National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for local degradation phenomena

  1. Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel Sang

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

  2. Effect of local filtering on Freezing Phenomena of Quantum Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumana Karmakar; Ajoy Sen; Amit Bhar; Debasis Sarkar

    2015-04-20

    General quantum correlations measures like quantum discord, one norm geometric quantum discord, exhibit freezing, sudden change, double sudden change behavior in their decay rates under different noisy channels. Therefore, one may attempt to investigate how the freezing behavior and other dynamical features are affected under application of local quantum operations. In this work, we demonstrate the effect of local filtering on the dynamical evolution of quantum correlations. We have found that using local filtering one may remove freezing depending upon the filtering parameter.

  3. Aalborg Universitet Experimental study and modeling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Sřren Juhl

    Fuel cell based combined heat and power production (CHP) systems fuel with natural gas fuel can 1 Serenergy A/S, Denmark, http://serenergy.dk , 2 Aalborg University, Department of Energy Technology, Denmark, http://www.iet.aau.dk ­ * Corresponding author: mpn@iet.aau.dk Abstract: Degradation

  4. A creep-damage model for mesoscale simulations of concrete expansion-degradation phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorla, Alain B; Le Pape, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Long-term performance of aging concrete in nuclear power plants (NPPs) requires a careful examination of the physical phenomena taking place in the material. Concrete under high neutron irradiation is subjected to large irreversible deformations as well as mechanical damage, caused by a swelling of the aggregates. However, these results, generally obtained in accelerated conditions in test reactors, cannot be directly applied to NPP irradiated structures, i.e., the biological shield, operating conditions due to difference in time scale and environmental conditions (temperature, humidity). Mesoscale numerical simulations are performed to separate the underlying mechanisms and their interactions. The cement paste creep-damage model accounts for the effect of the loading rate on the apparent damage properties of the material and uses an event-based approach to capture the competition between creep and damage. The model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the literature and shows a good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Studies of Local Degradation Phenomena in Composite Cathodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerlau, M.; Marcinek, M.; Srinivasan, V.; Kostecki, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Composite Cathodes for Li-ion Batteries Marie Kerlau, Marekfrom commercial Li-ion batteries and mode cells which

  6. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabelström, N., E-mail: sabelstrom.n.aa@m.titech.ac.jp; Hayashi, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Nagata, K. [Department of Conservation Science, Tokyo University of the Arts, 12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100?°C could be observed.

  7. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Janse, Daniel M. (Brookline, MA)

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  8. Attoheat transport phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc; M. A. Kozlowski

    2009-06-09

    Fascinating developments in optical pulse engineering over the last 20 years lead to the generation of laser pulses as short as few femtosecond, providing a unique tool for high resolution time domain spectroscopy. However, a number of the processes in nature evolve with characteristic times of the order of 1 fs or even shorter. Time domain studies of such processes require at first place sub-fs resolution, offered by pulse depicting attosecond localization. The generation, characterization and proof of principle applications of such pulses is the target of the attoscience. In the paper the thermal processes on the attosecond scale are described. The Klein-Gordon and Proca equations are developed. The relativistic effects in the heat transport on nanoscale are discussed. It is shown that the standard Fourier equation can not be valid for the transport phenomena induced by attosecond laser pulses. The heat transport in nanoparticles and nanotubules is investigated.

  9. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-?} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  10. Phenomena : and, Phoenix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabey, Benjamin James

    2009-01-01

    SAN DIEGO Phenomena and Phoenix A dissertation submitted inPhoenix……. ………………………………………………………………………………………. Recordings onViolinist Felix Olshofka: Phoenix for violin and computer,

  11. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Spernjak, Dusan; Baker, Andrew M.; Lujan, Roger W.; Langlois, David Alan; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Papadia, D. D.; Weber, Adam Z.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Shi, Shouwnen; More, K. L.; Grot, Steve

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  12. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  13. Superfluid analogies of cosmological phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volovik, G E

    2001-01-01

    Superfluid 3He-A gives example of how chirality, Weyl fermions, gauge fields and gravity appear in low emergy corner together with corresponding symmetries, including Lorentz symmetry and local SU(N). This supports idea that quantum field theory (Standard Model or GUT) is effective theory describing low-energy phenomena. * Momentum space topology of fermionic vacuum provides topological stability of universality class of systems, where above properties appear. * BCS scheme for 3He-A incorporates both ``relativistic'' infrared regime and ultraviolet ``transplanckian'' range: subtle issues of cut-off in quantum field theory and anomalies can be resolved on physical grounds. This allows to separate ``renormalizable'' terms in action, treated by effective theory, from those obtained only in ``transPlanckian'' physics. * Energy density of superfluid vacuum within effective theory is ~ E_{Planck}^4. Stability analysis of ground state beyond effective theory leads to exact nullification of vacuum energy: equilibrium...

  14. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  15. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

  16. Targeted polypeptide degradation (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    localization andor polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function. Authors: Church, George M. 1 ; Janse, Daniel M....

  17. Graphene tests of Klein phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano De Leo; Pietro Rotelli

    2012-02-07

    Graphene is characterized by chiral electronic excitations. As such it provides a perfect testing ground for the production of Klein pairs (electron/holes). If confirmed, the standard results for barrier phenomena must be reconsidered with, as a byproduct, the accumulation within the barrier of holes.

  18. Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation OLE PETERS1,2,3 * AND J. DAVID NEELIN3 1 convection and precipitation (the order parameter)--with correlated regions on scales of tens to hundreds the climatological mean by an order of magnitude or more. Moist convection and the accompanying precipitation have

  19. Measurements design and phenomena discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Rebollo-Neira

    2009-08-05

    The construction of measurements suitable for discriminating signal components produced by phenomena of different types is considered. The required measurements should be capable of cancelling out those signal components which are to be ignored when focusing on a phenomenon of interest. Under the hypothesis that the subspaces hosting the signal components produced by each phenomenon are complementary, their discrimination is accomplished by measurements giving rise to the appropriate oblique projector operator. The subspace onto which the operator should project is selected by nonlinear techniques in line with adaptive pursuit strategies.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Degradation in PEMFC with Dead-Ended Anode Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Experimental Investigation of Degradation in PEMFC with Dead-Ended Anode Operation Toyoaki Matsuura Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) systems. A Dead-Ended Anode (DEA) system has lower cost operation. In this study, the degradation phenomena of the PEMFC operated with DEA at the mid current range

  1. Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Degradation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Degradation in Petroleum-Contaminated Harbor Sediments under Sulfate of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in- situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum- contaminated did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe

  2. Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation, USA ABSTRACT In order to optimize and extend the life of photovoltaics (PV) modules, scientific photovoltaics. The statisti- cally significant relationships were investigated using lifetime and degradation

  3. "Multiscale Capabilities for Exploring Transport Phenomena in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: "Multiscale Capabilities for Exploring Transport Phenomena in Batteries": Ab Initio Calculations on Defective LiFePO4 Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  4. Canister storage building natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallman, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    This document specifies the natural phenomena loads for the canister storage building in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site.

  5. Theoretical Framework for Microscopic Osmotic Phenomena Theoretical Framework for Microscopic Osmotic Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Peter

    Theoretical Framework for Microscopic Osmotic Phenomena Theoretical Framework for Microscopic Osmotic Phenomena Paul J. Atzberger Department of Mathematics University of California, Santa Barbara 25, 2007) The basic ingredients of osmotic pressure are a solvent fluid with a soluble molecular

  6. Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires J. S. BARROWS U. S. Forest Service ABSTRACT Forest fire phenomena of forest fires is related to the International Symposium topic of Fire Models. Analysis of the behavior of large-scale forest fires and smaller scale experimental fires in forest fuels permits critical

  7. Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Interaction of energetic particles with solid targets . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.1 Ion irradiation

  8. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  9. Bayesian nonparametric learning of complex dynamical phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Emily Beth

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of many dynamical phenomena precludes the use of linear models for which exact analytic techniques are available. However, inference on standard nonlinear models quickly becomes intractable. In some cases, ...

  10. PRE-PRECIPITATION PHENOMENA AT GRAIN BOUNDARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briceno-Valero, J.

    2010-01-01

    13820 DE82 0 1 2 7 9 4 PRE-PRECIPITATION PHENOMENA AT GRAINof any evidence suggesting precipitation has occurred. Theand grain boundary precipitation have shown (1) that there

  11. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  12. Degradation Of Cementitious Materials Associated With Saltstone Disposal Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G. P; Smith, F. G. III

    2013-03-19

    The Saltstone facilities at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) stabilize and dispose of low-level radioactive salt solution originating from liquid waste storage tanks at the site. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives treated salt solution and mixes the aqueous waste with dry cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash to form a grout slurry which is mechanically pumped into concrete disposal cells that compose the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The solidified grout is termed “saltstone”. Cementitious materials play a prominent role in the design and long-term performance of the SDF. The saltstone grout exhibits low permeability and diffusivity, and thus represents a physical barrier to waste release. The waste form is also reducing, which creates a chemical barrier to waste release for certain key radionuclides, notably Tc-99. Similarly, the concrete shell of an SDF disposal unit (SDU) represents an additional physical and chemical barrier to radionuclide release to the environment. Together the waste form and the SDU compose a robust containment structure at the time of facility closure. However, the physical and chemical state of cementitious materials will evolve over time through a variety of phenomena, leading to degraded barrier performance over Performance Assessment (PA) timescales of thousands to tens of thousands of years. Previous studies of cementitious material degradation in the context of low-level waste disposal have identified sulfate attack, carbonation influenced steel corrosion, and decalcification (primary constituent leaching) as the primary chemical degradation phenomena of most relevance to SRS exposure conditions. In this study, degradation time scales for each of these three degradation phenomena are estimated for saltstone and concrete associated with each SDU type under conservative, nominal, and best estimate assumptions. The nominal value (NV) is an intermediate result that is more probable than the conservative estimate (CE) and more defensible than the best estimate (BE). The combined effects of multiple phenomena are then considered to determine the most limiting degradation time scale for each cementitious material. Degradation times are estimated using a combination of analytic solutions from literature and numerical simulation codes provided through the DOE Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Software Toolbox (http://cementbarriers.org). For the SDU 2 design, the roof, wall, and floor components are projected to become fully degraded under Nominal conditions at 3866, 923, and 1413 years, respectively. For SDU 4 the roof and floor are estimated to be fully degraded under Nominal conditions after 1137 and 1407 years, respectively; the wall is assumed to be fully degraded at time zero in the most recent PA simulations. Degradation of these concrete barriers generally occurs from combined sulfate attack and corrosion of embedded steel following carbonation. Saltstone is projected to degrade very slowly by decalcification, with complete degradation occurring in excess of 200,000 years for any SDU type. Complete results are provided.

  13. Degradation phenomena in PEM fuel cell with dead-ended anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    . Siegel, Anna G. Stefanopoulou Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward of Energy (DOE) target of 30 $/kW for automotive application by 2015 [1], cost reduction in both fuel cell cell systems for automotive applications employ a flow-through anode (FTA) mode which requires

  14. DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE...

  15. CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 3, 2013 CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - January 3, 2013 January 3, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events for...

  16. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH)...

  17. CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 21, 2012 CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August 21, 2012 August 21, 2012 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the...

  18. Method of microbially degrading trinitrotoluene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.; Vass, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method of degrading trinitrotoluene (TNT) includes contacting the TNT with intra-amoebic isolate CR-1, ATCC 75528.

  19. TRANSPORT NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2014-01-01

    NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION LutgardNUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION LutgardNUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard

  20. TRANSPORT NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2012-01-01

    NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION LutgardNUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION LutgardNUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard

  1. Non-thermal phenomena in galaxies clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfranco Brunetti

    2004-04-26

    The discovery of diffuse synchrotron radio emission and, more recently, of the hard X-ray (HXR) tails have triggered a growing interest about non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters. After a brief review of the most important evidences for non-thermal emission, I will focus on the origin of the emitting particles and of the hadronic component. In particular I will describe the particle-injection and -acceleration mechanisms at work in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and, at the same time, discuss the possibility to test current modellings of these phenomena with future radio, HXR, and gamma rays observatories.

  2. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.A. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)); Durham, M.D. (ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)); Sowa, W.A. (California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Combustion Lab.); Himes, R.M. (Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States)); Mahaffey, W.A. (CHAM of North America, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States))

    1991-10-21

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  3. DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop- Opening Remarks & Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop - Opening Remarks & Agenda October 25-26, 2011 Germantown, MD

  4. ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report+ on ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA . in a COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK presented-coil tokamak configurations that would achieve ignition under presently accepted scaling laws. Studies the extent to which these compact tokamak ignition experiments can resolve the technical issue of under

  5. Time Fractional Formalism: Classical and Quantum Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosein Nasrolahpour

    2012-03-18

    In this review, we present some fundamental classical and quantum phenomena in view of time fractional formalism. Time fractional formalism is a very useful tool in describing systems with memory and delay. We hope that this study can provide a deeper understanding of the physical interpretations of fractional derivative.

  6. Photo-Galvano-Mechanical Phenomena in Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tománek, David

    Photo-Galvano-Mechanical Phenomena in Nanotubes Petr KraI\\ E. J. Mele2 , David Tomanek3 and Moshe elec- trical "ballistic current". The photo-currents can be generated even in centrosym- metric be also generated in semiconductor nanotubes or in higher bands of metallic nanotubes [2]. The photo

  7. Possible new wave phenomena in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerzy Szwed

    2009-08-10

    We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well-known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than currently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of the wave nature of information coding.

  8. Outdoor PV Degradation Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Smith, R. M.; Osterwald, C. R.; Gelak, E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output; may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined; accurately. At the Performance and Energy Rating Testbed (PERT) at the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) at the; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) more than 40 modules from more than 10 different manufacturers; were compared for their long-term outdoor stability. Because it can accommodate a large variety of modules in a; limited footprint the PERT system is ideally suited to compare modules side-by-side under the same conditions.

  9. Lab 7: Fourier analysis and synthesis Fourier series (periodic phenomena)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    Lab 7: Fourier analysis and synthesis · Fourier series (periodic phenomena) · Fourier transform (aperiodic phenomena) · Fast Fourier transform (FFT) The Fourier Transform and its Applications Brad G A powerful analytic tool that has many applications.... #12;Applications of Fourier analysis Periodic

  10. Fast flow phenomena in a toroidal plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtransScientific Userflow phenomena in a toroidal plasma*

  11. EMERGENT PHENOMENA IN GENETIC PROGRAMMING1 LEE ALTENBERG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altenberg, Lee

    EMERGENT PHENOMENA IN GENETIC PROGRAMMING1 LEE ALTENBERG Institute of Statistics and Decision various emergent phenomena, primary of which is adaptation. In genetic programming, because and representations can emerge from the population dynamics. A review of ideas on these phenomena is presented

  12. Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alinger, Matthew

    2013-09-30

    This final report summarizes the progress made during the October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-NT0004109 for the U. S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled “Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes”. The primary objective of this program is to develop a performance degradation mitigation path for high performing, cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Strategies to mitigate performance degradation are developed and implemented. In addition, thermal spray manufacturing of SOFCs is explored. Combined, this work establishes a basis for cost-effective SOFC cells.

  13. A Graph method for mapping changes in temporal and spatial phenomena with relativistic consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Brown

    2006-03-24

    A cellular automata approach using a Directed Cyclic Graph is used to model interrelationships of fluctuating time, state and space. This model predicts phenomena including a constant and maximum speed at which any moving entity can travel, time dilation effects in accordance with special relativity, calculation for the Doppler effect, propagation in three spatial dimensions, an explanation for the non-local feature of collapse and a speculation on the origin of gravitation. The approach has proven amenable to computer modelling.

  14. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff...

  15. Superconductivity and Superfluidity as Universal Emergent Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidry, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Superconductivity (SC) or superfluidity (SF) is observed across a remarkably broad range of fermionic systems: in BCS, cuprate, iron-based, organic, and heavy-fermion superconductors, and superfluid helium-3 in condensed matter; in a variety of SC/SF phenomena in low-energy nuclear physics; in ultracold, trapped atomic gases; and in various exotic possibilities in neutron stars. The range of physical conditions and differences in microscopic physics defy all attempts to unify this behavior in any conventional picture. Here we propose a unification through the shared symmetry properties of the emergent condensed states, with microscopic differences absorbed into parameters. This, in turn, forces a rethinking of specific occurrences of SC/SF such as cuprate high-temperature superconductivity, which becomes far less mysterious when seen as part of a continuum of behavior shared by a variety of other systems.

  16. Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by B&W Technical Services, Pantex and Pro2Serve October, 2011

  17. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Abruna, Hector Daniel Cornell University 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION Our work is...

  18. Atomic and nuclear interference phenomena and their applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuznetsova, Yelena Anatolyevna

    2005-08-29

    In this work, interference and coherence phenomena, appearing in atomic and molecular ensembles interacting with coherent light sources, as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), coherent population trapping (CPT), ...

  19. Natural hazard phenomena and mitigation -- 1995; PVP-Volume 308...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hazard phenomena and mitigation -- 1995; PVP-Volume 308. DOE facilities programsdesign criteria and methods for: Impact, wave, high frequency, and seismic loads Citation...

  20. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  1. The Local Interstellar Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redfield, S

    2006-01-01

    The Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) is a unique environment that presents an opportunity to study general interstellar phenomena in great detail and in three dimensions. In particular, high resolution optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy have proven to be powerful tools for addressing fundamental questions concerning the physical conditions and three-dimensional (3D) morphology of this local material. After reviewing our current understanding of the structure of gas in the solar neighborhood, I will discuss the influence that the LISM can have on stellar and planetary systems, including LISM dust deposition onto planetary atmospheres and the modulation of galactic cosmic rays through the astrosphere - the balancing interface between the outward pressure of the magnetized stellar wind and the inward pressure of the surrounding interstellar medium. On Earth, galactic cosmic rays may play a role as contributors to ozone layer chemistry, planetary electrical discharge frequency, biological mutation rates, and cl...

  2. FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract A probability distribution derived from percolation theory is #12;tted to large datasets on the sizes of forest forest #12;res and oil #12;elds as percolation phenomena as well as suggesting the consideration of a new

  3. Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 Overall structure: umbra + penumbra.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 SUNSPOTS Overall structure: umbra + penumbra in decaying spots (hysteresis-like behaviour). #12;Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 Temperature, H2, CH, CN Maltby effect: Umbrae slightly hotter in solar maximum than in minimum. Recent studies

  4. Methods of degrading napalm B

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.; Vass, A.

    1995-09-12

    Methods of degrading napalm and/or trinitrotoluene involve contacting the waste with specific intra-amoebic isolates of ATCC 40908 and/or dispersants derived therefrom. Useful isolates are deposited as ATCC 77529, NAP-1 deposited as ATCC 77526 and 13 deposited as ATCC 77527.

  5. DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. Virkar

    2012-02-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL's test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. This model is under continued development. It shows that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, within the electrolyte. The chemical potential within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just under the oxygen electrode (anode)/electrolyte interface, leading to electrode delamination. This theory is being further refined and tested by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte.

  6. Conceptual Framework to Enable Early Warning of Relevant Phenomena (Emerging Phenomena and Big Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlicher, Bob G; Abercrombie, Robert K; Hively, Lee M

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are commonly used to represent natural and man-made dynamic systems such as food webs, economic and social networks, gene regulation, and the internet. We describe a conceptual framework to enable early warning of relevant phenomena that is based on an artificial time-based, evolving network graph that can give rise to one or more recognizable structures. We propose to quantify the dynamics using the method of delays through Takens Theorem to produce another graph we call the Phase Graph. The Phase Graph enables us to quantify changes of the system that form a topology in phase space. Our proposed method is unique because it is based on dynamic system analysis that incorporates Takens Theorem, Graph Theory, and Franzosi-Pettini (F-P) theorem about topology and phase transitions. The F-P Theorem states that the necessary condition for phase transition is a change in the topology. By detecting a change in the topology that we represent as a set of M-order Phase Graphs, we conclude a corresponding change in the phase of the system. The onset of this phase change enables early warning of emerging relevant phenomena.

  7. Cellulose degradation system of Cytophaga hutchinsonii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chao-Kuo

    2012-11-30

    In this project, Cytophaga hutchinsonii, an aerobic gliding bacterium with cellulose-degrading ability, was studied, since its cellulase system was unknown and might be very different from those of other cellulose-degrading ...

  8. PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

    2010-10-18

    This project conducted fundamental studies of PEM MEA degradation. Insights gained from these studies were disseminated to assist MEA manufacturers in understanding degradation mechanisms and work towards DOE 2010 fuel cell durability targets.

  9. Learner intuitions about energy degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daane, Abigail R; Vokos, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    A primary learning goal for energy in K-12 science instruction is that energy cannot be created or destroyed. However, learners' everyday ideas about energy often involve energy being "used up" or "wasted." In physics, the concept of energy degradation can connect those everyday ideas to the principle of energy conservation. Learners' spontaneous discussions of aspects of energy degradation and the second law of thermodynamics include ideas concerning the inaccessibility, usefulness and dispersion of energy. These ideas have motivated us to introduce new learning goals into our K-12 teacher professional development courses. We identify alignments between these learning goals and learners' informal ideas and discuss instructional implications created by these alignments. Our aim is to create stronger ties between formal physics knowledge and sociopolitical issues by making these learning goals a priority in our professional development.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 4: High-Temperature Materials PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Ballinger, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weaver, K. D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2008-03-01

    The Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) technique was used to identify safety-relevant/safety-significant phenomena and assess the importance and related knowledge base of high-temperature structural materials issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The major aspects of materials degradation phenomena that may give rise to regulatory safety concern for the NGNP were evaluated for major structural components and the materials comprising them, including metallic and nonmetallic materials for control rods, other reactor internals, and primary circuit components; metallic alloys for very high-temperature service for heat exchangers and turbomachinery, metallic alloys for high-temperature service for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), other pressure vessels and components in the primary and secondary circuits; and metallic alloys for secondary heat transfer circuits and the balance of plant. These materials phenomena were primarily evaluated with regard to their potential for contributing to fission product release at the site boundary under a variety of event scenarios covering normal operation, anticipated transients, and accidents. Of all the high-temperature metallic components, the one most likely to be heavily challenged in the NGNP will be the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Its thin, internal sections must be able to withstand the stresses associated with thermal loading and pressure drops between the primary and secondary loops under the environments and temperatures of interest. Several important materials-related phenomena related to the IHX were identified, including crack initiation and propagation; the lack of experience of primary boundary design methodology limitations for new IHX structures; and manufacturing phenomena for new designs. Specific issues were also identified for RPVs that will likely be too large for shop fabrication and transportation. Validated procedures for on-site welding, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), and inspections will be required for the materials of construction. High-importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy sections; and the maintenance of high emissivity of the RPV materials over their service lifetime to enable passive heat rejection from the reactor core. All identified phenomena related to the materials of construction for the IHX, RPV, and other components were evaluated and ranked for their potential impact on reactor safety.

  11. Modeling mesoscopic phenomena in extended dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, A.; Lomdahl, P.; Jensen, N.G.; Cai, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mertenz, F. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany); Konno, Hidetoshi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); Salkola, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have obtained classes of nonlinear solutions on curved geometries that demonstrate a novel interplay between topology and geometric frustration relevant for nanoscale systems. We have analyzed the nature and stability of localized oscillatory nonlinear excitations (multi-phonon bound states) on discrete nonlinear chains, including demonstrations of successful perturbation theories, existence of quasiperiodic excitations, response to external statistical time-dependent fields and point impurities, robustness in the presence of quantum fluctuations, and effects of boundary conditions. We have demonstrated multi-timescale effects for nonlinear Schroedinger descriptions and shown the success of memory function approaches for going beyond these approximations. In addition we have developed a generalized rate-equation framework that allows analysis of the important creation/annihilation processes in driven nonlinear, nonequilibiium systems.

  12. Seawater degradation of polymeric composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Timothy Sean

    1991-01-01

    of absorption are present in composite materials. Initially Fickian absorption dominates the absorption behavior; however, following microcracking, non-Fickian behavior is present. The Fickian absorption is a reversible process and any associated mechanical.... Depending on the sensitivity of the resin and fibers to absorbed moisture, a composite system may show considerable losses in mechanical properties. The degree of degradation does not seem to be solely a function of the amount of moisture absorbed...

  13. Degradation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novo Design ofDefects Lead Mechanisms of

  14. Simulation and design optimization for linear wave phenomena on metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saŕ-Seoane, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Periodicity can change materials properties in a very unintuitive way. Many wave propagation phenomena, such as waveguides, light bending structures or frequency filters can be modeled through finite periodic structures ...

  15. High speed imaging of transient non-Newtonian fluid phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallup, Benjamin H. (Benjamin Hodsdon), 1982-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, I investigate the utility of high speed imaging for gaining scientific insight into the nature of short-duration transient fluid phenomena, specifically applied to the Kaye effect. The Kaye effect, noted ...

  16. MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT for the modeling of geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production/injection and the cyclic dependence

  17. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    Abstract Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). ...

  18. Novel resonant and light-guiding phenomena in photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamam, Rafif E. (Rafif Ezzat)

    2010-01-01

    We investigate theoretically five novel resonant and light-guiding photonics phenomena. First, we develop a universal coupled mode theory (CMT) treatment of the freespace scattering of waves from resonant objects. This ...

  19. Renewal sequences, disordered potentials, and pinning phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giambattista Giacomin

    2008-07-27

    We give an overview of the state of the art of the analysis of disordered models of pinning on a defect line. This class of models includes a number of well known and much studied systems (like polymer pinning on a defect line, wetting of interfaces on a disordered substrate and the Poland-Scheraga model of DNA denaturation). A remarkable aspect is that, in absence of disorder, all the models in this class are exactly solvable and they display a localization-delocalization transition that one understands in full detail. Moreover the behavior of such systems near criticality is controlled by a parameter and one observes, by tuning the parameter, the full spectrum of critical behaviors, ranging from first order to infinite order transitions. This is therefore an ideal set-up in which to address the question of the effect of disorder on the phase transition,notably on critical properties. We will review recent results that show that the physical prediction that goes under the name of Harris criterion is indeed fully correct for pinning models. Beyond summarizing the results, we will sketch most of the arguments of proof.

  20. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  1. Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials Performance Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials Performance The collaborative...

  2. Deep Data Analysis of Conductive Phenomena on Complex Oxide Interfaces: Physics from Data Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelcov, Evgheni [ORNL; Belianinov, Alex [ORNL; Hsieh, Ying-Hui [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL; Chu, Ying Hao [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Spatial variability of electronic transport in BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 (BFO-CFO) self-assembled heterostructures is explored using spatially resolved first order reversal curve (FORC) current voltage (IV) mapping. Multivariate statistical analysis of FORC-IV data classifies statistically significant behaviors and maps characteristic responses spatially. In particular, regions of grain, matrix, and grain boundary responses are clearly identified. K-means and Bayesian demixing analysis suggests the characteristic response be separated into four components, with hysteretic type behavior localized at the BFO-CFO tubular interfaces. The conditions under which Bayesian components allow direct physical interpretation are explored, and transport mechanisms at the grain boundaries and individual phases are analyzed. This approach conjoins multivariate statistical analysis with physics-based interpretation, actualizing a robust, universal, data driven approach to problem solving, which can be applied to exploration of local transport and other functional phenomena in other spatially inhomogeneous systems.

  3. Ultrafast Phenomena XI, 1998, 156-158 Ultrafast STM-tip Localized Responses from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    and high peak powers are critical for successful simultaneous measurement of the surface topography current. Simultaneous determination of the photo-induced signal component is achieved by lockin amplifier demodulation of the output of a second pre-amp located in the STM head. Topography photo

  4. Investigation of Spin-Based Phenomena in Candidate Spintronic Materials by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swartz, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Phenomena in Candidate Spintronic Materials by MolecularPhenomena in Candidate Spintronic Materials by Molecularmolecules) and candidate spintronic mate- rials (i.e. GaAs,

  5. SAVING THE SCIENTIFIC PHENOMENA: WHAT POWERS CAN AND CANNOT DO Anjan Chakravartty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravartty, Anjan

    SAVING THE SCIENTIFIC PHENOMENA: WHAT POWERS CAN AND CANNOT DO Anjan;Anjan Chakravartty Saving the Scientific Phenomena 2 that break down when

  6. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01

    stream_size 21847 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Feddema_Soil_Degradation_Global_Warming.pdf.txt stream_source_info Feddema_Soil_Degradation_Global_Warming.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text.... This study will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare...

  7. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-07-01

    Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

  8. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

  9. Quantum Simulator for Transport Phenomena in Fluid Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mezzacapo; M. Sanz; L. Lamata; I. L. Egusquiza; S. Succi; E. Solano

    2015-08-19

    Transport phenomena still stand as one of the most challenging problems in computational physics. By exploiting the analogies between Dirac and lattice Boltzmann equations, we develop a quantum simulator based on pseudospin-boson quantum systems, which is suitable for encoding fluid dynamics transport phenomena within a lattice kinetic formalism. It is shown that both the streaming and collision processes of lattice Boltzmann dynamics can be implemented with controlled quantum operations, using a heralded quantum protocol to encode non-unitary scattering processes. The proposed simulator is amenable to realization in controlled quantum platforms, such as ion-trap quantum computers or circuit quantum electrodynamics processors.

