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Sample records for loblolly pine pinus

  1. Estimation of aboveground biomass and inorganic nutrient content of a 25-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, James Nelson

    1980-01-01

    ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON MOUSER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August lqBO Major Si bject: Forestry ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON HOUSER Approved...

  2. Acclimation of leaf hydraulic conductance and stomatal conductance of Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) to long-term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    Acclimation of leaf hydraulic conductance and stomatal conductance of Pinus taeda (loblolly pine, 3041 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA ABSTRACT We investigated how leaf hydraulic availability and the hydraulic regulation of the stomata (Katul, Leuning & Oren 2003). Understanding

  3. Root biomass and nutrient content of a 25-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus Taeda L.) plantation in East Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuttle, Charles LaGrone

    1978-01-01

    ROOT BIOMASS AND NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUP TAED!l LJ PIJIN ATION IN EAST TEIJIS A Thesis by Charles LaGrone Tuttle Submitted to the Graduate College of Texa s A & M University in partial, fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 iVIajor Subject: Forest S "ience ROOT BIOMASS AND NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by Charles LaGrone Tuttle Approved...

  4. A physiological and morphological analysis of the effects of nitrogen supply on the relative growth rates of nine loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) clones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stover, Corey Michael

    2006-08-16

    The influence of nitrogen supply on relationships of relative growth rate (RGR) to leaf physiology, structural and non-structural carbon partitioning, and nitrogen- and water-use efficiencies were examined in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) clonal...

  5. Population Structure, Association Mapping of Economic Traits and Landscape Genomics of East Texas Loblolly Pine ( Pinus taeda L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhatre, Vikram E.

    2013-05-07

    in forest trees. First-generation selection (FGS) and second- generation selection (SGS) breeding populations of loblolly pine from east Texas were studied to estimate the genetic diversity, population structure, linkage disequilibrium (LD), signatures...

  6. Genotype environment interactions in selected loblolly and slash pine plantations in the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    L.) and slash pine (P. elliottii Engelm. var. elliotttii). Efficient operational deployment silvicultural intensity. While loblolly performance was similar whether deployed in mixtures or pure family blocks ( p = 0.0754 for aboveground biomass). # 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Pinus taeda

  7. Exploiting Genetic Variation of Fiber Components and Morphology in Juvenile Loblolly Pine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou-min Chang, John F. Kadla, Bailian Li, Ron Sederoff,

    2005-06-30

    In order to ensure the global competitiveness of the Pulp and Paper Industry in the Southeastern U.S., more wood with targeted characteristics have to be produced more efficiently on less land. The objective of the research project is to provide a molecular genetic basis for tree breeding of desirable traits in juvenile loblolly pine, using a multidisciplinary research approach. We developed micro analytical methods for determine the cellulose and lignin content, average fiber length, and coarseness of a single ring in a 12 mm increment core. These methods allow rapid determination of these traits in micro scale. Genetic variation and genotype by environment interaction (GxE) were studied in several juvenile wood traits of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Over 1000 wood samples of 12 mm increment cores were collected from 14 full-sib families generated by a 6-parent half-diallel mating design (11-year-old) in four progeny tests. Juvenile (ring 3) and transition (ring 8) for each increment core were analyzed for cellulose and lignin content, average fiber length, and coarseness. Transition wood had higher cellulose content, longer fiber and higher coarseness, but lower lignin than juvenile wood. General combining ability variance for the traits in juvenile wood explained 3 to 10% of the total variance, whereas the specific combining ability variance was negligible or zero. There were noticeable full-sib family rank changes between sites for all the traits. This was reflected in very high specific combining ability by site interaction variances, which explained from 5% (fiber length) to 37% (lignin) of the total variance. Weak individual-tree heritabilities were found for cellulose, lignin content and fiber length at the juvenile and transition wood, except for lignin at the transition wood (0.23). Coarseness had moderately high individual-tree heritabilities at both the juvenile (0.39) and transition wood (0.30). Favorable genetic correlations of volume and stem straightness were found with cellulose content, fiber length and coarseness, suggesting that selection on growth or stem straightness would results in favorable response in chemical wood traits. We have developed a series of methods for application of functional genomics to understanding the molecular basis of traits important to tree breeding for improved chemical and physical properties of wood. Two types of technologies were used, microarray analysis of gene expression, and profiling of soluble metabolites from wood forming tissues. We were able to correlate wood property phenotypes with expression of specific genes and with the abundance of specific metabolites using a new database and appropriate statistical tools. These results implicate a series of candidate genes for cellulose content, lignin content, hemicellulose content and specific extractible metabolites. Future work should integrate such studies in mapping populations and genetic maps to make more precise associations of traits with gene locations in order to increase the predictive power of molecular markers, and to distinguish between different candidate genes associated by linkage or by function. This study has found that loblolly pine families differed significantly for cellulose yield, fiber length, fiber coarseness, and less for lignin content. The implication for forest industry is that genetic testing and selection for these traits is possible and practical. With sufficient genetic variation, we could improve cellulose yield, fiber length, fiber coarseness, and reduce lignin content in Loblolly pine. With the continued progress in molecular research, some candidate genes may be used for selecting cellulose content, lignin content, hemicellulose content and specific extractible metabolites. This would accelerate current breeding and testing program significantly, and produce pine plantations with not only high productivity, but desirable wood properties as well.

  8. Snag characteristics and dynamics following natural and artificially induced mortality in a managed loblolly pine forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarnoch, Stanley J.; Vukovich, Mark A.; Kilgo, John C.; Blake, John I.

    2013-06-10

    A 14-year study of snag characteristics was established in 41- to 44-year old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands in southeastern USA. During the initial 5.5 years, no stand manipulation or unusually high-mortality events occurred. Afterwards, three treatments were applied consisting of trees thinned and removed, trees felled and not removed, and artificial creation of snags produced by girdling and herbicide injection. The thinned treatments were designed to maintain the same live canopy density as the snag-created treatment, disregarding snags that remained standing.We monitored snag height, diameter, density, volume, and bark percentage; the number of cavities was monitored in natural snags only. During the first 5.5 years, recruitment and loss rates were stable, resulting in a stable snag population. Large snags (?25 cm diameter) were common, but subcanopy small snags (10 to <25 cm diameter) dominated numerically. Large natural snags survived (90% quantile) significantly longer (6.0–9.4 years) than smaller snags (4.4–6.9 years). Large artificial snags persisted the longest (11.8 years). Cavities in natural snags developed within 3 years following tree death. The mean number of cavities per snag was five times greater in large versus small snags and large snags were more likely to have multiple cavities, emphasizing the importance of mature pine stands for cavity-dependent wildlife species.

  9. MICROBIAL RESPIRATION RESPONSE TO C, N, AND P AVAILABILITY IN LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST SOILS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisenant, Justin

    2011-05-05

    and combined effects of nitrogen and phosphorous additions on soil carbon cycling. We performed laboratory incubations on soil samples from two loblolly pine forests in Florida and measured the CO2 respired by soil microbes using an infrared gas analyzer. Our...

  10. Effects of prescribed fire and varying stand basal area on nitrogen mineralization in a loblolly pine forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Bobby Glen

    1991-01-01

    EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED FIRE AND VARYING STAND BASAL AREA ON NITROGEN MINERALIZATION IN A LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST A Thesis by BOBBY GLEN WEBB Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Forestry EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED FIRE AND VARYING STAND BASAL AREA ON NITROGEN MINERALIZATION IN A LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST A Thesis by BOBBY GLEN WEBB Approved as to style...

  11. Growth, physiology, and [delta] 13C of loblolly and shortleaf pine as affected by ozone and soil water deficit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsik, Christine Golemboski

    1992-01-01

    balance be altered as a result of stomatal closure, because of decreased in transpirational cooling (Winner and Atkinson 1986). Biomass and Carbon Allocation Although a reduction in photosynthesis due to 0, . through a decrease in both photosynthetic... photosynthesis was linearly related to 0, in loblolly pine, and was accompanied by decreased foliar chlorophyll concenuation and decreased stomatal conductance, Decreased transpiration was attributable to 0, in both species. Ozone increased 5"Cms of loblolly...

  12. Early selection of loblolly pine based on genotype x fertilization interaction of seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Dorothy Elaine

    1982-01-01

    to varying levels of nutrients correlated strongly with family volume stability demonstrated by 15- and 20-year old trees of the same fam1lies which were planted on sites of varying quality (r=. 93), This comparison is, however, based on less than ten... Ten open-pollinated loblolly pine families which were utilized in earlier studies (Wax1er 1980, van Buij tenen 1981) were also selected for use in this study. Five of these families (54PT6, 53PT7, S6PT3, 15-39, S4PTB) have demonstrated greater than...

  13. Kudzu (Pueraria montana) community responses to herbicides, burning, and high-density loblolly pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.B. Harrington; L.T. Rader-Dixon; J.W. Taylor, Jr.

    2003-11-01

    Kudzu is an aggressive, nonnative vine that currently dominates an estimated 810,000 ha of mesic forest communities in the eastern United States. To test an integrated method of weed control, abundances of kudzu and other plant species were compared during 4 yr after six herbicide treatments (clopyralid, triclopyr, metsulfuron, picloram 1 2,4-D, tebuthiuron, and a nonsprayed check), in which loblolly pines were planted at three densities (0, 1, and 4 seedlings m22) to induce competition and potentially delay kudzu recovery. This split-plot design was replicated on each of the four kudzu-dominated sites near Aiken, SC. Relative light intensity (RLI) and soil water content (SWC) were measured periodically to identify mechanisms of interference among plant species. Two years after treatment (1999), crown coverage of kudzu averaged , 2% in herbicide plots compared with 93% in the nonsprayed check, and these differences were maintained through 2001, except in clopyralid plots where kudzu cover increased to 15%. In 2001, pine interference was associated with 33, 56, and 67% reductions in biomass of kudzu, blackberry, and herbaceous vegetation, respectively. RLI in kudzu-dominated plots (4 to 15% of full sun) generally was less than half that of herbicide-treated plots. SWC was greatest in tebuthiuron plots, where total vegetation cover averaged 26% compared with 77 to 111% in other plots. None of the treatments eradicated kudzu, but combinations of herbicides and induced pine competition delayed its recovery.

  14. CHANGES IN FIRE REGIMES AND THE SUCCESSIONAL STATUS OF TABLE MOUNTAIN PINE (Pinus pungens Lamb.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    CHANGES IN FIRE REGIMES AND THE SUCCESSIONAL STATUS OF TABLE MOUNTAIN PINE (Pinus pungens Lamb and encouragement concerning Table Mountain pine in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and the National Park Service for providing invaluable Table Mountain pine stand data. I wish to thank Charles Smart

  15. Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) invasion of Cape Cod pond shores alters abiotic environment and inhibits indigenous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) invasion of Cape Cod pond shores alters abiotic environment 25 April 2003 Abstract Invasion by pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) on coastal plain pond shores may that had been invaded by P. rigida and those that had not on two Cape Cod ponds. Soil under living pines

  16. Stimulation of precocious flowering of rooted slash pine cuttings, loblolly pine grafts, and Virginia pine seedlings by two nitrogen fertilizers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, Penelope Joy Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Tree Improv Conf, St. Paul, Minn, p11-16. Heybroek, H . M. and T. Visser. 1976 . Juvenility in fruit growing and forestry. Acta Horticulturae 56:71-80. Hoekstra, P. E. and F. Mergen. 1957. Experimental induction of female flowers on young slash pine.... Fertilization of an eight- year-old slash pine plantation thinned for seed production. In Proc 10th South Forest Tree Improv Conf, Houston, Texas, p217-221. Mott, R. L. 1977. Rooting of conifer propaoules. In Proc 13th Lake States Forest Tree Improv Conf, St...

  17. Linking morphology and physiology as predictors of productivity in elite families of southern pines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chmura, Daniel Jozef

    2009-05-15

    are not fully understood. It was hypothesized that trees with crown and leaf traits governing efficient light capture and photosynthesis at the canopy scale would be the most productive. To this end, families of loblolly (Pinus taeda) and slash pine (Pinus...

  18. Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) fire scars reveal new details of a frequent fire regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stambaugh, Michael C

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) fire scars reveal new details of a frequent fire regime, University of Missouri ­ Columbia, MO 65211, USA Abstract Question: How frequent and variable were fire disturbances in longleaf pine ecosystems? Has the frequency and seasonality of fire events changed during

  19. Relationship of coarse woody debris to arthropod Availability for Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers and other bark-foraging birds on loblolly pine boles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2008-04-01

    Abstract This study determined if short-term removal of coarse woody debris would reduce prey available to red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis Vieillot) and other bark-foraging birds at the Savannah River Site in Aiken and Barnwell counties, SC. All coarse woody debris was removed from four 9-ha plots of mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in 1997 and again in 1998. We sampled arthropods in coarse woody debris removal and control stands using crawl traps that captured arthropods crawling up tree boles, burlap bands wrapped around trees, and cardboard panels placed on the ground. We captured 27 orders and 172 families of arthropods in crawl traps whereas 20 arthropod orders were observed under burlap bands and cardboard panels. The most abundant insects collected from crawl traps were aphids (Homoptera: Aphididae) and ants (Hymenoptera: Forrnicidae). The greatest biomass was in the wood cockroaches (Blattaria: Blattellidae), caterpillars (Lepidoptera) in the Family Noctuidae, and adult weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The most common group observed underneath cardboard panels was lsoptera (termites), and the most common taxon under burlap bands was wood cockroaches. Overall, arthropod abundance and biomass captured in crawl traps was similar in control and removal plots. In contrast, we observed more arthropods under burlap bands (mean & SE; 3,021.5 k 348.6, P= 0.03) and cardboard panels (3,537.25 k 432.4, P= 0.04) in plots with coarse woody debris compared with burlap bands (2325 + 171.3) and cardboard panels (2439.75 + 288.9) in plots where coarse woody debris was removed. Regression analyses showed that abundance beneath cardboard panels was positively correlated with abundance beneath burlap bands demonstrating the link between abundance on the ground with that on trees. Our results demonstrate that short-term removal of coarse woody debris from pine forests reduced overall arthropod availability to bark-foraging birds.

  20. Fine root dynamics in a loblolly pine forest are influenced by free-air-CO2-enrichment: a six-year-minirhizotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    ). Accelerating rates of anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere, and accompanying forcing effects world, and that this will slow the rate of increase of atmospheric CO2 (DeLucia et al., 2005). In 1996Fine root dynamics in a loblolly pine forest are influenced by free-air-CO2-enrichment: a six

  1. Identification of drought responsive genes in aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda.L) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyan, Pratheesh

    2005-02-17

    Drought is a major constraint for attaining economic yield in tree crops. As an initial step to understand molecular response to water-deficit-stress in trees, gene expression in response to water stress was quantified using real-time RT...

  2. Gene Expression Analyses and Association Studies of Wood Development Genes in Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palle, Sreenath Reddy

    2011-10-21

    Gene expression analyses using native populations can provide information on the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine intraspecific variation and contribute to the understanding of plant development and adaptation ...

  3. Transcript profiling of differentiating xylem of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Suk-Hwan

    2005-02-17

    Wood formation (xylogenesis) is a critical developmental process for all woody land plants. As an initial step to understand the molecular basis for temporal and spatial regulation of xylogenesis and the effect of the expression of individual genes...

  4. Gene Expression and Association Analyses of Stress Responses in Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seeve, Candace Marie

    2012-02-14

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Carol A. Loopstra Committee Members, Konstantin V. Krutovsky David N. Appel Dirk B. Hays Chair of Interdisciplinary Faculty, Dirk... signal transduction pathways. Induced defenses are elicited by pathogen proteins and are amplified through endogenous signaling molecules including reactive oxygen species, salicylic acid, ethylene, jasmonates, Ca2+, H+ ions, lipids, nitric oxide (Yang...

  5. A survey of cavity-nesting bees and wasps in loblolly pine stands of the Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, S.; Hanula, J., L.

    2004-03-10

    Horn, Scott, and James L. Hanula. 2004. A survey of cavity-nesting bees and wasps in loblolly pine stands of the Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina. 39(3): 464-469. Abstract: In recent years concern over widespread losses in biodiversity has grown to include a possible decline of many native pollinators, primarily bees. Factors such as habitat fragmentation, agricultural practices, use of pesticides, the introduction of invasive species, or changes in land use may negatively impact these vital organisims. Most reported studies show that human impacts on pollinators are overwhelmingly negative. Reductions in pollinator populations may profoundly impact plant population dynamics and ecosystem function. Little baseline data exists on the diversity and relative abundance of bees and wasps in southern forests. The objective of this study was to develop a simple, effective method of surveying cavity-nesting bees and wasps and to determine species diversity in mature forests of loblolly pine, the most widely planted tree species in the southern United States.

  6. Community Loblolly Pine Slash Pine

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  7. Assessing the Significance of Above- and Belowground Carbon Allocation of Fast- and Slow-Growing Families of Loblolly Pine - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Topa, M. A.; Weinstein, D. A.; Retzlaff, W. A.

