearly established the role of transport of iron in forming a non-protective spinel phase in the initiation process and presence of carbon transfer channels in the oxide scale for the continued propagation of pits, by nano-beam X-ray analysis using the advance photon source (APS), Raman scattering, and SEM/EDX analysis. In this report, we have developed correlations between weight loss and pit progression rates and evaluated the effects of carbon activity, system pressure, and alloy chemistry, on weight loss and pit propagation. To develop pit propagation data for the alloys without incurring substantial time for the initiation of pits, especially for the Ni-base alloys that exhibit incubation times of thousands of hours, a pre-pitting method has been developed. The pre-pitted alloys exhibited pit propagation rates similar to those of materials tested without pre-pitting. We have also developed a substantial body of metal-dusting data on the performance of Fe- and Ni-base weldments. During the course of this project, we have developed new Ni-base and Cu-base alloys and tested them in simulated metal dusting environments at 1 atm and at high pressures. Results clearly showed superior performance of both classes of alloys in resisting metal dusting. We also developed an approach to mitigate metal dusting by performing an intermediate oxidation step for extending the life of alloys in which metal dusting has initiated and pits are in progression. Finally, we have analyzed several components that have failed in plants such as hydrogen plant, pilot plant reformer, and a gas boiler.

Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

Experiments with Underwater Robot Localization and Tracking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pipeline-, and ?sh tracking,” Journal of Marine Design andRobot Localization and Tracking Peter Corke † , Carrickinvestigation into feature tracking for visual odometry for

Corke, Peter; Detwiler, Carrick; Dunbabin, Matthew; Hamilton, Michael; Rus, Daniela; Vasilescu, Iuliu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Local Option - Special Districts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Special Districts Local Option - Special Districts Local Option - Special Districts < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Bioenergy Solar Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been

452

Carbon Nanofiber Arrays Introduced as Artificial Local ...  

ORNL 2010-G00642/jcn UT-B IDs PFTT-200100978, PFTT-200201199, PFTT-200401482, PFTT-200401483 Carbon Nanofiber Arrays Introduced as Artificial Local ...

453

Local Generation Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Place United Kingdom Sector Biomass Product UK-based biomass firm developing anaerobic digestion plants. References Local Generation Limited1 LinkedIn Connections...

454

Local Option - Energy Improvement Financing Programs | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

authority, port authority, or another entity permitted by law to exercise the powers of an authority. The authorizing laws sets a series of rules governing these local...

455

On reconciling quantum mechanics and local realism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A necessary and natural change in our application of quantum mechanics to separated systems is shown to reconcile quantum mechanics and local realism. An analysis of separation and localization justifies the proposed change in application of quantum mechanics. An important EPRB experiment is reconsidered and it is seen that when it is correctly interpreted it supports local realism. This reconciliation of quantum mechanics with local realism allows the axiom sets of quantum mechanics, probability, and special relativity to be joined in a consistent global axiom set for physics.