  10. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.A. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Durham, M.D. [ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States); Sowa, W.A. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Himes, R.M. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Mahaffey, W.A. [CHAM of North America, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States)

    1991-10-21

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  11. Research subjects for analytical estimation of core degradation at Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagase, F.; Ishikawa, J.; Kurata, M.; Yoshida, H.; Kaji, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Amaya, M; Okumura, K.; Katsuyama, J. [Fukushima Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Estimation of the accident progress and status inside the pressure vessels (RPV) and primary containment vessels (PCV) is required for appropriate conductance of decommissioning in the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP. For that, it is necessary to obtain additional experimental data and revised models for the estimation using computer codes with increased accuracies. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, considering previously obtained information, conditions specific to the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP accident, and recent progress of experimental and analytical technologies. As a result, research and development items have been picked up in terms of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the RPV and PCV, progression of fuel bundle degradation, failure of the lower head of RPV, and analysis of the accident. This paper introduces the selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, research plans and recent results from the JAEA's corresponding research programs. (authors)

  12. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Wednesday, October 22nd Soil Structure Interaction Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentations for the Soil Structure Interaction session at the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting.

  13. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentations from the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting - Tuesday, October 21st Session

  14. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Wednesday, October 22nd Session Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentations from the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting - Wednesday, October 22nd Session

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Microbial degradation of 7-ketocholesterol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Microbial degradation of 7-ketocholesterol Jacques Mathieu Ć John Schloendorn Ć of matrices to avoid adverse biological effects, its microbial degradation has not been previously addressed, utilized 7KC as a sole carbon and energy source, resulting in its mineralization. Nocardia nova, which

  16. Qian Susan Chi Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    of a degradation product NH3, which was indicative of the overall rate of degradation, was measured continuously on the rate of NH3 production were quantified. Several additives were studied; these include possible, and tertiary amines like N,N-diethylethanolamine as well as possible catalysts such as KMnO4, formaldehyde

  17. The Local Interstellar Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth Redfield

    2006-01-06

    The Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) is a unique environment that presents an opportunity to study general interstellar phenomena in great detail and in three dimensions. In particular, high resolution optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy have proven to be powerful tools for addressing fundamental questions concerning the physical conditions and three-dimensional (3D) morphology of this local material. After reviewing our current understanding of the structure of gas in the solar neighborhood, I will discuss the influence that the LISM can have on stellar and planetary systems, including LISM dust deposition onto planetary atmospheres and the modulation of galactic cosmic rays through the astrosphere - the balancing interface between the outward pressure of the magnetized stellar wind and the inward pressure of the surrounding interstellar medium. On Earth, galactic cosmic rays may play a role as contributors to ozone layer chemistry, planetary electrical discharge frequency, biological mutation rates, and climate. Since the LISM shares the same volume as practically all known extrasolar planets, the prototypical debris disks systems, and nearby low-mass star-formation sites, it will be important to understand the structures of the LISM and how they may influence planetary atmospheres.

  18. Mathematics and the Biological Phenomena1 Giuseppe Longo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longo, Giuseppe

    1 Mathematics and the Biological Phenomena1 Giuseppe Longo CNRS - Dept. de Mathematiques et in the style of mathematics, is not wiser than the zoologist who would refute numbers because of the differences in the use of mathematical tools in physics and in biology. Scientific knowledge is viewed

  19. Mathematics and the Biological Phenomena 1 Giuseppe Longo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longo, Giuseppe

    1 Mathematics and the Biological Phenomena 1 Giuseppe Longo CNRS ­ Dept. de Mathematiques et and deductions in the style of mathematics, is not wiser than the zoologist who would refute numbers because of the differences in the use of mathematical tools in physics and in biology. Scientific knowledge is viewed

  20. Turbulent Wind Fields for Gaseous Phenomena Eugene Fiume 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Turbulent Wind Fields for Gaseous Phenomena Jos Stam Eugene Fiume 0 Department of Computer Science of smoke, steam, mist and water re­ acting to a turbulent field such as wind is an attractive, and realistic illumina­ tion. We present a model for turbulent wind flow having a deterministic component

  1. MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved Heat on the surface of a bare, ZSM-5 coated, and Zeolite-A coated stainless steel 304 substrate at different initial surface temperatures was experimentally studied. ZSM-5 and Zeolite-A coated SS-304 are more much more

  2. Bacteria, Biofilms and Fluid Dynamics: Elementary Flows and Unexpected Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Bacteria, Biofilms and Fluid Dynamics: Elementary Flows and Unexpected Phenomena Wednesday February the migration of bacteria along surfaces when exposed to a shear flow. In particular, we identify an unusual response where flow produces a directed motion of twitching bacteria in the upstream direction. (ii) We

  3. Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana Songprakorp BSc, Prince of Songkhla University to the modeling and under- standing of the dynamic behavior of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs

  4. Thermal Phenomena in Fiber-reinforced Thermoplastic Tape Winding Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    Thermal Phenomena in Fiber-reinforced Thermoplastic Tape Winding Process: Computational Simulations-reinforced thermoplastic tapes, thermal simulation, convective coefficient of gas torches, fiber-reinforced thermoplastic a pre-impregnated fiber-reinforced thermoplastic tape is bounded on-line to the substrate. The bonding

  5. Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions SANUM Conference (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

  6. Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions CSIRO CSS TCP Detournay (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

  7. Chapter 7. Renewal Phenomena Renewal is life reborn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kani

    51 Chapter 7. Renewal Phenomena Renewal is life reborn. 7.1. Definitions and basic concepts. 7. Then, N(t) : t 0, is a renewal process. A mathematical definition: N(t) = max{n : n i=0 Xi t, } where, ...} or continuous: [0, ). Obviously, the path of a renewal process is non-decreasing. The renewal literally means

  8. Recent LEP2 results on searches for new phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan Yibin

    1998-05-29

    Recent results of searches for supersymmetric particles, Higgs bosons, and other new phenomena at LEP2 are summarized. These results are based on data and analyses from the four LEP experiments: ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL. The data were collected during the summer and fall of 1996 with center-of-mass energies of 161 and 172 GeV.

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Super-Explosions in the Universe and Related High-Energy Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Postnov

    2001-07-06

    The recent progress in studies of gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and host galaxies is discussed. The emphasis is given to high-energy phenomena associated with gamma-ray burst explosions: high-energy cosmic rays, neutrinos, gravitational waves. We also show how the relativistic fireball model for GRBs can be used to constrain modern theories of large and infinite extra-dimensions. In particular, in the frame of 5D gravity with the Standard Model localized on 3D brane (Dvali et al. 2000), the very existence of relativistic fireballs of $\\sim 10^{53}$ ergs puts the lower bound on the quantum gravity scale $\\sim 0.1$ eV.

  10. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Yuhu; Calzolaio, Ciro; Senatore, Carmine

    2014-08-01

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanical loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.

  11. Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Molecular Level Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay A Brandes

    2009-09-23

    This was a grant to support travel for scientists to present data and interact with others in their field. Specifically, speakers presented their data in a session entitled “Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Macroscopic Properties: Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Structure and Reactivity of Mineral Surfaces”. The session ran across three ˝ day periods, March 30-31 2004. The session’s organizers were David J. Wesolowski andGordon E. Brown Jr. There were a total of 30 talks presented.

  12. Fourth DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Conference: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This conference allowed an interchange in the natural phenomena area among designers, safety professionals, and managers. The papers presented in Volume I of the proceedings are from sessions I - VIII which cover the general topics of: DOE standards, lessons learned and walkdowns, wind, waste tanks, ground motion, testing and materials, probabilistic seismic hazards, risk assessment, base isolation and energy dissipation, and lifelines and floods. Individual papers are indexed separately. (GH)

  13. Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - October 2014 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department ofDepartmentNaturalEnergy 4 Natural Phenomena Hazards

  14. Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Program - Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department ofDepartmentNaturalEnergy 4 Natural Phenomena

  15. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  16. Method of degrading pollutants in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Lopez-De-Victoria, G.

    1994-07-05

    Disclosed are a method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms. This is accomplished by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant. 5 figures.

  17. Uncertainty Analysis for Photovoltaic Degradation Rates (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Hansen, C.

    2014-04-01

    Dependable and predictable energy production is the key to the long-term success of the PV industry. PV systems show over the lifetime of their exposure a gradual decline that depends on many different factors such as module technology, module type, mounting configuration, climate etc. When degradation rates are determined from continuous data the statistical uncertainty is easily calculated from the regression coefficients. However, total uncertainty that includes measurement uncertainty and instrumentation drift is far more difficult to determine. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was chosen to investigate a comprehensive uncertainty analysis. The most important effect for degradation rates is to avoid instrumentation that changes over time in the field. For instance, a drifting irradiance sensor, which can be achieved through regular calibration, can lead to a substantially erroneous degradation rates. However, the accuracy of the irradiance sensor has negligible impact on degradation rate uncertainty emphasizing that precision (relative accuracy) is more important than absolute accuracy.

  18. Method of degrading pollutants in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Lopez-De-Victoria, Geralyne (Irmo, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant.

  19. Synthetic biology approach to cellulose degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhundi, Sahreena Saleem

    2012-06-22

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on earth, is composed of ? – 1,4 – linked glucose units, which in turn form a highly ordered crystalline structure that is insoluble and recalcitrant to degradation. It is the ...

  20. Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources...

  1. Degradation of Trichloroethylene Using Advanced Reduction Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzaneh, Hajar

    2014-10-27

    and produce reducing radicals that can effectively degrade oxidized contaminants. Screening experiments were conducted to evaluate three different reducing reagents (sulfite, sulfide, and dithionite) and three UV light sources (low-pressure mercury UV lamp (UV...

  2. In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes 2011 DOE Hydrogen...

  3. Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics with SEI Layer Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics with SEI Layer 2011 DOE...

  4. Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending Filter Life Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending...

  5. Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Ultra-cold Atoms and Strongly Interacting Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Ultra-cold Atoms and Strongly Interacting Photons 11-13 June 2012 Room phenomena in hybrid light-matter systems composed of artificial atoms and photons. Such systems

  6. On Five Independent Phenomena Sharing a Common Cause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger Ellman

    2012-08-19

    Over the past century a succession of five different independent astronomical phenomena have been discovered, each appearing to be the result of a common underlying cause that also produces an unaccounted-for acceleration that is: quite small, centrally directed in the system exhibiting each phenomenon, non-gravitational, distance independent, and apparently of a common magnitude. The present paper analyzes the phenomena and proposes the underlying common cause, a common solution to the problem that they present. Four of the phenomena, in the order of their discovery are: 1 - In 1933, the indication by galactic rotation curves that there is such an acceleration present and acting in galaxies but with no observable cause [hence the postulating of "Dark Matter"]. Here the acceleration is directed toward the galactic center, the dominant factor in the mechanics of galaxy rotation. 2 - In 1998, the Pioneer Anomaly in which the acceleration is directed toward the Sun, the dominant factor in the mechanics of the Pioneer spacecrafts' motion. 3 - In 2008, the Flybys Anomaly for which the acceleration is directed toward the center of the Earth, the dominant factor in the mechanics of the flyby motion [as presented in the paper following]. 4 - Also in 2008, confirmed in 2010, the Dark Flow anomaly for which the acceleration is directed toward the central origin of the overall universe, the dominant factor in the mechanics of the overall universe, where the Big Bang and expansion began [as presented in the paper following]. The earliest of all is 5 - Hubble's discovery of Redshifts of the light from various distant astral bodies.

  7. Simulation of beam steering phenomena in bent crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery M. Biryukov

    2001-11-06

    The simulation methods for the channeling phenomena in GeV/TeV energy range in ideal or distorted crystal lattices are discussed. Monte Carlo predictions for feed-out and feed-in rates, dislocation dechanneling, and deflection efficiencies of bent crystals are compared to the experimental data. The role of multiple interactions with crystal in circular accelerators ("multipass channeling") for the efficiency boost in the crystal-aided extraction experiments is analysed. Possible future applications of the crystal channeling technique are considered.

  8. Quantum Simulator for Transport Phenomena in Fluid Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezzacapo, A; Lamata, L; Egusquiza, I L; Succi, S; Solano, E

    2015-01-01

    Transport phenomena are one of the most challenging problems in computational physics. We present a quantum simulator based on pseudospin-boson quantum systems, which is suitable for encoding fluid dynamics problems within a lattice kinetic formalism. This quantum simulator is obtained by exploiting the analogies between Dirac and lattice Boltzmann equations. It is shown that both the streaming and collision processes of lattice Boltzmann dynamics can be implemented with controlled quantum operations, using a heralded quantum protocol to encode non-unitary scattering processes. The proposed simulator is amenable to realization in controlled quantum platforms, such as ion-trap quantum computers or circuit quantum electrodynamics processors.

  9. Robust emergent climate phenomena associated with the high-sensitivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Robust emergent climate phenomena associated with

  10. Final Report Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J; Ellingwood, B R; Oland, C Barry

    2005-09-01

    The Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program had primary objectives of (1) understanding the significant factors relating corrosion occurrence, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments; (2) providing the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins or estimating future residual structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; (3) providing recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by USNRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation; and (4) providing technical assistance to the USNRC (as requested) related to concrete technology. Primary program accomplishments have included development of a degradation assessment methodology; reviews of techniques and methods for inspection and repair of containment metallic pressure boundaries; evaluation of high-frequency acoustic imaging, magnetostrictive sensor, electromagnetic acoustic transducer, and multimode guided plate wave technologies for inspection of inaccessible regions of containment metallic pressure boundaries; development of a continuum damage mechanics-based approach for structural deterioration; establishment of a methodology for reliability-based condition assessments of steel containments and liners; and fragility assessments of steel containments with localized corrosion. In addition, data and information assembled under this program has been transferred to the technical community through review meetings and briefings, national and international conference participation, technical committee involvement, and publications of reports and journal articles. Appendix A provides a listing of program reports, papers, and publications; and Appendix B contains a listing of program-related presentations.

  11. New Method to Characterize Degradation of First Surface Aluminum Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, F.; Heller, P.; Meyen, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Kennedy, C.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Schmucker, M.

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports the development of a new optical instrument capable of characterizing the aging process of enhanced first surface aluminum reflectors for concentrating solar power (CSP) application. Samples were exposed outdoors at different sites and in accelerated exposure tests. All samples exposed outdoors showed localized corrosion spots. Degradation originated from points of damage in the protective coating, but propagated underneath the protective coating. The degraded samples were analyzed with a microscope and with a newly designed space-resolved specular reflectometer (SR)2 that is capable of optically detecting and characterizing the corrosion spots. The device measures the specular reflectance at three acceptance angles and the wavelengths with spatial resolution using a digital camera's CMOS sensor. It can be used to measure the corrosion growth rate during outdoor and accelerated exposure tests. These results will allow a correlation between the degraded mirror surface and its specular reflectance.

  12. PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

    2007-11-02

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) Develop a system capable of measuring current and voltage performance for each membrane in a Polymer Electrolyte Membranes (PEM) fuel cell stack and record the performance of each individual cell; (2) Develop a single cell PEM FC to allow in situ synchrotron x-ray measurements of the cell in operation and to perform spatially resolved x-ray measurements on fuel cell elements before and after degradation; and (3) Perform initial magnetic resonance microimaging experiments on membrane materials. The Montana State University PEM Membrane Degradation program is geared towards determining how and why membranes in fuel cells degrade and fail. By monitoring every individual membrane in a fuel cell 2000 times/sec while the cell is subjected to real-world type use, we hope to: (1) cause the types of degradation users see, but in a controlled environment; (2) determine an electrical signature that will identify what causes failure, or at least warns of impending failure; (3) allows us to perform advanced x-ray and MRI characterization of the degraded membranes to provide information that may result in improvements of the membrane material; and (4) perhaps allow design of electronic control systems that will prevent fuel cells from operating under conditions where damage is likely to occur.

  13. Anderson localization of partially incoherent light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capeta, D.; Radic, J.; Buljan, H.; Szameit, A.; Segev, M.

    2011-07-15

    We study Anderson localization and propagation of partially spatially incoherent wavepackets in linear disordered potentials, motivated by the insight that interference phenomena resulting from multiple scattering are affected by the coherence of the waves. We find that localization is delayed by incoherence: the more incoherent the waves are, the longer they diffusively spread while propagating in the medium. However, if all the eigenmodes of the system are exponentially localized (as in one- and two-dimensional disordered systems), any partially incoherent wavepacket eventually exhibits localization with exponentially decaying tails, after sufficiently long propagation distances. Interestingly, we find that the asymptotic behavior of the incoherent beam is similar to that of a single instantaneous coherent realization of the beam.

  14. Local Universities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCenter (LMI-EFRC) ProximityCenterLeeincreasesLocal

  15. Local Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S C OLocal Information Local

  16. Scaling of Quench Front and Entrainment-Related Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aumiller, D. L.; Hourser, R. J.; Holowach, M. J.; Hochreiter, L. E.; Cheung, F-B.

    2002-04-01

    The scaling of thermal hydraulic systems is of great importance in the development of experiments in laboratory-scale test facilities that are used to replicate the response of full-size prototypical designs. One particular phenomenon that is of interest in experimental modeling is the quench front that develops during the reflood phase in a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) following a large-break LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The purpose of this study is to develop a scaling methodology such that the prototypical quench front related phenomena can be preserved in a laboratory-scale test facility which may have material, geometrical, fluid, and flow differences as compared to the prototypical case. A mass and energy balance on a Lagrangian quench front control volume along with temporal scaling methods are utilized in developing the quench front scaling groups for a phenomena-specific second-tier scaling analysis. A sample calculation is presented comparing the quench front scaling groups calculated for a prototypical Westinghouse 17 x 17 PWR fuel design and that of the geometry and material configuration used in the FLECHT SEASET series of experiments.

  17. EIT-related phenomena and their mechanical analogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Souza; L. Cabral; R. R. Oliveira; C. J. Villas-Boas

    2015-07-13

    Systems of interacting classical harmonic oscillators have received considerable attention in the last years as analog models for describing electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and associated phenomena. We review these models and investigate their validity for a variety of physical systems using two- and three-coupled harmonic oscillators. From the simplest EIT-$\\Lambda$ configuration and two-coupled single cavity modes we show that each atomic dipole-allowed transition and a single cavity mode can be represented by a damped harmonic oscillator. Thus, we have established a one-to-one correspondence between the classical and quantum dynamical variables. We show the limiting conditions and the equivalent for the EIT dark state in the mechanical system. This correspondence is extended to other systems that present EIT-related phenomena. Examples of such systems are two- and three-level (cavity EIT) atoms interacting with a single mode of an optical cavity, and four-level atoms in a inverted-Y and tripod configurations. The established equivalence between the mechanical and the cavity EIT systems, presented here for the first time, has been corroborated by experimental data. The analysis of the probe response of all these systems also brings to light a physical interpretation for the expectation value of the photon annihilation operator $\\left\\langle a\\right\\rangle$. We show it can be directly related to the electric susceptibility of systems, the composition of which includes a driven cavity field mode.

  18. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  19. Local-time effect on small space-time scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Panchelyuga; V. A. Kolombet; M. S. Panchelyuga; S. E. Shnoll

    2006-10-18

    The paper presents an investigation of local-time effect - one of the manifestations of macroscopic fluctuations phenomena. Was shown the existence of the named effect for longitudinal distance between locations of measurements up to 500 meters. Also a structure of intervals distribution in neighborhood of local-time peak was studied and splitting of the peak was found out. Obtained results lead to conclusion about sharp anisotropy of space-time.

  20. Remediation and management of degraded lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, M.H.; Wong, J.W.C.; Baker, A.J.M. [eds.

    1999-11-01

    This book presents the program of the first International Conference on the Remediation and Management of Degraded lands. The book has three sections: mine management and rehabilitation, the management of derelict lands, and soil contamination and reclamation. The 34 chapters present a proactive, solution based approach to the rehabilitation of natural resources. Topics of discussions include the following: the multidisciplinary approach practiced by the Australian Center for Minesite Rehabilitation Research; the relationship between biofuel harvesting and Hong Kong`s continuing upland degradation; and experiments with the effectiveness of EDTA/HCI to remove contaminants from soil.

  1. Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.G. Mon; F. Hua

    2005-04-12

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the first 10,000-years after repository closure. This paper provides an overview of the degradation of the waste packages and drip shields in the repository after permanent closure of the facility. The degradation modes discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on the degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are considered. It is concluded that the materials and design adopted will provide sufficient safety margins for at least 10,000-years after repository closure.

  2. Process for degrading hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxtable, William P. (Concord, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A process for degrading hypochlorite waste and lithium hypochlorite solutions uses a cobalt oxide/molybdenum oxide catalyst formed from about 1-10 w/w % cobalt oxide and 1-15 w/w % molybdenum oxide disposed on a suitable substrate. The major advantage of the catalyst lies in its high degree of effectiveness and its very low cost.

  3. Environmental degradation using functionally graded material approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevostianov, Igor

    . It is not yet understood how this unique combination of environmental factors impact on the mechanical propEnvironmental degradation using functionally graded material approach I. Sevostianov a,*, N.K. Sookay b , C.J. von Klemperer b , V.E. Verijenko b a Department of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico

  4. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

  5. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  6. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  7. Analysis of thermally-degrading, confined HMX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Renlund, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    The response of a thermally-degrading, confined HMX pellet is analyzed using a Reactive Elastic-Plastic (REP) constitutive model which is founded on the collapse and growth of internal inclusions resulting from physical and chemical processes such as forced displacement, thermal expansion, and/or decomposition. Axial stress predictions compare adequately to data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  8. Simultaneous Degradation of Organophosphorus Pesticides and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    of the most widely used classes of pesticide in industrialized countries. In the United States, over 40 Moraxella sp. degraded organophosphates as well as PNP rapidly, all within 10 h. The initial hydrolysis rate responses, leading to the pos- sibility of death. Repeated or prolonged exposure can cause delayed

  9. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

  10. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Assessment of anaerobic benzene degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    UNCORRECTEDPROOF Assessment of anaerobic benzene degradation potential using 16S rRNA gene Engineering, Rice University, MS 317, Houston, TX 77251-1892, USA. Summary Benzene is a common groundwater-contaminated aquifers. Thus, determining the potential for anaerobic benzene deg- radation is important to assess

  11. A kinetic-MHD model for low frequency phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid kinetic-MHD model for describing low-frequency phenomena in high beta anisotropic plasmas that consist of two components: a low energy core component and an energetic component with low density. The kinetic-MHD model treats the low energy core component by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description, the energetic component by kinetic approach such as the gyrokinetic equation, and the coupling between the dynamics of these two components through plasma pressure in the momentum equation. The kinetic-MHD model optimizes both the physics contents and the theoretical efforts in studying low frequency MHD waves and transport phenomena in general magnetic field geometries, and can be easily modified to include the core plasma kinetic effects if necessary. It is applicable to any magnetized collisionless plasma system where the parallel electric field effects are negligibly small. In the linearized limit two coupled eigenmode equations for describing the coupling between the transverse Alfven type and the compressional Alfven type waves are derived. The eigenmode equations are identical to those derived from the full gyrokinetic equation in the low frequency limit and were previously analyzed both analytically nd numerically to obtain the eigenmode structure of the drift mirror instability which explains successfully the multi-satellite observation of antisymmetric field-aligned structure of the compressional magnetic field of Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma. Finally, a quadratic form is derived to demonstrate the stability of the low-frequency transverse and compressional Alfven type instabilities in terms of the pressure anisotropy parameter {tau} and the magnetic field curvature-pressure gradient parameter. A procedure for determining the stability of a marginally stable MHD wave due to wave-particle resonances is also presented.

  12. Analysis of Wireless Information Locality and Association Patterns in a Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siris, Vasilios A.

    Analysis of Wireless Information Locality and Association Patterns in a Campus Francisco Chinchilla study of locality phenomena among wireless web users and their association patterns on a major university campus using the IEEE 802.11 wireless infrastructure. We evaluate the performance of different

  13. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kirchman

    2011-12-31

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (â??Methane in the Arctic Shelfâ?ť or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (â??metagenomesâ?ť). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation.

  14. Degradative capacities and bioaugmentation potential of an anaerobic benzene-degrading bacterium strain DN11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuki Kasai; Yumiko Kodama; Yoh Takahata; Toshihiro Hoaki; Kazuya Watanabe

    2007-09-15

    Azoarcus sp. strain DN11 is a denitrifying bacterium capable of benzene degradation under anaerobic conditions. The present study evaluated strain DN11 for its application to bioaugmentation of benzene-contaminated underground aquifers. Strain DN11 could grow on benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and benzoate as the sole carbon and energy sources under nitrate-reducing conditions, although o- and p-xylenes were transformed in the presence of toluene. Phenol was not utilized under anaerobic conditions. Kinetic analysis of anaerobic benzene degradation estimated its apparent affinity and inhibition constants to be 0.82 and 11 {mu}M, respectively. Benzene-contaminated groundwater taken from a former coal-distillation plant site in Aichi, Japan was anaerobically incubated in laboratory bottles and supplemented with either inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and nitrate) alone, or the nutrients plus strain DN11, showing that benzene was significantly degraded only when DN11 was introduced. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, and quantitative PCR revealed that DN11 decreased after benzene was degraded. Following the decrease in DN11 16S rRNA gene fragments corresponding to bacteria related to Owenweeksia hongkongensis and Pelotomaculum isophthalicum, appeared as strong bands, suggesting possible metabolic interactions in anaerobic benzene degradation. Results suggest that DN11 is potentially useful for degrading benzene that contaminates underground aquifers at relatively low concentrations. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  16. Adhesion and degradation of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic light-emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momodu, D. Y.; Chioh, A. V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Federal Capital Territory, Abuja (Nigeria); Tong, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Zebaze Kana, M. G. [Physics Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex, Abuja (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Federal Capital Territory, Abuja (Nigeria); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical, computational, and experimental study of adhesion and degradation of Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLEDs). The adhesion between layers that are relevant to OLEDs is studied using an atomic force microscopy technique. The interfacial failure mechanisms associated with blister formation in OLEDs and those due to the addition of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles into the active regions are then elucidated using a combination of fracture mechanics, finite element modeling and experiments. The blisters observed in the models are shown to be consistent with the results from adhesion, interfacial fracture mechanics models, and prior reports of diffusion-assisted phenomena. The implications of the work are then discussed for the design of OLED structures with improved lifetimes and robustness.

  17. Elastomer degradation sensor using a piezoelectric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olness, Dolores U. (Livermore, CA); Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B. (late of Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring the degradation of elastomeric materials is provided. Piezoelectric oscillators are placed in contact with the elastomeric material so that a forced harmonic oscillator with damping is formed. The piezoelectric material is connected to an oscillator circuit,. A parameter such as the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q value of the oscillating system is related to the elasticity of the elastomeric material. Degradation of the elastomeric material causes changes in its elasticity which, in turn, causes the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q of the oscillator to change. These changes are monitored with a peak height monitor, frequency counter, Q-meter, spectrum analyzer, or other measurement circuit. Elasticity of elastomers can be monitored in situ, using miniaturized sensors.

  18. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  19. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  20. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  1. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  2. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1990-06-26

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  3. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Tunesi, Simonetta (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

    1991-01-01

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light.

  4. Degradation of Materials in Combustion Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, J. M.; Federer, J. I.; Parks, W. P. Jr.; Reid, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    structural ceramics materials. involved formation of new liquid,glass, and solid phases. which resulted in loss of structural This paper briefly reviews the contents of 23 integrity. Destructi ve stresses a!iSOc i ated wi th ORNL reports describing... the past decade workers at Oak Ridge being used to study the effects of specific chemical National Laboratory (ORNL) and elsewhere have species on metallic and ceramic materials. Tests investigated the degradation of refractory materials have also been...

  5. Modeling superconductor degradation using magnetic levitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sriram, M.A.; Ponce, L.; Murr, L.E. (The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas (US). Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1991-03-18

    Corrosion of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} pellets has been studied using magnetic levitation. Pellets compressed at green compaction pressures of 120--200 MPa were exposed to water and air and the levitation heights were measured over a period of more than a month. A model based on diffusion as a rate-controlling step has been proposed. Levitation height normalized with respect to the initial levitation height was used as the modeling parameter. The experiments indicate that the normalized levitation height decreased with time up to a certain level called the saturation leviation, beyond which there is no change in the levitation height. Samples in air degraded faster than samples in water. The initial period of degradation before saturation fits the proposed model well and therefore appears to be diffusion controlled. The saturation levitation shows a dependence on the green compaction pressure. It has been proposed that corrosion (degrading reactions) is due to open porosities which are closed by the reaction products, thus causing a saturation in the levitation height dependent on the porosities.

  6. Investigations into the impact of astronomical phenomena on the terrestrial biosphere and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Fabo

    2015-01-01

    This thesis assesses the influence of astronomical phenomena on the Earth's biosphere and climate. I examine in particular the relevance of both the path of the Sun through the Galaxy and the evolution of the Earth's orbital parameters in modulating non-terrestrial mechanisms. I build models to predict the extinction rate of species, the temporal variation of the impact cratering rate and ice sheet deglaciations, and then compare these models with other models within a Bayesian framework. I find that the temporal distribution of mass extinction events over the past 550 Myr can be explained just as well by a uniform random distribution as by other models, such as variations in the stellar density local to the Sun arising from the Sun's orbit. Given the uncertainties in the Galaxy model and the Sun's current phase space coordinates, as well as the errors in the geological data, it is not possible to draw a clear connection between terrestrial extinction and the solar motion. In a separate study, I find that the...