    2001-03-01

    During this project we experimentally evaluated the below-ground biomass and carbon allocation and partitioning of four different fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine located in Scotland County, NC, in an effort to increase the long-term performance of the crop. The trees were subjected to optimal nutrition and control since planting in 1993. Destructive harvests in 1998 and 2000 were used for whole?plant biomass estimates and to identify possible family differences in carbon acquisition (photosynthesis) and water use efficiency. At regular intervals throughout each year we sampled tissues for carbohydrate analyses to assess differences in whole-tree carbon storage. Mini rhizotron observation tubes were installed to monitor root system production and turnover. Stable isotope analysis was used to examine possible functional differences in water and nutrient acquisition of root systems between the various families. A genetic dissection of root ontogenic and architectural traits, including biomass partitioning, was conducted using molecular markers to better understand the functional implications of these traits on resource acquisition and whole-plant carbon allocation.

  8. Performance of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings and in vitro plantlets on an east Texas site 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Mohd S.

    1997-01-01

    , survivability, root/shoot biomass ratio and root system architecture, and physiological attributes such as predawn and diurnal water potential, stomatal conductance and transpiration were investigated. Two adjacent sites in Cherokee County, Texas, were...

  9. Summary To determine the extent to which loblolly pine seedlings (Pinus taeda L.) acclimate to high temperatures,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    and dark respiration of all seedlings were measured at 25, 30 and 35 °C. Both net photosynthesis and dark treatment, the highest rate of net photosynthesis was measured at the growth temperature. Dark respiration. Keywords: biomass, dark respiration, net photosynthesis, provenance. Introduction With the concern

  10. Spatiotemporal Variations in the Fire Regimes of Whitebark Pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) Forests, Western Montana, USA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    gathered during the 2004 NADEF that strengthened my age-structure analyses for Morrell Mountain. C. Stewart, grizzly bears, and black bears. The decline of this species is directly related to mortality from widespread mountain pine beetle outbreaks and infestation by the invasive white pine blister rust, and may

  11. Liming effects on slash pine (Pinus elliottii Englm.) seedlings growing on acid soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzner, John Thomas

    1978-01-01

    (treatment, exchangeable aluminum, extractable aluminum, exchangeable acidity, pH and calcium) . . . , . . . . . . . . 53 18 Correlation (r) of soil variables with potassium content in tops of slash pine seedlings on three soils . . . . . . . . . 55 LIST... fixing power that accounted for low amounts of exchange- able potassium. They postulated that the amount of potassium available was not adequate for good growth of pines on highly limed plots. Excess liming may also have detrimental effects on soil...

  12. Basal area growth response to competition among improved families of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in a 20-year-old row plot progeny trial 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joel Talbot

    1989-01-01

    of competition. J Inst Polytech, Osaka City Univ, Ser D7:15-34. 39 Land, S. B. , and W. L. Nance. 1987. APA: a useful tool for analysis of progeny tests. 19th South Forest Tree Improv Conf Proc, College Station, TX. pp. 300-311. Moore, J. A. , C. A.... , and C. F. Bey. 1979. Incorporating genetic information in growth and yield models. 15th South Forest Tree Improv Conf Proc, Starkville, MS. pp. 140-148. Nance, W. L. , S. B. Land Jr. , and R. F. Daniels. 1983. Concepts for analys1s of intergenotypic...

  13. Intensive culture of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings on poorly drained sites in the Western Gulf region of the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Mohd Shafiqur

    2004-09-30

    A significant acreage of poorly drained sites occurs in the Western Gulf region of the United States. These sites experience standing water through much of the winter and spring, resulting in poor seedling survival. In addition, the sites...

  14. A comparison of selection and breeding strategies for incorporating wood properties into a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) elite population breeding program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myszewski, Jennifer Helen

    2004-09-30

    of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content by: Floyd Bridgwater William Lowe (Chair of Committee) (Member) Thomas Byram Carol Loopstra (Member) (Member) Javier Betran Robert Megraw (Member... this endeavor has meant more than I can say. I would also like to thank the members of my committee, Dr. Tom Byram, Dr. Bill Lowe, Dr. Carol Loopstra, Dr. Javier Betran, and Dr. Bob Megraw. Their time, knowledge, encouragement, and support were invaluable...

  15. Determination of leaf area index of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and its relationship to site water balance across a large precipitation gradient in East Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Mark Thomas

    1996-01-01

    was estimated using the Thornthwaite and Mather (1957) model to predict potential and actual evapotranspiration and moisture deficit. LAI and site water balance were estimated in both 1994 and 1995. 1 hypothesized that LAI would be positively correlated...

  16. Spatial and temporal patterns of colonization and brood development of IPS avulsus (Eichh.) and I. Calligraphus (Germ.) (Coleoptera:scolytidae) in loblolly pine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flamm, Richard Owen

    1984-01-01

    height . 2 Expected times of arrival (Days) of attacking I. au isus, I. ~cai1i a h s. a d D. f ontaiis Tn incnlvlZuaT trees Page 17 3 Expected times (days) of gallery construction by I. a i sue. i. ~col ii a h s, a d D. fro taiis in individual trees.... ) and mixed hardwood species. Four adjacent plots of 3 pine trees each were designated for this study. Average tree height of the sample trees was 21. 4 m (S. D. = Z. 3 m) and average tree diameter at 2 m was Z5. 9 m (S. O. = 2. 8 m). Bark beetle attack...

  17. Community Loblolly Pine Longleaf Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood

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  18. CHRONIC IRRADIATION OF SCOTS PINE TREES (PINUS SYLVESTRIS) IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE: DOSIMETRY AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 years old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y{sup -1}) to approximately 7 Gy y{sup -1} in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.

  19. Growth of 11 Introduced Tree Species on Selected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eucalyptus (ElIca1.l'PIU.1 microcorys) plantation grows in the Kalopa section of the Hamakua Forest Reserve Silk-oak 3 Norfolk-Island-Pine 4 Redwood 6 Loblolly Pine and Slash Pine 6 Eucalyptus Species 8!.), slash pine (Pinus elliO/lii Engelm.), loblolly pine (Pinus taeda 1..), tallowwood eucalyptus (Eucalyptus

  20. Red band needle blight is an economically important disease affecting a number of coniferous trees, in particular pines. The disease has a world-wide distribution but until recently it was mainly of concern in the southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , in particular pines. The disease has a world-wide distribution but until recently it was mainly of concern. The three main pine species grown in Britain are Corsican pine, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var is the main conifer spe

  1. Community Loblolly Pine Longleaf Pine Slash Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments responseScience SHERWOODAMF/GNDRADCommunity LeadersD_

  2. A. Nguyen-Queyrens et al.Osmotic adjustment in maritime pine cuttings Osmotic adjustment in Pinus pinaster cuttings in response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A. Nguyen-Queyrens et al.Osmotic adjustment in maritime pine cuttings Note Osmotic adjustment.82 to ­1.48 MPa, and was negatively correlated with plant size. Osmotic adjustment was estimated as the slope of the regression line fitted between relative water content (RWC) and osmotic poten- tial

  3. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii var. densa ) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmore »tree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.« less

  4. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine (Pinus elliottiivar.densa) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmore »tree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.« less

  5. Susceptibility of provenances and families of Pinus maximinoi and Pinus tecunumanii to frost in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in South Africa R. G. Mitchell · M. J. Wingfield · G. R. Hodge · W. S. Dvorak · T. A. Coutinho Received: 15+Business Media B.V. 2012 Abstract The future of South Africa's most important pine species, Pinus patula subtropical species that provide an alternative to planting P. patula on the warmer sites of South Africa

  6. Some aspects of drought resistance in loblolly pine seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Holger

    1959-01-01

    UxD ?gPLU 1NID? CEDCLd CI9 nOEUxDEmPED UxCU UxNL CFNuNU5 NL Pn aENmCE5 NmaPEUCIRD 9OENI( UxD nNELU UsP 5DCEL CnUDE DLUCFuNLxmDIU Pn UxD PID 5DCE Pu9 LDD9uNI(Lh ,N(h ? LxPsL C mCa Pn UxD ?gPLU 1NID? uPRCuNUNDL NI ,C5DUUDd cCLUEPad CI9 YCu9s... RENUDENC nPE LDuDRUNPI Pn axDIPU5aNR 9EPO(xU EDLNLUCIU uPFuPuu5 aNIDL UP FD OLD9 NI C UEDD NmaEPqDmDIU aEP(ECmh 8 ,N(h ?d ANCLU iDtCL CI9 aCEU Pn YDIUECu iDtCL LxPsNI( UxD sDLUDEI FPOI9CE5 uNID fB^ Pn UxD LPOUxDEI aNID ED(NPId UxD ?gPLU 1NIDL? uPRCuNU5d...

  7. Mesostructure Elastic Properties in Loblolly Pine1 , Kretschmann, D 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakes, Roderic

    (1958) Goggans (1964), Hodge and Purnell (1993)). Biblis (1969) studied the variations in the specific

  8. RESEARCH Open Access Decoding the massive genome of loblolly pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    @ucdavis.edu 1 Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA, USA Full list of author demonstrates a novel approach to sequencing the large and complex genomes of this important group of plants genera [1]), are one of the oldest of the major plant clades, having arisen from ancestral seed plants

  9. Vegetation Loblolly Pine N Site Boundary N Streams Roads

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric

  10. FABI WORK IN NATIVE PINE FORESTS IN GUATEMALA Project title: Understanding pest and pathogen threats to pine under expanding global cultivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FABI WORK IN NATIVE PINE FORESTS IN GUATEMALA Project title: Understanding pest and pathogen on common pine species in Guatemala, particularly those under testing as hybrid partners with Pinus patula, the University of San Carlos and the private forestry sector in Guatemala to discuss the project and avenues

  11. Evaluating Ozone Air Pollution Effects on Pines in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating Ozone Air Pollution Effects on Pines in the Western United States United States. Evaluating ozone air pollution effects on pines in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW­GTR­155. Historical and technical background is provided about ozone air pollution effects on ponderosa (Pinus

  12. Introduction Regeneration of Mediterranean pines is limited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    Introduction Regeneration of Mediterranean pines is limited by factors acting at different stages Variación del peso y del tiempo de emergencia de las semillas, y crecimiento de las plántulas en una de las semillas y el crecimiento de las plántulas se investigaron en una población de Pinus nigra

  13. Camped Among the Pines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Excess sedimentation began affecting the wetland dynamics of Pine Gully in Seabrook, Texas during the first quarter of 2004. This sedimentation was sudden and became a serious problem for the dynamics of the Pine Gully wetland because the fine...

  14. Black Pine Engineering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Black Pine Engineering is commercializing a disruptive technology in the turbomachinery industry. Using a patented woven composite construction, Black Pine Engineering can make turbomachines (turbines, compressors) that are cheaper and lighter than competing technologies. Using this technology, Black Pine Engineering will sell turbo-compressors which solve the problem of wasted steam in geothermal power plants.

  15. Author's personal copy Energy and water balance of two contrasting loblolly pine plantations on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noormets, Asko

    forest managements and land conversions on ecosystem services including energy partitioning (Gholz are more interested in water and carbon balances, quantifying forest energy balance offers insights to how Accepted 9 September 2009 Keywords: Energy balance Evapotranspiration Forest albedo Forest hydrology

  16. POLYPROPYLENE COMPOSITES FILLED WITH STEAM-EXPLODED WOOD FIBERS FROM BEETLE-KILLED LOBLOLLY PINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    -soluble materials and were mainly composed of fiber fragments with lignin droplets on their surfaces. Composites serve local markets with value-added products (Forest Prod- ucts Laboratory 2000). Wood

  17. A study of the effect of ozone and antioxidants on ozone-sensitive loblolly pine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posey, Karen Lashea

    1995-01-01

    Ozone, a phytotoxic air pollutant, is formed from photochemical reactions of hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides in the troposphere. Ozone is taken into the plant through the stomata, and quickly broken down into hydroxyl radicals. These hydroxyl...

  18. A biologically-consistent stand growth model for loblolly pine in the Piedmont physiographic region, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    . Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9. Canada bDepartment of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9. Email garcia@unbc.ca. Tel. 1(250)960-5005. Fax 1

  19. Air-pollution injury on Pinus strobus in Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore - 1985 survey results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchini, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    Visible symptoms of ozone injury were observed on 100% of the Eastern white pine trees (Pinus strobus) sampled in 1985 from permanent pine plots at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Average injury was low and affected about 5% of the needle surface. Only 6% of the trees sampled had more than 10% injury. Fleck injury was the most common ozone symptom encountered, followed by tipburn and chlorotic mottle. Significant variation among plots existed in total ozone injury, chlorotic mottle, tipburn, and needle length. Symptoms of other injury types were observed on 9% of the needle surfaces of sampled trees.

  20. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  1. Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine Stanley L. Krugman U. S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Berkeley, Calif.. Pacific pine, conelets, freezing temperature) Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage

  2. Pine Straw as a Ground Cover Mulch 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Tate, Jay

    2004-01-09

    Pine needles make excellent mulch for gardens and landscapes. Pine straw breaks down more slowly than other natural mulches and needs to be reapplied less often. This leaflet explains how to purchase and use pine straw mulch in your landscape....

  3. Black Pine Circle Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mytko, Christine

    2014-03-31

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  4. Black Pine Circle Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mytko, Christine

    2014-09-15

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  5. The effects of ethylenediurea and sodium erythorbate on photosynthetic function of ozone-exposed loblolly pine seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehler, Eric Anthony

    1995-01-01

    -top chambers in east Texas for one growing season beginning in April 1994 while being exposed to either sub-ambient (CF), approximate ambient (NF), 1.5Y,, 2.OX, or 2.5X ambient ozone levels. Net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g), and chloroplast...

  6. Early genetic evaluation of loblolly pine based on growth characteristics of seedlings grown under four moisture regimes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waxler, Michael Steven

    1980-01-01

    (AVER), 3) relative growth rate (Nilthorpe and I'hoorbey 29 1974) after moisture stress treatments began (RGR) 4, 4) shoot wei ght at 24 weeks of age (SW), 5) root weight at 24 weeks of age (RW), and 6) shoot-root ratio at 24 weeks of age (S... and individual family within treatment differences: 1) aver- age height at 16 and 24 weeks after sowing, 2) SW, 3) RW, and 4) S/R. A correlation coefficient (r) between average seed weight per family and average volume suoeriority per family in the field...

  7. Interactions among Silvicultural Intensity, Genotype, and Environment and Their Effects on the Growth and Mortality of Loblolly Pine and Slash Pine Families 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Lu

    2013-08-13

    . However, on the basis of 10-year forest inventory data of pure-family plots from three different sites and under two levels of cultural regime intensity, my study found that superior genotype, Lob 5 from South Carolina, still showed best performance...

  8. Pine pulpwood prices reached re-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pine pulpwood prices reached re- cord highs due to strong pulp and paper demand and lumber production curtailment. In contrast, sawlog prices continued their downward movement in November/December statewide av- erage pine sawlog prices decreased to $36.72/ton, a 4.3% drop for the period and a 14.1% drop

  9. Hydraulic architecture and tracheid allometry in mature Pinus palustris and Pinus elliottii trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    Hydraulic architecture and tracheid allometry in mature Pinus palustris and Pinus elliottii trees C and better-drained micro- sites than SL. The hydraulic architecture and tracheid dimen- sions of roots, trunk but weak trade-off between water conduction efficiency and safety. Tracheid hydraulic diameter (Dh

  10. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B.; Miller, Karl V.; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  11. Above- and belowground competition from longleaf pine plantations limits performance of reintroduced herbaceous species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.B. Harrington; C.M. Dagley; M.B. Edwards.

    2003-10-01

    Although overstory trees limit the abundance and species richness of herbaceous vegetation in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantations, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood because of confounding among limiting factors. In fall 1998, research was initiated to determine the separate effects of above- and belowground competition and needlefall from overstory pines on understory plant performance. Three 13- to 15-yr-old plantations near Aiken, SC, were thinned to 0, 25, 50, or 100% of nonthinned basal area (19.5 m2 ha-1). Combinations of trenching (to eliminate root competition) and needlefall were applied to areas within each plot, and containerized seedlings of 14 perennial herbaceous species and longleaf pine were planted within each. Overstory crown closure ranged from 0 to 81%, and soil water and available nitrogen varied consistently with pine stocking, trenching, or their combination. Cover of planted species decreased an average of 16.5 and 14.1% as a result of above- and below-ground competition, respectively. Depending on species, needlefall effects were positive, negative, or negligible. Results indicate that understory restoration will be most successful when herbaceous species are established within canopy openings (0.1-0.2 ha) managed to minimize negative effects from above- and belowground competition and needlefall.

  12. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the wood—terpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.

  13. Southern Pine Based on Biorefinery Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragauskas, Arthur J; Singh, Preet

    2014-01-10

    This program seeks to develop an integrated southern pine wood to biofuels/biomaterials processing facility on the Recipient’s campus, that will test advanced integrated wood processing technologies at the laboratory scale, including: • The generation of the bioethanol from pines residues and hemicelluloses extracted from pine woodchips; • The conversion of extracted woodchips to linerboard and bleach grade pulps; and • The efficient conversion of pine residues, bark and kraft cooking liquor into a useful pyrolysis oil.

  14. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) site index in relation to physico-chemical and biological properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battles, John

    properties in reclaimed mine soils Marcin Pietrzykowski · Jaroslaw Socha · Natalie S. van Doorn Received: 15 on four afforested post-mining sites after lignite, hard coal, sand and sulphur mining extraction. Site-chemical and biological properties of RMS. Field measurements were taken in tree stands ranging from 12 to 30 years of age

  15. Diagnosis & Correction of Soil Nutrient Limitations in Intensively managed southern pine forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of Florida

    2002-10-25

    Forest productivity is one manner to sequester carbon and it is a renewable energy source. Likewise, efficient use of fertilization can be a significant energy savings. To date, site-specific use of fertilization for the purpose of maximizing forest productivity has not been well developed. Site evaluation of nutrient deficiencies is primarily based on empirical approaches to soil testing and plot fertilizer tests with little consideration for soil water regimes and contributing site factors. This project uses mass flow diffusion theory in a modeling context, combined with process level knowledge of soil chemistry, to evaluate nutrient bioavailability to fast-growing juvenile forest stands growing on coastal plain Spodosols of the southeastern U.S. The model is not soil or site specific and should be useful for a wide range of soil management/nutrient management conditions. In order to use the model, field data of fast-growing southern pine needed to be measured and used in the validation of the model. The field aspect of the study was mainly to provide data that could be used to verify the model. However, we learned much about the growth and development of fast growing loblolly. Carbon allocation patterns, root shoot relationships and leaf area root relationships proved to be new, important information. The Project Objectives were to: (1) Develop a mechanistic nutrient management model based on the COMP8 uptake model. (2) Collect field data that could be used to verify and test the model. (3) Model testing.

  16. Evolution of resistance to white pine blister rust in high-elevation pines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavener, Simon

    Evolution of resistance to white pine blister rust in high-elevation pines Mike Antolin, Stuart Station, USDA Forest Service Thanks: NSF award 0734267, USDA Forest Service Evolution of resistance ­ p. 1/74 #12;The basic ecology Evolution of resistance ­ p. 2/74 #12;High-elevation White Pines · Habitat: dry

  17. INDIGO PINE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,SecurityHome . Form D-4-AILE: ILE: AdvancedINDIGO PINE

  18. INDIGO PINE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof71 Hydrogen andINDIGO PINE It's not easy to get 50

  19. INDIGO PINE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof71 Hydrogen andINDIGO PINE It's not easy to get

  20. INDIGO PINE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof71 Hydrogen andINDIGO PINE It's not easy to getINDIGO

  1. Ice flow sensitivity to geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larour, E; Morlighem, M; Seroussi, H; Schiermeier, J; Rignot, E; Rignot, E

    2012-01-01

    to geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarcticato geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica,Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica: (a) geothermal heat

  2. Running Title: C and N Allocation in Pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, J. Timothy

    1996-12-01

    A long standing challenge has been understanding how plants and ecosystems respond to shifts in the balance of resource availabilities. The continuing rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2} will induce changes in the availability and use of several terrestrial ecosystem resources. We report on the acquisition and allocation of carbon and nitrogen in Pinus ponderosa Laws. seedlings grown at three levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (370, 525, and 700 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) and three levels of soil nitrogen supply in a controlled environment experiment. Nitrogen was applied (0, 100, and 200 {micro}g N g soil{sup -1}) at planting and again at week 26 of a 58-week, 4-harvest experiment. At the final harvest, plants grown with variety low available soil nitrogen showed no significant response to atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Plants at higher N levels responded positively to CO{sub 2} with the highest biomass at the middle CO{sub 2} level. Plants growing at the lowest N levels immediately allocated a relatively large portion of their nitrogen and biomass to roots. Plants growing at near present ambient CO{sub 2} levels allocated relatively little material to roots when N was abundant but moved both carbon and nitrogen below-ground when N was withheld. Plants growing at higher CO{sub 2} levels, allocated more C and N to roots even when N was abundant, and made only small shifts in allocation patterns when N was no longer supplied. In general, allocation of C and N to roots tended to increase when N supply was restricted and also with increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} level. These allocation responses were consistent with patterns suggesting a functional balance in the acquisition of above-ground versus below-ground resources. In particular, variation in whole tree average nitrogen concentration can explain 68% of the variation ratio of root biomass to shoot biomass across the harvests. The capability to respond to temporal variation in nutrient conditions, the dynamics of nutrient uptake, and the dynamics of nutrient use were all seen to be influenced by the interplay between previous N supply, previous C supply, and the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The data suggest that in an elevated CO{sub 2} atmosphere ponderosa pine seedlings will have higher root biomass and be likely to capture more N compared to seedlings today. Further, the combined growth and allocation responses of Ponderosa pine at elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in higher growth per unit N (nitrogen productivity) and lower N per gram of tissue (all tissues not just leaves) when nitrogen was not in abundant supply.

  3. Photosynthesis, Nitrogen, Their Adjustment and its Effects on Ecosystem Carbon Gain at Elevated CO{sub 2}l. A Comparison of Loblolly and Ponderosa Pines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, J. Timothy; Eichelmann, Hillar Y.; Tissue, David T.; Lewis, James D.; Picone, Johnn B.; Ross, Peter D.

    1996-12-01

    A functional understanding of terrestrial ecosystem carbon processes is essential for two reasons. First, carbon flow is a most fundamental aspects of ecosystem function as it mediates most of the energy flow in these systems. Second, carbon flow also mediates the majority of energy flow in the global economy and will do for the foreseeable future. The increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and its inevitable flow through global ecosystems will influence ecosystem processes. There is, of course, great interest in the potential of ecosystems to sequester some of the carbon being loaded into the atmosphere by economic activity.

  4. The Drought Response of Physiological and Structural Traits in Loblolly Pine (P. taeda L.) Clones with a Focus on Mesophyll Conductance to CO_(2) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Elizabeth Susan

    2014-07-10

    ?13C of bulk leaf across dates for each treatment ....................... 58 Figure 17. Leaf specific conductivity and vulnerability to cavitation .............................. 60 Figure 18. Relative growth rate from May to June... and pit conductance control hydraulic conductivity (Sperry et al. 2006). Vessel structure that allows faster flow can also make the vessels more vulnerable to cavitation 2 (Sperry et al. 2006). Cavitation occurs when high tension causes air to enter...

  5. First Look at Smoke Emissions from Prescribed Burns in Long-unburned Longleaf Pine Forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akagi, Sheryl; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Weise, David; Reardon, James; Urbanski, Shawn; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-02-22

    While fire has long played a role in the longleaf pine ecosystem, there are still some stands in the southeastern United States where fire has not been reintroduced and fuels have accumulated for 50 years or more. As part of a larger study examining fuel loading and smoke emissions on Department of Defense installations in the southeastern U.S., fuels and trace emissions were measured during three prescribed burns at Ft. Jackson Army Base near Columbia, South Carolina in November 2011. These pine-forest understory fires provided valuable emissions data for fires that burned in stands that had little or no exposure to fire for decades. Smoke emissions were measured on the ground and from an aircraft by scientists from a large team of atmospheric researchers. (Akagi et al., 2013) To characterize initial emissions in the lofted plume and in point sources of residual smoldering combustion, trace-gas species were measured using an airborne FTIR and a ground-based FTIR, respectively. Whole-air sampling canisters were also collected from both ground- and airborne-based platforms. A total of 97 trace gases were quantified in this work, largely via infrared spectroscopy. Selected emissions data were compared with similar data collected from prescribed burns sampled in coastal North Carolina in 2010 in younger fuels beds of loblolly/longleaf stands near Camp Lejeune (Burling et al., 2011). The emission factors measured in this work differ by ~13-195% to EF measured from the managed stands at Camp Lejeune for organic and N-containing species, suggesting that fire emissions in similar ecosystems can exhibit large variability. Part of the differences, however, may be ascribed to burn conditions as well since the NC burns were during the wet season whereas the SC stands were burned after an extended drought. We also report the first detailed FTIR emissions data for a suite of monoterpenes. Figure 1 displays the emission factors (g/kg fuel) for several monoterpenes and isoprene as measured by the ground-based FTIR system. Due to their unsaturated structure, terpenes are highly reactive compounds emitted from plants thought to contribute to secondary organic aerosol formation (SOA) (Saathoff et al., 2009; Hennigan et al., 2011) and the formation of small oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) (Jacob et al., 2002) in fire plumes. The known chemistry and measured abundance of monoterpenes suggests that these species impacted secondary plume processes including ozone, OVOC, and SOA formation in sampled plumes within the first few hours after emission.

  6. Effects of Precommercial Thinning and Midstory Control on Avian and Small Mammal Communities during Longleaf Pine Savanna Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Vanessa R; Kilgo, John C

    2015-01-01

    Abstract - Restoring longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) savanna is a goal of many southern land managers, and longleaf plantations may provide a mechanism for savanna restoration. However, the effects of silvicultural treatments used in the management of longleaf pine plantations on wildlife communities are relatively unknown. Beginning in 1994, we examined effects of longleaf pine restoration with plantation silviculture on avian and small mammal communities using four treatments in four 8- to 11- year-old plantations within the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Treatments included prescribed burning every 3 to 5 years, plus: (1) no additional treatment (burn-only control); (2) precommercial thinning; (3) non-pine woody control with herbicides; and (4) combined thinning and woody control. We surveyed birds (1996-2003) using 50-m point counts and small mammals with removal trapping. Thinning and woody control alone had short-lived effects on avian communities, and the combination treatment increased avian parameters over the burn-only control in all years. Small mammal abundance showed similar trends as avian abundance for all three treatments when compared with the burn-only control, but only for 2 years post-treatment. Both avian and small mammal communities were temporarily enhanced by controlling woody vegetation with chemicals in addition to prescribed fire and thinning. Therefore, precommercial thinning in longleaf plantations, particularly when combined with woody control and prescribed fire, may benefit early-successional avian and small mammal communities by developing stand conditions more typical of natural longleaf stands maintained by periodic fire.

  7. How resilient are southwestern ponderosa pine forests after crown fires?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, M; Mast, J N

    2005-01-01

    of an intense prescribed forest fire: Is it ecologicalspecies to fires in Pinus ponderosa forests in northernIn Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the

  8. MountainPineBeetleManagement Short-Term Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to mountain pine beetle attacks and forest fires. Wider growth rings (to the right), show how a tree responds

  9. The Influence of Previous Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    The Influence of Previous Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) Activity on the 1988, Bozeman Montana, 59715, USA ABSTRACT We examined the historical record of mountain pine beetle variables: drought, aspect, and sus- tained mountain pine beetle activity in the period 1972­75. Of the two

  10. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure and risk reduction measures necessary to correct structural and maintenance deficiencies of Pine Creek Dam

  11. Rooting characteristics of slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) in relation to soil fragipans in the flatwoods section of southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batte, Charles David

    1975-01-01

    82t(x) 8 A2 821t BO IRO xx 4 xx ROQ BR2t ROO Flg. 5-" HGF1ZGGBt1GG 1G (h6 SG11 PRdGG Of BBCh SCUdt( PIGt. . Fig. 6-- Soil profile ot plots F6 and F7 showing extensive tongueing end cregflsh krotovines* 33 the description was written... distribution by diameter classes. 5 Soil classification 49 65 6 Physical and chemical soil properties for plot Fl . . lpl 7 Physical and chemical soil properties for plot F2 . . lp2 8 Physical and chemical soil properties for plot F3 . . lp3 9 Physical...

  12. The loss of mature pine trees to mountain pine beetles in sensitive watersheds raised fears that influxes of nutrients and sediment might threaten key sources of drinking water.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The loss of mature pine trees to mountain pine beetles in sensitive watersheds raised fears) From Death Comes Life: Recovery and Revolution in the Wake of Epidemic Outbreaks of Mountain Pine Beetle To stand witness to a wave of mountain pine beetles sweeping across a favorite western landscape

  13. Black Pine Engineering Wins Clean Energy Trust Clean Energy Challenge...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Explore the Energy Innovation Portal Last week the student team of Black Pine Engineering from Michigan State University...

  14. Southern Pine Electric Power Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Pine Electric Power Association offers the Comfort Advantage Home Program which provides rebates on heat pumps to new homes which meet certain Comfort Advantage weatherization standards....

  15. Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA Alan H. Taylor Abstract Questions: Did fire regimes in old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest change a pattern of continuous regeneration or is regeneration episodic and related to fire disturbance or fire

  16. Lodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Very large patches of even-aged forests varying in composition from Fire Regimes in Lodgepole Pine Forests The historic fire regime is dominated by severe, stand-replacing fires. These fires occur at longLodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management Claudia Regan ­ Regional

  17. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighte d Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted

  18. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted

  19. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Simple average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Simple average of Unweighted

  20. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Pine Mountain Builders, Pine Mountain, Georgia

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable for PublicDepartment ofNewNewCountryTraditionPine

  1. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  2. Experimental analysis of stove top designs for pine needle combustion in a semi-gasifier burner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roqué, Alyssa J

    2011-01-01

    The motivation behind this project was to develop a better understanding of the role that the stove top plays in a stove where pine needles are the main fuel source. Pine needles have distinct characteristics in their ...

  3. Characteristics of pine needle combustion in a semi-gasifier burner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Liane Jessica

    2011-01-01

    The motivation behind this report was to develop a stronger understanding of pine needle combustion behavior in a semi-gasifier, in order to ultimately design an effective pine needle cook stove for people in the developing ...

  4. Spatiotemporal Relationships between Climate and Whitebark Pine Mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    : mountain pine beetle, climate change, grizzly bears, Landsat, enhanced wetness difference index, regression food for wildlife. Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is an ideal bioindicator of climate the largest outbreak of mountain pine beetle on record, and evidence suggests that a changing climate has

  5. FOREST LIGHT AND STRUCTURE IN RELATION TO DISTURBANCES: COMPARING MOUNTAIN PINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOREST LIGHT AND STRUCTURE IN RELATION TO DISTURBANCES: COMPARING MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE, WILDFIRE of Thesis: Forest light and structure in relation to disturbances: comparing mountain pine beetle, wildfire light environment and structure of lodgepole pine forests in the southern interior of British Columbia

  6. Paleoclimatic implications of glacial and postglacial refugia for Pinus pumila in western Beringia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, P M; Lozhkin, A V; Solomatkina, T B; Brown, T A

    2010-02-05

    Palynological results from Julietta Lake currently provide the most direct evidence to support the existence of a glacial refugium for Pinus pumila in mountains of southwestern Beringia. Both percentages and accumulation rates indicate the evergreen shrub survived until at least {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. in the Upper Kolyma region. Percentage data suggest numbers dwindled into the late glaciation, whereas pollen accumulation rates point towards a more rapid demise shortly after {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. Pinus pumila did not re-establish in any great numbers until {approx}8100 14C yr B.P., despite the local presence {approx}9800 14C yr B.P. of Larix dahurica, which shares similar summer temperature requirements. The postglacial thermal maximum (in Beringia {approx}11,000-9000 14C yr B.P.) provided Pinus pumila shrubs with equally harsh albeit different conditions for survival than those present during the LGM. Regional records indicate that in this time of maximum warmth Pinus pumila likely sheltered in a second, lower-elevation refugium. Paleoclimatic models and modern ecology suggest that shifts in the nature of seasonal transitions and not only seasonal extremes have played important roles in the history of Pinus pumila over the last {approx}21,000 14C yr B.P.

  7. Hydrologic calibration of paired watersheds using a MOSUM approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ssegane, H.; Amatya, D. M.; Muwamba, A.; Chescheir, G. M.; Appelboom, T.; Tollner, E. W.; Nettles, J. E.; Youssef, M. A.; Birgand, F.; Skaggs, R. W.

    2015-01-09

    Paired watershed studies have historically been used to quantify hydrologic effects of land use and management practices by concurrently monitoring two neighboring watersheds (a control and a treatment) during the calibration (pre-treatment) and post-treatment periods. This study characterizes seasonal water table and flow response to rainfall during the calibration period and tests a change detection technique of moving sums of recursive residuals (MOSUM) to select calibration periods for each control-treatment watershed pair when the regression coefficients for daily water table elevation (WTE) were most stable to reduce regression model uncertainty. The control and treatment watersheds included 1–3 year intensively managedmore »loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) with natural understory, same age loblolly pine intercropped with switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), 14–15 year thinned loblolly pine with natural understory (control), and switchgrass only. Although monitoring during the calibration period spanned 2009 to 2012, silvicultural operational practices that occurred during this period such as harvesting of existing stand and site preparation for pine and switchgrass establishment may have acted as external factors, potentially shifting hydrologic calibration relationships between control and treatment watersheds. Results indicated that MOSUM was able to detect significant changes in regression parameters for WTE due to silvicultural operations. This approach also minimized uncertainty of calibration relationships which could otherwise mask marginal treatment effects. All calibration relationships developed using this MOSUM method were quantifiable, strong, and consistent with Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) greater than 0.97 for WTE and NSE greater than 0.92 for daily flow, indicating its applicability for choosing calibration periods of paired watershed studies.« less

  8. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Pine Mountain Builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-02-01

    Pine Mountain Builders achieved HERS scores as low as 59 and electric bills as low as $50/month with extensive air sealing (blower door tests = 1.0 to 1.8 ACH 50), R-3 XPS sheathing instead of OSB, and higher efficiency heat pumps.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of Pinus taeda L. in the Late Quaternary: An interdisciplinary approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Rabab'ah, Moh'd Ali

    2004-11-15

    Pinus taeda L. dynamics, migration patterns and genetic structure were investigated over geological time scale (the past 21,000 years), historical time scale (the past 500 years) and recent time scale (the past 50 years ago) using multi-source data...