  7. Phenomena of complex analytic dynamics in the non-autonomous, nonlinear ring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. B. Isaeva; S. P. Kuznetsov; M. A. Obichev

    2011-12-09

    The model system manifesting phenomena peculiar to complex analytic maps is offered. The system is a non-autonomous ring cavity with nonlinear elements and filters,

  8. Quantum phenomena modelled by interactions between many classical worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael J. W. Hall; D. -A. Deckert; Howard M. Wiseman

    2014-10-26

    We investigate whether quantum theory can be understood as the continuum limit of a mechanical theory, in which there is a huge, but finite, number of classical 'worlds', and quantum effects arise solely from a universal interaction between these worlds, without reference to any wave function. Here a `world' means an entire universe with well-defined properties, determined by the classical configuration of its particles and fields. In our approach each world evolves deterministically; probabilities arise due to ignorance as to which world a given observer occupies; and we argue that in the limit of infinitely many worlds the wave function can be recovered (as a secondary object) from the motion of these worlds. We introduce a simple model of such a 'many interacting worlds' approach and show that it can reproduce some generic quantum phenomena---such as Ehrenfest's theorem, wavepacket spreading, barrier tunneling and zero point energy---as a direct consequence of mutual repulsion between worlds. Finally, we perform numerical simulations using our approach. We demonstrate, first, that it can be used to calculate quantum ground states, and second, that it is capable of reproducing, at least qualitatively, the double-slit interference phenomenon.

  9. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-03-15

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  10. A Generalized Analytical Mechanics in which Quantum Phenomena Appear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Yasuda

    2015-12-18

    We propose a mechanics of a massive particle in a potential field effective for both classical and quantum system as a modified classical analytical mechanics (modified CM). We transform, under coordinate transformation, the covariant tensor of order two in the Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) eq. of CM, not with the classical action, but with extended action of diffeomorphism group. Then, the H-J eq., a first-order partial differential eq., is modified to a third-order one. The Euler-Lagrange (E-L) eq. of CM, a second-order ordinary differential eq., related to the H-J eq. through the action integral is accordingly modified to a fourth-order one. Thus obtained mechanics accommodates quantum phenomena due to the higher-order eqs., and always gives trajectory unlike quantum mechanics (QM) due to the E-L eq. Discrete energy levels of a particle in a confining potential are the same as those of QM because quantization criterion is equivalent. Particle distribution in an ensemble disagrees with that of QM even if initial distribution is set identical because dynamics is different; it however agrees with observed data to date within experimental uncertainty. The mechanics thus is a testable alternative to QM.

  11. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soilof Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Journals Tropicalof Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

  12. Localization on the Landscape and Eternal Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini-Houghton; Malcolm J. Perry

    2014-04-22

    We investigate the validity of the assertion that eternal inflation populates the landscape of string theory. We verify that bubble solutions do not satisfy the Klein Gordon equation for the landscape potential. Solutions to the landscape potential within the formalism of quantum cosmology are Anderson localized wavefunctions. Those are inconsistent with inflating bubble solutions. The physical reasons behind the failure of a relation between eternal inflation and the landscape are rooted in quantum phenomena such as interference between wavefunction concentrated around the various vacua in the landscape.

  13. Pulmonary macrophages: Phenomena associated with the particle overload'' condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehnert, B.E.; Sebring, R.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Oberdoerster, G. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence support the generalization that alveolar macrophage (AM)-mediated particle clearance, or the transport of particle-containing AM from the alveoli out of the lung via the mucociliary apparatus, is a prominent mechanism that determines the pulmonary retention characteristics of relatively insoluble particles. Studies have also shown that the alveolar deposition of excessive burdens of particles with even low intrinsic cytotoxicity can result in impairments of the AM-mediated panicle clearance mechanism and the development of pathologic disorders including pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer, at least in the lungs of rats. We briefly review evidence consistent with the idea that the high volumetric loads of particles contained in AM during particle overload conditions underlies their inabilities to translocate from the lung. Using a condition of particle overload brought about by subchronic exposure of rats to ultra-fine titanium dioxide as an experimental model, we have obtained ultrastructural and other evidence that indicates an association between particle overload and: The occurrence of aggregates of particle-containing AM in alveoli, Type II cell hyperplasia in alveoli that contain the AM aggregates, a loss in patent pores of Kohn in alveoli that contain the AM aggregates and show Type II cell hyperplasia, the interstitialization of particles at the sites where these phenomena collectively occur, and the development of fibrosis in alveolar regions where particle interstitialization occurs. The loss of pores of Kohn in the alveoli that contain aggregates of particle-laden AM suggests that these interalveolar pores normally serve as passageways through which AM may migrate to neighboring alveoli as they perform their function of phagocytizing particles that have deposited on the alveolar surface. The pores of Kohn also serve as short-cut pathways for AM to reach the mucociliary apparatus from more distal alveoli.

  14. Pulmonary macrophages: Phenomena associated with the particle ``overload`` condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehnert, B.E.; Sebring, R.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Oberdoerster, G. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Numerous lines of evidence support the generalization that alveolar macrophage (AM)-mediated particle clearance, or the transport of particle-containing AM from the alveoli out of the lung via the mucociliary apparatus, is a prominent mechanism that determines the pulmonary retention characteristics of relatively insoluble particles. Studies have also shown that the alveolar deposition of excessive burdens of particles with even low intrinsic cytotoxicity can result in impairments of the AM-mediated panicle clearance mechanism and the development of pathologic disorders including pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer, at least in the lungs of rats. We briefly review evidence consistent with the idea that the high volumetric loads of particles contained in AM during particle overload conditions underlies their inabilities to translocate from the lung. Using a condition of particle overload brought about by subchronic exposure of rats to ultra-fine titanium dioxide as an experimental model, we have obtained ultrastructural and other evidence that indicates an association between particle overload and: The occurrence of aggregates of particle-containing AM in alveoli, Type II cell hyperplasia in alveoli that contain the AM aggregates, a loss in patent pores of Kohn in alveoli that contain the AM aggregates and show Type II cell hyperplasia, the interstitialization of particles at the sites where these phenomena collectively occur, and the development of fibrosis in alveolar regions where particle interstitialization occurs. The loss of pores of Kohn in the alveoli that contain aggregates of particle-laden AM suggests that these interalveolar pores normally serve as passageways through which AM may migrate to neighboring alveoli as they perform their function of phagocytizing particles that have deposited on the alveolar surface. The pores of Kohn also serve as short-cut pathways for AM to reach the mucociliary apparatus from more distal alveoli.

  15. FINITE VOLUME METHODS APPLIED TO THE COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF WELDING PHENOMENA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gary

    1 FINITE VOLUME METHODS APPLIED TO THE COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF WELDING PHENOMENA Gareth A.Taylor@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT This paper presents the computational modelling of welding phenomena within a versatile numerical) and Computational Solid Mechanics (CSM). With regard to the CFD modelling of the weld pool fluid dynamics, heat

  16. Understanding the Standard Model, as a bridge to the discovery of new phenomena at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelangelo L. Mangano

    2008-02-02

    I discuss the basic elements of the process that will lead to the discovery of possible new phenomena at the LHC. We review the status of the tools available to model the Standard Model backgrounds, and the role that such tools can play in the discovery phase, and in the exploration of the features and parameters of such new phenomena.

  17. On the fourth order PI equation and coalescing phenomena of nonlinear turning points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIMS­1804 On the fourth order PI equation and coalescing phenomena of nonlinear turning points), 000--000 On the fourth order PI equation and coalescing phenomena of nonlinear turning points we present a conjecture for the fourth order PI equation with a large parameter to show its

  18. On the fourth order PI equation and coalescing phenomena of nonlinear turning points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIMS-1804 On the fourth order PI equation and coalescing phenomena of nonlinear turning points), 000­000 On the fourth order PI equation and coalescing phenomena of nonlinear turning points Dedicated a conjecture for the fourth order PI equation with a large parameter to show its importance in the exact WKB

  19. Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Ultra-cold Atoms and Strongly Interacting Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Ultra-cold Atoms and Strongly Interacting Photons Monday, 11 June 2012 Phenomena in Ultra-cold Atoms and Strongly Interacting Photons Tuesday, 12 June 2012 (continued) 11:00 ­ 11 2012 9:00 - 9:45 "Quantum dynamics of strongly interacting spins and photons'" Mikhail Lukin, Harvard

  20. Transport Phenomena in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes II. Binary Friction Membrane Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struchtrup, Henning

    Transport Phenomena in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes II. Binary Friction Membrane Model J. Fimrite by the need for improved and more gen- eral models to represent transport phenomena within polymer elec dynamic models required for fundamental simulation of in situ processes that are difficult to ob- serve

  1. Corrosion degradation mechanisms in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the historical aspects related to the development of coiled tubing for oilfield drilling, logging, workover and production operations. It focuses on the metallurgical and process variables of coiled tubing and their interrelationship with aspects of the downhole service environment and the resultant corrosion performance. Special emphasis is placed on (1) operating conditions that can lead to excessive corrosion and/or cracking damage and corrosion fatigue and (2) metallurgical and processing parameters which can be controlled to maximize coiled tubing resistance to corrosion degradation.

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J

    2008-03-01

    A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

  3. An atomistic description of the high-field degradation of dielectric polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bealing, Clive R.; Ramprasad, R.

    2013-11-07

    A microscopic mechanism governing the initiating step in the high-field aging of crystalline polyethylene is proposed, based on density functional calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is assumed that electrons, holes, and excitons are present in the system. While the additional individual electrons or holes are not expected to lead to significant degradation, the presence of triplet excitons are concluded to be rather damaging. The electron and hole states of the exciton localize on a distorted region of polyethylene, significantly weakening nearby C–H bonds and facilitating C–H bond scission. The barrier to cleavage of the weakened C–H bonds is estimated and is comparable to the thermal energy, suggesting that this mechanism may be responsible for the degradation of polyethylene when placed under electrical stress, e.g., in high-voltage cables.

  4. A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-10-13

    This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

  5. Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction (FAI/00-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PLYS, M.G.

    2000-10-10

    The purpose of this report is to provide a topical reference on the phenomena and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project with specific applications to SNF Project processes and situations. Spent metallic uranium nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater at the K basins in the Hanford 100 area, and planned processing steps include: (1) At the basins, cleaning and placing fuel elements and scrap into stainless steel multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) holding about 6 MT of fuel apiece; (2) At nearby cold vacuum drying (CVD) stations, draining, vacuum drying, and mechanically sealing the MCOs; (3) Shipping the MCOs to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) on the 200 Area plateau; and (4) Welding shut and placing the MCOs for interim (40 year) dry storage in closed CSB storage tubes cooled by natural air circulation through the surrounding vault. Damaged fuel elements have exposed and corroded fuel surfaces, which can exothermically react with water vapor and oxygen during normal process steps and in off-normal situations, A key process safety concern is the rate of reaction of damaged fuel and the potential for self-sustaining or runaway reactions, also known as uranium fires or fuel ignition. Uranium metal and one of its corrosion products, uranium hydride, are potentially pyrophoric materials. Dangers of pyrophoricity of uranium and its hydride have long been known in the U.S. Department of Energy (Atomic Energy Commission/DOE) complex and will be discussed more below; it is sufficient here to note that there are numerous documented instances of uranium fires during normal operations. The motivation for this work is to place the safety of the present process in proper perspective given past operational experience. Steps in development of such a perspective are: (1) Description of underlying physical causes for runaway reactions, (2) Modeling physical processes to explain runaway reactions, (3) Validation of the method against experimental data, (4) Application of the method to plausibly explain operational experience, and (5) Application of the method to present process steps to demonstrate process safety and margin. Essentially, the logic above is used to demonstrate that runaway reactions cannot occur during normal SNF Project process steps, and to illustrate the depth of the technical basis for such a conclusion. Some off-normal conditions are identified here that could potentially lead to runaway reactions. However, this document is not intended to provide an exhaustive analysis of such cases. In summary, this report provides a ''toolkit'' of models and approaches for analysis of pyrophoricity safety issues at Hanford, and the technical basis for the recommended approaches. A summary of recommended methods appears in Section 9.0.

  6. Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

    2010-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900şC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

  7. Resources for Local Policymakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEE Action

    2012-06-01

    Provides a summary of State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) information resources available to local policymakers, organized by topic.

  8. Emergent Mesoscale Phenomena in Magnetized Accretion Disc Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Jacob B; Armitage, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    We study how the structure and variability of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in accretion discs converge with domain size. Our results are based on a series of vertically stratified local simulations, computed using the Athena code, that have fixed spatial resolution, but varying radial and azimuthal extent (from \\Delta R = 0.5H to 16H, where H is the vertical scale height). We show that elementary local diagnostics of the turbulence, including the Shakura-Sunyaev {\\alpha} parameter, the ratio of Maxwell stress to magnetic energy, and the ratio of magnetic to fluid stresses, converge to within the precision of our measurements for spatial domains of radial size Lx \\geq 2H. We obtain {\\alpha} = 0.02-0.03, consistent with recent results. Very small domains (Lx = 0.5H) return anomalous results, independent of spatial resolution. The convergence with domain size is only valid for a limited set of diagnostics: larger spatial domains admit the emergence of dynamically important mesoscale structures. In our la...

  9. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meneghini, O.; Luna, C. J.; Smith, S. P.; Lao, L. L.

    2014-06-15

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat flux profiles has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest fidelity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport profiles. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range of plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat flux profiles are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-defined, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport fluxes. The numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-?s per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.

  10. Biocarrier composition for and method of degrading pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to biocarrier compositions that attract and bond pollutant-degrading antigens that will degrade the pollutants. Biocarriers are known generally as a variety of inert or semi-inert compounds or structures having the ability to sequester (attract), hold and biomagnify (enhance) specific microorganisms within their structure. Glass or polystyrene beads are the most well known biocarriers. The biocarrier, which is preferably in the form of glass microspheres, is coated with an antibody or group of antibodies that attract and react specifically with certain pollutant-degrading antigens. The antibody, once bonded to the biocarrier, is used by the composition to attract and bond those pollutant-degrading antigens. Each antibody is specific for an antigen that is specific for a given pollutant. The resulting composition is subsequently exposed to an environment contaminated with pollutants for degradation. In the preferred use, the degrading composition is formed and then injected directly into or near a plume or source of contamination.

  11. Marriage of Electromagnetism and Gravity in Extended Space Model and Astrophysical Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Andreev; D. Yu. Tsipenyuk

    2013-04-06

    The generalization of Einstein's special theory of relativity (SRT) is proposed. In this model the possibility of unification of scalar gravity and electromagnetism into a single united field is considered. Formally, the generalization of the SRT is that instead of (1+3)-dimensional Minkowski space the (1+4)-dimensional extension G is considered. As a fifth additional coordinate the interval S is used. This value is saved under the usual Lorentz transformations in Minkowski space M, but it changes when the transformations in the extended space G are used. We call this model the extended space model (ESM). From a physical point of view our expansion means that processes in which the rest mass of the particles changes are acceptable now. If the rest mass of a particle does not change and the physical quantities do not depend on an additional variable S, then the electromagnetic and gravitational fields exist independently of each other. But if the rest mass is variable and there is a dependence on S, then these two fields are combined into a single united field. In the extended space model a photon can have a nonzero mass and this mass can be either positive or negative. The gravitational effects such as the speed of escape, gravitational red shift and deflection of light can be analyzed in the frame of the extended space model. In this model all these gravitational effects can be found algebraically by the rotations in the (1+4) dimensional space. Now it becomes possible to predict some future results of visible size of super massive objects in our Universe due to new stage of experimental astronomy development in the Radio Astron Project and analyze phenomena of the star V838 Monocerotis explosion as possible Local Big Bang (LBB).

  12. Fluctuations around Bjorken Flow and the onset of turbulent phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We study how fluctuations in fluid dynamic fields can be dissipated or amplified within the characteristic spatio-temporal structure of a heavy ion collision. The initial conditions for a fluid dynamic evolution of heavy ion collisions may contain significant fluctuations in all fluid dynamical fields, including the velocity field and its vorticity components. We formulate and analyze the theory of local fluctuations around average fluid fields described by Bjorken's model. For conditions of laminar flow, when a linearized treatment of the dynamic evolution applies, we discuss explicitly how fluctuations of large wave number get dissipated while modes of sufficiently long wave-length pass almost unattenuated or can even be amplified. In the opposite case of large Reynold's numbers (which is inverse to viscosity), we establish that (after suitable coordinate transformations) the dynamics is governed by an evolution equation of non-relativistic Navier-Stokes type that becomes essentially two-dimensional at late...

  13. Targeted Energy Transfer Phenomena in Vibro-Impact Oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Young S.; McFarland, D. Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Nucera, Francesco [Department of Mechanics and Materials, Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Vakakis, Alexander F. [School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, P.O. Box 64042, GR-15710 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Departments of Mechanical Science and Engineering, and of Aerospace Engineering (adjunct), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2008-07-08

    We study targeted energy transfer (TET) in a coupled oscillator, consisting of a single-degree-of-freedom primary linear oscillator coupled to a vibro-impact nonlinear energy sink (VI NES). For this purpose, we first compute the VI periodic orbits of the underlying hamiltonian VI system, and construct the corresponding frequency-energy plot (FEP). Then, considering inelastic impacts and viscous dissipation, we examine VI damped transitions on the FEP to identify a TET phenomenon by exciting a VI impulsive orbit, which is the most efficient mechanism for TET. Not only can the VI TET involve passive absorption and local dissipation of significant portions of the energy from the primary systems, but it occurs at sufficiently fast time scales. This renders VI NESs suitable for applications, like seismic mitigation, where shock elimination in the early, highly energetic regime of the motion is a critical requirement.

  14. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the DOE's Hanford Site, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. This review is an update and expansion to the September 2010 review of PNNL-19751, Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic).

  15. Novel Collective Phenomena in High-Energy Proton-Proton and Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dusling, Kevin; Schenke, Bjoern

    2015-01-01

    The observation of long-range collective correlations for particles emitted in high-multiplicity pp and pPb collisions has opened up new opportunities of investigating novel high-density QCD phenomena in small colliding systems. We review experimental results related to the studies of collective phenomena in small systems from RHIC and the LHC over the past several years. Latest development in theoretical interpretations motivated by different frameworks are also reviewed, and confronted with the experimental data. Perspectives on possible future directions are discussed, with the aim of further exploring the rich emergent QCD phenomena.

  16. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.; Sullivan, Robin S.

    2010-09-24

    The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. The review includes all natural phenomena hazards with the exception of seismic/earthquake hazards, which are being addressed under a separate effort. It was determined that existing non-seismic NPH assessments are consistent with current design methodology and site specific data.

  17. Outdoor PV Module Degradation of Current-Voltage Parameters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. M.; Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) module degradation rate analysis quantifies the loss of PV power output over time and is useful for estimating the impact of degradation on the cost of energy. An understanding of the degradation of all current-voltage (I-V) parameters helps to determine the cause of the degradation and also gives useful information for the design of the system. This study reports on data collected from 12 distinct mono- and poly-crystalline modules deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Most modules investigated showed < 0.5%/year decrease in maximum power due to short-circuit current decline.

  18. Sandia Energy - Goal 1: Degradation Study of Components and Subsystems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Subsystems Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics PV Systems Reliability Inverter Reliability Program Goal 1: Degradation Study of...

  19. Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005.

  20. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Tunesi, S.; Xu, Q.

    1991-07-30

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light. 3 figures.

  1. Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy Summarizes latest findings on impact of specific parameters affecting ash-related diesel particulate filter performance degradation and information useful to...

  2. Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

    2012-04-03

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

  3. Characterization of thermally degraded energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renlund, A.M.; Miller, J.C.; Trott, W.M.; Erickson, K.L.; Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Wellman, G.W.; Baer, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    Characterization of the damage state of a thermally degraded energetic material (EM) is a critical first step in understanding and predicting cookoff behavior. Unfortunately, the chemical and mechanical responses of heated EMs are closely coupled, especially if the EM is confined. The authors have examined several EMs in small-scale experiments (typically 200 mg) heated in both constant-volume and constant-load configurations. Fixtures were designed to minimize free volume and to contain gas pressures to several thousand psi. The authors measured mechanical forces or displacements that correlated to thermal expansion, phase transitions, material creep and gas pressurization as functions of temperature and soak time. In addition to these real-time measurements, samples were recovered for postmortem examination, usually with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis. The authors present results on EMs (HMX and TATB), with binders (e.g., PBX 9501, PBX 9502, LX-14) and propellants (Al/AP/HTPB).

  4. Skyshine And Groundshine Phenomena And Related Radiological quantities evaluated For The Environment Of A High Current Spallation Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zazula, J M; Cloth, P

    1987-01-01

    Skyshine And Groundshine Phenomena And Related Radiological quantities evaluated For The Environment Of A High Current Spallation Facility

  5. Nonlinear Phenomena Induced by Millijoule Femtosecond Laser Pulses at an Air-water Interface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strycker, Benjamin

    2013-11-04

    Femtosecond laser pulses with millijoule energy have the potential to be used in many applications for remote sensing in marine environments. In this dissertation, we investigate some of the basic phenomena involved when a loosely focused...

  6. The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective Jeff Kimball Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Staff Department of Energy NPH Conference October 26, 2011

  7. Optical, electronic, and dynamical phenomena in the shock compression of condensed matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Evan J. (Evan John), 1976-

    2003-01-01

    Despite the study of shock wave compression of condensed matter for over 100 years, scant progress has been made in understanding the microscopic details. This thesis explores microscopic phenomena in shock compression of ...

  8. Instability and self-contact phenomena in the writhing of clamped rods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neukirch, SĂ©bastien

    ;nd new jump phenomena by treating the ratio of torsional to bending sti#11;ness of the rod and torsional sti#11;ness, and sti#11;ness ratio C=B F ; F; f (dimensionless) internal force T; t (dimensionless

  9. Natural Phenomena Hazard Analysis and Design Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-08-03

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety, and to ensure that the SSCs will be able to effectively perform their intended safety functions under the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPHs).

  10. SCIAMACHY'S ABSORBING AEROSOL INDEX AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF INSTRUMENT DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    SCIAMACHY'S ABSORBING AEROSOL INDEX AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF INSTRUMENT DEGRADATION L. G. Tilstra1- itoring the Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) [1] measured by the satellite instrument SCIAMACHY [2]. We find. This we conclude from straightforward calculation of the effect of instrument degradation based

  11. RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach M.J. Wildman and P recalci- trance to microbial degradation, low volatility (dimensionless Henry's constant, H' = 2 × 10 attractive for in situ remedia- tion in that they conserve energy and water, and through long-term low

  12. 17 -Estradiol-Degrading Bacteria Isolated from Activated Sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Kung-Hui "Bella"

    17 -Estradiol-Degrading Bacteria Isolated from Activated Sludge C H A N G - P I N G Y U , H Y U N G-degrading bacteria (strains KC1-14) were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant

  13. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  14. Degradation Analysis of Weathered Crystalline-Silicon PV Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C. R.; Anderberg, A.; Rummel, S.; Ottoson, L.

    2002-05-01

    We present an analysis of the results of a solar weathering program that found a linear relationship between maximum power degradation and the total UV exposure dose for four different types of commercial crystalline Si modules. The average degradation rate for the four modules types was 0.71% per year. The analysis showed that losses of short-circuit current were responsible for the maximum power degradation. Judging by the appearance of the undegraded control modules, it is very doubtful that the short-circuit current losses were caused by encapsulation browning or obscuration. When we compared the quantum efficiency of a single cell in a degraded module to one from an unexposed control module, it appears that most of the degradation has occurred in the 800 - 1100 nm wave-length region, and not the short wavelength region.

  15. Degradation chemistry of PETN and its homologues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepodd, T.; Behrens, R.; Anex, D.; Miller, D.; Anderson, K.

    1997-11-01

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is used throughout the stockpile as an energetic material. The formulation of PETN into XTX8003 (80% PETN, 20% Sylgard 182) creates an extrudable energetic composite. PETN and XTX8003 are used in the firesets for the retired W68 (MC2370) and the W76 (MC3028). When faced with potential lifetime extensions, energetic materials are naturally suspect regarding their output after prolonged aging. The authors have studied PETN and XTX8003 by looking at 25-year-old samples from retired MC2370s and newer materials. Both the old and new materials have also been placed in various accelerated aging protocols to investigate any decomposition that might occur over time. PETN is known to decompose autocatalytically even in the early stages of decomposition, but the process is poorly understood. Published values for the activation energy of decomposition vary by >40 kcal/mol. The 12 million year half life predicted for room temperature PETN would be dramatically shortened by chemical influences that lead to lower energy decomposition pathways. Degree of confinement, purity, and crystal size all influence degradation rates. In this paper, the authors observe the effects of chemical and thermal aging on PETN. They anticipate changes in mechanism at higher temperature aging, and before trying to extrapolate to lower temperatures, they want to make sure that they understand the different chemical processed involved.

  16. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Odar, F. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present information that can be used in severe accident management by providing an improved understanding of the effects of water addition to a degraded core. This improved understanding is developed using a diagram showing a sequence of core damage states. Whenever possible, a temperature and a time after accident initiation are estimated for each damage state in the sequence diagram. This diagram can be used to anticipate the evolution of events during an accident. Possible responses of plant instruments are described to identify these damage states and the effects of water addition. The rate and amount of water addition needed (1) to remove energy from the core, (2) to stabilize the core or (3) to not adversely affect the damage progression, are estimated. Analysis of the capability to remove energy from large cohesive and particulate debris beds indicates that these beds may not be stabilized in the core region and they may partially relocate to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel.

  17. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Odar, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In this paper we present information that can be used in severe accident management by providing an improved understanding of the effects of water addition to a degraded core. This improved understanding is developed using a diagram showing a sequence of core damage states. Whenever possible, a temperature and a time after accident initiation are estimated for each damage state in the sequence diagram. This diagram can be used to anticipate the evolution of events during an accident. Possible responses of plant instruments are described to identify these damage states and the effects of water addition. The rate and amount of water addition needed (1) to remove energy from the core, (2) to stabilize the core or (3) to not adversely affect the damage progression, are estimated. Analysis of the capability to remove energy from large cohesive and particulate debris beds indicates that these beds may not be stabilized in the core region and they may partially relocate to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel.

  18. Thermal Degradation Studies of Polyurethane/POSS Nanohybrid Elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J P; Pielichowski, K; TremblotDeLaCroix, P; Janowski, B; Todd, D; Liggat, J J

    2010-03-05

    Reported here is the synthesis of a series of Polyurethane/POSS nanohybrid elastomers, the characterization of their thermal stability and degradation behavior at elevated temperatures using a combination of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Thermal Volatilization Analysis (TVA). A series of PU elastomers systems have been formulated incorporating varying levels of 1,2-propanediol-heptaisobutyl-POSS (PHIPOSS) as a chain extender unit, replacing butane diol. The bulk thermal stability of the nanohybrid systems has been characterized using TGA. Results indicate that covalent incorporation of POSS into the PU elastomer network increase the non-oxidative thermal stability of the systems. TVA analysis of the thermal degradation of the POSS/PU hybrid elastomers have demonstrated that the hybrid systems are indeed more thermally stable when compared to the unmodified PU matrix; evolving significantly reduced levels of volatile degradation products and exhibiting a {approx}30 C increase in onset degradation temperature. Furthermore, characterization of the distribution of degradation products from both unmodified and hybrid systems indicate that the inclusion of POSS in the PU network is directly influencing the degradation pathways of both the soft and hard block components of the elastomers: The POSS/PU hybrid systems show reduced levels of CO, CO2, water and increased levels of THF as products of thermal degradation.

  19. Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA)); Short, S.A. (ABB Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA)); McDonald, J.R. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA)); McCann, M.W. Jr. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA)); Murray, R.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using palladized iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Holden, W.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a persistent problem within the Department of Energy complex, as well as in numerous industrial sites around the US. To date, commercially available technologies for destroying these highly stable compounds involve degradation at elevated temperatures either through incineration or base-catalyzed dehalogenation at 300{degrees}C. Since the heating required with these processes substantially increases the costs for treatment of PCB-contaminated wastes, there is a need for finding an alternative approach where PCB can be degraded at ambient temperatures. This report describes the degradation of PCB`s utilizing the bimetallic substrate of iron/palladium.

  1. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  2. Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Kirk Steven

    2011-01-01

    Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.

  3. Prolonged ?-amanitin treatment of cells for studying mutated polymerases causes degradation of DSIF 160 and other proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, David Ching-heng

    2012-01-01

    studying mutated polymerases causes degradation of DSIF 160studying mutated polymerases causes degradation of DSIF 160cells with ?-amanitin causes selective protein degradation

  4. Local Energy Landscape in a Simple Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuya Iwashita; Takeshi Egami

    2014-10-31

    It is difficult to relate the properties of liquids and glasses directly to their structure because of complexity in the structure which defies precise definition. The potential energy landscape (PEL) approach is a very insightful way to conceptualize the structure-property relationship in liquids and glasses, particularly on the effect of temperature and history. However, because of the highly multi-dimensional nature of the PEL it is hard to determine, or even visualize, the actual details of the energy landscape. In this article we introduce a modified concept of the local energy landscape (LEL) which is limited in phase space, and demonstrate its usefulness using molecular dynamics simulation on a simple liquid at high temperatures. The local energy landscape is given as a function of the local coordination number, the number of the nearest neighbor atoms. The excitations in the LEL corresponds to the so-called beta-relaxation process. The LEL offers a simple but useful starting point to discuss complex phenomena in liquids and glasses.