  10. Carbon concentration variations in the roots, stem and crown of mature Pinus pinaster (Ait.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bert, Didier

    Carbon concentration variations in the roots, stem and crown of mature Pinus pinaster (Ait.) Didier. Evaluations of carbon fixation and storage in this forest are facilitated by its general homogeneity for expansion factors and carbon concentration in the biomass, and more accurate results could be obtained

  11. Performance of slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) containerized rooted cuttings and bare-root seedlings established on five planting dates in the flatlands of western Louisiana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akgul, Alper

    2005-08-29

    -root seedlings (BRS) and containerized rooted cuttings (CRC) were hand planted in September, November, January, March and April in three consecutive planting seasons (2000-2001, 2001-2002 and 2002-2003) on three sites with silt loam topsoils in southwestern...

  12. Contrasting responses of forest ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2: Implications for the global C cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norby, Richard J [ORNL; DeLucia, E. H. [University of Illinois; Moore, D J [University of Illinois

    2005-01-01

    In two parallel but independent experiments, Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology was used to expose plots within contrasting evergreen loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and deciduous sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) forests to the level of CO2 anticipated in 2050. Net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) increased in both forests. In the year 2000, after exposing pine and sweetgum to elevated CO2 for approximately 5 and 3 years, a complete budget calculation revealed increases in net ecosystem production (NEP) of 41% and 44% in the pine forest and sweetgum forest, respectively, representing the storage of an additional 174 gC m-2 and 128 gC m-2 in these forests. The stimulation of NPP without corresponding increases in leaf area index or light absorption in either forest resulted in 23-27% stimulation in radiation-use efficiency, defined as NPP per unit absorbed photosynthetically active radiation. Greater plant respiration contributed to lower NPP in the loblolly pine forest than in the sweetgum forest, and these forests responded differently to CO2 enrichment. Where the pine forest added C primarily to long-lived woody tissues, exposure to elevated CO2 caused a large increase in the production of labile fine roots in the sweetgum forest. Greater allocation to more labile tissues may cause more rapid cycling of C back to the atmosphere in the sweetgum forest compared to the pine forest. Imbalances in the N cycle may reduce the response of these forests to experimental exposure to elevated CO2 in the future, but even at the current stimulation observed for these forests, the effect of changes in land use on C sequestration are likely to be larger than the effect of CO2-induced growth stimulation.

  13. EIS-0215: Pinon Pine Power Project, Tracy Station, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this statement to assess the environmental and human health issues associated with the Pinon Pine Power Project, a proposed demonstration project that would be cost-shared by DOE and the Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPCo.) under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program. The proposed Federal action is for DOE to provide cost-shared funding support for the construction and operation of the Pinon Pine Power Project, a coal-fired power generating facility, which would be a nominal, 800-ton-per-day (104 megawatt (MW) gross generation) air-blown, Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle plant proposed by SPPCo. at its Tracy Power Station near Reno, Nevada.

  14. Analysis of formaldehyde fluxes above a Ponderosa Pine forest measured via eddy-covariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digangi, FABCDE

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of formaldehyde fluxes above a Ponderosa Pine Go To Analysis of formaldehyde fluxes above a Ponderosa 2011: Analysis of formaldehyde fluxes above a Ponderosa 

  15. Increase of monoterpene emissions from a pine plantation as a result of mechanical disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Increase of monoterpene emissions from a pine plantation as a result of mechanical disturbances and emission rates of monoterpenes were measured above a ponderosa pine plantation in the Sierra Nevada chemistry. The increase was mostly because of higher basal emission rates, but small changes

  16. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Pine and FLOOD SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    and Caboolture FLOOD SYSTEM for the PINE & CABOOLTURE RIVERS This brochure describes the flood system operated information which will be useful for understanding River Height Bulletins issued by the Bureau's Flood Warning Centre during periods of high rainfall and flooding. Pine River at Murrumba Downs Contained

  17. Historical Fire Regimes in Ponderosa Pine Forests of the Colorado Front Range, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical Fire Regimes in Ponderosa Pine Forests of the Colorado Front Range, and Recommendations scientific understanding of historical fire regimes in the forested landscapes of Colorado's Front Range and the Colorado-Wyoming border. This article focuses on forests in which ponderosa pine is a dominant or co

  18. Fusarium circinatum (teleomorph = Gibberella circinata) causes the serious disease of pines known as pitch canker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is found in South Africa where the pathogen first appeared in pine nurseries in 1990 and has come to plantations in South Africa,and it threatens the future of pine forestry in the country. Members it first appeared in South Africa.This work has developed to a point where knowledge of the genome

  19. Pine sawlog markets remained slow and prices were flat to slightly lower. Dry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pine sawlog markets remained slow and prices were flat to slightly lower. Dry weather brought price prices averaged $28.36 per ton, 5 percent lower than the last period. This was 36% higher than the price a year ago. The average pine sawlog price was $26.51 per ton for Northeast Texas and $30.23 per ton

  20. White Pine County, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake, New Jersey: EnergyOhio:Pine County,

  1. Repellents to prevent cattle browsing of pine seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Don Arlen

    1959-01-01

    of undamaged did. w n J 17, 1 E th to V; transformation. '7. Treatment means tbat, difrer. d oigmiflcant1y, determined by iiultiple Ssnge Test. 2I3 O' Brosslng damage by ms)or damage clsoseo on June 1'f, by tres~mont and, by individual plot. ~ ~ 32 g... { Q f'Gnc'al anl couthuectern ncl i si 'un@ much of unich Qn. once cove QJ 1rith nn e. =c&cnt stcnd. of longle-f pine io non largely c1xiov. " land that nas not restockel or lrciiucci n Qu'b;tnnticl cmount ol timb ~ since tile virgin foxest ms cub...

  2. Community D Mixed/Pine Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood Mixed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments responseScience SHERWOODAMF/GNDRAD _D Mixed/Pine

  3. Idyllwild-Pine Cove, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFBIdea One Inc Jump to:Idyllwild-Pine

  4. Hillsboro Pines, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey,High-TemperatureHiles,Hillcrest, NewPines, Florida:

  5. La Pine, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville,LEDSGP/activities <LEDSGP/hometrainingLPGEscoMesa,Palma,PazPine,

  6. Pine Beach, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,Pilgrim HotPilusPinckney, NewPine

  7. Pembroke Pines, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program |ViewIllinois: EnergyPelham, New Hampshire:ZonePines,

  8. Southern Pine Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSolo EnergySouthSouthInformationHillsPine Elec

  9. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Final phase 1, Environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  10. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: Controls by light, temperature and stomatal conductance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harley, P.; Eller, Allyson; Guenther, Alex B.; Monson, Russell K.

    2014-07-14

    Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was light dependent and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions which explicitly accounts for the physico-chemical properties of emitted compounds, we are able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced through experimentation or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light dependent monoterpenes can comprise a large fraction of emissions. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in ?-3-carene.

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pine Mountain...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1.0-1.8 ACH50 construction, spray-foamed walls and attics, and high-efficiency heat pumps with fresh-air intake. Pine Mountain Builders - Georgia More Documents & Publications...

  12. Identifying and assessing areas for pine woodland regeneration in the lowland savannas of Southern Belize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsigiannis, Panagiotis

    2014-08-31

    ), is valuable not only as a timber resource, but also in forming natural habitats for the local endangered species. However, degradation by frequent fires, anthropogenic pressures and climate change often convert gallery pine forests and dense tree savannas...

  13. Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culver, Wesley Richard

    2009-06-02

    OF A GALVESTON BAY WETLAND AT PINE GULLY, SEABROOK, TEXAS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BEACH RENOURISHMENT A Thesis by WESLEY RICHARD CULVER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2007 Major Subject: Geology UNUSUAL SEDIMENTATION OF A GALVESTON BAY WETLAND AT PINE GULLY, SEABROOK, TEXAS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BEACH RENOURISHMENT A Thesis by WESLEY RICHARD CULVER...

  14. Summary Pinus taeda L. stomata respond slowly to changes in irradiance. Because incident irradiance on a leaf varies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    Summary Pinus taeda L. stomata respond slowly to changes in irradiance. Because incident irradiance on a leaf varies constantly, the rate of change in stomatal conductance to fluc- tuating irradiance may have with very different irradiance patterns, assuming that rates of stomatal opening and closing were similar

  15. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuelson, Lisa [Auburn University] [Auburn University

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  16. The Effect of Mountain Pine Beetle Attack and Salvage Harvesting On Streamflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    The Effect of Mountain Pine Beetle Attack and Salvage Harvesting On Streamflows Special ....................................................................................................................4 FRPA requirements for Water Management in MPB-attacked watersheds ..........5 The Baker Creek. These disturbances have potential effects on water yield (the total amount of water flowing out of a watershed

  17. Longleaf Pine: Overview of Planting http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    planting. Site preparation herbicide sprays are also conducted before planting and will control most. Pastureland Site Preparation: Planted trees cannot com- pete with established grasses in open field settingsLongleaf Pine: Overview of Planting http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2 ter sites with more poorly

  18. Climate warming will reduce growth and survival of Scots pine except in the far north

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    LETTER Climate warming will reduce growth and survival of Scots pine except in the far north P. B in North America. Growth and survival were analysed in response to climatic transfer distance populations at each site, and across sites for regional groups of populations, were related to climate

  19. Structural optimization and spiralling of the grain in a pine trunk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkaev, Andrej

    Structural optimization and spiralling of the grain in a pine trunk Andrej Cherkaev and Seubpong.1 The phenomenon 1.1.0.1 Evolution and optimization criteria We observe that some trees have grains spiralling. The paper concerns with morphology of tree's trunk from structural optimization viewpoint. Speci cally, we

  20. An adult pine weevil feeding on the bark of the main stem of a young tree.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1 An adult pine weevil feeding on the bark of the main stem of a young tree. 1 P R A C T I C forest sites after clearfelling. Typically, adult weevils feed on bark of the main stem (Figure 1 of attack, the main management alternatives are to delay planting, to restock with pre- treated trees or

  1. White Pine Emission Trends of Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes After Acute Ozone Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    White Pine Emission Trends of Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes After Acute Ozone Exposure Daniel M on a large scale in forests. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from trees significantly contribute investigates the effect of an abiotic stress, specifically acute ozone exposure, on the terpene emissions

  2. Mortality in Southern Ontario Red Pine Plantations: Causes, Consequences, and Management Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    No. 69 2010 Mortality in Southern Ontario Red Pine Plantations: Causes, Consequences, and Management Options By J.A. McLAughLin1 , T. hsiAng2 , g. hALicki hAyden1 And s. greifenhAgen1 1 Ontario that is among the most extensively planted tree species in southern Ontario. In the 1920s, reforestation

  3. Effect of Cattle Grazing, Seeded Grass, and an Herbicide on Ponderosa Pine Seedling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effect of Cattle Grazing, Seeded Grass, and an Herbicide on Ponderosa Pine Seedling Survival M.; Fiddler, Gary O. 1999. Effect of cattle grazing, seeded grass, and an herbicide on ponderosa forage grass species at plantation age 3, cattle grazing with and without seeded grasses, and applying

  4. Hydraulic adjustment of Scots pine across Europe J. Martnez-Vilalta1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    Research Hydraulic adjustment of Scots pine across Europe J. Martínez-Vilalta1,2 , H. Cochard3), 8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland Summary · The variability of branch-level hydraulic properties, xylem anatomy, sapwood- and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity (KS and KL), vulnerability to embolism

  5. Pine sawlog markets remained slow. Pulp-wood and hardwood sawlog prices declined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    logging conditions and downward pressure from rising energy costs. Diesel prices soared 22 percent over by the end of April, mainly driven by higher energy and food prices. Middle East turmoil, rising demand fromPine sawlog markets remained slow. Pulp- wood and hardwood sawlog prices declined due to favorable

  6. Lateral resistance of ring-shank nail connections in Southern Pine lumber 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theilen, Ross Dean

    1996-01-01

    groups tested in Southern Pine lumber. Nail specimens included three suppliers, two shank types (smooth and ringshank), two diameters (3.76 and 4.50 mm), and two coatings (galvanized and ungalvanized). Ring-shank nails averaged 85% higher nail bending...

  7. Pine and hardwood pulpwood stumpage prices continued an upward trend in March/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pine and hardwood pulpwood stumpage prices continued an upward trend in March/ April 2010. The strong global pulp market and wet weather conditions in East Texas pushed up the pulpwood stumpage prices to a eight-month high. Lumber and panel prices continued rising. Observers com- mented that the price surge

  8. Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

  9. Fuzzy logic approach to supervised segmentation of forest regions infested by Southern Pine Beetle using color airborne images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Kit-Tong

    1994-01-01

    Digital image processing technique and fuzzy logic approach are used to identify forest areas infested with Southern Pine Beetle, SPB, using normal color airborne imageries in this research. This research will be used as a front end of a larger...

  10. Analysing the Environmental Niches for Caribbean Pine and Palmetto Palm in the Lowland Savannas of Southern Belize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Keeffe, Jamie

    2015-10-01

    and constraining environmental factors, which depending on geographic variance, combine to form the respective environmental niches for pine and palm. Deductive analysis identified the environmental niches for both species and these were tested using the historical...

  11. The Influence of Fire and Other Disturbance on Ericaceous Shrubs in Xeric Pine-Oak Forests of the Appalachian Mountains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pipkin, Ashley

    2012-07-16

    OF FIRE AND OTHER DISTURBANCE ON ERICACEOUS SHRUBS IN XERIC PINE-OAK FORESTS OF THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS A Thesis by ASHLEY R. PIPKIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2011 Major Subject: Geography The Influence of Fire and Other Disturbance on Ericaceous Shrubs in Xeric Pine-Oak Forests of the Appalachian Mountains...

  12. Climate Warming and Drought Effects on Pinus and Juniperus Species: Contrasting Drought Tolerance Traits Limit Function and Growth in Tree Seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenoir, Katherine Judith

    2013-04-29

    Junipers and pines exhibit contrasting patterns of growth decline and mortality with climate change-type warming and drought; yet, the underlying physiological mechanisms are not fully understood. Does warming exacerbate the effects of drought...

  13. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Pine Street Canal, Burlington, VT, September 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This Decision Document presents the selected remedial action for the Pine Street Canal Superfund in Burlington, Vermont. The major components of the selected remedy include: Capping contaminated sediments in Canal and Wetland Subareas 1, 2, 3, 7, and 8; Institutional controls for groundwater below the Site; Institutional controls for land-use development; Site boundary definition; Long-term performance monitoring; and Five-year reviews.

  14. The initial phase of a Longleaf Pine-Wiregrass Savanna restoration: species establishment and community responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenbach, Todd, A; Foster, Bryan, L.; Imm, Donald, W.

    2010-09-01

    AbstractAbstract The significant loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem in the southeastern United States has serious implications for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In response to this loss, we have initiated a long-term and landscape-scale restoration experiment at the 80,125 ha (310 mi2) Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. Aristida beyrichiana (wiregrass), an important and dominant grass (i.e., a “matrix” species) of the longleaf pine savanna understory, and 31 other herbaceous “non-matrix” species were planted at six locations throughout SRS in 2002 and 2003. Of the 36,056 transplanted seedlings, 75% were still alive in June 2004, while mean 1–2 year survival across all planted species was 48%. Lespedeza hirta (hairy lespedeza) exhibited the greatest overall survival per 3 ×3 m cell at 95%, whereas Schizachyrium spp. (little bluestem) exhibited the greatest mean cover among individual species at 5.9%. Wiregrass survival and cover were significantly reduced when planted with non-matrix species. Aggregate cover of all planted species in restored cells averaged 25.9% in 2006. High rates of survival and growth of the planted species resulted in greater species richness (SR), diversity, and vegetative cover in restored cells. Results suggest that the loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem may be ameliorated through restoration efforts and illustrate the positive impact of restoration plantings on biodiversity and vegetative cover.

  15. Ozone fluxes in a Pinus ponderosa ecosystem are dominated by non-stomatal processes: Evidence from long-term continuous measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Ozone fluxes in a Pinus ponderosa ecosystem are dominated by non-stomatal processes: Evidence from and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands 1. Introduction Ozone is considered one of the most dangerous oxidant molecules for plants (UNECE, 2004; EPA, 2007). Ozone concentra- tion

  16. Abstract Plantations of Pinus spp. constitute approximately 50% of the South African forestry industry. The first aim of this study was to develop a reliable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry. The first aim of this study was to develop a reliable inoculation technique to screen Pinus spp. Kietzka Mondi Business Paper, P.O. Box 179, Pietermaritzburg, KZN, South Africa 123 New Forests DOI 10 African forestry industry is crucially important for the continued sustainability of this important

  17. Mycologist, Volume 19, Part 4 November 2005. British Mycological Society Printed in the United Kingdom. DOI: 10.1017/S0269915XO5004027

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massicotte, Hugues

    Mycologist, Volume 19, Part 4 November 2005. ©British Mycological Society Printed in the United.) Coker and Couch and Paxillus involutus (Batsch) Fr. and two pine species, Pinus strobus L. and Pinus

  18. Understory plant communities and the functional distinction between savanna trees, forest trees, and pines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veldman, Joseph, W., Mattingly, Brett, W., Brudvig, Lars, A.

    2013-04-01

    Abstract. Although savanna trees and forest trees are thought to represent distinct functional groups with different effects on ecosystem processes, few empirical studies have examined these effects. In particular, it remains unclear if savanna and forest trees differ in their ability to coexist with understory plants, which comprise the majority of plant diversity in most savannas. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) and data from 157 sites across three locations in the southeastern United States to understand the effects of broadleaf savanna trees, broadleaf forest trees, and pine trees on savanna understory plant communities. After accounting for underlying gradients in fire frequency and soil moisture, abundances (i.e., basal area and stem density) of forest trees and pines, but not savanna trees, were negatively correlated with the cover and density (i.e., local-scale species richness) of C4 graminoid species, a defining savanna understory functional group that is linked to ecosystem flammability. In analyses of the full understory community, abundances of trees from all functional groups were negatively correlated with species density and cover. For both the C4 and full communities, fire frequency promoted understory plants directly, and indirectly by limiting forest tree abundance. There was little indirect influence of fire on the understory mediated through savanna trees and pines, which are more fire tolerant than forest trees. We conclude that tree functional identity is an important factor that influences overstory tree relationships with savanna understory plant communities. In particular, distinct relationships between trees and C4 graminoids have implications for grass-tree coexistence and vegetation-fire feedbacks that maintain savanna environments and their associated understory plant diversity.

  19. Tree Improvement Forest Health, Productivity & Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Foresters maintain orchards to supply seed from select native hardwood trees for use in urban landscapes tax base. · The Lost Pines seed source was preserved off-site in a TFS drought- hardy loblolly orchard and is now providing source appropriate seed to aid in the Lost Pines Recovery Effort. · Seed orchards

  20. The Influence of Process Conditions on the Chemical Composition of Pine Wood Catalytic Pyrolysis Oils

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pereira, J.; Agblevor, F. A.; Beis, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Pine wood samples were used as model feedstock to study the properties of catalytic fast pyrolysis oils. The influence of two commercial zeolite catalysts (BASF and SudChem) and pretreatment of the pine wood with sodium hydroxide on pyrolysis products were investigated. The pyrolysis oils were first fractionated using column chromatography and characterized using GC-MS. Long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, levoglucosan, aldehydes and ketones, guaiacols/syringols, and benzenediols were the major compounds identified in the pyrolysis oils. The catalytic pyrolysis increased the polycyclic hydrocarbons fraction. Significant decreases in phthalate derivatives using SudChem and long chain aliphatics using BASF catalyst were observed. Significant amountsmore »of aromatic heterocyclic hydrocarbons and benzene derivatives were formed, respectively, using BASF and SudChem catalysts. Guaiacyl/syringyl and benzenediols derivatives were partly suppressed by the zeolite catalysts, while the sodium hydroxide treatment enriched phenolic derivatives. Zeolite catalyst and sodium hydroxide were employed together; they showed different results for each catalyst.« less

  1. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil from Pine Sawdust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Solantausta, Yrjo

    2012-06-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to the fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) from softwood biomass in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of operating parameters including temperature, and flow-rate were tested with bio-oil derived from pine wood as recovered and pyrolyzed in the pilot pyrolyzer of Metso Power in Tampere, Finland. Effects of time on stream and catalyst activity were assessed. Details of the process results were presented included product yields and hydrogen consumption. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an initial understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to the Finnish pine bio-oil.

  2. Figure 10--Proportion of basal area accounted for by each tree spe-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), black oak, willow (Salix spp.), western white pine (P. monticola Forest QUKE Salix CADE PICO Figure 11--Spatial distribution of basal area of major tree species within

  3. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF AN UNPRECEDENTED OUTBREAK Allan L. Carroll University of British Columbia, Department of Forest carbon dynamics. The loss of carbon uptake and the increased emissions from decaying trees have converted

  4. Linking heavy metal bioavailability (Cd, Cu, Zn and Pb) in Scots pine needles to soil properties in reclaimed mine areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Linking heavy metal bioavailability (Cd, Cu, Zn and Pb) in Scots pine needles to soil properties elements bioavailability and biological (dehydrogenase activity) and physico-chemical properties of mine areas affected by hard coal, sand, lignite and sulphur mining, there is no risk of trace element

  5. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-198. 2005. 123 Management of Ponderosa Pine Nutrition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Through Fertilization 1 Mariann T. Garrison-Johnston2 , Terry M. Shaw2 , Peter G. Mika2 and Leonard R to the establishment of a region-wide Seedling Establishment study (Moore and Mika 1997, Garrison and others 1@uidaho.edu, ljohnson@uidaho.edu) #12;Management of ponderosa pine nutrition--Garrison-Johnston, Shaw, Mika and Johnson

  6. Managing genetic resources of lodgepole pine in west-central Alberta: patterns of isozyme variation in natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    in natural populations and effects of forest management S.E. Macdonald* , B.R. Thomas, D.M. Cherniawsky, BManaging genetic resources of lodgepole pine in west-central Alberta: patterns of isozyme variation.G. Purdy Department of Renewable Resources, Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics, University

  7. Vegetation patterns of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas, in relation to elevation and slope aspect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bryan Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Data on the woody vegetation of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas was gathered on an elevational gradient from 1250 m to 2000 m elevation using the point-centered quarter method. Sampling was conducted at 12 sites at 1250 m, 1500 m, 1625 m...

  8. Exposure to an enriched CO2 atmosphere alters carbon assimilation and allocation in a pine forest ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    to reduce the rate at which atmospheric CO2 increases, the Kyoto Protocol has transformed CO2 emissions in a future CO2-enriched world is even greater (Houghton, 1997). For example, despite some downExposure to an enriched CO2 atmosphere alters carbon assimilation and allocation in a pine forest

  9. Genotypic variability in ponderosa pine responses to combined ozone and drought stresses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temple, P.J.

    1995-06-01

    Five-year-old ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) seedlings from 18 half-sib and one full-sib families obtained from the California Tree Improvement Program were harvested after 1, 2, and 3 growing seasons of exposure to three levels of ozone (O{sub 3}) and two levels of available soil water (ASW) in open-top chambers in the California Sierras. Seedlings were evaluated for O{sub 3} injury symptoms, biomass, and radial growth in response to these stresses. Ozone injury responses were highly variable across families, but family rankings for O{sub 3} injury were consistent across years. Family rankings for O{sub 3} injury were highly correlated with those for reductions in biomass and radial growth for trees in the high ASW treatment, but drought-stressed trees showed no consistent relation between foliar 03 injury and reductions in growth. After three seasons of exposure to 88 ppb O{sub 3}, foliar biomass of the three most susceptible families averaged 60% less than trees in the low-O{sub 3} control, while O{sub 3} had no effect on growth of the three most resistant families. Variability across families of growth responses to drought was significantly less than the variability in seedling responses to O{sub 3}.

  10. The use of a synthetic attractant as a survey instrument for the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmerman 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nash, Charles Ross

    1970-01-01

    ? ch 1s 2 t1(. n?t+1 fa iin 2?00th;. . Ot" 1 cap. Ti;is i" ~)~?Ortant because of the southern pine beet" e'0 ahi -:t~ to ?cove rpi?ard in thc Stir&en to the top o the trap ;)here '" ua?1'cs in -"= circu&zr pct!? around? . he ri ?of the cap. i, sel...

  11. Land-Use History and Contemporary Management Inform an Ecological Reference Model for Longleaf Pine Woodland Understory Plant Communities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brudvig, Lars A.; Orrock, John L.; Damschen, Ellen I.; et al, et al

    2014-01-23

    Ecological restoration is frequently guided by reference conditions describing a successfully restored ecosystem; however, the causes and magnitude of ecosystem degradation vary, making simple knowledge of reference conditions insufficient for prioritizing and guiding restoration. Ecological reference models provide further guidance by quantifying reference conditions, as well as conditions at degraded states that deviate from reference conditions. Many reference models remain qualitative, however, limiting their utility. We quantified and evaluated a reference model for southeastern U.S. longleaf pine woodland understory plant communities. We used regression trees to classify 232 longleaf pine woodland sites at three locations along the Atlantic coastal plain based on relationships between understory plant community composition, soils lol(which broadly structure these communities), and factors associated with understory degradation, including fire frequency, agricultural history, and tree basal area. To understand the spatial generality of this model, we classified all sites together. and for each of three study locations separately. Both the regional and location-specific models produced quantifiable degradation gradients–i.e., progressive deviation from conditions at 38 reference sites, based on understory species composition, diversity and total cover, litter depth, and other attributes. Regionally, fire suppression was the most important degrading factor, followed by agricultural history, but at individual locations, agricultural history or tree basal area was most important. At one location, the influence of a degrading factor depended on soil attributes. We suggest that our regional model can help prioritize longleaf pine woodland restoration across our study region; however, due to substantial landscape-to-landscape variation, local management decisions should take into account additional factors (e.g., soil attributes). Our study demonstrates the utility of quantifying degraded states and provides a series of hypotheses for future experimental restoration work. More broadly, our work provides a framework for developing and evaluating reference models that incorporate multiple, interactive anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem degradation.

  12. Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrdlicka, J.; Feik, C.; Carpenter, D.; Pomeroy, M.

    2008-12-01

    With oak and pine feedstocks, the Gasification of Biomass to Hydrogen project maximizes hydrogen production using the Full Stream Reformer during water-gas shift fixed-bed reactor testing. Results indicate that higher steam-to-biomass ratio and higher thermal cracker temperature yield higher hydrogen concentration. NREL's techno-economic models and analyses indicate hydrogen production from biomass may be viable at an estimated cost of $1.77/kg (current) and $1.47/kg (advanced in 2015). To verify these estimates, NREL used the Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), an integrated system of unit operations that investigates biomass thermochemical conversion to gaseous and liquid fuels and chemicals.

  13. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  14. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palm, B. B.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Ortega, A. M.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Karl, T.; Hansel, A.; Hunter, J. F.; Cross, E. S.; et al

    2015-11-04

    Ambient air was oxidized by OH radicals in an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) located in a montane pine forest during the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign to study biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and aging. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semi-continuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative time scales of condensation of low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles, condensational loss to the walls, and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. Moremore »SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 4 ?g m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 1 ?g m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene + p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 LT. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic compounds, and net production at lower ages followed by net consumption of terpenoid oxidation products as photochemical age increased. New particle formation was observed in the reactor after oxidation, especially during times when precursor gas concentrations and SOA formation were largest. Approximately 6 times more SOA was formed in the reactor from OH oxidation than could be explained by the VOCs measured in ambient air. Several recently-developed instruments quantified ambient semi- and intermediate-volatility organic compounds (S/IVOCs) that were not detected by a PTR-TOF-MS. An SOA yield of 24–80 % from those compounds can explain the observed SOA, suggesting that these typically unmeasured S/IVOCs play a substantial role in ambient SOA formation. Our results allow ruling out condensation sticking coefficients much lower than 1. Our measurements help clarify the magnitude of SOA formation in forested environments, and demonstrate methods for interpretation of ambient OFR measurements.« less

  15. Solar Treatment for Mountain Pine Beetle Solar treatment may be appropriate in some areas of Colorado to reduce beetle populations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Treatment for Mountain Pine Beetle Solar treatment may be appropriate in some areas number of logs in high-value areas. There are two options of solar treatment: with plastic sheeting, and without plastic. Below is a brief description on set-up and difficulties when using solar treatment

  16. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-63. 2011. 203 Abstract--Predicting the future of high-elevation pine popula-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Recently, a number of NSF-supported environmental observing projects have generated exciting oppor- tunities to improve our understanding of the climatic sensitivity of these pine species. The Nevada system, soil temperature, hydraulic head, etc.), and vegetational (stem incre- ment, sap flow, NDVI

  17. -RESPONSES OF PINE SAVANNAS TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND LARGE-SCALE DISTURBANCE -75 Applied Vegetation Science 9: 75-82, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckage, Brian

    ). In addition to rising temperatures, global warming is expected to change the frequency of natural disturbances- RESPONSES OF PINE SAVANNAS TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND LARGE-SCALE DISTURBANCE - 75 Applied Vegetation ecological commu- nities through altered disturbance regimes in addition to in- creased temperatures. We

  18. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 547561, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/547/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and Physics Carbonyl sulfide exchange in a temperate loblolly pine forest grown under ambient and elevated CO2, soil and ecosystem level carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange was observed at Duke Forest, a temperate of approximately 5 years and an average global mixing ratio of 500 pptv, carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most

  19. The combined effects of thinning and prescribed fire on carbon and nutrient budgets in a Jeffrey pine forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Dale W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Murphy, James D. [University of Nevada, Reno; Walker, Roger F. [University of Nevada, Reno; Miller, Watkins W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Glass, D. W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    Both burning and harvesting cause carbon and nutrient removals from forest ecosystems, but few studies have addressed the combination of these effects. For a Pinus jeffreyii forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, we posed the question: what are the relative impacts of thinning and subsequent burning on carbon and nutrient removals? The thinning methods included whole-tree thinning (WT, where all aboveground biomass was removed) cut to length (CTL, where branches and foliage were left on site in a slash mat on top of skid trails) and no harvest (CONT). Total C and nutrient exports with thinning and burning were greater in the WT and CTL than in the CONT treatments. Total C and N removals were approximately equal for the WT and CTL treatments, although harvesting dominated exports in the WT treatment and burning dominated exports in the CTL treatment. Total removals of P, K, Ca, Mg and S were greatest in the WT treatments, where harvesting dominated removals. Comparisons of nutrient removals with ecosystem capital and calculations of potential replenishment by atmospheric deposition suggested that N is the nutrient likely to be most depleted by harvesting and burning treatments.

  20. Data Report: Meteorological and Evapotranspiration Data from Sagebrush and Pinyon Pine/Juniper Communities at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, 2011-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasoni, Richard L [DRI; Larsen, Jessica D [DRI; Lyles, Brad F. [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI; Cooper, Clay A [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI; Lefebre, Karen J [DRI

    2013-04-01

    Pahute Mesa is a groundwater recharge area at the Nevada National Security Site. Because underground nuclear testing was conducted at Pahute Mesa, groundwater recharge may transport radionuclides from underground test sites downward to the water table; the amount of groundwater recharge is also an important component of contaminant transport models. To estimate the amount of groundwater recharge at Pahute Mesa, an INFIL3.0 recharge-runoff model is being developed. Two eddy covariance (EC) stations were installed on Pahute Mesa to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) to support the groundwater recharge modeling project. This data report describes the methods that were used to estimate ET and collect meteorological data. Evapotranspiration was estimated for two predominant plant communities on Pahute Mesa; one site was located in a sagebrush plant community, the other site in a pinyon pine/juniper community. Annual ET was estimated to be 310±13.9 mm for the sagebrush site and 347±15.9 mm for the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 26, 2011 to March 26, 2012). Annual precipitation measured with unheated tipping bucket rain gauges was 179 mm at the sagebrush site and 159 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site. Annual precipitation measured with bulk precipitation gauges was 222 mm at the sagebrush site and 227 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 21, 2011 to March 28, 2012). A comparison of tipping bucket versus bulk precipitation data showed that total precipitation measured by the tipping bucket rain gauges was 17 to 20 percent lower than the bulk precipitation gauges. These differences were most likely the result of the unheated tipping bucket precipitation gauges not measuring frozen precipitation as accurately as the bulk precipitation gauges. In this one-year study, ET exceeded precipitation at both study sites because estimates of ET included precipitation that fell during the winter of 2010-2011 prior to EC instrumentation and the precipitation gauges started collecting data in March 2011.

  1. Carbon Isotopic Studies of Assimilated and Ecosystem Respired CO2 in a Southeastern Pine Forest. Final Report and Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conte, Maureen H

    2008-04-10

    Carbon dioxide is the major “greenhouse” gas responsible for global warming. Southeastern pine forests appear to be among the largest terrestrial sinks of carbon dioxide in the US. This collaborative study specifically addressed the isotopic signatures of the large fluxes of carbon taken up by photosynthesis and given off by respiration in this ecosystem. By measuring these isotopic signatures at the ecosystem level, we have provided data that will help to more accurately quantify the magnitude of carbon fluxes on the regional scale and how these fluxes vary in response to climatic parameters such as rainfall and air temperature. The focus of the MBL subcontract was to evaluate how processes operating at the physiological and ecosystem scales affects the resultant isotopic signature of plant waxes that are emitted as aerosols into the convective boundary layer. These wax aerosols provide a large-spatial scale integrative signal of isotopic discrimination of atmospheric carbon dioxide by terrestrial photosynthesis (Conte and Weber 2002). The ecosystem studies have greatly expanded of knowledge of wax biosynthetic controls on their isootpic signature The wax aerosol data products produced under this grant are directly applicable as input for global carbon modeling studies that use variations in the concentration and carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide to quantify the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of carbon uptake on the global scale.