  5. The dynamic of information-driven coordination phenomena: a transfer entropy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Gonçalves, Bruno; González-Bailón, Sandra; Arenas, Alex; Moreno, Yamir; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Data from social media are providing unprecedented opportunities to investigate the processes that rule the dynamics of collective social phenomena. Here, we consider an information theoretical approach to define and measure the temporal and structural signatures typical of collective social events as they arise and gain prominence. We use the symbolic transfer entropy analysis of micro-blogging time series to extract directed networks of influence among geolocalized sub-units in social systems. This methodology captures the emergence of system-level dynamics close to the onset of socially relevant collective phenomena. The framework is validated against a detailed empirical analysis of five case studies. In particular, we identify a change in the characteristic time-scale of the information transfer that flags the onset of information-driven collective phenomena. Furthermore, our approach identifies an order-disorder transition in the directed network of influence between social sub-units. In the absence of ...

  6. Computational Modeling of Degradation of Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, H.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2014-09-01

    The degradation of cations on the alkaline exchange membranes is the major challenge for alkaline membrane fuel cells. In this paper, we investigated the degradation barriers by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations, which is one of the most commonly used cations for alkaline exchange membranes. We found that substituted cations with electron-releasing substituent groups at meta-position of the benzyl ring could result in improved degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations with ten different substituent groups, the largest improvement of degradation barriers is only 1.6 kcal/mol. This implies that the lifetime of alkaline membrane fuel cells could increase from a few months to a few years by using substituted BTMA+ cations, an encouraging but still limited improvement for real-world applications.

  7. Mixed Hydrologic Recovery of a Degraded Mesquite Rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukenbach, Maxwell

    2011-08-08

    Land degradation and anthropogenic change is widespread on rangelands in Texas. Over the last 150 years, noticeable change has occurred as a direct result of agricultural practices and human activity. As novel ecosystems ...

  8. Unravelling the Performance Degradation Mechanisms in High-voltage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unravelling the Performance Degradation Mechanisms in High-voltage Lithium-ion Battery Composite Oxide Electrodes Apr 11 2014 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM Debasish Mohanty, ORNL, Oak Ridge...

  9. Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance Nicholas R. Wheeler, Laura data from Underwriter Labs, featuring measurements taken on 18 identical photovoltaic (PV) modules in modules and their effects on module performance over lifetime. Index Terms--photovoltaics, statistical

  10. Investigation of the Photocatalytic Degradation of Ethanol and Acetone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y.; Ding, B.; Dong, S.

    2006-01-01

    In-situ transmission Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the photocatalytic oxidation of acetone, ethanol and the interaction between acetone and ethanol. Compared with the degradation of acetone alone, it cannot...

  11. Mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Qinjin; Wang, Moran; Mukherjee, Partha P; Lichtner, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO{sub 2} saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occuning at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multi-physicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

  12. The Dynamics of Internet Traffic: Self-Similarity, Self-Organization, and Complex Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2010-09-05

    The Internet is the most complex system ever created in human history. Therefore, its dynamics and traffic unsurprisingly take on a rich variety of complex dynamics, self-organization, and other phenomena that have been researched for years. This paper is a review of the complex dynamics of Internet traffic. Departing from normal treatises, we will take a view from both the network engineering and physics perspectives showing the strengths and weaknesses as well as insights of both. In addition, many less covered phenomena such as traffic oscillations, large-scale effects of worm traffic, and comparisons of the Internet and biological models will be covered.

  13. Some Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Study (The Yucca Mountain Project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Hua; P. Pasupathi; N. Brown; K. Mon

    2005-09-19

    The safe disposal of radioactive waste requires that the waste be isolated from the environment until radioactive decay has reduced its toxicity to innocuous levels for plants, animals, and humans. All of the countries currently studying the options for disposing of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) have selected deep geologic formations to be the primary barrier for accomplishing this isolation. In U.S.A., the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) designated Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site to be characterized for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal. Long-term containment of waste and subsequent slow release of radionuclides into the geosphere will rely on a system of natural and engineered barriers including a robust waste containment design. The waste package design consists of a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 cylindrical barrier surrounding a Type 316 stainless steel inner structural vessel. The waste package is covered by a mailbox-shaped drip shield composed primarily of Ti Grade 7 with Ti Grade 24 structural support members. The U.S. Yucca Mountain Project has been studying and modeling the degradation issues of the relevant materials for some 20 years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes based on the past 20 years studies on Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) materials degradation issues with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the 10,000 years regulatory period. This paper provides an overview of the current understanding of the likely degradation behavior of the waste package and drip shield in the repository after the permanent closure of the facility. The degradation scenario discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, calcium ions, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are further considered. It is concluded that, as far as materials degradation is concerned, the materials and design adopted in the U.S. Yucca Mountain Project will provide sufficient safety margins within the 10,000-years regulatory period.

  14. Technology and Climate Trends in PV Module Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-10-01

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) technology it is vital to know how power output decreases with time. Unfortunately, it can take years to accurately measure the long-term degradation of new products, but past experience on older products can provide a basis for prediction of degradation rates of new products. An extensive search resulted in more than 2000 reported degradation rates with more than 1100 reported rates that include some or all IV parameters. In this paper we discuss how the details of the degradation data give clues about the degradation mechanisms and how they depend on technology and climate zones as well as how they affect current and voltage differently. The largest contributor to maximum power decline for crystalline Si technologies is short circuit current (or maximum current) degradation and to a lesser degree loss in fill factor. Thin-film technologies are characterized by a much higher contribution from fill factor particularly for humid climates. Crystalline Si technologies in hot & humid climates also display a higher probability to show a mixture of losses (not just short circuit current losses) compared to other climates. The distribution for the module I-V parameters (electrical mismatch) was found to change with field exposure. The distributions not only widened but also developed a tail at the lower end, skewing the distribution.

  15. Technology and Climate Trends in PV Module Degradation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-10-01

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) technology it is vital to know how power output decreases with time. Unfortunately, it can take years to accurately measure the long-term degradation of new products, but past experience on older products can provide a basis for prediction of degradation rates of new products. An extensive search resulted in more than 2000 reported degradation rates with more than 1100 reported rates that include some or all IV parameters. In this presentation we discuss how the details of the degradation data give clues about the degradation mechanisms and how they depend on technology and climate zones as well as how they affect current and voltage differently. The largest contributor to maximum power decline for crystalline Si technologies is short circuit current (or maximum current) degradation and to a lesser degree loss in fill factor. Thin-film technologies are characterized by a much higher contribution from fill factor particularly for humid climates. Crystalline Si technologies in hot & humid climates also display a higher probability to show a mixture of losses (not just short circuit current losses) compared to other climates. The distribution for the module I-V parameters (electrical mismatch) was found to change with field exposure. The distributions not only widened but also developed a tail at the lower end, skewing the distribution.

  16. PEO/CHCl3: Crystallinity of the polymer and vapor pressure of the solvent - Equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. KHassanova; B. A. Wolf

    2003-04-16

    Vapor pressures were measured for the system chloroform/polyethylene oxide (peo, weight average molar mass = 1000 kg/mol) at 25 degrees centigrade as a function of the weight fraction w of the polymer by means of a combination of head space sampling and gas chromatography. The establishment of thermodynamic equilibria was assisted by employing thin polymer films. The degrees of crystallinity alpha of the pure peo and of the solid polymer contained in the mixtures were determined via dsc. An analogous degree of polymer insolubility, beta, was calculated from the vapor pressures measured in this composition range. The experiments demonstrate that both quantities and their concentration dependence are markedly affected by the particular mode of film preparation. These non-equilibrium phenomena are discussed in terms of frozen local and temporal equilibria, where differences between alpha and beta are attributed to the occlusion of amorphous material within crystalline domains. Equilibrium information was obtained from two sources, namely from the vapor pressures in the absence of crystalline material (gas/liquid) and from the saturation concentration of peo (liquid/solid). The thermodynamic consistency of these data is demonstrated using a new approach that enables the modeling of composition dependent interaction parameters by means of two adjustable parameters only.

  17. Report on the Implementation of Periodic Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Reviews at Department of Energy Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides the results of a review conducted by the Office of Nuclear Safety (AU-30) of the implementation of periodic Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) assessment reviews by sites reporting to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the Offices of Environmental Management, Nuclear Energy, and Science.

  18. Photoelectric phenomena in polymer-based composites H. Ruda, and E. H. Sargent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photoelectric phenomena in polymer-based composites A. Shik,a) H. Ruda, and E. H. Sargent. The effect is observed experimentally in a wide range of polymer-based composites with disparate inclusions. © 2000 American Institute of Physics. S0021-8979 00 03719-1 I. INTRODUCTION Conducting polymers provide

  19. A unifying mechanical equation with applications to non-holonomic constraints and dissipative phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Minguzzi

    2014-10-01

    A mechanical covariant equation is introduced which retains all the effectingness of the Lagrange equation while being able to describe in a unified way other phenomena including friction, non-holonomic constraints and energy radiation (Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac force equation). A quantization rule adapted to the dissipative degrees of freedom is proposed which does not pass through the variational formulation.

  20. Simulation of Heat Exchange Phenomena and Water Regime in Green Roof Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    187 Simulation of Heat Exchange Phenomena and Water Regime in Green Roof Substrates S. Charpentier UR EPHor Agrocampus-Ouest Centre d'Angers 2, rue Le Nôtre, F49045 Angers France Keywords: green roof roofs increases in Western European and North American cities. It is estimated that 12% of all flat

  1. Welding Procedures and Type IV Phenomena J.A. Francis, W. Mazur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Welding Procedures and Type IV Phenomena J.A. Francis, W. Mazur CSIRO Manufacturing of the type IV rupture stress for welds in ferritic power plant steels containing 9­12 wt. % chromium, using, to infer the dependence of the stress on welding parameters. The rupture stress increases with the preheat

  2. A Competition-Ba sed Explanation of Syntactic Attachment Preferences and Garden Path Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Competition-Ba sed Explanation of Syntactic Attachment Preferences and Garden Path Phenomena suzanne@cs.toronto.edu Abstract This paper presents a massively parallel parser that pre- dicts critical or revision strategies. The processing of a syntactic am- biguity is modeled as an active, distributed

  3. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  4. Thermal challenges in MEMS applications: phase change phenomena and thermal bonding processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    Thermal challenges in MEMS applications: phase change phenomena and thermal bonding processes Liwei, MC 1740, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Two thermal challenges for current and next generation generate single, spherical and controllable thermal bubbles with diameters between 2 and 500 mm. Both

  5. On Metric Ramsey-Type Phenomena Yair Bartal Nathan Linial Manor Mendel Assaf Naor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Yair

    On Metric Ramsey-Type Phenomena Yair Bartal Nathan Linial Manor Mendel Assaf Naor Abstract The main space theory or as part of Ramsey Theory in combinatorics. Given a #12;nite metric space on n points, we.2 Generic upper bounds via metric composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3 Metric Ramsey

  6. Nonlocal Collisionless Phenomena in Plasmas, PPPL Time August 2, 2005 August 3, 2005 August 4, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Nonlocal Collisionless Phenomena in Plasmas, PPPL Time August 2, 2005 August 3, 2005 August 4, 2005 9:00 AM Registration S. A. Cohen Experimental studies of double layers in helicon plasmas W. Lee How transport in industrial RF plasmas I. Kolev Comprehensive PIC-MC model for planar magnetron discharges 10

  7. Three-Dimensional Computational Analysis of Transport Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Three-Dimensional Computational Analysis of Transport Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell by Torsten or other means, without permission of the author. #12;Supervisor: Dr. N. Djilali Abstract Fuel cells-isothermal computational model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The model was developed to improve

  8. Non-Gaussian Model for Ringing Phenomena in Offshore Federico Waisman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Non-Gaussian Model for Ringing Phenomena in Offshore Structures Federico Waisman1 ; Kurtis Gurley been shown in identifying the nonlinear mechanisms that induce a ringing type response in offshore structural systems. This high frequency transient type response has been observed in offshore systems

  9. Could quantum mechanics describe completely and consistently all superconducting and other quantum phenomena?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Nikulov

    2015-07-15

    Canonical description of quantization effects observed at measurements on superconducting structures seems one of the most triumphant achievements of quantum mechanics. But impartial consideration uncovers incompleteness and inconsistency of this description. Contradictions in the description of other quantum phenomena are revealed also.

  10. Could quantum mechanics describe completely and consistently all superconducting and other quantum phenomena?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikulov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Canonical description of quantization effects observed at measurements on superconducting structures seems one of the most triumphant achievements of quantum mechanics. But impartial consideration uncovers incompleteness and inconsistency of this description. Contradictions in the description of other quantum phenomena are revealed also.

  11. Bull. Astr. Soc. India (2010) 38, 147163 Comparison of energies between eruptive phenomena and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Bull. Astr. Soc. India (2010) 38, 147­163 Comparison of energies between eruptive phenomena the energy carried away by a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the radiative energy loss in associated flare plasma, with the decrease in magnetic free energy during a release in active region NOAA 10930

  12. Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

  13. Transport phenomena in stochastic magnetic mirrors Leonid Malyshkin 1 and Russell Kulsrud 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transport phenomena in stochastic magnetic mirrors Leonid Malyshkin 1 and Russell Kulsrud 2 as the electron­proton collision term. Finally, we obtain the four plasma transport coefficients and the effective magnetic field lines, and as a result, they have to go larger distances between hot and cold regions

  14. Threshold phenomena and complexity: a statistical physics analysis of the random

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duxbury, Phillip M.

    Threshold phenomena and complexity: a statistical physics analysis of the random Satis#12;ability problem. R#19;emi Monasson 1 Laboratoire de Physique Th#19;eorique de l'ENS, 75005 Paris. Abstract designed by physicists to deal with optimization or decision problems in an accessible language

  15. Local Regression and Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    Local Regression and Likelihood Clive Loader Springer #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Preface This book, and the associated software, have grown out of the author's work in the field of local regression over the past- ods and in particular regression, for example at the level of Draper and Smith (1981). The theoretical

  16. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

  17. Use of airborne laser scanning to characterise land degradation processes the Dead Sea as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco, Shmuel "Shmulik"

    . Keywords: Airborne laser scanning, Geomorphology, Dead Sea, Land degradation, Channel incision, Sinkholes

  18. Environmental impacts and sustainability of degraded water reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, D.L.; Bradford, S.A. [USDA ARS, Riverside, CA (United States). US Salin Laboratory

    2008-09-15

    Greater urban demand for finite water resources to meet domestic, agricultural, industrial, and recreational needs; increased frequency of drought resulting from erratic weather; and continued degradation of available water resources from point and nonpoint sources of pollution have focused attention on the reuse of degraded waters as a potential water source. However, short- and long-term detrimental environmental impacts and sustainability of degraded water reuse are not well known or understood. These concerns led to the organization of the 2007 ASA-CSSA-SSSA Symposium entitled Environmental Impacts and Sustainability of Degraded Water Reuse. Out of this symposium came a special collection of 4 review papers and 12 technical research papers focusing on various issues associated with the reuse of agricultural drainage water, well water generated in the production of natural gas from coalbeds, municipal wastewater and biosolids, wastewater from confined animal operations, urban runoff, and food-processing wastewater. Overviews of the papers, gaps in knowledge, and future research directions are presented. The future prognosis of degraded water reuse is promising, provided close attention is paid to managing constituents that pose short- and long-term threats to the environment and the health of humankind.

  19. Geography of local configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Coupier

    2010-10-12

    A $d$-dimensional binary Markov random field on a lattice torus is considered. As the size $n$ of the lattice tends to infinity, potentials $a=a(n)$ and $b=b(n)$ depend on $n$. Precise bounds for the probability for local configurations to occur in a large ball are given. Under some conditions bearing on $a(n)$ and $b(n)$, the distance between copies of different local configurations is estimated according to their weights. Finally, a sufficient condition ensuring that a given local configuration occurs everywhere in the lattice is suggested.

  20. The effect of moisture regimes on the anaerobic degradation of municipal solid waste from Metepec (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez-Berriel, Ma.C. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Calz. La Virgen S/N, Metepec, Edo. Mexico (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias y Forestales, UMSNH Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, Morelia, Mich (Mexico); Marquez-Benavides, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias y Forestales, UMSNH Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, Morelia, Mich (Mexico)], E-mail: lili.marquez@gmail.com; Gonzalez-Perez, D.J. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Calz. La Virgen S/N, Metepec, Edo. Mexico (Mexico); Buenrostro-Delgado, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias y Forestales, UMSNH Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, Morelia, Mich (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The State of Mexico, situated in central Mexico, has a population of about 14 million, distributed in approximately 125 counties. Solid waste management represents a serious and ongoing pressure to local authorities. The final disposal site ('El Socavon') does not comply with minimum environmental requirements as no liners or leachate management infrastructure are available. Consequently, leachate composition or the effects of rain water input on municipal solid waste degradation are largely unknown. The aim of this work was to monitor the anaerobic degradation of municipal solid waste (MSW), simulating the water addition due to rainfall, under two different moisture content regimes (70% and 80% humidity). The study was carried out using bioreactors in both laboratory and pilot scales. The variation of organic matter and pH was followed in the solid matrix of the MSW. The leachate produced was used to estimate the field capacity of the MSW and to determine the pH, COD, BOD and heavy metals. Some leachate parameters were found to be within permitted limits, but further research is needed in order to analyze the leachate from lower layers of the disposal site ('El Socavon')

  1. Dynamics of Conformal Maps for a Class of Non-Laplacian Growth Phenomena Martin Z. Bazant,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    Dynamics of Conformal Maps for a Class of Non-Laplacian Growth Phenomena Martin Z. Bazant,1,2 Jaehyuk Choi,1 and Benny Davidovitch3 1 Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology a class of growth phenomena limited by coupled non-Laplacian transport processes, such as nonlinear

  2. Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and NonNuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-03-28

    This document provides guidance in implementing the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation requirements of DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.4, "Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation." This Guide does not establish or invoke any new requirements. Any apparent conflicts arising from the NPH guidance would defer to the requirements in DOE O 420.1. No cancellation.

  3. Towards understanding junction degradation in cadmium telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nardone, Marco

    2014-06-21

    A degradation mechanism in cadmium telluride (CdTe/CdS) solar cells is investigated using time-dependent numerical modeling to simulate various temperature, bias, and illumination stress conditions. The physical mechanism is based on defect generation rates that are proportional to nonequilibrium charge carrier concentrations. It is found that a commonly observed degradation mode for CdTe/CdS solar cells can be reproduced only if defects are allowed to form in a narrow region of the absorber layer close to the CdTe/CdS junction. A key aspect of this junction degradation is that both mid-gap donor and shallow acceptor-type defects must be generated simultaneously in response to photo-excitation or applied bias. The numerical approach employed here can be extended to study other mechanisms for any photovoltaic technology.

  4. Isolation of a bacterium capable of degrading peanut hull lignin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, T.A.; Kerr, R.D.; Benner, R.

    1983-11-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial strains capable of degrading peanut hull lignin were isolated by using four types of lignin preparations and hot-water-extracted peanut hulls. One of the isolates, tentatively identified as Arthrobacter species, was capable of utilizing all four lignin preparations as well as extracted peanut hulls as a sole source of carbon. The bacterium was also capable of degrading specifically labeled (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose and (/sup 14/C)cellulose-labeled lignocellulose from the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora and could also degrade (/sup 14/C) Kraft lignin from slash pine. After 10 days of incubation with (/sup 14/C) cellulose-labeled lignocellulose or (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose from S. alterniflora, the bacterium mineralized 6.5% of the polysaccharide component and 2.9% of the lignin component. (Refs. 24).

  5. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  6. Local Public Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01

    1959. The Theory of Public Finance. New York: McGraw-Hill.T. 2003. School finance, spatial income segregation, and theJohn M. "local public finance." The New Palgrave Dictionary

  7. Effects of sediment resuspension on the degradation of phenanthrene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlanc, L.A.; Gulnick, J.; Brownawell, B.J.; Taylor, G.T. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Marine Sciences Research Center

    1995-12-31

    Degradation of bulk organic matter in sediments is enhanced by oxic/anoxic cycling, a feature common in coastal sediments which are resuspended into overlying waters. The authors are examining the effect of periodic cycling of sediment between an oxic water column and a reducing sediment bed on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation by altering resuspension frequency in controlled laboratory exposures. Rates of initial degradation in coastal sediment have been studied for {sup 14}C-labeled phenanthrene in sediments that were suspended at the following frequencies: 12/day, 6/day, 1/day, 0.25/day and 0/day in liter-sized flow through chambers. Results to date show that degradation rates are initially log linear, with the greatest initial rates (2.4--2.7%/day) occurring in the first three treatments. In treatments resuspended less frequently, this rate decreases with time and is followed at 10--12 days, by another rate increase, which may indicate the stimulation of a bacterial subpopulation. Rates of PAH mineralization are tied to the lability and mineralization of other pools of sediment organic matter, that in turn are also affected also by oxic/anoxic cycling. Addition of fresh diatom detritus stimulated the rates of phenanthrene degradation in resuspension experiments where labile organic matter had already been consumed and microbial activity was low; in contrast diatom addition depressed phenanthrene degradation in sediment exposures with more labile organic matter remaining. The authors are further addressing the behavior of phenanthrene in exposures where they vary the concentration of initial phenanthrene and the concentration and nature of co-substrates.

  8. Mechanism and kinetics of COS-induced diethanolamine degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawodu, O.F.; Meisen, A. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The degradation of aqueous diethanolamine (DEA) solutions by carbonyl sulfide was examined by using a 600-mL well-stirred reactor operating under the following conditions: DEA concentration 20--40 wt %, temperature 120--180 C, COS partial pressure 0.3--1.17 MPa. The reaction products were identified by GC/MS, and reaction mechanisms are developed which conform with experimental observations. The reaction rate constants are determined, and a mathematical model for estimating DEA degradation by COS is presented.

  9. Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

    2013-01-11

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

  10. Neural Network Modeling of Degradation of Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Himanshu; Ghosh, Bahniman [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, 208016 (India); Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78758 (United States)

    2011-05-25

    Neural network modeling has been used to predict the degradation in conversion efficiency of solar cells in this work. The model takes intensity of light, temperature and exposure time as inputs and predicts the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Backpropagation algorithm has been used to train the network. It is found that the neural network model satisfactorily predicts the degradation in efficiency of the solar cell with exposure time. The error in the computed results, after comparison with experimental results, lies in the range of 0.005-0.01, which is quite low.

  11. Materials Degradation and Detection (MD2): Deep Dive Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Henager, Charles H.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2013-02-01

    An effort is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a fundamental and general framework to foster the science and technology needed to support real-time monitoring of early degradation in materials used in the production of nuclear power. The development of such a capability would represent a timely solution to the mounting issues operators face with materials degradation in nuclear power plants. The envisioned framework consists of three primary and interconnected “thrust” areas including 1) microstructural science, 2) behavior assessment, and 3) monitoring and predictive capabilities. A brief state-of-the-art assessment for each of these core technology areas is discussed in the paper.

  12. Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however. (authors)

  13. Comparative study of two- and three-dimensional modeling on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Keun Su; Park, Jin Myung; Choi, Sooseok; Kim, Jongin; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-02-15

    A comparative study between two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) modeling is carried out on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes, in order to evaluate the effects of arc root configuration characterized by either 2D annular or 3D highly localized attachment on the electrode surface. For this purpose, a more precise 3D transient model has been developed by taking account of 3D arc current distribution and arc root rotation. The 3D simulation results apparently reveal that the 3D arc root attachment brings about the inherent 3D and turbulence nature of plasma fields inside the torch. It is also found that the constricted arc column near the vortex chamber plays an important role in heating and acceleration of injected arc gases by concentrating arc currents on the axis of the hollow electrodes. The inherent 3D nature of arc discharge is well preserved inside the cathode region, while these 3D features slowly diminish behind the vortex chamber where the turbulent flow begins to be developed in the anode region. Based on the present simulation results, it is noted that the mixing effects of the strong turbulent flow on the heat and mass transfer are mainly responsible for the gradual relaxation of the 3D structures of plasma fields into the 2D axisymmetric ones that eventually appear in the anode region near the torch exit. From a detailed comparison of the 3D results with the 2D ones, the arc root configuration seems to have a significant effect on the heat transfer to the electrode surfaces interacting with the turbulent plasma flow. That is, in the 2D simulation based on an axisymmetric stationary model, the turbulence phenomena are fairly underestimated and the amount of heat transferred to the cold anode wall is calculated to be smaller than that obtained in the 3D simulation. For the validation of the numerical simulations, calculated plasma temperatures and axial velocities are compared with experimentally measured ones, and the 3D simulation turns out to be more accurate than the 2D simulation as a result of a relatively precise description of the turbulent phenomena inside the torch using a more realistic model of arc root attachment. Finally, it is suggested that the 3D transient formulation is indeed required for describing the real arc discharge phenomena inside the torch, while the 2D stationary approach is sometimes useful for getting practical information about the time-averaged plasma characteristics outside the torch because of its simplicity and rapidness in computation.

  14. Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

    2014-07-01

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  15. From human mobility to renewable energies: Big data analysis to approach worldwide multiscale phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raischel, Frank; Lind, Pedro G

    2014-01-01

    We address and discuss recent trends in the analysis of big data sets, with the emphasis on studying multiscale phenomena. Applications of big data analysis in different scientific fields are described and two particular examples of multiscale phenomena are explored in more detail. The first one deals with wind power production at the scale of single wind turbines, the scale of entire wind farms and also at the scale of a whole country. Using open source data we show that the wind power production has an intermittent character at all those three scales, with implications for defining adequate strategies for stable energy production. The second example concerns the dynamics underlying human mobility, which presents different features at different scales. For that end, we analyze $12$-month data of the Eduroam database within Portuguese universities, and find that, at the smallest scales, typically within a set of a few adjacent buildings, the characteristic exponents of average displacements are different from...

  16. Studies of Intermittency-like Phenomena in Plasma turbulence at IPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, R.; Das, A.; Bisai, N.; Kaw, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Near Indira Bridge, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

    2010-11-23

    The observation of intermittency in the turbulent scrape-off layer plasma of ADITYA tokamak was first reported about one and a half decade ago. In the last decade or so, several aspects of intermittency-like phenomena have been observed on tokamaks and other fusion devices throughout the world. A review of the research carried out at the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) is presented, which closely follow the research trend on intermittency-like phenomena in plasmas worldwide. We also present our analysis of particle flux data in order to test the recently proposed fluctuation theorem, which states that the probability of 'entropy consuming' flux events falls off exponentially with the averaging time. This theorem, proposed in the context of small systems, is applied to macroscopic system like tokamak edge plasma by invoking an 'effective temperature' of the bath of drift waves from which, plasma objects take energy and carry out work of transporting matter

  17. Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

  18. MAPPING FLOW LOCALIZATION PROCESSES IN DEFORMATION OF IRRADIATED REACTOR STRUCTURAL ALLOYS - FINAL REPORT. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program No. MSF99-0072. Period: August 1999 through September 2002. (ORNL/TM-2003/63)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, K.

    2003-09-26

    Metals that can sustain plastic deformation homogeneously throughout their bulk tend to be tough and malleable. Often, however, if a metal has been hardened it will no longer deform uniformly. Instead, the deformation occurs in narrow bands on a microscopic scale wherein stresses and strains become concentrated in localized zones. This strain localization degrades the mechanical properties of the metal by causing premature plastic instability failure or by inducing the formation of cracks. Irradiation with neutrons hardens a metal and makes it more prone to deformation by strain localization. Although this has been known since the earliest days of radiation damage studies, a full measure of the connection between neutron irradiation hardening and strain localization is wanting, particularly in commercial alloys used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Therefore, the goal of this project is to systematically map the extent of involvement of strain localization processes in plastic deformation of three reactor alloys that have been neutron irradiated. The deformation processes are to be identified and related to changes in the tensile properties of the alloys as functions of neutron fluence (dose) and degree of plastic strain. The intent is to define the role of strain localization in radiation embrittlement phenomena. The three test materials are a tempered bainitic A533B steel, representing reactor pressure vessel steel, an annealed 316 stainless steel and annealed Zircaloy-4 representing reactor internal components. These three alloys cover the range of crystal structures usually encountered in structural alloys, i.e. body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and close-packed hexagonal (cph), respectively. The experiments were conducted in three Phases, corresponding to the three years duration of the project. Phases 1 and 2 addressed irradiations and tensile tests made at near-ambient temperatures, and covered a wide range of neutron fluences. Phase 3 was aimed at a higher irradiation and test temperature of about 288 C, pertinent to the operating temperature of commercial reactor pressure vessel steels. Phase 3 explored a narrower fluence range than Phases 1 and 2, and it included an investigation of the strain rate dependence of deformation.