  2. Hymenaea courbaril Marine construction, heavy construction,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FSC Jatoba Hymenaea courbaril Marine construction, heavy construction, light construction, interior construction, furniture FSC Pine Pinus spp. Marine construction, heavy construction, light construction, interior construction, panel products, furniture FSC Larch Larix spp. (European Larch, Larix decidua

  3. The Red Squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris L.) in relation to its food resource 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittensor, Andrew M

    1. A study of the ecology of the native red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris leucorus) was carried out in a mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) plantation in East Scotland. 2. The aims of this study were:- 1)To determine the ...

  4. Pyrolysis of Woody Residue Feedstocks: Upgrading of Bio-Oils from Mountain-Pine-Beetle-Killed Trees and Hog Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Preto, Fernando; Iisa, Kristiina

    2014-12-01

    Liquid transportation fuel blend-stocks were produced by pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of woody residue biomass. Mountain pine beetle killed wood and hog fuel from a saw mill were pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed reactor and subsequently upgraded to hydrocarbons in a continuous fixed bed hydrotreater. Upgrading was performed by catalytic hydrotreatment in a two-stage bed at 170°C and 405°C with a per bed LHSV between 0.17 and 0.19. The overall yields from biomass to upgraded fuel were similar for both feeds: 24-25% despite the differences in bio-oil (intermediate) mass yield. Pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was 61% from MPBK wood, and subsequent upgrading of the bio-oil gave an average mass yield of 41% to liquid fuel blend stocks. Hydrogen was consumed at an average of 0.042g/g of bio-oil fed, with final oxygen content in the product fuel ranging from 0.31% to 1.58% over the course of the test. Comparatively for hog fuel, pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was lower at 54% due to inorganics in the biomass, but subsequent upgrading of that bio-oil had an average mass yield of 45% to liquid fuel, resulting in a similar final mass yield to fuel compared to the cleaner MPBK wood. Hydrogen consumption for the hog fuel upgrading averaged 0.041 g/g of bio-oil fed, and the final oxygen content of the product fuel ranged from 0.09% to 2.4% over the run. While it was confirmed that inorganic laded biomass yields less bio-oil, this work demonstrated that the resultant bio-oil can be upgraded to hydrocarbons at a higher yield than bio-oil from clean wood. Thus the final hydrocarbon yield from clean or residue biomass pyrolysis/upgrading was similar.

  5. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Carey, Joanna C.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2015-01-13

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, longterm free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwoodmore »species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.« less

  6. 255USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Vitality inventories of Scots pine stands, the most common species in Poland, have been done since 1991 by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    255USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Abstract Vitality inventories of Scots pine as the primary indicator of stand vitality. During 1991 to 1995, SO2 and NOx were measured at 1,417 forest, decreasing concentrations of SO2 and NOx were observed during the past 5 years. Changes of vitality in Scots

  7. neath the Pines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    the site index provided by SSURGO and the site index curves created for the study area with an RMSE of 4.8 years for mean plot age. Underestimation of tree height by lidar and error in the site index curve explained 91% of the error in mean plot age...

  8. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  9. Nitrogen Accumulation and Changes in Nitrate Leaching After Four Years of Intensive Forest Culture on Marginal Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.M.; Gresham, C.A.

    2000-02-15

    Loblolly pine and sweetgum were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilizer application and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate-nitrogen in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for four years. Years 1 and 2, groundwater nitrate-nitrogen concentration exceeded drinking water standards. Years 3 and 4, groundwater nitrate-nitrogen concentration decreased where the greatest reduction occurred in soil moisture at the shallowest depths.

  10. Measuring the Effects of Disturbance & Climate on the CO2 & Energy Exchange of Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly E. Law; Larry Mahrt

    2007-01-05

    The goal is to quantify and understand the influence of climate and disturbance on ecosystem processes and thus net carbon uptake by forests. The objective is to combine tower and ground-based observations to quantify the effects of disturbance on processes controlling carbon storage and CO{sub 2} and energy exchange in varying climatic conditions. Specific objectives are: (1) Investigate the effects of logging and fire on carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in chronosequences of ponderosa pine, using consistent methodology; (2) Determine key environmental factors controlling carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in these forests through a combination of measurements and process modeling; and (3) Assess spatial variation of the concentrations and transport in complex terrain. The eddy covariance method is used for measurements of CO2, water vapor, and energy exchanges in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests (burned in 2002 wildfire, 10 year-old stand, 90 year-old mature stand). The mature stand has been an AmeriFlux site since 2000 (following previous flux sites in young and old stands initiated in 1996). In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, a large suite of biological processes and ecosystem properties are determined for the purpose of developing independent forest carbon budgets and NEP estimates; these include photosynthesis, stand respiration, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes, annual litterfall, foliar chemistry, and bole increment, and soil organic matter among other parameters. The measurements are being integrated and evaluated with two ecosystem models (BIOME-BGC and SPA). Such analyses are needed to assess regional terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets. The results will contribute scientific understanding of carbon processes, and will provide comprehensive data sets for forest managers and those preparing national carbon inventories to use in assessments of carbon sequestration in relation to interannual climate variation and disturbance. Frameworks and methodologies developed by the PI will contribute to AmeriFlux Network facility functions for data acquisition, exchange and modeling of results in a broad spectrum of carbon cycle research.

  11. Field measurements of trace gases emitted by prescribed fires in southeastern U.S. pine forests using an open-path FTIR system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.; Cameron, Melanie; Griffith, David WT; Paton-Walsh, C.; Weise, David; Reardon, James; Yokelson, Robert J.

    2014-01-08

    We report trace-gas emission factors from three pine-understory prescribed fires in South Carolina, U.S. measured during the fall of 2011. The fires were an attempt to simulate high-intensity burns and the fuels included mature pine stands not frequently subjected to prescribed fire that were lit following a sustained period of drought. In this work we focus on the emission factor measurements made using a fixed open-path gas analyzer Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) system. We compare these emission factors with those measured using a roving, point sampling, land-based FTIR and an airborne FTIR that were deployed on the same fires. We also compare to emission factors measured by a similar open-path FTIR system deployed on savanna fires in Africa. The data suggest that the method in which the smoke is sampled can strongly influence the relative abundance of the emissions that are observed. The airborne FTIR probed the bulk of the emissions, which were lofted in the convection column and the downwind chemistry while the roving ground-based point sampling FTIR measured the contribution of individual residual smoldering combustion fuel elements scattered throughout the burn site. The open-path FTIR provided a fixed path-integrated sample of emissions produced directly upwind mixed with emissions that were redirected by wind gusts, or right after ignition and before the adjacent plume achieved significant vertical development. It typically probed two distinct combustion regimes, “flaming-like” (immediately after adjacent ignition) and “smoldering-like”, denoted “early” and “late”, respectively. The calculated emission factors from open-path measurements were closer to the airborne than to the point measurements, but this could vary depending on the calculation method or from fire to fire given the changing MCE and dynamics over the duration of a typical burn. The emission factors for species whose emissions are not highly fuel dependent (e.g. CH4 and CH3OH) from all three systems can be plotted versus modified combustion efficiency and fit to a single consistent trend suggesting that differences between the systems for these species may be mainly due to the unique mix of flaming and smoldering that each system sampled. For other more fuel dependent species, the different fuels sampled also likely contributed to platform differences in emission factors. The path-integrated sample of the ground-level smoke layer adjacent to the fire provided by the open-path measurements is important for estimating fire-line exposure to smoke for wildland fire personnel. We provide a table of estimated fire-line exposures for numerous known air toxics based on synthesizing results from several studies. Our data suggest that peak exposures are more likely to challenge permissible exposure limits for wildland fire personnel than shift-average exposures.

  12. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory / Kirk and Pine Street / P.O. Box 500 / Batavia, IL 60510 / 630.840.3000 / www.fnal.gov / fermilab@fnal.gov Managed by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory / Kirk and Pine Street / P.O. Box 500 / Batavia, IL 60510 / 630.840.3000 / www.fnal.gov / fermilab@fnal.gov Managed by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science AFFIDAVIT I (employee), _________________________, certify that my

  13. Torrey Pine and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Wolfgang H

    2007-01-01

    San Diego, Ca. , 98pp. Peltier, W.R. , and R.G. Fairbanks,24,000 years according to Peltier and Fairbanks, 2006 (black

  14. Trail of the Lonesome Pines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the attitudes of parents toward outdoor environments and their children spending time outdoors, and how these attitudes related to their children's overall health. The sample...

  15. INDIGO PINE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,SecurityHome . Form D-4-AILE: ILE: Advanced

  16. INDIGO PINE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice ofofWindUpcomingcanGridDoesHydrogen is

  17. MORPHOLOGY, HISTOLOGY, AND FINE STRUCTURE Sensilla on the Antennal Flagellum of Sirex noctilio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MORPHOLOGY, HISTOLOGY, AND FINE STRUCTURE Sensilla on the Antennal Flagellum of Sirex noctilio subterminal pore is seen to be associated with each sensillum. Males had signiÞcantly more uniporous sensory (Pinus taeda L.). S. noctilio has therefore been assessed as being a high risk to native pine forests

  18. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) species and hybrids--largely from the western United States locations in the eastern and southern United States. Cover Image: Chapter 6, Figure 6-2. #12;Xylem

  19. Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    1 Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone. Insects and fire have tremendous ecological and economic effects in western forests, yet surprisingly fire hazard in two widespread but contrasting forest types, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Douglas

  20. Abstract Fire can cause severe nitrogen (N) losses from grassland, chaparral, and temperate and boreal forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    and boreal forest ecosystems. Paradoxically, soil ammonium levels are markedly increased by fire, resulting in a recently burned Californian bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don) forest. Ash stimulated post-fire primary, chaparral, and temperate and boreal forests (Koslowski and Ahlgren 1974). As a result of fire, nutrients

  1. Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS ecosystems. Historically, ponderosa pine (Pinus contorta) forest systems have had low intensity fires every forests. Once forest managers began suppressing forest fires, vegetation and debris accumulated

  2. MForSc Theses-1 M.For.Sc. Theses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Bondi, M.C. 1977 The effects of cultural treatments on water stress levels in field planted Pinus for forecasting forest harvest machinery demands Fatah A.A.A.R.A. Salt toxicity and fertilizers effect orchards Wiyono, Bambang Supercritical fluid CO2 extraction of waxes from radiata pine needles Douglass

  3. Association of the arboreal forage lichen Bryoria fremontii with Abies magnifica in the Sierra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    of the south-central Sierra Nevada in California. The hypotheses that red fir microclimate, foliar leachate p-crown vapor pressure deficits among five conifer species. In spring leachate solutions, NH4 + and K+ were pine (Pinus lambertiana Douglas) leachate had the lowest pH. Mineral nutrient concentrations

  4. Author's personal copy Canopy disturbance and tree recruitment over two centuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Neil

    , particularly reconstructing disturbance size, shape, frequency, and severity, is fundamental for developmentAuthor's personal copy Canopy disturbance and tree recruitment over two centuries in a managed 2007 Abstract Disturbance history was reconstructed across an 11300 ha managed longleaf pine (Pinus

  5. Soil-site relationships to photodelineated forest types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Dale Robert

    1975-01-01

    to as the Southeastern Evergreen Forest (Braun, 1950). The forest is a mixed woodland dominated by loblolly pine and numerous hardwoods such as southern red oak, post oak, water oak, sweetgum, blackgun, and winged elm. The forest type map of the study sites within... Department at Texas A(M University and the Statistical Analysis System written by Anthony Barr and James Goodnight at North Carolina State University. The Texas A(M IBM 360, Model 65 computer was utilized for all mathematical and statistical analysis...

  6. Nitrate Distribution in Soil Moisture and Groundwater with Intensive Plantation Management on Abandoned Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Paper outlines nitrate leaching results of loblolly pine and sweet gum that were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilization and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for two years. Groundwater nitrate concentration beneath the minimum treatment was much higher than the maximum treatment and old field. All three treatments often exceeded the drinking water standard. Forest and lake edge had low levels while the soil moisture nitrate concentrations in the two plantations treatments were much higher than the old field.

  7. Nitrate Leaching from Intensive Fiber Production on Abandoned Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Paper outlines nitrate leaching results of loblolly pine and sweet gum that were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilization and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for two years. Groundwater nitrate concentration beneath the minimum treatment was much higher than the maximum treatment and old field. All three treatments often exceeded the drinking water standard. Forest and lake edge had low levels while the soil moisture nitrate concentrations in the two plantation treatments were much higher than the old field.

  8. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments responseScience SHERWOODAMF/GNDRAD _ Loblolly Pine

  9. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments responseScience SHERWOODAMF/GNDRAD _ Loblolly Pine*

  10. Hydraulic limitation not declining nitrogen availability causes the age-related photosynthetic decline in loblolly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Hydraulic limitation not declining nitrogen availability causes the age-related photosynthetic capacity and thus decreases GPP with increasing age; and (2) hydraulic limitations increasingly induce conservative with age. We conclude that hydraulic limitation increasingly limits the photosyn- thetic rates

  11. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, David A.

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site operations, specifically as associated with lead in surface soil at the abandoned water tank and nickel in surface soils over the northern portion of the parcel from former Bldg. K-1037 smelting operations. Low level detections of organics are also reported in some surface soils including Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) near Blair Road and common laboratory contaminants at randomly distributed locations. However, human health risk from site-related contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are acceptable?though maximum concentrations of lead and nickel and the screening-level ecological risk assessment (SLERA) demonstrate no further ecological evaluation is warranted. The weight of evidence leads to the conclusion Parcel 21d does not require any actions per the FFA.

  12. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision.

  14. Reconstructing Scotland’s pine forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The Caledonian pinewoods are a habitat of crucial environmental and cultural importance, and the sole home of many rare species. However, they have seen steady decline in recent centuries, through the establishment of ...

  15. In the Shadows of the Pines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    .g., cold temperatures inhibit tree survival at high elevations). Thus, the prevailing assumption states that this ecotone is in equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium with the surrounding physical environment and that any dynamic shifts express direct linkages...

  16. Human Impacts in Pine Forests: Past, Present,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are combined with perspectives from paleoecology to suggest probable trajectories in the face of escalating

  17. Mapping Pine Mortality by Aerial Photography,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PSW-158 Clarence J. DeMars Garey W. Slaughter Lula E. Greene John H.Ghent #12;Authors: CLARENCE J (1973) in forestry from the University of California. LULA E. GREENE is a research entomologist, Umstead State Park, North Carolina Clarence J. DeMars CONTENTS Garey W. Slaughter Lula E. Greene John H

  18. Pine Mountain Builders | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPima County,Builders Jump

  19. Pine Ridge Job Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPima County,BuildersJob

  20. Pine Tree Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPimaWind Farm Jump to:

  1. Pinyon Pines I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPimaWind FarmI Jump to:

  2. Pinyon Pines II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPimaWind FarmI Jump to:II

  3. Original article Germination of Pinus pinaster, P. radiata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The treatments chosen were three solutions of ash in water (0.5,1 and 5 g L-1) which were used to periodically water the seeds of each species, and a treatment in which a cer- tain amount of ash was applied directly to the amount of ash produced in forest fires Otilia Reyes* Mercedes Casal Area de Ecología, Departamento de

  4. Somatic embryogenesis, maturation and DNA transfer in Pinus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek, Kimberly Ann

    1994-01-01

    was translucent, friable and white; histochemical staining with acetocarmine revealed it to be embryogenic. Calli of some sources became yellow and 'sticky' after 1-3 months on medium, thus, losing their embryogenic potential. One source, which proliferated...

  5. REGULAR ARTICLE Responses of Pinus halepensis growth, soil microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thioulouse, Jean

    and desertification processes result- ing in a loss or reduction of major physico-chemical and biological soil

  6. Chemical characteristics of precipitation beneath three forest types in east Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Charles Edward

    1977-01-01

    . 27 9. 14 138. 07 Vl IU Qt IQ VI I 5- W Ql o c E CU CU CT Cl Ql Ql L/I 4? E 5- 0 0 5- Vl O C IA ICI I C/I 0 5- Ql /Cl ~ O O. O D o CU 5- CU GL CD ~ Vl c 0 C-I VI I I/I I/I C/I IC Vl E IU O /C Vl I N w E o QI N 0... 5. M IQ I/I Ql 4 ? D 0 W ~ ~ 5 C QI Ql 0 0 I/I 4- Q, ' Ql 0 IQ I I ~ ~ ~ QQ 0 0 0 0 0 0 tg lg ~ OJ )Ueo&ed'Uol)D!&Dg $0 qua!oggaog 20 T~hh hf 11 Throughfal1 in the loblolly pine plantation (PP) was 82/ of inci- dent precipitation...