  19. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

  20. RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach M.J. Wildman and P was enhanced by anaerobic bacteria that feed on cathodic hydrogen (i.e., H2 produced during anaerobic Fe(0) corrosion by water). Apparently, the hydrogenotrophic consortium that exploits Fe(0) corrosion

  1. Correcting vibration-induced performance degradation in enterprise servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Correcting vibration-induced performance degradation in enterprise servers Christine S. Chan.gross, kaylan.vaidyanathan}@oracle.com ABSTRACT Server fan subsystems are power-hungry and generate vibrations types of vibrations and quantify their effect on hard disks. We introduce a thermal and cooling

  2. OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN FOR MODELING BATTERY DEGRADATION Joel C. Forman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    , battery health dependence on voltage, and a lack of power fade under the cy- cling conditions. The useOPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN FOR MODELING BATTERY DEGRADATION Joel C. Forman Mechanical Engineering.edu ABSTRACT Accurate battery health modeling allows one to make better design decisions, enables health

  3. A Study on Performance Degradation of PEMFC by Water Freezing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Study on Performance Degradation of PEMFC by Water Freezing Workshop on Fuel Cell Operation at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Feb. 1-2, 2005 EunAe Cho Fuel Cell Research Center Korea Institute and PEM. Nyquist plots Ionic conductivity #12;Fuel Cell Research Center Conclusions A repetitive freezing

  4. Robust Design of Reliability Test Plans Using Degradation Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Crowder, Stephen V.; Crowder, Stephen V.

    2014-10-01

    With short production development times, there is an increased need to demonstrate product reliability relatively quickly with minimal testing. In such cases there may be few if any observed failures. Thus, it may be difficult to assess reliability using the traditional reliability test plans that measure only time (or cycles) to failure. For many components, degradation measures will contain important information about performance and reliability. These measures can be used to design a minimal test plan, in terms of number of units placed on test and duration of the test, necessary to demonstrate a reliability goal. Generally, the assumption is made that the error associated with a degradation measure follows a known distribution, usually normal, although in practice cases may arise where that assumption is not valid. In this paper, we examine such degradation measures, both simulated and real, and present non-parametric methods to demonstrate reliability and to develop reliability test plans for the future production of components with this form of degradation.

  5. Test Plan to Assess Electric Vehicle Cell Degradation under Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Plan to Assess Electric Vehicle Cell Degradation under Electric Utility Grid Operations. The U.S. Government assumes no liability for the contents or use thereof. #12;Test Plan to Assess EV. Abstract This report details the testing plan that will be used by the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute

  6. Degradation of Perchloroethylene and Dichlorophenol by Pulsed-Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Degradation of Perchloroethylene and Dichlorophenol by Pulsed-Electric Discharge and Bioremediation- terium. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 59: 438­444, 1998. Keywords: bioremediation) as well as in groundwater supplies, and water stan- dard limits are set to 0.30 g/L (United States

  7. Biocide evaluation against sessile xanthan polymer-degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, W.B.; Boivin, J.W.; Dasinger, B.L.; Beck, D.; Goldman, I.M.; Wernau, W.C.

    1987-11-01

    This paper supports the use of formaldehyde at economically feasible concentrations as a biocide for EOR processes that use xanthan biopolymer. Its biocidal action against anaerobic sessile xanthan-degrading field organisms was clearly superior to three other biocides tested when 100% kill was used as the criterion for effectiveness.

  8. The Relationship between Economic Growth and Environmental Degradation: Exploring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    and Questioning the Existence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve Advisor Brian Blais, PhD Professor of Science Kuznets Curve Turning Point Environmental Degradation Environmental Improvement Real GDP per capita://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2346173 Figure 1 in Paper #12;Literature · Kuznets curve first developed

  9. Grid Security and Integration with Minimal Performance Degradation Sugata Sanyal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Sugata

    Grid Security and Integration with Minimal Performance Degradation Sugata Sanyal School of computational grids becoming a reality. However, the question of grid security remains one of the important open research issues. Here, we present some novel ideas about how to implement grid security, without

  10. BWR containment failure analysis during degraded-core accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, D.D.

    1982-06-06

    This paper presents a containment failure mode analysis during a spectrum of postulated degraded core accident sequences in a typical 1000-MW(e) boiling water reactor (BWR) with a Mark-I wetwell containment. Overtemperature failure of containment electric penetration assemblies (CEPAs) has been found to be the major failure mode during such accidents.

  11. Deciphering Active Estrogen-Degrading Microorganisms in Bioreactors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roh, Hyung Keun

    2010-10-12

    degraders (strains KC8 and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB)) and amoA gene (associated with ammonia oxidation) to total bacteria decreased as SRT increased in SBRs. These observations correspond to the decreasing percentages of 17 beta-estradiol biodegraded...

  12. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.2: UV Degradation Prevention on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet M. Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Use of wind energy has expanded very quickly because of the energy prices, environmental concerns and improved efficiency of wind generators. Rather than using metal and alloy based wind turbine blades, larger size fiber (glass and carbon) reinforced composite blades have been recently utilized to increase the efficiency of the wind energy in both high and low wind potential areas. In the current composite manufacturing, pre-preg and vacuum-assisted/heat sensitive resin transfer molding and resin infusion methods are employed. However, these lighter, stiffer and stronger composite blades experience ultraviolet (UV) light degradation where polymers (epoxies and hardeners) used for the blades manufacturing absorb solar UV lights, and cause photolytic, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative reactions resulting in breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds, polymer degradation and internal and external stresses. One of the main reasons is the weak protective coatings/paints on the composite blades. This process accelerates the aging and fatigue cracks, and reduces the overall mechanical properties of the blades. Thus, the lack of technology on coatings for blade manufacturing is forcing many government agencies and private companies (local and national windmill companies) to find a better solution for the composite wind blades. Kansas has a great wind potential for the future energy demand, so efficient wind generators can be an option for continuous energy production. The research goal of the present project was to develop nanocomposite coatings using various inclusions against UV degradation and corrosion, and advance the fundamental understanding of degradation (i.e., physical, chemical and physiochemical property changes) on those coatings. In pursuit of the research goal, the research objective of the present program was to investigate the effects of UV light and duration on various nanocomposites made mainly of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoflakes, contribute the valuable information to this emerging field of advanced materials and manufacturing and advance the Kansas economy through creation of engineering knowledge and products in the wind energy. The proposed work was involved in a multidisciplinary research program that incorporates nanocomposite fabrication, advanced coating, characterization, surface and colloidal chemistry, physicochemistry, corrosion science, and analysis with a simple and effective testing methodology. The findings were closely related to our hypothesis and approaches that we proposed in this proposal. The data produced in the study offered to advance the physical understanding of the behavior of nanostructured materials for the prevention of UV light at different exposure time and salt fogging. Founding of this proposal enabled the first UV resistive nanocomposite corrosion coating effort in Kansas to impact the local and national wind mill industry. Results of this program provided valuable opportunities for the multidisciplinary training of undergraduate and graduate students at Wichita State University (WSU), as well as a number of aircraft companies (e.g., Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier/Learjet) and other local and regional industries.

  13. Development Of An Experiment For Measuring Flow Phenomena Occurring In A Lower Plenum For VHTR CFD Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; K.G. Condie; G. E. Mc Creery; H. M. Mc Ilroy

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the present report is to document the design of our first experiment to measure generic flow phenomena expected to occur in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In the process, fabrication sketches are provided for the use of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysts wishing to employ the data for assessment of their proposed codes. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. One aspect of the complex flow in a prismatic VHTR is being addressed: flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue). Current prismatic VHTR concepts were examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses were applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentum-dominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other.

  14. Local STAR Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCenter (LMI-EFRC) ProximityCenterLeeincreasesLocal HighLocal

  15. Local Blog Get Listed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Home· Local Blog· Get Listed· Popular Listings· More Directories· Advertise Here· Home » Arlington ... | directoryofarlingt... 1/9/2011http://www.directoryofarlington.com/blog/2011/01/ut ... | directoryofarlingt... 1/9/2011http://www.directoryofarlington.com/blog/2011/01/ut

  16. Lithium Local Pseudopotential Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Lithium Local Pseudopotential Using DFT Sergio Orozco Student Advisor: Chen Huang Faculty Mentor Lithium LPS Test Lithium LPS #12;Density Functional Theory (DFT) Successful quantum mechanical approach (1979) #12;Building LPS for Lithium Create a LPS using NLPS density for Lithium Test LPS by comparing

  17. Supersymmetry and localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Schwarz; Oleg Zaboronsky

    1995-11-15

    We study conditions under which an odd symmetry of the integrand leads to localization of the corresponding integral over a (super)manifold. We also show that in many cases these conditions guarantee exactness of the stationary phase approximation of such integrals.

  18. LEEDBuilding LocalGovernments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    their jurisdictions' green building programs. #12;1LEED Building Ordinances for Local Governments LEED Building are increasingly common. Most of these ordinances adopt the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Rating System, promulgated by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The LEED rating system sets

  19. Local microwave background radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domingos Soares

    2014-11-13

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  20. Influence of Impurities in Module Packaging on Potential-Induced Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Glick, S.; Johnston, S.; Reedy, R.; Pankow, J.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-09-01

    Chemical compounds were added into crystalline silicon cell mini modules, including in the encapsulant, interfaces, and glass, to determine their effect on potential-induced degradation (PID). Fe, either in the glass or at the glass/encapsulant interface, was found to be correlated with increased PID, but the difference in module power loss was not statistically significant compared to controls. Additions of Cu, Cr, Pb, Sn, Ag, and Na compounds to either the encapsulant or at the glass/encapsulant interface did not appear correlated with PID. Lock-in thermography on bare cells affected by PID removed from the mini modules show highly localized areas of junction breakdown, and SIMS analysis indicates localized impurities as well, though a spatial relation between the two was not established. Deposition of a conductive layer on the front surface of the cell, either with semitransparent Ta or Poly 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT), eliminated PID when the cells were stressed at -1000 V bias, 50 degrees C, with the glass face grounded for 140 h.

  1. NEW DIRECTIONS IN LOCAL HISTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    NEW DIRECTIONS IN LOCAL HISTORY SINCE HOSKINS Edited by Christopher Dyer, Andrew Hopper, Evelyn Lord and Nigel Tringham New Directions in Local History since Hoskins Local history in Britain can of the publication of his Local History in England which was designed to help people researching the history

  2. Hydrodynamic and transport phenomena at the interface between flow and aquatic vegetation : from the forest to the blade scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2014-01-01

    From the canopy scale to the blade scale, interactions between fluid motion and kelp produce a wide array of hydrodynamic and scalar transport phenomena. At the kilometer scale of the kelp forest, coastal currents transport ...

  3. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) By: Integrated NPH Team: David Luke, Lead, TJSO Rusty Sprouse, JSA Michael A. Epps, TJSO Richard Korynta, TJSO

  4. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-12-01

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

  5. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  6. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for New Phenomena from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the New Phenomena Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers.

  7. Stress-related phenomena in transient radiation-induced absorption in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.; Kelly, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The optical properties of materials can be modified by exposure to radiation and research to investigate these radiation-induced phenomena has intensified over the last several decades. The advent of optical fiber technology and the many applications of optical fiber for information transmission have sharply increased the interest in these investigations. Optical fibers present a long optical transmission path and that path may traverse different adverse environments, including radiation areas. The long tranmission path provides increased potential for interactions between the optical information signal and the optical medium. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  9. Thermal degradation of deoxybenzoin polymers studied by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal degradation of deoxybenzoin polymers studied by pyrolysis-gas chromatography Available online 29 March 2008 Keywords: Flame-retardant polymers Thermal degradation Pyrolysis by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The polymers were synthesized

  10. The effects of degraded oil and pre-frying treatments on the quality of tortilla chips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yi-Chang

    1995-01-01

    Refined soybean oils were degraded at 190C for 60 hours. It was observed that degradation time correlated well with free fatty acid contents, total polar materials, convective heat transfer coefficient, color, specific gravity, viscosity...

  11. Monitoring the Performance of a Residential Central Air Conditioner under Degraded Conditions on a Test Bench 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palani, M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Haberl, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the measured degradation in performance of a residential air conditioning system operating under degraded conditions. Experiments were conducted using a R-22 threeton split-type cooling system with a short-tube orifice expansion...

  12. Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments by providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments to simulate the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic contaminated sediments was investigated as the sole electron acceptor. Providing graphite electrodes as an electron acceptor in hydrocarbon

  13. Understanding and harnessing energy-dependent proteolysis for controlled protein degradation in bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Joseph H. (Joseph Harry), III

    2010-01-01

    Regulated intracellular protein degradation is critical for cellular viability. In many organisms, degradation controls cell-cycle progression, executes responses to stress-inducing environmental changes, and enables the ...

  14. A synthetic gene network for tuning protein degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasty, Jeff

    6.6.07 Protein decay rates are regulated by degradation machinery that clears unnecessary components of the Escherichia coli degradation machinery to construct a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of quantitative design principles will accelerate progress towards therapeutic applications. Many cellular

  15. Failure and Degradation Modes of PV Modules in a Hot Dry Climate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Failure and Degradation Modes of PV Modules in a Hot Dry Climate: Results After 12 to 26 Years of Field Exposure Failure and Degradation Modes of PV Modules in a Hot Dry Climate:...

  16. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA)

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  17. Challenges in Modeling the Degradation of Ceramic Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2011-09-01

    We identify the state of the art, gaps in current understanding, and key research needs in the area of modeling the long-term degradation of ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste disposition. The directed purpose of this report is to define a roadmap for Waste IPSC needs to extend capabilities of waste degradation to ceramic waste forms, which overlaps with the needs of the subconsinuum scale of FMM interests. The key knowledge gaps are in the areas of (i) methodology for developing reliable interatomic potentials to model the complex atomic-level interactions in waste forms; (ii) characterization of water interactions at ceramic surfaces and interfaces; and (iii) extension of atomic-level insights to the long time and distance scales relevant to the problem of actinide and fission product immobilization.

  18. Genome-wide Map of Nuclear Protein Degradation Shows NCoR1 Turnover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    of their degradation on rele- vant gene transcription. The UPS eliminates proteins in a specific, step-wise manner

  19. Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01

    Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

  20. Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    1989-01-01

    A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

  1. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

    2011-09-01

    To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

  2. Poly(lactic acid) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.; Mudde, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Biochemical processes to derive value from the management of high carbohydrate food wastes, such as potato starch, corn starch, and cheese whey permeate, have typically been limited to the production of either ethanol or methane. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) believes that lactic acid presents an attractive option for an alternate fermentation end product, especially in light of lactic acids' being a viable candidate for conversion to environmentally safe poly(lactic acid) (PLA) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders. Technology is being developed at ANL to permit a more cost effective route to modified high molecular weight PLA. Preliminary data on the degradation behavior of these modified PLAs shows the retention to the inherent hydrolytic degradability of the PLA modified, however, by introduced compositional variables. A limited study was done on the hydrolytic stability of soluble oligomers of poly(L-lactic acid). Over a 34 day hold period, water-methanol solutions of Pl-LA oligomers in the 2-10 DP range retained some 75% of their original molecular weight.

  3. Poly(lactic acid) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.; Mudde, J.P.

    1992-05-01

    Biochemical processes to derive value from the management of high carbohydrate food wastes, such as potato starch, corn starch, and cheese whey permeate, have typically been limited to the production of either ethanol or methane. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) believes that lactic acid presents an attractive option for an alternate fermentation end product, especially in light of lactic acids` being a viable candidate for conversion to environmentally safe poly(lactic acid) (PLA) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders. Technology is being developed at ANL to permit a more cost effective route to modified high molecular weight PLA. Preliminary data on the degradation behavior of these modified PLAs shows the retention to the inherent hydrolytic degradability of the PLA modified, however, by introduced compositional variables. A limited study was done on the hydrolytic stability of soluble oligomers of poly(L-lactic acid). Over a 34 day hold period, water-methanol solutions of Pl-LA oligomers in the 2-10 DP range retained some 75% of their original molecular weight.

  4. [21] FusionBased Strategies to Identify Genes Involved in Degradation of a Specific Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    [21] FusionBased Strategies to Identify Genes Involved in Degradation of a Specific Substrate By RANDOLPH Y. HAMPTON Abstract Fusion proteins have been used in many instances to allow genetic screening Principles of Using Fusion Reporters to Discover Degradation Genes Because protein degradation is highly

  5. Minimally invasive monitoring of cellulose degradation by desorption electrospray ionization and laser ablation electrospray ionization mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Minimally invasive monitoring of cellulose degradation by desorption electrospray ionization cellulose degradation products produced by accelerated aging in unsized cotton paper. Soluble extracts from and degradation rate of cellulose in aging paper has been of great concern in applications where the long term

  6. Photochemical and microbial degradation of dissolved lignin phenols: Implications for the fate of terrigenous dissolved organic matter in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernes, Peter J.

    Photochemical and microbial degradation of dissolved lignin phenols: Implications for the fate phenols. A 10-day incubation experiment with plume water indicated rates of microbial degradation the impact of various removal mechanisms (photooxidation, microbial degradation, and flocculation

  7. Comminution phenomena during the fluidized bed combustion of a commercial refuse-derived fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, U.; Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R.; D`Anna, G.

    1995-12-31

    A commercial densified refuse-derived fuel (RDF), obtained as pellets from municipal solid wastes, was burned in two laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed combustors, having an internal diameter of 41 mm. The apparatus were both batchwise operated at 850 C by injecting batches of RDF particles into a bed of silica sand (300--400 {micro}m as size range) fluidized at a superficial gas velocity of 0.8 m/s. RDF particles with equivalent mean diameter ranging from 4 to 9 mm were used. Different experimental procedures were set up to separately investigate comminution phenomena of fuel particles. Results were compared with those obtained burning a South African bituminous coal. Results pointed out that RDF particles undergo a strong primary fragmentation phenomenon, with a probability of particle breakage equal to 1 for fuel particles larger than 6 mm. Attrition and char fragmentation phenomena are particularly relevant under both inert and oxidizing conditions, generating a large amount of unburned fines which may affect overall combustion efficiency.

  8. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

    2005-04-26

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

  9. Position-dependent photon operators in the quantization of the electromagnetic field in dielectrics at local thermal equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikko Partanen; Teppo Häyrynen; Jani Oksanen; Jukka Tulkki

    2014-12-02

    It has very recently been suggested that asymmetric coupling of electromagnetic fields to thermal reservoirs under nonequilibrium conditions can produce unexpected oscillatory behavior in the local photon statistics in layered structures. Better understanding of the predicted phenomena could enable useful applications related to thermometry, noise filtering, and enhancing optical interactions. In this work we briefly review the field quantization and study the local steady state temperature distributions in optical cavities formed of lossless and lossy media to show that also local field temperatures exhibit oscillations that depend on position as well as the photon energy.

  10. Material Aging and Degradation Detection and Remaining Life Assessment for Plant Life Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Pitman, Stan G.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-12-31

    One of the major factors that may impact long term operations is structural material degradation, Detecting materials degradation, estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of the component, and determining approaches to mitigating the degradation are important from the perspective of long term operations. In this study, multiple nondestructive measurement and monitoring methods were evaluated for their ability to assess the material degradation state. Metrics quantifying the level of damage from these measurements were defined, and evaluated for their ability to provide estimates of remaining life of the component. An example of estimating the RUL from nondestructive measurements of material degradation condition is provided.

  11. Medial Axis Local Planner: Local Planning for Medial Axis Roadmaps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manavi, Kasra Mehron

    2012-07-16

    implemented this local planner and have tested it in 2D and 3D rigid body and 8D and 16D fixed base articulated linkage environments. We compare MALP with a straight-line local planner (SL), a typical local planer used in motion planning that interpolated...

  12. Superdiffusive Transport and Energy Localization in Disordered Granular Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro J. Martínez; P. G. Kevrekidis; Mason A. Porter

    2015-09-11

    We study the spreading of initially localized excitations in 1D disordered granular crystals. We thereby investigate localization phenomena in strongly nonlinear systems, which we demonstrate to be fundamentally different from localization in linear and weakly nonlinear systems. We compare wave dynamics in chains with 3 different types of disorder: an uncorrelated (Anderson-like) disorder and 2 types of correlated disorders (random dimer arrangements), and for 2 types of initial conditions: displacement excitations and velocity excitations. For strongly precompressed chains, the dynamics depend strongly on the initial condition. For displacement excitations, the long-time behavior of the second moment $\\tilde{m}_2$ has oscillations that depend on the type of disorder, with a complex trend that differs markedly from a power law and which is particularly evident for an Anderson disorder. For velocity excitations, we find a scaling $\\tilde{m}_2\\sim t^{\\gamma}$ (for a constant $\\gamma$) for all 3 types of disorder. For weakly precompressed (strongly nonlinear) chains, $\\tilde{m}_2$ and the inverse participation ratio $P^{-1}$ satisfy $\\tilde{m}_2\\sim t^{\\gamma}$ and $P^{-1}\\sim t^{-\\eta}$, and the dynamics is superdiffusive for all examined cases. When precompression is strong, the IPR decreases slowly for all 3 types of disorder, and we observe a partial localization around the core and the leading edge of the wave. For an Anderson disorder, displacement perturbations lead to localization of energy primarily in the core, and velocity perturbations cause the energy to be divided between the core and the leading edge. This localization phenomenon does not occur in the sonic-vacuum regime, which yields the surprising result that the energy is no longer contained in strongly nonlinear waves but instead is spread across many sites. In this regime, the exponents are very similar in all cases.

  13. Bayesian locally weighted online learning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edakunni, Narayanan U.

    2010-01-01

    Locally weighted regression is a non-parametric technique of regression that is capable of coping with non-stationarity of the input distribution. Online algorithms like Receptive FieldWeighted Regression and Locally ...

  14. Local Experts in Social Media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachani, Vandana

    2013-12-04

    The problem of finding topic experts on social networking sites has been a continued topic of research. This thesis addresses the problem of identifying local experts in social media systems like Twitter. Local experts are experts with a topical...

  15. Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

  16. Geothermal Casimir phenomena for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexej Weber; Holger Gies

    2010-03-17

    We investigate the nontrivial interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. At low temperature, the thermal contribution to the Casimir force is dominated by this interplay, implying that standard approximation techniques such as the PFA are inapplicable even in the limit of small surface separation. Thermal fluctuations on scales of the thermal wavelength lead to a delocalization of the thermal force density at low temperatures. As a consequence, the temperature dependence strongly differs from naive expectations. Most prominently, thermal forces can develop non-monotonic behavior below a critical temperature. We perform a comprehensive study of such geothermal phenomena in these Casimir geometries, using analytical and numerical worldline techniques for Dirichlet scalar fluctuations.

  17. Geothermal Casimir phenomena for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Alexej

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the nontrivial interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. At low temperature, the thermal contribution to the Casimir force is dominated by this interplay, implying that standard approximation techniques such as the PFA are inapplicable even in the limit of small surface separation. Thermal fluctuations on scales of the thermal wavelength lead to a delocalization of the thermal force density at low temperatures. As a consequence, the temperature dependence strongly differs from naive expectations. Most prominently, thermal forces can develop non-monotonic behavior below a critical temperature. We perform a comprehensive study of such geothermal phenomena in these Casimir geometries, using analytical and numerical worldline techniques for Dirichlet scalar fluctuations.

  18. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Smith, James A.; Jewell, James Keith

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  19. Pipeline including network and topology for identifying, locating and quantifying physical phenomena

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richardson, John G.; Moore, Karen A.; Carrington, Robert A.

    2006-02-14

    A method and system for detecting, locating and quantifying a physical phenomena such as strain or a deformation in a structure. A plurality of laterally adjacent conductors may each include a plurality of segments. Each segment is constructed to exhibit a unit value representative of a defined energy transmission characteristic. A plurality of identity groups are defined with each identity group comprising a plurality of segments including at least one segment from each of the plurality of conductors. The segments contained within an identity group are configured and arranged such that each of their associated unit values may be represented by a concatenated digit string which is a unique number relative to the other identity groups. Additionally, the unit values of the segments within an identity group maintain unique ratios with respect to the other unit values in the identity group.

  20. Microsimulations of Arching, Clogging, and Bursty Exit Phenomena in Crowd Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Francisco Enrique Vicente G

    2015-01-01

    We present in this paper the behavior of an artificial agent who is a member of a crowd. The behavior is based on the social comparison theory, as well as the trajectory mapping towards an agent's goal considering the agent's field of vision. The crowd of artificial agents were able to exhibit arching, clogging, and bursty exit rates. We were also able to observe a new phenomenon we called double arching, which happens towards the end of the simulation, and whose onset is exhibited by a "calm" density graph within the exit passage. The density graph is usually bursty at this area. Because of these exhibited phenomena, we can use these agents with high confidence to perform microsimulation studies for modeling the behavior of humans and objects in very realistic ways.

  1. Apparatus and method for interaction phenomena with world modules in data-flow-based simulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gottlieb, Eric J. (Corrales, NM); McDonald, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Oppel, III, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-08-01

    A method and apparatus accommodate interaction phenomenon in a data-flow-based simulation of a system of elements, by establishing meta-modules to simulate system elements and by establishing world modules associated with interaction phenomena. World modules are associated with proxy modules from a group of meta-modules associated with one of the interaction phenomenon. The world modules include a communication world, a sensor world, a mobility world, and a contact world. World modules can be further associated with other world modules if necessary. Interaction phenomenon are simulated in corresponding world modules by accessing member functions in the associated group of proxy modules. Proxy modules can be dynamically allocated at a desired point in the simulation to accommodate the addition of elements in the system of elements such as a system of robots, a system of communication terminals, or a system of vehicles, being simulated.

  2. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr

    1996-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Information has been presented by a number of researchers, which indicated that those tests may be inappropriate for examining microbial degradation of cement-solidified LLW. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program was to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that would be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluation of the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. The procedures that have been developed in this work are presented and discussed. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites were employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this final report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides developed during this study are presented.

  3. Compaction behavior of surrogate degraded emplaced WIPP waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Kuthakun, Souvanny James; Pfeifle, Thomas W.; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2014-03-01

    The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of degraded Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) containers and TRU waste materials at the end of the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, triaxial, and uniaxial strain tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers (CPR). Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial, lateral, and pore stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk moduli of the samples measured using this technique were consistent with those measured using more conventional methods. The second technique involved performing triaxial tests under lateral strain control. By limiting the lateral strain to zero by controlling the applied confining pressure while loading the specimen axially in compression, one can maintain a right-circular cylindrical geometry even under large deformations. This technique is preferred over standard triaxial testing methods which result in inhomogeneous deformation or (3z(Bbarreling(3y. (BManifestations of the inhomogeneous deformation included non-uniform stress states, as well as unrealistic Poissons ratios (> 0.5) or those that vary significantly along the length of the specimen. Zero lateral strain controlled tests yield a more uniform stress state, and admissible and uniform values of Poissons ratio.

  4. Technical basis, supporting information, and strategy for development and implementation of DOE policy for natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    Policy for addressing natural phenomenon comprises a hierarchy of interrelated documents. The top level of policy is contained in the code of Federal Regulations which establishes the framework and intent to ensure overall safety of DOE facilities when subjected to the effects of natural phenomena. The natural phenomena to be considered include earthquakes and tsunami, winds, hurricanes and tornadoes, floods, volcano effects and seiches. Natural phenomena criteria have been established for design of new facilities; evaluation of existing facilities; additions, modifications, and upgrades to existing facilities; and evaluation criteria for new or existing sites. Steps needed to implement these four general criteria are described. The intent of these criteria is to identify WHAT needs to be done to ensure adequate protection from natural phenomena. The commentary provides discussion of WHY this is needed for DOE facilities within the complex. Implementing procedures identifying HOW to carry out these criteria are next identified. Finally, short and long term tasks needed to identify the implementing procedure are tabulated. There is an overall need for consistency throughout the DOE complex related to natural phenomena including consistent terminology, policy, and implementation. 1 fig, 6 tabs.

  5. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  6. Degradation problems with the solvent extraction organic at Roessing uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munyungano, Brodrick; Feather, Angus; Virnig, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Roessing Uranium Ltd recovers uranium from a low-grade ore in Namibia. Uranium is recovered and purified from an ion-exchange eluate in a solvent-extraction plant. The solvent-extraction plant uses Alamine 336 as the extractant for uranium, with isodecanol used as a phase modifier in Sasol SSX 210, an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent. Since the plant started in the mid 1970's, there have been a few episodes where the tertiary amine has been quickly and severely degraded when the plant was operated outside certain operating parameters. The Rossing experience is discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  7. Degradation of nanostructured bainitic steel under rolling contact fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solano-Alvarez, W.; Pickering, E. J.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-09-06

    that the degradation mechanism is ductile void formation at interfaces, followed by growth and coalescence into larger voids that lead to fracture along the direction of the softer phase. This is di?erent from the conventional dam- age mechanism that involves crack... for the manufacture of bearings. The steel in its transformed condition can have a hardness in the range 600-670HV,Preprint submitted to Elsevier July 30, 2014 strength exceeding 2GPa, and toughness levels of around 30-40MPam1/2; the available information...