  7. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT TO PREPARE AND CHARACTERIZE ROBUST COAL/BIOMASS MIXTURES FOR DIRECT CO-FEEDING INTO GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felix, Larry; Farthing, William; Hoekman, S. Kent

    2014-12-31

    This project was initiated on October 1, 2010 and utilizes equipment and research supported by the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Award Number DE- FE0005349. It is also based upon previous work supported by the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Award Numbers DOE-DE-FG36-01GOl1082, DE-FG36-02G012011 or DE-EE0000272. The overall goal of the work performed was to demonstrate and assess the economic viability of fast hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) for transforming lignocellulosic biomass into a densified, friable fuel to gasify like coal that can be easily blended with ground coal and coal fines and then be formed into robust, weather-resistant pellets and briquettes. The specific objectives of the project include: • Demonstration of the continuous production of a uniform densified and formed feedstock from loblolly pine (a lignocellulosic, short rotation woody crop) in a hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process development unit (PDU). • Demonstration that finely divided bituminous coal and HTC loblolly pine can be blended to form 90/10 and 70/30 weight-percent mixtures of coal and HTC biomass for further processing by pelletization and briquetting equipment to form robust weather resistant pellets and/or briquettes suitable for transportation and long term storage. • Characterization of the coal-biomass pellets and briquettes to quantify their physical properties (e.g. flow properties, homogeneity, moisture content, particle size and shape), bulk physical properties (e.g. compressibility, heat transfer and friability) and assess their suitability for use as fuels for commercially-available coal gasifiers. • Perform economic analyses using Aspen-based process simulations to determine the costs for deploying and operating HTC processing facilities for the production of robust coal/biomass fuels suitable for fueling commercially-available coal-fired gasifiers. This Final Project Scientific/Technical Report discusses and documents the project work required to meet each of these objectives.

  8. Modeling Endemic Bark Beetle Populations in Southwestern Ponderosa Pine Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Christopher

    2015-02-20

    at the spatial distribution and susceptibility of host trees in southwestern US forested landscapes. To do this, I (1) analyzed 21 years of field data to examine the population dynamics of bark beetles and the factors that affect them, (2) created a statistical...

  9. Whispering Pines, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland: EnergyWexfordSouthValley Geothermal

  10. September 2003 Articulation Agreement Institution: Pine Technical College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    for Business and Technologv Core Reauirements Needed: Acct 2101Principles of AccountingI 3 credits Acct 2102Principles of Accounting I1 3 credits GBus 3107Legal Environment of Business 3 credits Mgmt 3100Managerial Applied Hacking and SystemsSecurity ITM 3900 Internship ITM 4020 Analysis and Design of Information

  11. The Boneyard Episode One: Young Pine and God's Country

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urdrian Jr, William Allen

    2015-01-01

    s chest. MISTY ( CONT’D) FBI, Ma’am. Just here to ask you aMisty. MISTY Agent McQueen. FBI. They shake. RUIZ Pleased toEVERSON (CONT’D) I’m with the FBI. Everson puts the box out

  12. Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trees Local economy Less people visiting = less spending Forest Fires Ski Resort Concerns Forest Fires of a forest fire. Vail Eagle County Vail $500,000 for thinning -2008 Helicopter to remove beetle infected

  13. The Boneyard Episode One: Young Pine and God's Country

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urdrian Jr, William Allen

    2015-01-01

    t it? We hear an INBOUND HELICOPTER. Boyle pulls a pistol onI tell you? Huh?! The HELICOPTER gets louder; a SPOTLIGHTwe have feed from the helicopter Jack and Victoria stare

  14. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing ToolSustainableSecurityHigh Energy CostHighofPlantations |

  15. Slash Pine Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de ProvenceSolar Jump to: navigation, searchSkåneSlash

  16. Southern Pines, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southern

  17. Pine Castle, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,Pilgrim HotPilusPinckney,

  18. Pine County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,Pilgrim HotPilusPinckney,County,

  19. Pine Glen, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,Pilgrim

  20. Pine Grove Mills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGrove Mills, Pennsylvania:

  1. Pine Hill, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGrove Mills,

  2. Pine Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGrove Mills,California:

  3. Pine Hills, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGrove

  4. Pine Island Ridge, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGroveIsland Ridge,

  5. Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGroveIsland Ridge,Lake

  6. Pine Lake, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGroveIsland

  7. Pine Mountain, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGroveIslandMountain,

  8. Pine Ridge at Crestwood, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open

  9. Pine Tree Bethlehem Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehem Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search

  10. Pine Tree Fitchburg Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehem Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation,

  11. Pine Valley, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehem Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation,Valley,

  12. Southern Pine Elec Power Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin JumpOpen EnergySoutheastern ElectricCAGenE C,Mun

  13. City of Pine Bluffs, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIRChurchFontanelle,Information NorthCityCity of

  14. Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy ResourcesAir QualityTuri Biomass Facility Jump to:Oil

  15. Pine Mountain Club, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPima County,Builders

  16. Pine Tree Extension Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPima

  17. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡HighApproaches |

  18. Black Pine Engineering Wins Clean Energy Trust Clean Energy Challenge |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, IncBio Centers Announcementand TheBiota Biota Welcome

  19. FOR 4934/6934 Longleaf Pine: Ecology, Management and Restoration Course Title: Forestry 6934/4934 Longleaf Pine: Ecology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and ecology. Methods of Instruction: 1) Lectures Major source of theory and technical information Discussion assigned papers #12;2 2) Laboratory Major source of practical and applied information; 3) Textbook). Univ. Georgia Press. 211 p. Purpose and Objectives: 1) Knowledge of fundamental ecological

  20. Influence of fertilization on nutrient status and size of bare-root Pinus taeda L. seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Margot Marie

    1994-01-01

    fertilized with either pre-plant nitrogen, top-dress nitrogen or top-dress magnesium. Nitrogen was supplied as ammonium nitrate(NH,N03) and magnesium as magnesium sulfate(MgSO,*7H20)' Seedlings were evaluated after ten weeks for shoot length, root length...

  1. One of the major threats to the continued use of Pinus species in South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will depend on the particular insect and environment involved.Effective monitoring of forestry pests is an important factor in achieving successful control.Monitoring tools include traps.Research in the TPCP focus specifically on identification methods, population dynamics,monitoring tools and systems

  2. THE DENDROCHRONOLOGY OF PINUS ELLIOTTII IN THE LOWER FLORIDA KEYS: CHRONOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    ), which contained a fire scar from a known wildfire and a known date for hurricane-induced tree mortality because 98% of these com- munities have been lost worldwide by land-use conversion and ecological

  3. (Pinus heldreichii Christ) "" e-mail : panayotov.m@ltu.bg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Forestry (Bulgaria)

    .30 0.00 0.0255 0.23 0.33 8.47 1.20 1900 0.22 0.00 0.0340 0.17 0.27 15.16 2.14 , mm 2100 0.34 0.01 0.0555

  4. Capacidad reproductiva de Pinus nigra subsp. salzmannii en relacin con la edad de la planta madre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    salgareños senescentes, siendo este aspecto importante para el mantenimiento de la biodiversidad en los, tamaño de las semillas, biodiversidad. INTRODUCCIÓN Este artículo examina el comportamiento de la relacionarse también con la importancia que la conservación de la biodiversidad tiene en la gestión forestal

  5. Bark-stripping Patterns in Pinus aristata Stands in Colorado Richard L. Boyce and Brad Lubbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, Richard L.

    : This project was funded by an NKU Faculty Project Grant, an NKU Summer Fellowship and an NKU CINSAM grant. D architecture (Larson et al. 1993, 1994, Matthes et al. 2002). Work by the last-named authors on cliff. Aspect at each tree was also recorded, and wind direction was estimated from flagged trees. Mean top

  6. Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

    2012-03-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

  7. Organic Matter Decomposition: Interactions of Temperature, Moisture and Substrate Type Major Paper by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    . Pine and hardwood litters, popsicle sticks, aspen and pine wood stakes were subjected to 4 temperature

  8. Analysis of the physical and mechanical properties of the pine nut as criteria in the design of a pine nut shelter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menchaca Lara, Jesus

    1996-01-01

    damage the nuts and reduce value of the product. Improved mechanical shelling techniques are needed to provide a quality product at reasonable prices. The overall goal of this work was to develop information to establish design criteria for applying...

  9. Response of Pinus flexilis James seedlings to simulated climate change through gas exchange rates, phenology and morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Jennifer Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    2008). Both net photosynthesis and dark respiration arecan acclimate. When net photosynthesis or dark respirationhigher rates of net photosynthesis and dark respiration than

  10. Hartig Net Structure of Ectomycorrhizae Synthesized between Laccaria bicolor (Tricholomataceae) and Two Hosts: Betula alleghaniensis (Betulaceae) and Pinus resinosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massicotte, Hugues

    and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support amethystina (Bolt. ex Hooker) Murr.-Fagus sylvatica ectomycorrhi- zae, and Lei and Dexheimer (1988) who dem

  11. Testing the ecological stability of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: effects of heat, ash and mycorrhizal colonization on Pinus muricata seedling performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peay, Kabir G.; Bruns, Thomas D.; Garbelotto, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    batch was subjected to heat treatments modified from Izzo etof the seedlings from each heat treatment were then randomlyresults show that heat treatments (which increase mineral N

  12. The Effect of Local Atmospheric Circulations on Daytime Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over a Pinus elliottii Canopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    The Effect of Local Atmospheric Circulations on Daytime Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over canopy, have been used to provide estimates of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) (Black et" transported from the below-canopy environment associated with cold-air drainage. Since then, advection has

  13. An improved method for estimating water-mass ventilation age from radiocarbon data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primeau, FW; DeVries, T

    2010-01-01

    to geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarcticato geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica,Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica: (a) geothermal heat

  14. Fungal Diversity Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fungal Diversity 103 Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia and Pinus). Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia and Pinus in Venezuela. Fungal Diversity 25: 103, Eucalyptus and Pinus. Some anamorphs associated with the Botryosphaeriaceae have been reported from Venezuela

  15. Fire Regimes and Successional Dynamics of Pine and Oak Forests in the Central Appalachian Mountains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, Serena Rose

    2012-07-16

    The role of fire in determining the structure and composition of many forested ecosystems is well documented (e.g. North American boreal forests; piñon-juniper woodlands of the western US). Fire is also believed to be important in temperate forests...

  16. Silviculture for Lodgepole Pine Forests Where economic sustainability and ecological compatibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to live Bare mineral soil temperature water #12;Harvesting Patterns To clearcut or partial cut? How big Regeneration Harvesting Patterns Thininng Forest Health #12;Lodgepole Regeneration Getting Seeds ­ all about

  17. BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISll COMMISSION. 859 Pine mesh, minnow nota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    times, to the great risk of its occupants. "An extremely simplo and inoxpensive lllethod of saving could be transferred day or night, and in almost d l n~eatlic~,vith atenth part of the present labor and no risk to life or boats, as quickly as the steamer could haul the boxes up her sides. A supply of empty

  18. An Archaeological Survey for the Lost Pines Trails Project in Central Bastrop County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-29

    An archaeological survey for a proposed system of hike and bike trails on the north bank of the Colorado River in central Bastrop County, Texas was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) on October 2, 2007 under Texas Antiquities...

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER M. A. G. Koas R. Ramamoorthi W. A. Pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinskey, Anthony J.

    - aplerotic enzyme replenishing oxaloacetate consumed for biosynthesis during growth, or lysine and glutamic acid production in industrial fermentations. We used regions of homology from pyruvate carboxylase se. glutam- icum genomic DNA. This 850-base-pair fragment was used to probe a C. glutamicum cosmid library

  20. Aftershocks of an Explosively Induced Mine Collapse at White Pine, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; their occurrence rate followed the modified Omori law: rate=560(time-0.01)-1.3 , with time in hours. Based on P (U.N. General Assembly, 1996). However, ground motions generated by the collapse and associated

  1. Acoustics of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) (Curculionidae, Scolytinae): sonic, ultrasonic, and vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yack, Jayne E.

    ): sonic, ultrasonic, and vibration characteristics A.J. Fleming, A.A. Lindeman, A.L. Carroll, and J­male (rivalry) chirps are predominantly simple, with evidence of antiphonal calling. Substrate-borne vibrations organs could be tuned to either air or substrate-borne vibrations. These results have important

  2. Ice flow sensitivity to geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larour, E; Morlighem, M; Seroussi, H; Schiermeier, J; Rignot, E; Rignot, E

    2012-01-01

    as heat available from geothermal energy. The consequence isbasal friction and geothermal energy are all on the sameis influenced by geothermal energy in the slow moving areas

  3. Analysis of formaldehyde fluxes above a Ponderosa Pine forest measured via eddy-covariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digangi, FABCDE

    2011-01-01

    Society. Karl, T.  , Atmospheric Chemistry Division (ACD)Kim, S.  , Atmospheric Chemistry Division (ACD) Turnipseed, A.A.  , Atmospheric Chemistry Division (ACD) Mauldin, 

  4. Carbon fluxes in a young, naturally regenerating jack pine ecosystem Eugenie S. Euskirchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    , are measurements within young, recently disturbed ecosystems. [3] Generally, net ecosystem productivity (NEP, or equiv- alently, net ecosystem exchange of carbon, NEE = ­NEP; where a positive value of NEP indicates a C uptake, or equivalently, a C sink, and a negative value of NEP indicates a C loss, or equivalently

  5. Gray squirrel usage of hardwood ravines within pine plantations in east Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McElfresh, Robert William

    1977-01-01

    lHag nakia v~g~ana Mpaa agf v~ca TOTALS 667 167 222 278 11l 111 ill 111 ill 56 56 2001 30. 59 10. 28 5. 97 3. 47 5. 23 2. 52 2. 37 1. 26 1. 05 0. 63 0. 86 64. 23 33. 3 8. 4 11. 1 13. 9 5. 5 5. 5 5. 5 5. 5 5. 5 2. 9...

  6. Withdrawal resistance of ring-shank nails embedded in Southern pine lumber 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skulteti, Matthew John

    1996-01-01

    The overall goal of this research was to was to gain a better understanding of ringshank nail connections, and to critically evaluate allowable design values for withdrawal. Specific goals ]Included: 1) measuring and comparing withdrawal...

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Pine Island Glacier ice flow using ISSM and DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    along flowlines, upstream and downstream of the fluxgate. Atwhich reaches far upstream and downstream of each consideredis measured upstream and downstream of the gate only.

  8. Development of south Swedish pine chronologies from peat bogs extension of existing records and assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    valuable knowledge of Holocene climate variability and its forcing mechanisms (Mayewski et al. 2004). Tree to suppressed growth and initially unknown age distributions. Wood remains in bogs normally appear in horizontal

  9. RAPID COMMUNICATION Acetophenone as an Anti-attractant for the Western Pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbilgin, Nadir

    , thus enhancing their tree killing ability (Wood 1982). WPB releases exo-brevocomin ((+)-exo-7-ethyl-5- methyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1] octane), (-)-frontalin ((-)-1,5-dimethyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo [3.2.1]octane

  10. Selecting indicators of soil, microbial, and plant conditions to understand ecological changes in Georgia pine forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Garten Jr, Charles T; Wolfe, Amy K; Sobek, Edward A

    2008-11-01

    Characterizing how resource use and management activities affect ecological conditions is necessary to document and understand anthropogenic changes in ecological systems. Resource managers on military installations have the delicate task of balancing the training needs of soldiers effectively with the need to maintain a high quality of ecological conditions. This study considers ways that ecological indicators can provide information on impacts that training has on environmental characteristics that occur at different scales and in different sectors of the environment. The characteristics examined include soil chemistry, soil microbes, and vegetation. A discriminant function analysis was conducted to determine whether ecological indicators could differentiate among different levels of military use. A combination of 10 indicators explained 90% of the variation among plots from five different military use levels. Results indicated that an appropriate suite of ecological indicators for military resource managers includes soil, microbial, and vegetation characteristics. Since many of these indicators are related, managers at this location potentially have freedom to choose indicators that are relatively easy to measure, without sacrificing information.

  11. Environmental Maternal Effects Mediate the Resistance of Maritime Pine to Biotic Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : This work was supported by Instituto Nacional de Investigacio´n y Tecnologi´a Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA

  12. SELECTED PROPERTIES OF WOOD STRAND AND ORIENTED STRANDBOARD FROM SMALL-DIAMETER SOUTHERN PINE TREES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and bending strength and modulus varied little in the parallel direction and slightly decreased with increase of temperature in the range of 25° to 200°C. Small loss modulus (E ) peaks were observed over and paper industry and restricted logging on fed- eral forest land, there is an overstocking of small

  13. The effect of prescribed fire on sugar pine mortality in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesmith, Jonny CB

    2011-01-01

    L. W. Ruth. 2005. Federal forest-fire policy in the UnitedHeight of crown scorch in forest fires. Canadian Journal ofevidence for increasing forest fire severity in the Sierra

  14. ECOLOGICAL BASES FOR SILVICULTURAL PRESCRIPTIONS FOR CONTROL OF DWARF MISTLETOEIN LODGEPOLE PINE-^

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the en- science of stand management resulted in some vironmental impact of such treatments. stand provides direction tionable and/or socially insensitive. for carrying out cultural treatments. 3 of the ef- Forest, Santa Fe, New Mexico, stationed in fectiveness of the cultural treat- Coyote, New Mexico

  15. Understanding trait interactions and their impacts on growth in Scots pine branches across Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    ­effect relationships between anatomical traits, hydraulic traits and branch growth, we measured for each branch Studies, Wageningen University, PO 47, NL­6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands; 2 CREAF / Ecology Unit: the tracheid hydraulic diame- ter, double cell wall thickness, cell lumen span area, wood density, cavitation

  16. PHOTO GUIDE FOR APPRAISING DOWNED WOODY MASTICATED FUELS IN INTERIOR PONDEROSA PINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Station, Ogden, Utah. Hornby, L.G. 1936. Fire control planning in the northern Rocky Mountain region. USDA allows one to determine expected fire behavior and smoke production. Stand conditions such as pre- and post-treatment basal area and stems per acre provide insight into woody fuel production and eventual

  17. Sr sourcing of ponderosa pine used in Anasazi great house construction at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , New Mexico Amanda C. Reynoldsa,*, Julio L. Betancourtb , Jay Quadea , P. Jonathan Patchetta , Jeffrey to decipher prehistoric migration patterns, residential shifts in population [29], and long at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico [14,23,35,36]. Construction of the great houses at Chaco Canyon required over

  18. Distribution of Fine Roots of Ponderosa Pine and Douglas-Fir in a Central Idaho Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    at a study site in a central Idaho forest. Concentration and content of fine roots extracted from soil cores of exotic dis- eases, heavy grazing, and timber harvest has altered forest structure, stand composition(SwezyandAgee1991,Dumm2003).Finerootsarecritical structures for water and nutrient absorption from the soil

  19. Small isolated aspen stands enrich bird communities in southwestern ponderosa pine forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beier, Paul

    ­ 1910), continuing seasonal use by cattle, browsing by larger than historically present elk populations associated with hills. The theory of island biogeography is often applied by conservation biologists

  20. Multiaged Silviculture of Ponderosa Pine1 Kevin L. O'Hara2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    regime becomes one of higher severity and lower frequency. In pure stands, the disturbance regime often is primarily the result of a frequent, low severity disturbance regime, but also because it naturally occurs a single stand. This is primarily the result of the disturbance regimes that affect regeneration, mortality

  1. The use of mobile mapping technology to automate surveying and monitoring of southern pine beetle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petty, Saul David

    2005-08-29

    managers in preventing further infestations from becoming established. The SPBIS mobile mapping system addresses current problems with the database and offers viable solutions to each. Mobile mapping technology is a versatile tool, which is used to collect...