  8. Advanced Materials for RSOFC Dual Operation with Low Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric, Tang; Tony, Wood; Sofiane, Benhaddad; Casey, Brown; Hongpeng, He; Jeff, Nelson; Oliver, Grande; Ben, Nuttall; Mark, Richards; Randy, Petri

    2012-12-27

    Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (RSOFCs) are energy conversion devices. They are capable of operating in both power generation mode (SOFC) and electrolysis modes (SOEC). RSOFC can integrate renewable production of electricity and hydrogen when power generation and steam electrolysis are coupled in a system, which can turn intermittent solar and wind energy into "firm power." In this DOE EERE project, VPS continuously advanced RSOFC cell stack technology in the areas of endurance and performance. Over 20 types of RSOFC cells were developed in the project. Many of those exceeded performance (area specific resistance less than 300 mohmcm2) and endurance (degradation rate less than 4% per 1000 hours) targets in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes at 750C. One of those cells, RSOFC-7, further demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Ultra high current electrolysis over 3 A/cm2 at 75% water electrolysis efficiency voltage of 1.67 V. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of over 600 days with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Over 6000 SOFC/SOEC cycles in an accelerated 20-minute cycling with degradation less than 3% per 1000 cycles. In RSOFC stack development, a number of kW-class RSOFC stacks were developed and demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis operation of over 5000 hours. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of 100 cycles. Scale up capability of using large area cells with 550 cm2 active area showing the potential for large-scale RSOFC stack development in the future. Although this project is an open-ended development project, this effort, leveraging Versa Power Systems' years of development experience, has the potential to bring renewable energy RSOFC storage systems significantly closer to commercial viability through improvements in RSOFC durability, performance, and cost. When unitized and deployed in renewable solar and wind installations, an RSOFC system can enable higher availability for intermittent renewable resources, thereby improving the commercial viability of these types of energy resources.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy for online monitoring of extraction solvent degradation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.; Robinson, T.; Bryan, S.A.; Levitskaia, T.G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-25 Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In our research, we are exploring the potential of online monitoring of the organic solvents for the flowsheets relevant to the used nuclear fuel reprocessing and tributyl phosphate (TBP)- based extraction processes in particular. Utilization of vibrational spectroscopic techniques permits the discrimination of the degradation products from the primary constituents of the loaded extraction solvent. Multivariate analysis of the spectral data facilitates development of the regression models for their quantification in real time and potentially enables online implementation of a monitoring system. Raman and FTIR spectral databases were created and used to develop the regression partial least squares (PLS) chemometric models for the quantitative prediction of HDBP (dibutyl phosphoric acid) degradation product, TBP, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} extraction organic product phase. It was demonstrated that both these spectroscopic techniques are suitable for the quantification of the Purex solvent components in the presence of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Developed PLS models successfully predicted HDBP and TBP organic concentrations in simulated Purex solutions.

  10. Degradation of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria by neutral oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hauptman, N.; Klanjsek-Gunde, M. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-11-15

    The degradation of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria during treatment with neutral oxygen atoms was monitored by scanning electron microscopy. Experiments were performed in an afterglow chamber made from borosilicate glass. The source of oxygen atoms was remote inductively coupled radiofrequency oxygen plasma. The density of atoms at the samples was 8x10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. The treatment was performed at room temperature. The first effect was the removal of dried capsule. Capsule on exposed parts of bacteria was removed after receiving the dose of 6x10{sup 23} at./m{sup 2}, while the parts of capsule filling the gaps between bacteria were removed after receiving the dose of 2.4x10{sup 24} m{sup -2}. After removing the capsule, degradation continued as etching of bacterial cell wall. The etching was rather nonuniform as holes with diameter of several 10 nm were observed. The cell wall was removed after receiving the dose of about 7x10{sup 24} m{sup -2}. The etching probabilities were about 2x10{sup -5} for the capsule and 2x10{sup -6} for the cell wall. The results were explained by different compositions of capsule and the cell wall.

  11. Data Filtering Impact on PV Degradation Rates and Uncertainty (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-03-01

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaics (PV) it becomes vital to know how power output decreases with time. In order to predict power delivery, degradation rates must be determined accurately. Data filtering, any data treatment assessment of long-term field behavior, is discussed as part of a more comprehensive uncertainty analysis and can be one of the greatest sources of uncertainty in long-term performance studies. Several distinct filtering methods such as outlier removal and inclusion of only sunny days on several different metrics such as PVUSA, performance ratio, DC power to plane-of-array irradiance ratio, uncorrected, and temperature-corrected were examined. PVUSA showed the highest sensitivity while temperature-corrected power over irradiance ratio was found to be the least sensitive to data filtering conditions. Using this ratio it is demonstrated that quantification of degradation rates with a statistical accuracy of +/- 0.2%/year within 4 years of field data is possible on two crystalline silicon and two thin-film systems.

  12. Ag@AgHPW as a plasmonic catalyst for visible-light photocatalytic degradation of environmentally harmful organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wenhui; Cao, Minhua, E-mail: caomh@bit.edu.cn; Li, Na; Su, Shuangyue; Zhao, Xinyu; Wang, Jiangqiang; Li, Xianghua; Hu, Changwen

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW12O40 (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant, which show a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • A new visible-light driven photocatalyst Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} was designed. • The photocatalyst shows a high activity for the degradation of methyl blue. • The high activity can be ascribed to the synergy of photoexcited AgHPW and Ag. - Abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant. They show strong absorption in the visible region because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag NPs. This plasmonic photocatalyst shows a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation, which could be attributed to the highly synergy of photoexcited Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (AgHPW) and plasmon-excited Ag NPs and the confinement effects at interfaces between polyoxometalates (POMs) and silver. POM anions have redox ability and high photocatalytic activity, whereas Ag NPs could effectively accelerate the separation of electrons and holes, both of which contribute to their high activity.

  13. Persistent Near-Surface Flow Structures from Local Helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, R; Baker, D; Harra, L; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Bogart, R S

    2015-01-01

    Near-surface flows measured by the ring-diagram technique of local helioseismology show structures that persist over multiple rotations. We examine these phenomena using data from the {\\em Global Oscillation Network Group} (GONG) and the {\\em Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) and show that a correlation analysis of the structures can be used to estimate the rotation rate as a function of latitude, giving a result consistent with the near-surface rate from global helioseismology and slightly slower than that obtained from a similar analysis of the surface magnetic field strength. At latitudes of 60$^{\\circ}$ and above the HMI flow data reveal a strong signature of a two-sided zonal flow structure. This signature may be related to recent reports of "giant cells" in solar convection.

  14. To freeze or not to: Quantum correlations under local decoherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titas Chanda; Amit Kumar Pal; Anindya Biswas; Aditi Sen De; Ujjwal Sen

    2014-09-07

    We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for freezing of quantum correlations as measured by the quantum discord and the quantum work deficit in the case of bipartite as well as multipartite states subjected to local noisy channels. We recognize that inhomogeneity of the magnetizations of the shared quantum states plays an important role in the freezing phenomena. We show that the frozen value of the quantum correlation and the time interval for freezing follow a complementarity relation. For states which do not exhibit freezing properties, but can be frozen effectively by suitable tuning of the state parameters, we introduce an index -- the freezing index -- to quantify the goodness of freezing. We find that the freezing index can be used to detect quantum phase transitions and discuss the corresponding scaling behavior.

  15. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from Exxon Nuclear MOFP, Richland, Washington, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Exxon Nuclear Company Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant (MOFP), Richland, Washington. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, high straight-line winds, and floods. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values most likely to occur offsite are also given.

  16. Combined surface analytical methods to characterize degradative processes in anti-stiction films in MEMS devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallant, David Robert; Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Hankins, Matthew Granholm; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2005-03-01

    The performance and reliability of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices can be highly dependent on the control of the surface energetics in these structures. Examples of this sensitivity include the use of surface modifying chemistries to control stiction, to minimize friction and wear, and to preserve favorable electrical characteristics in surface micromachined structures. Silane modification of surfaces is one classic approach to controlling stiction in Si-based devices. The time-dependent efficacy of this modifying treatment has traditionally been evaluated by studying the impact of accelerated aging on device performance and conducting subsequent failure analysis. Our interest has been in identifying aging related chemical signatures that represent the early stages of processes like silane displacement or chemical modification that eventually lead to device performance changes. We employ a series of classic surface characterization techniques along with multivariate statistical methods to study subtle changes in the silanized silicon surface and relate these to degradation mechanisms. Examples include the use of spatially resolved time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometric, photoelectron spectroscopic, photoluminescence imaging, and scanning probe microscopic techniques to explore the penetration of water through a silane monolayer, the incorporation of contaminant species into a silane monolayer, and local displacement of silane molecules from the Si surface. We have applied this analytical methodology at the Si coupon level up to MEMS devices. This approach can be generalized to other chemical systems to address issues of new materials integration into micro- and nano-scale systems.

  17. A System Degradation Study of 445 Systems Using Year-Over-Year Performance Index Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This graphic summarizes the results of a study conducted by the SunPower Corporation, to assess the median degradation of a large number of systems. This is important because solar investors need proof of low degradation. The study, a project under DOE's SunShot Initiative, makes use of year-over-year performance index change analysis, a powerful and practical technique for assessing the median degradation of a large fleet of systems, which in this case includes a sample of 445.

  18. Performing a local barrier operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value of the counter, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  19. Performing a local barrier operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value of the counter, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  20. Potential-induced degradation in solar cells: Electronic structure and diffusion mechanism of sodium in stacking faults of silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebarth, Benedikt Gumbsch, Peter; Mrovec, Matous; Elsässer, Christian

    2014-09-07

    Sodium decorated stacking faults (SFs) were recently identified as the primary cause of potential-induced degradation in silicon (Si) solar-cells due to local electrical short-circuiting of the p-n junctions. In the present study, we investigate these defects by first principles calculations based on density functional theory in order to elucidate their structural, thermodynamic, and electronic properties. Our calculations show that the presence of sodium (Na) atoms leads to a substantial elongation of the Si-Si bonds across the SF, and the coverage and continuity of the Na layer strongly affect the diffusion behavior of Na within the SF. An analysis of the electronic structure reveals that the presence of Na in the SF gives rise to partially occupied defect levels within the Si band gap that participate in electrical conduction along the SF.

  1. Nonequilibrium phenomena and determination of plasma parameters in the hot core of the cathode region in free-burning arc discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuehn, Gerrit; Kock, Manfred

    2007-01-15

    We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma parameters (electron density n{sub e}, electron temperature T{sub e}, gas temperature T{sub g}, underpopulation factor b) in the hot-core region in front of the cathode of a low-current, free-burning arc discharge in argon under atmospheric pressure. The discharge is operated in the hot-core mode, creating a hot cathode region with plasma parameters similar to high-current arcs in spite of the fact that we use comparatively low currents (less than 20 A). We use continuum emission and (optically thin) line emission to determine n{sub e} and T{sub e}. We apply relaxation measurements based on a power-interruption technique to investigate deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). These measurements let us determine the gas temperature T{sub g}. All measurements are performed side-on with charge-coupled-device cameras as detectors, so that all measured plasma parameters are spatially resolved after an Abel inversion. This yields the first ever spatially resolved observation of the non-LTE phenomena of the hot core in the near-cathode region of free-burning arcs. The results only partly coincide with previously published predictions and measurements in the literature.

  2. On the cause of conductivity degradation in sodium strontium silicate ionic conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jee, Y; Zhao, X; Huang, K

    2015-01-01

    Here we present strong experimental evidence that elucidates the fundamental cause for the conductivity degradation observed in Na-SrSiO3 ionic conductor.

  3. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soilunseen majority: soil microbes as drivers of plant diversitya challenge for soil microbes and biofuels engineers alike.

  4. Genomics of wood-degrading fungi (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on November 1, 2015 Title: Genomics of wood-degrading fungi Authors: Ohm, Robin A. ; Riley, Robert ;...

  5. Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summarizes latest findings on impact of specific parameters affecting ash-related diesel particulate filter performance degradation and information useful to enhance performance and extend service life

  6. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    degradation of the lignin substrate analog L-dihydrophenylalanine (L-DOPA) with 0.3% hydrogen peroxide for peroxidase, and without for phenol

  7. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    degradation of the lignin substrate analog L-dihydrophenylalanine (L-DOPA) with 0.3% hydrogen peroxide for peroxidase, and without for phenol

  8. Final report for the designed synthesis of controlled degradative materials LDRD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOY,DOUGLAS A.; ULIBARRI,TAMARA A.; CURRO,JOHN G.; SAUNDERS,R.; DERZON,DORA K.; GUESS,TOMMY R.; BAUGHER,B.M.

    2000-02-01

    The main goal of this research was to develop degradable systems either by developing weaklink-containing polymers or identifying commercial polymeric systems which are easily degraded. In both cases, the degradation method involves environmentally friendly chemistries. The weaklinks are easily degradable fragments which are introduced either randomly or regularly in the polymer backbone or as crosslinking sites to make high molecular weight systems via branching. The authors targeted three general application areas: (1) non-lethal deterrents, (2) removable encapsulants, and (3) readily recyclable/environmentally friendly polymers for structural and thin film applications.

  9. Rapid environmental degradation in a subarctic ecosystem influences resource use of a keystone avian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockwell, Robert F.

    Rapid environmental degradation in a subarctic ecosystem influences resource use of a keystone). Keystone herbivores in Arctic ecosystems are especially susceptible to the effects of environmental change

  10. Engineering the Surface of Bacillus subtilis to Degrade Lignocellulose for Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy David

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolysis and Biofuel Production. Industrial & EngineeringDegrade Lignocellulose for Biofuel Production A dissertationLignocellulose for Biofuel Production by Timothy David

  11. Electra-optic phenomena in gelatin-based poled polymer Z. Z. Ho, Ray T. Chen, and Robert Shih

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    Electra-optic phenomena in gelatin-based poled polymer Z. Z. Ho, Ray T. Chen, and Robert Shih lime gel has been constructed and demonstrated. The transmission spectrum of nitrophenol/gelatin shows-linked nature of the gelatin. This result indicates that both passive and active integrated optical devices can

  12. Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang January 2009 Available online 20 February 2009 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell Mass efficient energy production has long been sought to solve energy and environmental problems. Fuel cells

  13. An Introduction to Fuel Cells and Related Transport Phenomena Matthew M. Mench, Chao-Yang Wang and Stefan T. Thynell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    much work to be done. The fuel cell is a unique and fascinating system. For optimal performance1 An Introduction to Fuel Cells and Related Transport Phenomena Matthew M. Mench, Chao-Yang Wang of fuel cell systems for primary or auxiliary power for stationary, portable, and automotive systems has

  14. 469IEEE TRANSACTIONSON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. AP-30, NO. 3, MAY 1982 Signal Cancellation Phenomena in Adaptive Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widrow, Bernard

    Phenomena in Adaptive Antennas: Causes and Cures BERNARD WIDROW, FELLOW, IEEE, KENNETH M. DUVALL, MEMBER beamformers, Manuscript received lanuary 6 , 1981; revised August 10, 1981. This work was supported in.part by the Naval Air Systems Command under Contract N00019-79C-0331 and by ONR under Contract N00014-76- B. Widrow

  15. Grid Security and Integration with Minimal Performance Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Sugata; Abraham, Ajith; Paprzycki, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Computational grids are believed to be the ultimate framework to meet the growing computational needs of the scientific community. Here, the processing power of geographically distributed resources working under different ownerships, having their own access policy, cost structure and the likes, is logically coupled to make them perform as a unified resource. The continuous increase of availability of high-bandwidth communication as well as powerful computers built of low-cost components further enhance chances of computational grids becoming a reality. However, the question of grid security remains one of the important open research issues. Here, we present some novel ideas about how to implement grid security, without appreciable performance degradation in grids. A suitable alternative to the computationally expensive encryption is suggested, which uses a key for message authentication. Methods of secure transfer and exchange of the required key(s) are also discussed.

  16. Local Option- Clean Energy Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money through their local government to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically...

  17. Quantum Features of Vacuum Flux Impact: An Interpretation of Quantum Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Herzenberg

    2005-11-25

    Special relativity combined with the stochastic vacuum flux impact model lead to an explicit interpretation of many of the phenomena of elementary quantum mechanics. We examine characteristics of a repetitively impacted submicroscopic particle in conjunction with examination of the ways in which effects associated with the particle's behavior appear in moving frames of reference. As seen from relatively moving frames of reference, the time and location of impacts and recoils automatically exhibit wave behavior. This model leads to free particle waves with frequencies proportional to the energy and wavelengths inversely proportional to the momentum. As seen from relatively moving frames of reference, impacts and their associated recoils can appear to an observer to take place simultaneously at multiple locations in space. For superposed free particle waves corresponding to bidirectional motion, an amplitude that varies sinusoidally with distance results. A governing equation identical in form to the Schroedinger equation is developed that describes the behavior of the impacts and their associated recoils. This approach permits many features of quantum mechanics to be examined within an intuitively visualizable framework.

  18. Phenomena in oscillating downward propagating flames induced by external laser irradiation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, June Sung; Fujita, Osamu; Honko, Teruaki; Yamada, Yuichiro; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yuji [Division of Mechanical and Space Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita13 Nishi8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Experiments in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2} premixed flames (Le < 1) propagating downwardly in a tube have been conducted to observe transition phenomena from laminar flame front to turbulent flame propagation triggered by external laser irradiation method. To investigate the exact motions of flame tip fluctuation at the initial moment of irradiating CO{sub 2} laser, the completely flat flame front is selected as a default flame, which is corresponding to the primary acoustic instability as reported by Searby (1992). According to the time-resolved observation, the flame front exposed to CO{sub 2} laser beam shows extremely unstable flame motions in which highly curved flame front towards unburned mixture is subject to diffusive-thermal instability. Then, the sudden enhanced burning state (increased flame surface) caused by flame instability induces the secondary acoustic instability which is akin to the observation in Ref. In the present study, we report the detailed descriptions of flame fronts on the transient behaviors leading the primary acoustic instability to turbulent motions actively induced by the absorption of externally irradiated CO{sub 2} laser beam. (author)

  19. Apparatus to study crystal channeling and volume reflection phenomena at the SPS H8 beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scandale, Walter; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Still, Dean A.; Carnera, Alberto; De Salvador, Davide; Della Mea, Gianantonio; Milan, Riccardo; Vomiero, Alberto; Baricordi, Stefano; Chiozzi, Stefano; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Damiani, Chiara; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Guidi, Vincenzo; Martinelli, Giuliano; Mazzolari, Andrea; Milan, Emiliano; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Azzarello, Philipp; Battiston, Roberto

    2008-02-15

    A high performance apparatus has been designed and built by the H8-RD22 collaboration for the study of channeling and volume reflection phenomena in the interaction of 400 GeV/c protons with bent silicon crystals, during the 2006 data taking in the external beamline H8 of the CERN SPS. High-quality silicon short crystals were bent by either anticlastic or quasimosaic effects. Alignment with the highly parallel (8 {mu}rad divergence) proton beam was guaranteed through a submicroradian goniometric system equipped with both rotational and translational stages. Particle tracking was possible by a series of silicon microstrip detectors with high-resolution and a parallel plate gas chamber, triggered by various scintillating detectors located along the beamline. Experimental observation of volume reflection with 400 GeV/c protons proved true with a deflection angle of (10.4{+-}0.5) {mu}rad with respect to the unperturbed beam, with a silicon crystal whose (111) planes were parallel to the beam.

  20. Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of concrete silos 1, 2, 3 and 4 at Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Char, C.V. [PARSONS Environmental Remedial Action Project, Fairfield, OH (United States); Shiner, T.J. [FERMCO, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a United States Department of Energy (DOE) site located near Cincinnati, Ohio. FEMP was formerly established as the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) in 1951 under the Atomic Energy Commission. FEMP is currently undergoing site wide environmental remediation. This paper addresses four concrete silos built during the 1950s and located in Operable Unit 4 (OU-4). Silos 1 and 2 known as K-65 Silos contain residues from Uranium Ore processing. Silo 3 contains metal oxides in powder form. Silo 4 is empty. The Silos are categorized as low hazard facilities and the Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) performance category is PC-2, based on a recently completed safety analysis report. This paper describes the structural evaluation of concrete Silos 1, 2, 3 and 4 for NPH. Non Destructive Tests (NDT) were conducted to establish the current conditions of the silos. Analytical and computer methods were used to evaluate the stresses and displacements for different silo configurations and different loading combinations. Finite element models were developed to uniquely represent each silo, and analyzed using SAP90 computer program. The SAPLOT post processor was used for rapid determination of critical areas of concern for critical loading combinations and for varying silo configurations.

  1. Water in a Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane: Sorption/Desorption and Freezing phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marie Plazanet; Francesco Sacchetti; Caterina Petrillo; Bruno Deme; Paolo Bartolini; Renato Torre

    2013-12-17

    Nafion is a perfluorosulfonated polymer, widely used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. This polymer adopts a complex structural organisation resulting from the microsegregation between hydrophobic backbones and hydrophilic sulfonic acid groups. Upon hydration appear water-filled channels and cavities, in which are released the acidic protons to form a solution of hydronium ions in water embedded in the polymer matrix. Below 273 K, a phenomenon of water sorption/desorption occurs, whose origin is still an open question. Performing neutron diffraction, we monitored the quantity of ice formed during the sorption/desorption as a function of temperature down to 180 K. Upon cooling, we observe that ice forms outside of the membrane and crystallises in the hexagonal Ih form. Simultaneously, the membrane shrinks and dehydrate, leading to an increase of the hydronium ions concentration inside the matrix. Reversibly, the ice melts and the membrane re-hydrate upon heating. A model of solution, whose freezing point varies with the hydronium concentration, is proposed to calculate the quantity of ice formed as a function of temperature. The quantitative agreement between the model and experimental data explains the smooth and reversible behavior observed during the sorption or desorption of water, pointing out the origin of the phenomena. The proposed picture reconciles both confinement and entropic effects. Other examples of water filled electrolyte nano-structures are eventually discussed, in the context of clarifying the conditions for water transport at low temperature.

  2. On the Thermodynamic Geometry and Critical Phenomena of AdS Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anurag Sahay; Tapobrata Sarkar; Gautam Sengupta

    2010-04-21

    In this paper, we study various aspects of the equilibrium thermodynamic state space geometry of AdS black holes. We first examine the Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS (RN-AdS) and the Kerr-AdS black holes. In this context, the state space scalar curvature of these black holes is analysed in various regions of their thermodynamic parameter space. This provides important new insights into the structure and significance of the scalar curvature. We further investigate critical phenomena, and the behaviour of the scalar curvature near criticality, for KN-AdS black holes in two mixed ensembles, introduced and elucidated in our earlier work arXiv:1002.2538 [hep-th]. The critical exponents are identical to those in the RN-AdS and Kerr-AdS cases in the canonical ensemble. This suggests an universality in the scaling behaviour near critical points of AdS black holes. Our results further highlight qualitative differences in the thermodynamic state space geometry for electric charge and angular momentum fluctuations of these.

  3. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ?2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ?10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (?100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ?64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  4. Theoretical Study of Steam Condensation Induced Water Hammer Phenomena in Horizontal Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barna, Imre Ferenc

    2014-01-01

    We investigate steam condensation induced water hammer (CIWH) phenomena and present new theoretical results. We use the WAHA3 model based on two-phase flow six first-order partial differential equations that present one dimensional, surface averaged mass, momentum and energy balances. A second order accurate high-resolution shock-capturing numerical scheme was applied with different kind of limiters in the numerical calculations. The applied two-fluid model shows some similarities to Relap5 which is widely used in the nuclear industry to simulate nuclear power plant accidents. This model was validated with different CIWH experiments which were performed in the PMK-2 facility, which is a full-pressure thermo-hydraulic model of the nuclear power plant of VVER-440/312 type in the Energy Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest and in the Rosa facility in Japan. In our recent study we show the first part of a planned large database which will give us the upper and lower flooding mass flow ...

  5. PIV Experiments to Measure Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a VHTR Lower Plenum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Richard R. Schultz; Daniel Christensen; Robert J. Pink; Ryan C. Johnson

    2006-09-01

    A report of experimental data collected at the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Laboratory in support of contract DE-AC07-05ID14517 and the INL Standard Problem on measurements of flow phenomena occurring in a lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR concept reactor to assess CFD code is presented. Background on the experimental setup and procedures is provided along with several samples of data obtained from the 3-D PIV system and an assessment of experimental uncertainty is provided. Data collected in this study include 3-dimensional velocity-field descriptions of the flow in all four inlet jets and the entire lower plenum with inlet jet Reynolds numbers (ReJet) of approximately 4300 and 12,400. These investigations have generated over 2 terabytes of data that has been processed to describe the various velocity components in formats suitable for external release and archived on removable hard disks. The processed data from both experimental studies are available in multi-column text format.

  6. Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts ___ an in situ XAS Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-06-22

    One of the major challenges in the development of clean energy fuel cells is the performance degradation of the electrocatalyst, which, apart from poisoning effects, can suffer from corrosion due to its exposure to a harsh environment under high potentials. In this communication, we demonstrate how interactions of Pt with a transition metal support affect not only, as commonly intended, the catalytic activity, but also the reactivity of Pt towards oxide formation or dissolution. We use two well-defined single-crystal model systems, Pt/Rh(111) and Pt/Au(111) and a unique x-ray spectroscopy technique with enhanced energy resolution to monitor the potential-dependent oxidation state of Pt, and find two markedly different oxidation mechanisms on the two different substrates. This information can be of great significance for future design of more active and more stable catalysts. We have studied the potential-induced degradation of Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on Rh(111) and Au(111) single-crystal substrates. The anodic formation of Pt oxides was monitored using in situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection x-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS). Although Pt was deposited on both substrates in a three-dimensional island growth mode, we observed remarkable differences during oxide formation that can only be understood in terms of strong Pt-substrate interactions throughout the Pt islands. Anodic polarization of Pt/Rh(111) up to +1.6 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) leads to formation an incompletely oxidized passive layer, whereas formation of PtO2 and partial Pt dissolution is observed for Pt/Au(111).

  7. Local Voltage Support from Distributed Energy Resources to Prevent Air Conditioner Motor Stalling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baone, Chaitanya A; Xu, Yan; Kueck, John D

    2010-01-01

    Microgrid voltage collapse often happens when there is a high percentage of low inertia air-conditioning (AC) motors in the power systems. The stalling of the AC motors results in Fault Induced Delayed Voltage Recovery (FIDVR). A hybrid load model including typical building loads, AC motor loads, and other induction motor loads is built to simulate the motoring stalling phenomena. Furthermore, distributed energy resources (DE) with local voltage support capability are utilized to boost the local bus voltage during a fault, and prevent the motor stalling. The simulation results are presented. The analysis of the simulation results show that local voltage support from multiple DEs can effectively and economically solve the microgrid voltage collapse problem.

  8. Computational model of local intravascular drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Brinda

    2007-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) virtually eradicate the clinical phenomena of vessel restenosis; yet, they also increase the short and long term risks for stent thrombosis. To improve their safety and efficacy, it is critical ...

  9. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  10. Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott

    2010-01-01

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

  11. Local Power in Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillermo Albareda; Fabio Lorenzo Traversa; Xavier Oriols

    2015-11-12

    A general expression for the local power of a quantum system is derived. Defined as the time rate of change of the kinetic energy evaluated in a finite volume $\\Omega$ of the physical space, the local power exhibits contributions from both many-body classical and quantum correlations. Significantly, quantum correlations are manifested through the presence of non-local sources/sinks of power and through the action of local forces with no classical counterpart. The soundness of our results is proved along three limits of particular relevance: the closed-system limit ($\\Omega \\to \\infty$), the limit of non-interacting particles, and invoking classicality. Interestingly, we show that quantum fingerprints arise on the local power expression only when the volume $\\Omega$ is finite. Otherwise we recover a classical-like expression. This work could be of particular interest in the field of nanoelectronics, where the realization of a zero-power technology constitutes a long standing challenge.

  12. Local Termination: theory and practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endrullis, Joerg; Waldmann, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The characterisation of termination using well-founded monotone algebras has been a milestone on the way to automated termination techniques, of which we have seen an extensive development over the past years. Both the semantic characterisation and most known termination methods are concerned with global termination, uniformly of all the terms of a term rewriting system (TRS). In this paper we consider local termination, of specific sets of terms within a given TRS. The principal goal of this paper is generalising the semantic characterisation of global termination to local termination. This is made possible by admitting the well-founded monotone algebras to be partial. We also extend our approach to local relative termination. The interest in local termination naturally arises in program verification, where one is probably interested only in sensible inputs, or just wants to characterise the set of inputs for which a program terminates. Local termination will be also be of interest when dealing with a specif...

  13. Analysis of transport phenomena during the convective drying in superheated steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Topin, F.; Tadrist, L. [Univ. de Provence, Marseille (France)

    1997-10-01

    This work focused on high-temperature convective drying (superheated steam drying). The process has been investigated both experimentally and numerically. The experimental analysis was carried out in an aerodynamic return-flow wind-tunnel, with very small cylinders of cellular concrete. For the local analysis, the samples were fitted with thermocouples and pressure sensors. The mean moisture content of the cylinders was measured by simple weighing while the temperature and pressure readings were being taken. Global and local analysis of heat and mass transfer in small cylinders in superheated steam were carried out. The systematical study for several sizes and aerothermal conditions show a similar behavior for moisture content, pressure and temperature values. A numerical model for high temperature drying, using the finite elements method, in a 2-D configuration, was implemented and validated.

  14. Lunar Outgassing, Transient Phenomena and The Return to The Moon, III: Observational and Experimental Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arlin P. S. Crotts

    2007-06-27

    In Papers II and III we show that Transient Lunar Phenomena (TLPs) are likely related to lunar outgassing, albeit in ways not fully understood. Here we propose a path forward, in which current and forthcoming technologies provide a more controlled, sensitive probe of lunar outgassing. Many of these techniques are being realized for the first time. Given the optical transient/outgassing connection, progress can be made by remote sensing, and we suggest programs of imaging, spectroscopy and combinations thereof. However, as found in Paper II, many aspects of lunar outgassing seem covert in nature. TLPs betray outgassing, but not all outgassing produces TLPs. Some outgassing may never appear at the surface, but remain trapped in the regolith. We also suggest more intrusive techniques, from radar mapping to in-situ probes. Understanding these volatiles seems promising in terms of a resource for humans on the Moon and beyond, and offers an interesting scientific goal in its own right. Hence this paper is a series of proposed techniques, some in practice, some which might be soon, and some requiring significant future investment, some of which may prove unwise pending results from predecessor investigations. These point towards enhancement of our knowledge of lunar outgassing, its relation to other lunar processes, and an increase in our understanding of how volatiles are involved in the evolution of the Moon. We emphasize certain ground-based observations in time for flights of SELENE, LRO and other robotic missions, and others before extensive human xploration. We discuss how study of the pristine lunar atmosphere pertains to understanding the role of anthropogenic volatiles, an important confusing signal

  15. Lunar Outgassing, Transient Phenomena and The Return to The Moon, I: Existing Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arlin P. S. Crotts

    2007-06-27

    Herein the transient lunar phenomena (TLP) report database is subjected to a discriminating statistical filter robust against sites of spurious reports, and produces a restricted sample that may be largely reliable. This subset is highly correlated geographically with the catalog of outgassing events seen by the Apollo 15, 16 and Lunar Prospector alpha-particle spectrometers for episodic Rn-222 gas release. Both this robust TLP sample and even the larger, unfiltered sample are highly correlated with the boundary between mare and highlands, as are both deep and shallow moonquakes, as well as Po-210, a long-lived product of Rn-222 decay and a further tracer of outgassing. This offers another significant correlation relating TLPs and outgassing, and may tie some of this activity to sagging mare basalt plains (perhaps mascons). Additionally, low-level but likely significant TLP activity is connected to recent, major impact craters (while moonquakes are not), which may indicate the effects of cracks caused by the impacts, or perhaps avalanches, allowing release of gas. The majority of TLP (and Rn-222) activity, however, is confined to one site that produced much of the basalt in the Procellarum Terrane, and it seems plausible that this TLP activity may be tied to residual outgassing from the formerly largest volcanic ffusion sites from the deep lunar interior. With the coming in the next few years of robotic spacecraft followed by human exploration, the study of TLPs and outgassing is both promising and imperiled. We will have an unprecedented pportunity to study lunar outgassing, but will also deal with a greater burden of anthropogenic lunar gas than ever produced. There is a pressing need to study lunar atmosphere and its sources while still pristine. [Abstract abridged.

  16. Fundamental Understanding of Ambient and High-Temperature Plasticity Phenomena in Structural Materials in Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Chaitanya; Zhu, Ting; McDowell, David

    2013-11-17

    The goal of this research project is to develop the methods and tools necessary to link unit processes analyzed using atomistic simulations involving interaction of vacancies and interstitials with dislocations, as well as dislocation mediation at sessile junctions and interfaces as affected by radiation, with cooperative influence on higher-length scale behavior of polycrystals. These tools and methods are necessary to design and enhance radiation-induced damage-tolerant alloys. The project will achieve this goal by applying atomistic simulations to characterize unit processes of: 1. Dislocation nucleation, absorption, and desorption at interfaces 2. Vacancy production, radiation-induced segregation of substitutional Cr at defect clusters (point defect sinks) in BCC Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels 3. Investigation of interaction of interstitials and vacancies with impurities (V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Al, Si, P, S) 4. Time evolution of swelling (cluster growth) phenomena of irradiated materials 5. Energetics and kinetics of dislocation bypass of defects formed by interstitial clustering and formation of prismatic loops, informing statistical models of continuum character with regard to processes of dislocation glide, vacancy agglomeration and swelling, climb and cross slip This project will consider the Fe, Fe-C, and Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic material system, accounting for magnetism by choosing appropriate interatomic potentials and validating with first principles calculations. For these alloys, the rate of swelling and creep enhancement is considerably lower than that of face-centered cubic (FCC) alloys and of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mo alloys. The team will confirm mechanisms, validate simulations at various time and length scales, and improve the veracity of computational models. The proposed research?s feasibility is supported by recent modeling of radiation effects in metals and alloys, interfacial dislocation transfer reactions in nano-twinned copper, and dislocation reactions at general boundaries, along with extensive modeling cooperative effects of dislocation interactions and migration in crystals and polycrystals using continuum models.

  17. PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL OPERATION AND DEGRADATION IN SHORT-CIRCUIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL OPERATION AND DEGRADATION IN SHORT-CIRCUIT R.E. Silvaa, b, d , F exchange membrane fuel cells, short circuit, degradation mechanism, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy an electrical short circuit of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack. The physical quantities in the fuel

  18. Ambient induced degradation and chemically activated recovery in copper phthalocyanine thin film transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Ambient induced degradation and chemically activated recovery in copper phthalocyanine thin film 2009 The electrical degradation aging of copper phthalocyanine CuPc organic thin film transistors OTFTs of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3159885 I. INTRODUCTION The recent demand for low cost, versatile electronic de

  19. A study on failure prediction and design criteria for fiber composites under fire degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, Ming

    Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA Abstract Polymer matrix composites can be severely degraded/damaged under experimental and theoretical studies of compressive failures of polymer-matrix glass-reinforced composites, and conduct combined experi- mental­theoretical studies of the behavior of thermally degraded composite

  20. Statistics of Landscapes Based on Free Energies, Replication and Degradation Rate Constants of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Peter F.

    Statistics of Landscapes Based on Free Energies, Replication and Degradation Rate Constants of RNA are computed from primary sequences by means of a folding algorithm which uses a minimum free energy criterion. Free energies as well as replication and degradation rate constants are derived from secondary

  1. State-of-the-Art 3-D Assessment of Elements Degrading TBR of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) degrade breeding? · Could required TBR be achieved in presence of several design elements (such design elements on TBR ­ Vary Li enrichment from natural to 90% to determine operating enrichmentState-of-the-Art 3-D Assessment of Elements Degrading TBR of ARIES-ACT SiC/LiPb Blanket L. El

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Cellulosilyticum lentocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David A [Cornell University; Suen, Garret [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Fox, Brian G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Angert, Esther R. [Cornell University; Currie, Cameron [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosilyticum lentocellum DSM 5427 is an anaerobic, endospore-forming member of the Firmicutes. We describe the complete genome sequence of this cellulose-degrading bacterium; originally isolated from estuarine sediment of a river that received both domestic and paper mill waste. Comparative genomics of cellulolytic clostridia will provide insight into factors that influence degradation rates.

  3. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell degradation prediction based on Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell degradation prediction based on Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference online XX XX XXXX Keywords: Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell degradation, Prognostic and Health nominal operating condition of a PEM fuel cell stack. It proposes a methodology based on Adaptive Neuro

  4. Silicone oil contamination and electrical contact resistance degradation of low-force gold contacts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dickrell, Daniel John, III

    2006-02-01

    Hot-switched low-force gold electrical contact testing was performed using a nanomechanical test apparatus to ascertain the sensitivity of simulated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) contact to silicone oil contamination. The observed cyclic contact resistance degradation was dependent on both closure rate and noncontact applied voltage. The decomposition of silicone oil from electrical arcing was hypothesized as the degradation mechanism.

  5. Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2006-01-01

    Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 38­40 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose the thickness of the cellulose nitrate layer of the commonly used LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detector spectrometry will induce degradation of the cellulose nitrate. For this purpose, Fourier transform infrared

  6. Surface plasmon resonance imaging of the enzymatic degradation of cellulose microfibrils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging of the enzymatic degradation of cellulose microfibrils Scott G with cellulose microfibrils using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging. The cellulose microfibrils, obtained of the enzymes onto both the cellulose microfibrils and the bare surface, and the subsequent degradation

  7. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292­2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza´ c ova´ a,b,Ă, Hana Hrs elova´ a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  8. Functional Characterization of Propane-Enhanced N-Nitrosodimethylamine Degradation by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    ARTICLE Functional Characterization of Propane-Enhanced N-Nitrosodimethylamine Degradation by Two: Propane-induced cometabolic degradation of n-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) by two propanotrophs is characterized through kinetic, gene presence, and expression studies. After growth on propane, resting cells

  9. Potential for Atmospheric-Driven Lead Paint Degradation in the South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Potential for Atmospheric-Driven Lead Paint Degradation in the South Coast Air Basin of California manuscript received September 27, 2009. Accepted October 8, 2009. Exposure to lead in paint or lead residuesUnitedStates.Componentsofphotochemicalsmog can increase the degradation of binders in lead paint, leading to increased release of lead pigment

  10. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  11. Degradation of Xenobiotics in a Partitioning Bioreactor in Which the Partitioning Phase is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    ­405, 2003. Keywords: partitioning bioreactor; phenol; degradation; polymer; EVA INTRODUCTION The controlledDegradation of Xenobiotics in a Partitioning Bioreactor in Which the Partitioning Phase the aqueous concentration of phenol in a bioreactor from toxic levels (~2,000 mg/L) to subinhibi- tory levels

  12. Understanding Blue-to-Red Conversion in Monomeric Fluorescent Timers and Hydrolytic Degradation of Their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    Understanding Blue-to-Red Conversion in Monomeric Fluorescent Timers and Hydrolytic Degradation phenolate oxygen and the side chain hydroxyl of Ser146. In Blue102, a bulky side chain of Ile146 precludes-FT and Blue102 structures revealed hydrolytic degradation of the chromophores. In Fast-FT, chromophore

  13. Hurricane, Habitat Degradation, and Land Loss Effects on Brown Pelican Nesting Colonies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karubian, Jordan

    Hurricane, Habitat Degradation, and Land Loss Effects on Brown Pelican Nesting Colonies Scott T.J., and Leberg, P.L., 2013. Hurricane, habitat degradation, and land loss effects on Brown Pelican nesting colonies of coastal avifauna are perennially threatened by hurricanes, land loss, and environmental

  14. PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan and Ilya Tsvankin , Center for Wave Phenomena, Colorado School of Mines (CSM),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan and Ilya Tsvankin , Center for Wave Phenomena, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Mike Batzle, Center for Rock Abuse, CSM, Kasper van Wijk, Physical Acoustics Laboratory, CSM, and Matt Haney, Center for Wave Phenomena

  15. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent with the inherent complexity associated with correct heme insertion and acylation of MtrC that occurs in the periplasm prior to its targeting to the outer membrane. These latter results suggest that MtrC protein trafficking to the outer membrane and its subsequent degradation are tightly regulated, which is consistent with cellular processing pathways that target MtrC to extracellular structures and their possible role in promoting electron transfer from Shewanella to extracellular acceptors.

  16. Methods And Systms For Analyzing The Degradation And Failure Of Mechanical Systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarrell, Donald B. (Kennewick, WA); Sisk, Daniel R. (Richland, WA); Hatley, Darrel D. (Kennewick, WA); Kirihara, Leslie J. (Richland, WA); Peters, Timothy J. (Richland, WA)

    2005-02-08

    Methods and systems for identifying, understanding, and predicting the degradation and failure of mechanical systems are disclosed. The methods include measuring and quantifying stressors that are responsible for the activation of degradation mechanisms in the machine component of interest. The intensity of the stressor may be correlated with the rate of physical degradation according to some determinable function such that a derivative relationship exists between the machine performance, degradation, and the underlying stressor. The derivative relationship may be used to make diagnostic and prognostic calculations concerning the performance and projected life of the machine. These calculations may be performed in real time to allow the machine operator to quickly adjust the operational parameters of the machinery in order to help minimize or eliminate the effects of the degradation mechanism, thereby prolonging the life of the machine. Various systems implementing the methods are also disclosed.

  17. Kinetic viscoelasticity modeling applied to degradation during carbon–carbon composite processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drakonakis, Vasileios M.

    Kinetic viscoelasticity modeling has been successfully utilized to describe phenomena during cure of thermoset based carbon fiber reinforced matrices. The basic difference from classic viscoelasticity is that the fundamental ...

  18. Thermally-activated non-local amplification in quantum energy transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Leggio; Riccardo Messina; Mauro Antezza

    2015-11-18

    We study energy-transport efficiency in light-harvesting planar and 3D complexes of two-level atomic quantum systems, embedded in a common thermal blackbody radiation. We show that the collective non-local dissipation induced by the thermal bath plays a fundamental role in energy transport. It gives rise to a dramatic enhancement of the energy-transport efficiency, which may largely overcome $100\\%$. This effect, which improves the understanding of transport phenomena in experimentally relevant complexes, suggests a particularly promising mechanism for quantum energy management.

  19. Ultrasensitive mode-localized mass sensor with electrically tunable parametric sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiruvenkatanathan, P.; Yan, J.; Seshia, A. A. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Nanoscience Centre, University of Cambridge, 11 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FF (United Kingdom); Woodhouse, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Aziz, A. [Nanoscience Centre, University of Cambridge, 11 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FF (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-22

    We use the phenomena of mode localization and vibration confinement in pairs of weakly coupled, nearly identical microelectromechanical (MEMS) resonators as an ultrasensitive technique of detecting added mass on the resonator. The variations in the eigenstates for induced mass additions are studied and compared with corresponding resonant frequency shifts in pairs of MEMS resonators that are coupled electrostatically. We demonstrate that the relative shifts in the eigenstates can be over three orders of magnitude greater than those in resonant frequency for the same addition of mass. We also investigate the effects of voltage controlled electrical spring tuning on the parametric sensitivity of such sensors and demonstrate sensitivities tunable by over 400%.

  20. Application of the GALI Method to Localization Dynamics in Nonlinear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Bountis; T. Manos; H. Christodoulidi

    2008-06-22

    We investigate localization phenomena and stability properties of quasiperiodic oscillations in $N$ degree of freedom Hamiltonian systems and $N$ coupled symplectic maps. In particular, we study an example of a parametrically driven Hamiltonian lattice with only quartic coupling terms and a system of $N$ coupled standard maps. We explore their dynamics using the Generalized Alignment Index (GALI), which constitutes a recently developed numerical method for detecting chaotic orbits in many dimensions, estimating the dimensionality of quasiperiodic tori and predicting slow diffusion in a way that is faster and more reliable than many other approaches known to date.

  1. Thermally-activated non-local amplification in quantum energy transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Leggio; Riccardo Messina; Mauro Antezza

    2015-05-13

    We study energy-transport efficiency in light-harvesting planar and 3D complexes of two-level atomic quantum systems, embedded in a common thermal blackbody radiation. We show that the collective non-local dissipation induced by the thermal bath plays a fundamental role in energy transport. It gives rise to a dramatic enhancement of the energy-transport efficiency, which may largely overcome $100\\%$. This effect, which improves the understanding of transport phenomena in experimentally relevant complexes, suggests a particularly promising mechanism for quantum energy management.

  2. Monte Carlo model for electron degradation in methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhardwaj, Anil

    2015-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for degradation of 1-10,000 eV electrons in an atmosphere of methane. The electron impact cross sections for CH4 are compiled and analytical representations of these cross sections are used as input to the model.model.Yield spectra, which provides information about the number of inelastic events that have taken place in each energy bin, is used to calculate the yield (or population) of various inelastic processes. The numerical yield spectra, obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations, is represented analytically, thus generating the Analytical Yield Spectra (AYS). AYS is employed to obtain the mean energy per ion pair and efficiencies of various inelastic processes.Mean energy per ion pair for neutral CH4 is found to be 26 (27.8) eV at 10 (0.1) keV. Efficiency calculation showed that ionization is the dominant process at energies >50 eV, for which more than 50% of the incident electron energy is used. Above 25 eV, dissociation has an efficiency of 27%. Below 10 eV, vibrational e...

  3. Production of degradable polymers from food-waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.P.: Coleman, R.D.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Moon, S.H.

    1992-07-01

    In the United States, billions of pounds of cheese whey permeate and approximately 10 billion pounds of potatoes processed each year are typically discarded or sold as cattle feed at $3{endash}6/ton; moreover, the transportation required for these means of disposal can be expensive. As a potential solution to this economic and environmental problem, Argonne National Laboratory is developing technology that: Biologically converts existing food-processing waste streams into lactic acid and uses lactic acid for making environmentally safe, degradable polylactic acid (PLA) and modified PLA plastics and coatings. An Argonne process for biologically converting high-carbohydrate food waste will not only help to solve a waste problem for the food industry, but will also save energy and be economically attractive. Although the initial substrate for Argonne`s process development is potato by-product, the process can be adapted to convert other food wastes, as well as corn starch, to lactic acid. Proprietary technology for biologically converting greater than 90% of the starch in potato wastes to glucose has been developed. Glucose and other products of starch hydrolysis are subsequently fermented by bacteria that produce lactic acid. The lactic acid is recovered, concentrated, and further purified to a polymer-grade product.

  4. Production of degradable polymers from food-waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.P.: Coleman, R.D.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Moon, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    In the United States, billions of pounds of cheese whey permeate and approximately 10 billion pounds of potatoes processed each year are typically discarded or sold as cattle feed at $3{endash}6/ton; moreover, the transportation required for these means of disposal can be expensive. As a potential solution to this economic and environmental problem, Argonne National Laboratory is developing technology that: Biologically converts existing food-processing waste streams into lactic acid and uses lactic acid for making environmentally safe, degradable polylactic acid (PLA) and modified PLA plastics and coatings. An Argonne process for biologically converting high-carbohydrate food waste will not only help to solve a waste problem for the food industry, but will also save energy and be economically attractive. Although the initial substrate for Argonne's process development is potato by-product, the process can be adapted to convert other food wastes, as well as corn starch, to lactic acid. Proprietary technology for biologically converting greater than 90% of the starch in potato wastes to glucose has been developed. Glucose and other products of starch hydrolysis are subsequently fermented by bacteria that produce lactic acid. The lactic acid is recovered, concentrated, and further purified to a polymer-grade product.

  5. INTERIM REPORT ON CONCRETE DEGRADATION MECHANISMS AND ONLINE MONITORING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Neal, Kyle; Kosson, David; Adams, Douglas

    2014-09-01

    The existing fleets of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, though most these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. The online monitoring of concrete structure conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory will develop and demonstrate concrete structures health monitoring capabilities. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Therefore, the structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University proposes to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses available techniques and ongoing challenges in each of the four elements of the proposed framework with emphasis on degradation mechanisms and online monitoring techniques.

  6. Physical phenomena induced by passage of intense electromagnetic pulses (including CO/sub 2/ lasers) through the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, J.H.; Mayhall, D.J.; Alvarez, R.

    1985-10-23

    The electron fluid equations are combined with Maxwell's equations to investigate the physical phenomena that occurs when short, intense electromagnetic pulses (including the CO/sub 2/ laser pulse) interact with the atmosphere. The phenomena of ''tailed erosion'' occurs when the pulse intensity exceeds the air-breakdown threshold. In some cases, the erosion of the pulse occurs first in the middle of the pulse and then occurs in the tail of the pulse. In addition, we discovered that the amount of the energy that a pulse carries through the atmosphere is independent of whether it is propagating vertically upward from the Earth's surface or vertically downward toward the Earth's surface, provided the distance the pulse travels is the same for both directions of the propagation. 20 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Termination Detection of Local Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godard, Emmanuel; Tel, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the sequential world, the processes involved in a distributed system do not necessarily know when a computation is globally finished. This paper investigates the problem of the detection of the termination of local computations. We define four types of termination detection: no detection, detection of the local termination, detection by a distributed observer, detection of the global termination. We give a complete characterisation (except in the local termination detection case where a partial one is given) for each of this termination detection and show that they define a strict hierarchy. These results emphasise the difference between computability of a distributed task and termination detection. Furthermore, these characterisations encompass all standard criteria that are usually formulated : topological restriction (tree, rings, or triangu- lated networks ...), topological knowledge (size, diameter ...), and local knowledge to distinguish nodes (identities, sense of direction). These re- sult...

  8. Radially global $\\delta f$ computation of neoclassical phenomena in a tokamak pedestal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landreman, Matt; Catto, Peter J; Ernst, Darin R; Pusztai, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Conventional radially-local neoclassical calculations become inadequate if the radial gradient scale lengths of the H-mode pedestal become as small as the poloidal ion gyroradius. Here, we describe a radially global $\\delta f$ continuum code that generalizes neoclassical calculations to allow stronger gradients. As with conventional neoclassical calculations, the formulation is time-independent and requires only the solution of a single sparse linear system. We demonstrate precise agreement with an asymptotic analytic solution of the radially global kinetic equation in the appropriate limits of aspect ratio and collisionality. This agreement depends crucially on accurate treatment of finite orbit width effects.

  9. Comparative investigation of the freezing phenomena for quantum correlations under nondissipative decoherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Aaronson; Rosario Lo Franco; Gerardo Adesso

    2013-07-22

    We show that the phenomenon of frozen discord, exhibited by specific classes of two-qubit states under local nondissipative decoherent evolutions, is a common feature of all known bona fide measures of general quantum correlations. All those measures, despite inducing typically inequivalent orderings on the set of nonclassically correlated states, return a constant value in the considered settings. Every communication protocol which relies on quantum correlations as resource will run with a performance completely unaffected by noise in the specified dynamical conditions. We provide a geometric interpretation of this

  10. Space- and Time-Resolved Mapping of Ionic Dynamic and Electroresistive Phenomena in Lateral Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelcov, Evgheni [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Yen-Lin, Huang [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Yung-Chun, Teng [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Ying-Hao, Chu [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscopy (SPM) based technique for probing local ionic and electronic transport and their dynamic behavior on the 10 ms 10 s scale is presented. The time-resolved Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (tr-KPFM) allows mapping surface potential in both space and time domains, visualizing electronic and ionic charge dynamics and separating underlying processes based on their time responses. Here, tr-KPFM is employed to explore the interplay of the adsorbed surface ions and bulk oxygen vacancies and their role in the resistive switching in the Ca-substituted bismuth ferrite thin film.

  11. State-of-the Art Simulations of Liquid Phenomena | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2,BL4-2 Bio-SAXS RapidState, Local andComputing

  12. Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-05-01

    Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. This paper reviews the experimental apparatus and procedures, presents a sample of the data set, and reviews the INL Standard Problem. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions are also presented.

  13. Prognosis of Component Degradation Under Uncertainty: A Method for Early Stage Design of a Complex Engineering System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Bo Yang

    This paper proposes a method that dynamically improves a statistical model of system degradation by incorporating uncertainty. The method is illustrated by a case example of fouling, or degradation, in a heat exchanger in ...

  14. Materials Science and Engineering A 445446 (2007) 669675 Degradation of elastomeric gasket materials in PEM fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Zee, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. ical degradation of fluoroelastomer in an alkaline environment. Youn, the overall scope of study includes chemical/material degradation and mechanical property characterization. T

  15. Characterization of ZnO-degraded varistors used in high-tension devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, M.A.; Maniette, Y.

    2007-06-05

    The effects of the degradation process on the structural, microstructural and electrical properties of ZnO-based varistors were analyzed. Rietveld refinement showed that the BiO{sub 2-x} phase is affected by the degradation process. Besides the changes in the spinel phase, the degradation process also affects the lattice microstrain in the ZnO phase. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed electrode-melting failure, while wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy qualitative analysis showed deficiency of oxygen species at the grain boundaries in the degraded samples. Atomic force microscopy using electrostatic mode force illustrated a decrease in the charge density at the grain boundaries of the degraded sample. Transmission electron microscopy showed submicrometric spinel grains embedded in a ZnO matrix, but their average grain size is smaller in the degraded sample than in the standard one. Long pulses appeared to be more harmful for the varistors' properties than short ones, causing higher leakage current values. The electrical characteristics of the degraded sample are partially restored after heat treatment in an oxygen-rich atmosphere.

  16. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Dan

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  17. Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitin Padture

    2011-12-31

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

  18. Multiple phosphorylation events control mitotic degradation of the muscle transcription factor Myf5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doucet, Christine; Gutierrez, Gustavo J.; Lindon, Catherine; Lorca, Thierry; Lledo, Gwendaline; Pinset, Christian; Coux, Olivier

    2005-12-01

    mitotic degradation is conserved in non-muscle cellsFigure 1 Myf5 mitotic degradation is conserved in non-muscle cells. HeLa-S3 cells expressing Myf5 under an inducible pro- motor (tetoff) were treated (lanes 2, 3, 4) or not (AS, lane 1) with nocodazole... inhibitors tested in Xenopus egg extracts for their potential effect on Myf5 degradation These inhibitors were purchased from Sigma-Aldrich, stock solutions were prepared in ethanol or DMSO, following the furnisher instructions. Inhibitor Action...

  19. Electrical contact resistance degradation of a hot-switched simulated metal MEMS contact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dickrell, Daniel John, III

    2005-03-01

    Electrical contact resistance testing was performed by hot-switching a simulated gold-platinum metal microelectromechanical systems contact. The experimental objective was to determine the sensitivity of the contact resistance degradation to current level and environment. The contact resistance increased sharply after 100 hot-switched cycles in air. Hot-switching at a reduced current and in nitrogen atmosphere curtailed contact resistance degradation by several orders of magnitude. The mechanism responsible for the resistance degradation was found to be arc-induced decomposition of adsorbed surface contaminants.

  20. Selective Oxidative Degradation of Organic Pollutants by Singlet Oxygen-Mediated Photosensitization: Tin Porphyrin versus C60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    degradation of neutral phenols under high power light irradiation. Self-sensitized destruction caused gradualSelective Oxidative Degradation of Organic Pollutants by Singlet Oxygen-Mediated Photosensitization-derivatized silica (SnP/silica and aminoC60/silica) as 1 O2 generating systems for photo- chemical degradation

  1. Functional genomics of the bacterial degradation of the emerging water contaminants: 1,4-dioxane and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sales, Christopher Michael

    2012-01-01

    degradation EthD Betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase Ferredoxin--NAD(+) reductase methane/phenol/degradation EthD Betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase Ferredoxin--NAD(+) reductase methane/phenol/degradation EthD Betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase Ferredoxin--NAD(+) reductase methane/phenol/

  2. Non-Local Correlations and Interactive Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preda, Daniel Ciprian

    2011-01-01

    non-local provers P NL such that the acceptance probabilitynon-local provers P i Q such that the acceptance probabilitythe same acceptance probability CHAPTER 4. GENERAL NON-LOCAL

  3. EIT-like transmission by interaction between multiple Bragg scattering and local plasmonic resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z Z; Xiao, J J

    2015-01-01

    We study the optical properties associated to both the polariton gap and the Bragg gap in periodic resonator-waveguide coupled system, based on the temporal coupled mode theory and the transfer matrix method. By the complex band and the transmission spectrum, it is feasible to tune the interaction between multiple Bragg scattering and the local resonance, which may give rise to analogous phenomena of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We further design a plasmonic slot waveguide side-coupled with local plasmonic resonator to demonstrate the EIT-like effects in the near-infared band. Numerical calculations show that realistic amount of metal Joule loss may destroy the interference and the total absorption is enhanced in the transparency windwo due to the near zero group velocity of the guiding wave.

  4. Localization via Automorphisms of the CARs. Local gauge invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrik Grundling; Karl-Hermann Neeb

    2010-01-07

    The classical matter fields are sections of a vector bundle E with base manifold M. The space L^2(E) of square integrable matter fields w.r.t. a locally Lebesgue measure on M, has an important module action of C_b^\\infty(M) on it. This module action defines restriction maps and encodes the local structure of the classical fields. For the quantum context, we show that this module action defines an automorphism group on the algebra A, of the canonical anticommutation relations on L^2(E), with which we can perform the analogous localization. That is, the net structure of the CAR, A, w.r.t. appropriate subsets of M can be obtained simply from the invariance algebras of appropriate subgroups. We also identify the quantum analogues of restriction maps. As a corollary, we prove a well-known "folk theorem," that the algebra A contains only trivial gauge invariant observables w.r.t. a local gauge group acting on E.

  5. algorithmic computation of local cohomology modules and the local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowledge of local cohomology modules provides interesting in-. formation .... below). Most of the algorithmic ideas in this section appear already in .... mials of An, subject to m < m ... on which gi we pick amongst those whose initial term divides the initial ..... For purposes of reference we also list algorithms that compute the.

  6. Derived Hom-Tensor adjointness. Local duality.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-02-22

    Feb 16, 2009 ... 1 Left-derived functors. Tensor and Tor. 2 Hom -Tensor adjunction. 3 Abstract local duality. 4 Concrete local duality. 5 Residues and duality for ...

  7. DNAPL source control by reductive dechlorination with iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Si Hyun

    2009-05-15

    Iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization (Fe(II)-DS/S) is a treatment method that could be economically applied to smaller DNAPL-contaminated sites and to those sites with impermeable soils. Reductive dechlorination ...

  8. Impact of bioaugmentation on crude oil degradation in salt-marsh-sediment microcosms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neralla, Srinivasan

    1994-01-01

    Bioremediation is the method of choice for eliminating oil from marshes and is dependent on microorganisms capable of mineralizing oil. Because populations of oil degrading microorganisms are low in marshes there is a potential for increasing...

  9. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    PLoS ONE: Characterization of Trapped Lignin-DegradingAccess For Readers Hubs Characterization of Trapped Lignin-11:36:02 AM] PLoS ONE: Characterization of Trapped Lignin-

  10. Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    2006-10-30

    Green rusts (GRs), a group of layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxide salts, have been observed to be effective reductants for degrading organic and inorganic contaminants under suboxic conditions. Furthermore, the addition of a ...

  11. The Copolymerization of CO_(2) and Cyclic Ethers and Their Degradation Pathways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Sheng-Hsuan

    2013-07-24

    oxide. Thermodynamically stable cyclic carbonate byproducts are produced during the course of the reaction from the degradations of propagating polymer chains. The depolymerization reactions of several polycarbonates produced from the completely...

  12. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics in porous media : battery degradation, and sorption and transport in porous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinson, Matthew Bede

    2015-01-01

    Porous media offer many interesting problems in physics and engineering due to the interaction of phase transitions, surface effects and transport. In this thesis I examine two such problems: the degradation of lithium-ion ...

  13. Is degradation of the herbicide atrazine enhanced in turfgrass pond sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shourds, Shalyn Wayne

    2001-01-01

    monitored. In addition, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, and ammonium levels, and bacterial populations were monitored in the mesocosms. To determine the role of microbes in the degradation of atrazine, sterile controls were developed in a manner...

  14. Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links in an Era of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links in an Era: This paper proposes environmental impact assessment indices to evaluate the environmental effects of link does not necessarily lead to reduced emissions. Key words: environmental assessment, transportation

  15. Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Sae Bom

    2006-08-16

    the the important elements that affect degradation activity. Elemental compositions of the mixtures and the conditions affecting solid formation might be the important factors in determining how active solids are formed. Second, instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM...

  16. Testing Modules for Potential-Induced Degradation - A Status Update of IEC 62804 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.

    2014-03-01

    Stresses and degradation rates for the 25 degrees C with foil and the 60 degrees C/85% RH damp heat tests are compared, the Illumination factor on PID rate is evaluated, and measurement techniques and stress levels are discussed.

  17. Poly(lactide)-containing Multifunctional Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Domain-selective Degradation and Therapeutic Applicability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samarajeewa, Sandani

    2013-02-14

    of the PLA cores of the nanoparticles was achieved upon the addition of proteinase K (PK). Kinetic analyses and comparison of the properties of the nanomaterials as a function of degradation extent will be discussed. Building upon our findings from...

  18. Development of the in vitro gas production technique to estimate protein degradation in the rumen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to adapt the in vitro gas production technique (IVGPT) to estimate the rumen degradation profile of feed protein and to investigate the effect of sample preparation on the estimated kinetics ...

  19. Correlation of Chemical and Mechanical Property Changes During Oxidative Degradation of Neoprene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celina, M.; Wise, J.; Ottesen, D.K.; Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1999-07-01

    The thermal degradation of a commercial, stabilized, unfilled neoprene (chloroprene) rubber was investigated at temperatures up to 140 C. The degradation of this material is dominated by oxidation rather than dehydrochlorination. Important heterogeneous oxidation effects were observed at the various temperatures investigated using infrared micro-spectroscopy and modulus profiling. Intensive degradation-related spectral changes in the IR occurred in the conjugated carbonyl and hydroxyl regions. Quantitative analysis revealed some differences in the development of the IR oxidation profiles, particularly towards the sample surface. These chemical degradation profiles were compared with modulus profiles (mechanical properties). It is concluded that the profile development is fundamentally described by a diffusion-limited autoxidation mechanism. Oxygen consumption measurements showed that the oxidation rates display non-Arrhenius behavior (curvature) at low temperatures. The current results, when compared to those of a previously studied, clay-filled commercial neoprene formulation, indicate that the clay filler acts as an antioxidant, but only at low temperatures.

  20. Degradable polymeric nano-films and particles as delivery platforms for vaccines and immunotherapeutics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xingfang

    2012-01-01

    Degradable polymeric materials provide opportunities for the development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies by acting as platforms that facilitate the delivery of molecules to appropriate tissue and cellular locations ...

  1. Genomics of wood-degrading fungi Ohm, Robin A.; Riley, Robert...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genomics of wood-degrading fungi Ohm, Robin A.; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Min, Byoungnam; Choi, In-Geol; Grigoriev, Igor V. Not Available Elsevier None USDOE United States...

  2. Characterization of aggregate resistance to degradation in stone matrix asphalt mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatchalian, Dennis

    2006-04-12

    of aggregates to degradation in SMA was evaluated through the analysis of aggregate gradation before and after compaction using conventional mechanical sieve analysis and nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (CT). The findings of this study led...

  3. Power plant degradation : a modular secondary plant and integral flow accelerated corrosion model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van der Helm, Mark Johan, 1972-

    2001-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) is the most prevalent material degradation mechanism for low carbon steel in steam-water flow systems. The band of uncertainty in predictions of wear rate due to FAC spans one to two orders ...

  4. Study on Degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell With Pure Ni Anode Zhenjun Jiaoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    Study on Degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell With Pure Ni Anode Zhenjun Jiaoa , Naoki Shikazonoa Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has attracted more and more attentions in the last few decades

  5. Cruel and Degrading: The Use of Dogs for Cell Extractions in U.S. Prisons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellner, Jaime; Reiter, Keramet A.

    2006-01-01

    Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners http://www.unhchr.ch/them into direct contact with prisoners should not be armed.human rights violations in U.S. prisons. Cruel and degrading

  6. Single-molecule denaturation and degradation of proteins by the AAA+ ClpXP protease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Yongdae

    ClpXP is an ATP-fueled molecular machine that unfolds and degrades target proteins. ClpX, an AAA+ enzyme, recognizes specific proteins, and then uses cycles of ATP hydrolysis to denature any native structure and to translocate ...

  7. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Fe(ii) in degradative solidification/stabilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Bahng Mi

    2007-04-25

    This dissertation examines the applicability of the iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization (DS/S-Fe(II)) to various chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) that are common chemicals of concern at contaminated sites. The research...

  8. Main chain acid-degradable polymers for the delivery of bioactive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frechet, Jean M. J. (Oakland, CA); Standley, Stephany M. (Evanston, IL); Jain, Rachna (Milpitas, CA); Lee, Cameron C. (Cambridge, MA)

    2012-03-20

    Novel main chain acid degradable polymer backbones and drug delivery systems comprised of materials capable of delivering bioactive materials to cells for use as vaccines or other therapeutic agents are described. The polymers are synthesized using monomers that contain acid-degradable linkages cleavable under mild acidic conditions. The main chain of the resulting polymers readily degrade into many small molecules at low pH, but remain relatively stable and intact at physiological pH. The new materials have the common characteristic of being able to degrade by acid hydrolysis under conditions commonly found within the endosomal or lysosomal compartments of cells thereby releasing their payload within the cell. The materials can also be used for the delivery of therapeutics to the acidic regions of tumors and other sites of inflammation.

  9. Degradation of Vinyl Chloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane by Advanced Reduction Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xu

    2013-07-27

    A new treatment technology, called Advanced Reduction Process (ARP), was developed by combining UV irradiation with reducing reagents to produce highly reactive species that degrade contaminants rapidly. Vinyl chloride (VC) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1...

  10. Local

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S C O NLivingtearing mode

  11. Local

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S C O NLivingtearing

  12. Local

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S C O NLivingtearingparticle

  13. Furthering Your Local Governments' Energy Efficiency Goals: Getting Support from Local Leaders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Point presentation from the Furthering your Local Governments Energy Efficiency Goals part 1 Getting Support From Local Leaders webcast.

  14. FINAL REPORT on Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Hee C. NO; Nam Z. Cho

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Generation IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification & validation are of very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air ingress will occur through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. This study indicates that depending on the location and the size of the pipe break, the air ingress phenomena are different. In an effort to estimate the proper safety margin, experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model are required. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation, eventually. This 3-year project (FY 2008–FY 2010) is focused on various issues related to the VHTR air-ingress accident, including (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) structural tests of the oxidized core bottom structures, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 2: Accident and Thermal Fluids Analysis PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J; Corradini, M.; Fisher, Stephen Eugene; Gauntt, R.; Geffraye, G.; Gehin, Jess C; Hassan, Y.; Moses, David Lewis; Renier, John-Paul; Schultz, R.; Wei, T.

    2008-03-01

    An accident, thermal fluids, and reactor physics phenomena identification and ranking process was conducted by a panel of experts on the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) design (consideration given to both pebble-bed and prismatic gas-cooled reactor configurations). Safety-relevant phenomena, importance, and knowledge base were assessed for the following event classes: (1) normal operation (including some reactor physics aspects), (2) general loss of forced circulation (G-LOFC), (3) pressurized loss-of-forced circulation (P-LOFC), (4) depressurized loss-of-forced circulation (D-LOFC), (5) air ingress (following D-LOFC), (6) reactivity transients - including anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), (7) processes coupled via intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) (IHX failure with molten salt), and (8) steam/water ingress. The panel's judgment of the importance ranking of a given phenomenon (or process) was based on the effect it had on one or more figures of merit or evaluation criteria. These included public and worker dose, fuel failure, and primary (and other safety) system integrity. The major phenomena of concern that were identified and categorized as high importance combined with medium to low knowledge follow: (1) core coolant bypass flows (normal operation), (2) power/flux profiles (normal operation), (3) outlet plenum flows (normal operation), (4) reactivity-temperature feedback coefficients for high-plutonium-content cores (normal operation and accidents), (5) fission product release related to the transport of silver (normal operation), (6)emissivity aspects for the vessel and reactor cavity cooling system (G-LOFC), (7) reactor vessel cavity air circulation and heat transfer (G-LOFC), and (8)convection/radiation heating of upper vessel area (P-LOFC).

  16. Developing Effective Continuous On-Line Monitoring Technologies to Manage Service Degradation of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

    2011-09-30

    Recently, there has been increased interest in using prognostics (i.e, remaining useful life (RUL) prediction) for managing and mitigating aging effects in service-degraded passive nuclear power reactor components. A vital part of this philosophy is the development of tools for detecting and monitoring service-induced degradation. Experience with in-service degradation has shown that rapidly-growing cracks, including several varieties of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs), can grow through a pipe in less than one fuel outage cycle after they initiate. Periodic inspection has limited effectiveness at detecting and managing such degradation requiring a more versatile monitoring philosophy. Acoustic emission testing (AET) and guided wave ultrasonic testing (GUT) are related technologies with potential for on-line monitoring applications. However, harsh operating conditions within NPPs inhibit the widespread implementation of both technologies. For AET, another hurdle is the attenuation of passive degradation signals as they travel though large components, relegating AET to targeted applications. GUT is further hindered by the complexity of GUT signatures limiting its application to the inspection of simple components. The development of sensors that are robust and inexpensive is key to expanding the use of AET and GUT for degradation monitoring in NPPs and improving overall effectiveness. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of AET and GUT in NPPs can be enhanced through thoughtful application of tandem AET-GUT techniques.

  17. Indexing Permafrost Soil Organic Matter Degradation Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mann, Benjamin F.; Chen, Hongmei; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Tolic, Nikola; Portier, Evan F.; Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Robinson, Errol W.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; et al

    2015-06-12

    Microbial degradation of soil organic matter (SOM) is a key process for terrestrial carbon cycling, although the molecular details of these transformations remain unclear. This study reports the application of ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry to profile the molecular composition of SOM and its degradation during a simulated warming experiment. A soil sample, collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA, was subjected to a 40-day incubation under anoxic conditions and analyzed before and after the incubation to determine changes of SOM composition. A CHO index based on molecular C, H, and O data was utilized to codify SOM components according to their observedmore »degradation potentials. Compounds with a CHO index score between –1 and 0 in a water-soluble fraction (WSF) demonstrated high degradation potential, with a highest shift of CHO index occurred in the N-containing group of compounds, while similar stoichiometries in a base-soluble fraction (BSF) did not. Additionally, compared with the classical H:C vs O:C van Krevelen diagram, CHO index allowed for direct visualization of the distribution of heteroatoms such as N in the identified SOM compounds. We demonstrate that CHO index is useful not only in characterizing arctic SOM at the molecular level but also enabling quantitative description of SOM degradation, thereby facilitating incorporation of the high resolution MS datasets to future mechanistic models of SOM degradation and prediction of greenhouse gas emissions.« less

  18. Chemical and Mechanical Degradation of Sulfonated Poly(sulfone) Membranes in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Soowhan; Tighe, Timothy B.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Yan, Jingling; Zhang, Jianlu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo; Hickner, Michael A.

    2011-10-01

    A sulfonated poly(sulfone) (S-Radel{reg_sign}) membrane with high proton conductivity and low vanadium ion diffusion showed high initial performance in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) but suffered damage during charge/discharge cycling. The S-Radel membrane had different degradation behaviors in flow cell cycling and ex-situ vanadium ion immersion tests. The S-Radel membrane immersed in V5+ solution cracked into small pieces, but in the VRFB cell, the membrane underwent internal delamination preferentially on the side of the membrane that faced the positive electrode. A vanadium-rich interface was observed near the membrane surface that experienced delamination and Raman spectroscopic analysis of the surfaces of the membrane indicated a slightly depressed 1026 cm-1 band corresponding to the sulfonate SO2 stretch for the degraded surface. Even though the S-Radel membrane underwent severe mechanical damage during the flow cell cycling, significant chemical degradation was not obvious from the spectroscopic analyses. For the VRFB containing an S-Radel membrane, an increase in membrane resistance caused an abnormal voltage depression during the discharge cycle. The reversible increase in membrane resistance and severe mechanical degradation of the membrane during cycling may be attributed repeated formation and dissolution of particles inside the membrane. The mechanical stresses imposed by the particles coupled with a small amount of chemical degradation of the polymer by V5+, are likely degradation mechanisms of the S-Radel membrane in VRFBs under high state-of-charge conditions.

  19. Modelling chemical degradation of concrete during leaching with rain and soil water types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, D., E-mail: djacques@sckcen.b [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Environment, Health, and Safety, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Wang, L.; Martens, E.; Mallants, D. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Environment, Health, and Safety, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Percolation of external water through concrete results in the degradation of cement and changes the concrete pore water and solid phase composition. The assessment of long-term degradation of concrete is possible by means of model simulation. This paper describes simulations of chemical degradation of cement for different types of rain and soil water at an ambient earth surface temperature (10 {sup o}C). Rain and soil water types were derived using generic equations and measurement of atmospheric boundary conditions representative for North-Belgium. An up-to-date and consistent thermodynamic model is used to calculate the geochemical changes during chemical degradation of the concrete. A general pattern of four degradation stages was simulated with the third stage being the geochemically most complex stage involving reactions with calcium-silicate hydrates, AFm and AFt phases. Whereas the sequence of the dissolution reactions was relatively insensitive to the composition of the percolating water, the duration of the different reactions depends strongly on the percolating water composition. Major identified factors influencing the velocity of cement degradation are the effect of dry deposition and biological activity increasing the partial pressure of CO{sub 2(g)} in the soil air phase (and thus increasing the inorganic carbon content in the percolating water). Soil weathering processes have only a minor impact, at least for the relatively inert sandy material considered in this study.

  20. Search for new phenomena with the monojet and missing transverse momentum signature using the ATLAS detector in ?s = 7 TeV proton–proton collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for new phenomena in events featuring a high energy jet and large missing transverse momentum in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV is presented using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 33 ...

  1. A FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF LOCALIZED CORROSION AT THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. J.H. Payer

    2006-04-18

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository: (1) the most likely degradation process; (2) controls the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package; and (3) determines when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. In this presentation a framework for the analysis of localized corrosion is presented and demonstrated for a scenario: (1) water chemistry of mixed salt solutions (sodium chloride-potassium nitrate); and (2) time-temperature-relative humidity profiles for a hot, mid and cool temperature waste package.

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Stochastic Oscillatory Phenomena in a Nonrelativistic Electron Beam with a Virtual Cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Kalinin; A. A. Koronovskii; A. E. Hramov; E. N. Egorov; R. A. Filatov

    2006-01-28

    Results are presented from experimental investigations of oscillatory phenomena in an electron beam with a virtual cathode in a diode gap with a decelerating field. Experiments have revealed a stochastic broadband generation of the microwave oscillations of a virtual cathode in a decelerating field. Numerical simulations based on a simple one-dimensional model have shown that the onset of the stochastic generation and the broadening of the oscillation spectrum with increasing beam deceleration rate are governed by the processes of regrouping of the electrons in a beam with a virtual cathode.

  3. Acoustic emission signals resulting from the drying induced fractures of Phyllostachys Pubescens bamboo, Evidence of scale free phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Villalobos

    2015-03-15

    I have performed experimental measurements of acoustic emission signals resulting from the drying process of Phyllostachys Pubescens bamboo. The emphasis was on identifying individual events, and characterize them according to their time span and energy release. My results show a histogram of experimental squared voltage distributions nicely fit into a power law with exponent of $-1.16$, reminiscent of scale free phenomena. I have also calculated the average signal shape, for different time spans of the system, and found an asymmetrical form. The experimental evidence points to the system having an isolated large crack at the beginning of the simulation.

  4. Effects of season, plane of nutrition, and levels of protein and energy on reproductive phenomena in gilts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gossett, John Warren

    1957-01-01

    invaluable. Sincere appreciation is also expressed to Dr. R. 0. Berry of the Animal Husbandry Department and Dr. H. 0. Kunkel of the Animal Husbandry and Biocliemistry and Nutrition Departments for their continued encouragement and inspiration during.... SUMMARY OF EFFECTS OF ENERGY ON REPRODUCTIVE PHENOMENA (STUDIES I AND I I ) .....................52 TA BLEESab le PeePgRB le PIPa1b lI aP.alCLgRNGP .OPIlEPIS MBRLCNPB NNN FIC N G H AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA X2 PART III 8. SUMMARY OF EFFECTS OF SEASONS...

  5. Evidences for and the models of self-similar skeletal structures in fusion devices, severe weather phenomena and space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kukushkin, A B

    2005-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews (i) the evidences for self-similar structures of a skeletal form (namely, tubules and cartwheels, and their simplest combinations), called the Universal Skeletal Structures (USS), observed in the range 10-5 cm - 1023 cm. in the high-current electric discharges in various fusion devices, severe weather phenomena, and space, (ii) the models for interpreting the phenomenon of skeletal structures, including the hypothesis for a fractal condensed matter (FCM), assembled from nanotubular dust, and (iii) probable role of FCM, which might be responsible for the USS phenomenon, in tornado, ball lightning, and waterspout.

  6. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  7. Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    utility customers. Using a hybrid energy resource optimization framework, we explore optimal configuration to come from a mixture of locally managed small-scale hydroelectricity, biogas generators and accompanying of the Baram River Basin in Sarawak as the basin next scheduled for mega hydroelectricity development

  8. Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil of CWP is on seismic modeling, imaging and inversion methods, as well as on improving the accuracy

  9. Diagnostic Evaluation of Detrimental Phenomena in High-PowerLithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostecki, Robert; Lei, Jinglei; McLarnon, Frank; Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn

    2005-11-01

    A pouch-type lithium-ion cell, with graphite anode and LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} cathode, was cycled at C/2 over 100% depth of discharge (DOD) at ambient temperature. The LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} composite cathode was primarily responsible for the significant impedance rise and capacity fade observed in that cell. The processes that led to this impedance rise were assessed by investigating the cathode surface electronic conductance, surface structure, composition, and state of charge at the microscopic level with the use of local probe techniques. Raman microscopy mapping of the cathode surface provided evidence that the state of charge of individual LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} particles was non-uniform despite the deep discharge at the end of cell testing. Current-sensing atomic force microscopy imaging revealed that the cathode surface electronic conductance diminished significantly in the tested cells. Loss of contact of active material particles with the carbon matrix and thin film formation via electrolyte decomposition not only led to LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} particle isolation and contributed to cathode interfacial charge-transfer impedance but also accounted for the observed cell power and capacity loss.

  10. Small scale laboratory studies of flow and transport phenomena in pores and fractures: Phase 2. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Pore level laboratory experiments using microscopy permit the in situ visualization of flow and transport phenomena, that can be recorded on film or videotape. One of the principal tools for visualization is the etched glass micromodel, which is composed of a transparent two dimensional network of three dimensional pores. The spatial scale of interest in these models extends from the individual pore, up to a network of pores, perhaps with small scale heterogeneities. Micromodels are best used to help validate concepts and assumptions, and to elucidate new, previously unrecognized phenomena for further study. They are not quantitative tools, but should be used in combination with quantitative tools such as column studies or mathematical models. There are three applications: multi-phase flow, colloid transport, and bacterial transport and colonization. Specifically the authors have examined behavior of relevance to liquid-liquid mass transfer (solubilization of capillary trapped organic liquids); liquid-gas mass transfer (in situ volatilization); mathematical models of multi-phase pressure-saturation relationships; colloid movement, attachment and detachment in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces, clay interference with multi-phase flow; and heterogeneity effects on multi-phase flow and colloid movement.

  11. Local algorithms for graph partitioning and finding dense subgraphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Reid

    2007-01-01

    ed local partitioning algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . .7 A Local Algorithm for Finding DenseComparison of local partitioning algorithms . . . . . . . .

  12. Quasi-local energy for cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang-Mei Chen; Jian-Liang Liu; James M. Nester

    2007-05-15

    First we briefly review our covariant Hamiltonian approach to quasi-local energy, noting that the Hamiltonian-boundary-term quasi-local energy expressions depend on the chosen boundary conditions and reference configuration. Then we present the quasi-local energy values resulting from the formalism applied to homogeneous Bianchi cosmologies. Finally we consider the quasi-local energies of the FRW cosmologies. Our results do not agree with certain widely accepted quasi-local criteria.

  13. Ferroplasmons: Intense Localized Surface Plasmons in Metal-Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachan, Ritesh [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Malasi, Abhinav [ORNL; Ge, Jingxuan [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Yadavali, Sagar P [ORNL; Gangopadhyay, Anup [Washington University, St. Louis; Krishna, Dr. Hare [Washington University, St. Louis; Garcia, Hernando [Southern Illinois University; Duscher, Gerd J M [ORNL; Kalyanaraman, Ramki [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of photons with matter at length scales far below their wavelengths has given rise to many novel phenomena, including localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). However, LSPR with narrow bandwidth (BW) is observed only in a select few noble metals, and ferromagnets are not among them. Here, we report the discovery of LSPR in ferromagnetic Co and CoFe alloy (8% Fe) in contact with Ag in the form of bimetallic nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser dewetting. These plasmons in metal-erromagnetic nanostructures, or ferroplasmons (FP) for short, are in the visible spectrum with comparable intensity and BW to those of the LSPRs from the Ag regions. This finding was enabled by electron energy-loss mapping across individual nanoparticles in a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The appearance of the FP is likely due to plasmonic interaction between the contacting Ag and Co nanoparticles. Since there is no previous evidence for materials that simultaneously show ferromagnetism and such intense LSPRs, this discovery may lead to the design of improved plasmonic materials and applications. It also demonstrates that materials with interesting plasmonic properties can be synthesized using bimetallic nanostructures in contact with each other.

  14. The Local Dimension of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Scott

    2011-01-31

     emissions  from  local  authority  owned  infrastructure  (excluding social housing energy consumption).    10 More  importantly,  additional  energy  savings  can  be  made  from  the  more  than  3.6  million homes in the UK classified as “social rented...  regional development agendas. In contrast, the USA has a  somewhat centralised political administration where power for the most part of the 20th  5 As measured by energy intensity in 2006 (gross inland consumption (GDP) / kg of oil equivalent) source: IEA...

  15. Photo-oxidative degradation of TiO{sub 2}/polypropylene films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Montelongo, X.L.; Martínez-de la Cruz, A.; Vázquez-Rodríguez, S.; Torres-Martínez, Leticia M.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photo-oxidative degradation of polypropylene is accelerated by TiO{sub 2} incorporation. • Weight loss, FTIR, SEM and GPC shown high degree of degradation of polypropylene. • A mechanism of the photo-degradation of polypropylene by TiO{sub 2} is proposed. - Abstract: Photo-oxidative degradation of polypropylene films with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles incorporated was studied in a chamber of weathering with Xenon lamps as irradiation source. TiO{sub 2} powder with crystalline structure of anatase was synthesized by thermal treatments at 400 and 500 °C starting from a precursor material obtained by sol–gel method. Composites of TiO{sub 2}/polypropylene were prepared with 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 wt% of TiO{sub 2}. The mixture of components was performed using a twin screw extruder, the resulting material was pelletized by mechanical fragmenting and then hot-pressed in order to form polypropylene films with TiO{sub 2} dispersed homogeneously. Photo-oxidative degradation process was followed by visual inspection, weight loss of films, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transformed (FTIR), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC)

  16. Automated Data Collection for Determining Statistical Distributions of Module Power Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Spataru, S.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method for increasing the frequency of data collection and reducing the time and cost of accelerated lifetime testing of photovoltaic modules undergoing potential-induced degradation (PID). This consists of in-situ measurements of dark current-voltage curves of the modules at elevated stress temperature, their use to determine the maximum power at 25 degrees C standard test conditions (STC), and distribution statistics for determining degradation rates as a function of stress level. The semi-continuous data obtained by this method clearly show degradation curves of the maximum power, including an incubation phase, rates and extent of degradation, precise time to failure, and partial recovery. Stress tests were performed on crystalline silicon modules at 85% relative humidity and 60 degrees C, 72 degrees C, and 85 degrees C. Activation energy for the mean time to failure (1% relative) of 0.85 eV was determined and a mean time to failure of 8,000 h at 25 degrees C and 85% relative humidity is predicted. No clear trend in maximum degradation as a function of stress temperature was observed.

  17. Investigation of Oxidative Degradation in Polymers Using (17)O NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Todd M.; Celina, Mathew; Assink, Roger A.; Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.; Wheeler David R.

    1999-07-20

    The thermal oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}), and of the homopolymer polyisoprene, has been investigated using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. By performing the oxidation using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas, it is possible to easily identify degradation products, even at relatively low concentrations. It is demonstrated that details of the degradation mechanism can be obtained from analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra as a function of total oxidation. Pentacontane reveals the widest variety of reaction products, and exhibits changes in the relative product distributions with increasing O{sub 2} consumption. At low levels of oxygen incorporation, peroxides are the major oxidation product, while at later stages of degradation these species are replaced by increasing concentrations of ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters. Analyzing the product distribution can help in identification of the different free-radical decomposition pathways of hydroperoxides, including recombination, proton abstraction and chain scission, as well as secondary reactions. The {sup 17}O NMR spectra of thermally oxidized polyisoprene reveal fewer degradation functionalities, but exhibit an increased complexity in the type of observed degradation species due to structural features such as unsaturation and methyl branching. Alcohols and ethers formed from hydrogen abstraction and free radical termination.

  18. An Insect Herbivore Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suen, Garret; Barry, Kerrie; Goodwin, Lynne; Scott, Jarrod; Aylward, Frank; Adams, Sandra; Pinto-Tomas, Adrian; Foster, Clifton; Pauly, Markus; Weimer, Paul; Bouffard, Pascal; Li, Lewyn; Osterberger, Jolene; Harkins, Timothy; Slater, Steven; Donohue, Timothy; Currie, Cameron; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2010-09-23

    Herbivores can gain indirect access to recalcitrant carbon present in plant cell walls through symbiotic associations with lignocellulolytic microbes. A paradigmatic example is the leaf-cutter ant (Tribe: Attini), which uses fresh leaves to cultivate a fungus for food in specialized gardens. Using a combination of sugar composition analyses, metagenomics, and whole-genome sequencing, we reveal that the fungus garden microbiome of leaf-cutter ants is composed of a diverse community of bacteria with high plant biomass-degrading capacity. Comparison of this microbiome?s predicted carbohydrate-degrading enzyme profile with other metagenomes shows closest similarity to the bovine rumen, indicating evolutionary convergence of plant biomass degrading potential between two important herbivorous animals. Genomic and physiological characterization of two dominant bacteria in the fungus garden microbiome provides evidence of their capacity to degrade cellulose. Given the recent interest in cellulosic biofuels, understanding how large-scale and rapid plant biomass degradation occurs in a highly evolved insect herbivore is of particular relevance for bioenergy.

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W; Gorensek, M. B.; Herring, S.; Pickard, P.

    2008-03-01

    A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

  20. Method and compositions for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in chemical waste mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoner, D.L.; Tien, A.J.

    1995-09-26

    A method and process are disclosed for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in an organic waste mixture and a biologically pure, novel bacteria culture for accomplishing the same. A newly-discovered bacteria (a strain of Acinetobacter sp. ATCC 55587) is provided which is combined in a reactor vessel with a liquid waste mixture containing tributyl phosphate and one or more organic waste compounds capable of functioning as growth substrates for the bacteria. The bacteria is thereafter allowed to incubate within the waste mixture. As a result, the tributyl phosphate and organic compounds within the waste mixture are metabolized (degraded) by the bacteria, thereby eliminating such materials which are environmentally hazardous. In addition, the bacteria is capable of degrading waste mixtures containing high quantities of tributyl phosphate (e.g. up to about 1.0% by weight tributyl phosphate). 6 figs.