  2. LATENT AND SENSIBLE HEAT FLUX PREDICTIONS FROM A UNIFORM PINE FOREST USING SURFACE RENEWAL AND FLUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    VARIANCE METHODS GABRIEL KATUL'v2,CHENG-I HSIEH', RAM OREN',3, DAVID ELLSWORTH'14andNATHAN PHILLIPS, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 U.S.A. 3Jet Propulsion Laboratory. California Institute of Technology

  3. A site index model for lodgepole pine in British Columbia Adrian Batho, Oscar Garcia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    of Northern British Columbia 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, Canada V2N 4Z9 Abstract A height growth

  4. Leisure Village West-Pine Lake Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: EnergyLebanon County,LefloreInformation East, New

  5. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pine Mountain

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at the Edge of a Slab

  6. Alexander Pines, 1988 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life ofASCRLight SourceAlexanderAlexander

  7. EIS-0443: Southwest Intertie Project-South (SWIP-S), White Pine, Nye,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatement | Department of EnergyFinalManagement onRecord

  8. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡HighApproaches | 03.25.2015

  9. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡HighApproaches | 03.25.2015DOE

  10. Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Lacatell; David Shoch; Bill Stanley; Zoe Kant

    2007-03-01

    The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market opportunities. This is reflected and further substantiated in the results of the forest cover change analysis, which demonstrated a decline in area of land in forest use in the study area for the 1987/88-2001 period. The project team collected data necessary to identify sites for reforestation in the study area, environmental data for the determining site suitability for a range of reforestation alternatives and has identified and addressed potential leakage and additionality issues associated with implementing a carbon sequestration project in the Chesapeake Rivers Conservation Area. Furthermore, carbon emissions reductions generated would have strong potential for recognition in existing reporting systems such as the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b) voluntary reporting requirements and the Chicago Climate Exchange. The study identified 384,398 acres on which reforestation activities could potentially be sited. Of these candidate sites, sites totaling 26,105 acres are an appropriate size for management (> 100 acres) and located in priority conservation areas identified by The Nature Conservancy. Total carbon sequestration potential of reforestation in the study area, realized over a 100 year timeframe, ranges from 58 to 66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, and on the priority sites alone, potential for carbon sequestration approaches or exceeds 4 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the absence of concerted reforestation efforts, coupled with policy strategies, the region will likely face continued declines in forest land.

  11. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  12. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  13. Overcoming the Recalcitrance of Cellulosic Biomass by Value Prior to Pulping: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-221

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Value Prior to Pulping (VPP) project goal was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of introducing a new value stream into existing pulp and paper mills. Essentially the intent was to transfer the energy content of extracted hemicellulose from electricity and steam generated in the recovery boiler to a liquid transportation fuel. The hemicellulose fraction was extracted prior to pulping, fractionated, or conditioned if necessary, and fermented to ethanol. Commercial adaptation of the process to wood hemicelluloses was a prerequisite for using this less currently valued component available from biomass and wood. These hemicelluloses are predominately glucurono-xylan in hardwoods and galactoglucomannan in softwoods (with a significant softwood component of an arabino-xylan) and will yield fermentation substrates different from cellulose. NREL provided its expertise in the area of fermentation host evaluation using its Zymomonas strains on the CleanTech Partner's (CTP) VPP project. The project was focused on the production of fuel ethanol and acetic acid from hemicellulose streams generated from wood chips of industrially important hardwood and softwood species. NREL was one of four partners whose ethanologen was tested on the hydrolyzed extracts. The use of commercially available enzymes to treat oligomeric sugar extracts was also investigated and coupled with fermentation. Fermentations by NREL were conducted with the Zymomonas mobilis organism with most of the work being performed with the 8b strain. The wood extracts hydrolyzed and/or fermented by NREL were those derived from maple, mixed southern hardwoods, and loblolly pine. An unhydrolyzed variant of the mixed southern hardwood extract possessed a large concentration of oligomeric sugars and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed with a number of enzymes, followed by fermentation. The fermentation of the wood extracts was carried out at bench scale in flasks or small bioreactors, with a maximum volume of 500 mL.

  14. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon–juniper woodland

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pangle, Robert E.; Limousin, Jean -Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A.; Yepez, Enrico A.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Boutz, Amanda L.; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T.; McDowell, Nate G.

    2015-03-23

    Plant hydraulic conductance (ks) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between ks and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (EC) and conductance (GC). For both species, we observed significant reductionsmore »in plant transpiration (E) and ks under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and ks in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in ks under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant ks also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthesis (An) declined strongly with decreasing ks. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant ks was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy EC and GC. Our data indicate that significant reductions in ks precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon–juniper woodlands can be expected due to reduced plant hydraulic conductance and increased mortality of both piñon pine and juniper under anticipated future conditions of more frequent and persistent regional drought in the southwestern United States.« less

  15. Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, James E.

    2014-04-01

    Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species’ recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

  16. EIS-0443: Project Financing for Southwest Intertie Project- South, Clark, Lincoln, Nye, and White Pine Counties, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration, is considering whether to provide partial financing of the southern portion of the Southwest lntertie Project (SWIP-South) which consists of approximately 235 miles of 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line.

  17. Grazing practices as a major factor in fire occurrence in the longleaf pine region of southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David Adair

    1952-01-01

    fozest fire recozds . 6B To'aal ~ ef vrild fires and area burned in Problem sxsa by s7unbisax during calendar years 3. 946 to 19/), From Twas Forest 8srviss foresb fixe records . , ~ . , ~. . . . . , 69 Rslabionship ~en ths total n~ of mLld fires... location of areas share conflicts exist, betseen forest. land ouuers and livestoch operators. Forest fire report of ti e Texas Forest, Service, lo50 . Forest, fire report of the Texas Forest, Services 19/7 . , 61 62 63 Cpen ran e grazing perm9. tz...

  18. Holographic characterization of individual colloidal spheres' porosities Fook Chiong Cheong, Ke Xiao, David J. Pine, and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    ­ plications as diverse as catalysis, medical diagnostics, and photonics. Even as many applications advance to, such characterization methods as mercury adsorption porosimetry, nitrogen isotherm porosimetry, transmission electron microscopy [1, 2] in which individual colloidal spheres are illuminated by the collimated beam from a fiber

  19. Holographic characterization of individual colloidal spheres' porosities Fook Chiong Cheong, Ke Xiao, David J. Pine, and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    - plications as diverse as catalysis, medical diagnostics, and photonics. Even as many applications advance to, such characterization methods as mercury adsorption porosimetry, nitrogen isotherm porosimetry, transmission electron microscopy [1, 2] in which individual colloidal spheres are illuminated by the collimated beam from a fiber

  20. Assessment of carbon sequestration and timber production of Scots pine across Scotland using the process-based model 3-PGN 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xenakis, Georgios

    2007-11-27

    Forests are a valuable resource for humans providing a range of products and services such as construction timber, paper and fuel wood, recreation, as well as living quarters for indigenous populations and habitats for ...

  1. A review of "The Isle of Pines, 1668: Henry Neville's Uncertain Utopia" by John Scheckter and Henry Neville 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Dan

    2012-01-01

    her to Rome, received male guests like a queen, but ended up (probably) out on the street. An unusually confes- sional letter of Lelio Capilupi to a religious friend about his pursuit of a Neapolitan courtesan, asks in a mix of pride and shame...

  2. Hydraulic constraints on photosynthesis in subtropical evergreen broad leaf forest and pine woodland trees of the Florida Everglades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Tim J.; Luton, Corene D.; Santiago, Louis S.; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    127:445– Zimmermann MH (1978) Hydraulic architecture of someÁ South Florida Á Hydraulic conductivity Á PhotosyntheticArgentina Introduction Plant hydraulic characteristics have

  3. Soils as a factor in Pinyon Pine mortality due to Ips Beetle infestation in Garden Park, Colorado: a case study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krecic, Jeffrey

    2008-02-25

    Abstract: Observations by European settlers indicate that the distribution of pinyon - juniper woodlands has been expanding in the southwestern United States over the last two centuries. Beginning in the late 1990s, drought ...

  4. THe sZ DeVIce for cerVIcal sPIne sTaBIlIsaTIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    after decompression, as well as certain degenerative and chronic pain conditions. Dynamic stabilisation is limited due to the size of bone mass and the proximity of nerves and blood vessels. Posterior dynamic of development The device is at the design stage, but will quickly move to prototype and clinical testing

  5. Faculty Development Office, Lady Meredith House 1110 Pine Avenue West, Room 103, Montreal, QC H3A 1A3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    Intyre Medical Sciences Building 08h00 REGISTRATION AND WELCOME 08h30 PLENARY PRESENTATION: The Teacher's Roadmap

  6. Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 49, No. 322, pp. 871878, May 1998 Responses of sap flux and stomatal conductance of Pinus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    March 1997; Accepted 3 December 1997 Abstract and other hydraulic parameters. Increased gas exchange-intolerant, pioneer species common in studied (Welter, 1989). Transpiration rate per unit leaf the south-eastern USA. Sap flux was measured with area and g s have generally been found to increase with constant heat sap

  7. Random acts of weevil: A spatial analysis of Hylobius warreni attack on Pinus contorta var. latifolia in the sub-boreal spruce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillingham, Michael

    University Way, Prince George, BC, Canada V2N 4Z9 Received 27 July 2005; received in revised form 3 December

  8. Life-Cycle Assessment of Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Philp; Puettmann, Maureen E.; Penmetsa, Venkata Kanthi; Cooper, Jerome E.

    2012-02-01

    As part ofthe Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials' Phase I life-cycle assessments ofbiofuels, lifecycle inventory burdens from the production of bio-oil were developed and compared with measures for residual fuel oil. Bio-oil feedstock was produced using whole southern pine (Pinus taeda) trees, chipped, and converted into bio-oil by fast pyrolysis. Input parameters and mass and energy balances were derived with Aspen. Mass and energy balances were input to SimaPro to determine the environmental performance of bio-oil compared with residual fuel oil as a heating fuel. Equivalent functional units of 1 MJ were used for demonstrating environmental preference in impact categories, such as fossil fuel use and global warming potential. Results showed near carbon neutrality of the bio-oil. Substituting bio-oil for residual fuel oil, based on the relative carbon emissions of the two fuels, estimated a reduction in CO2 emissions by 0.075 kg CO2 per MJ of fuel combustion or a 70 percent reduction in emission over residual fuel oil. The bio-oil production life-cycle stage consumed 92 percent of the total cradle-to-grave energy requirements, while feedstock collection, preparation, and transportation consumed 4 percent each. This model provides a framework to better understand the major factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions related to bio-oil production and conversion to boiler fuel during fast pyrolysis.

  9. Linking ecosystem scale vegetation change to shifts in carbon and water cycling: the consequences of widespread piñon mortality in the Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvak, Marcy Ellen [University of New Mexico

    2012-10-01

    The southwestern United States experienced an extended drought from 1999-2002 which led to widespread coniferous tree mortality. Piñon-juniper (PJ) woodlands, which occupy 24 million ha throughout the Southwest, were extremely vulnerable to this drought. An abrupt die-off of 40 to 95% of piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% of juniper (Juniperus monosperma) across 1.5 million ha triggered rapid and extensive changes in the structure of PJ woodlands with potentially large, yet unknown, consequences for ecosystem services and feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate system. Given the spatial extent of PJ woodlands (3rd largest biome in the US) and climatic predictions of increased frequency and intensity of drought in the region, it is crucial to understand the consequences of these disturbances on regional carbon and energy dynamics, biogeochemical processes and atmospheric CO2. The overall objective of our research was to quantify what impact widespread mortality of piñon trees has for carbon and water cycling in PJ woodlands. Our specific objectives for this proposal were: 1) Quantify the carbon, water and energy exchange trajectory after mortality in PJ woodlands; 2) Determine the mechanisms controlling the response and recovery of ecosystem production and respiration processes following large-scale piñon mortality; 3) Use the relationships we measure between ecosystem structure and function PJ woodlands recover from mortality to scale the results of our study up to the regional scale.

  10. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-01-28

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gasmore »chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  11. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore »coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  12. Smoke and toxic species analyses from controlled combustion of wood impregnated with guayule resin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lonnie

    1995-01-01

    Ambient Particle Fractionating Sampler. Inflections of guayule-impregnated and untreated pine are indeed minor with respect to all aspects investigated. Ignition data indicated guayule-impregnated pine did not ignite as quickly as untreated pine...

  13. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    combustion of pine, oak and Eucalyptus wood was respectivelymass (FPM) for both oak and Eucalyptus and 1.4% FPM for pine44% of FPM for pine, oak and Eucalyptus wood. Figure 2. Size

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon in heartwood, sapwood and bark along the stem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon in heartwood, sapwood and bark along the stem profile in three Mediterranean to orientate ecosystem management towards potential C sequestration. To achieve this, information is required in forest ecosystems. Keywords Pinus nigra . Pinus pinaster. Pinus sylvestris . Radial and axial . Carbon

  15. Integrated navigation for AUV operations under ice shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    2000 Heat Wipes Out Giant Antarctic Ice Shelf The Independent, 31 January 2000 Catastrophic Melting VI Pine Island Bay #12;The (virtual) mission ... #12;The first mission- March 2003: Pine Island Bay NASA 30 km Sea Ice Pine Island Glacier Open Water 9 February 2003 #12;The Pine Island Bay Glacier

  16. Post-Fire Vegetation Response 49 Barbara A. Holzman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    -Fire Vegetation Response in the Bishop Pine Forest at Point Reyes National Seashore Chinook helicopter dropping

  17. The Needs of Texas Soils for Lime. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1919-01-01

    .. 9758 Pine ashes (leached) 47 per cent water. ... 9775 Peanut hull ashes.. ..................... 9776 Mesquite wood ashes. .................. ....................... 11227 Ashes of cactus.. 11272 Pine wood ashes..... ...................... ...................... 11273 Rice straw ashes. 11413 Pine ashes (not exposed) 16.7 per cent water 11414 Pine ashes cxposed to weather, 29.3 per cent water.. ........................ ..................... 11429 Peanut hull ashes.. 13809 Ashes from mesquite wood...

  18. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 83658375, 2009 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/8365/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    ) from Los Gatos Research Ltd and demonstrate its performance for EC measurements at a Ponderosa pine

  19. The determination of volumes of forage produced after one year of protection in pine-hardwood stand as compared with production under current grazing practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamans, Robert L

    1951-01-01

    la yaALal Alftllmeae ef the teyCtoaeaes for %he legree ef WLICRL Ol OOIOOOO SR 3INNRI?AIIQR OF VOKiWSL' OF FDRNIX PR)IXICNI k7%%t SKI ~ IIF ~XCe nI Fhe. NIIIneee 8Fuu W CeIFueu VZm l%8MSIOR ININI CIIIBm' IIIIAXXSS 1%NTICWI kpyrove4 e? to style... aa4 also for valaaQo aoeistaaee ia soeariag ih? yhetogra~ soataiaod horeia. Ss wishes to ?eyroos aypreeiatioa to Nr, %short R. Nhsdee ef tho Soyartaoai of Nsage aad forestry for his ai4 ia the tie%sr veloce stadioe aa4 fer other holyful saggostioas...

  20. Soil and Water Science Department University of Florida Effects of different soil amendments on the leachate chemistry of pine forest soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    regulations. The pulp and paper industry in the US generates considerable quantities of sludges and ash. Cost-effective and environmentally friendly practices for waste disposal have been a challenge for the industry and for forest sludge and boiler ash from a paper company affect water quality for a forested site in Georgia

  1. Web-site Summary: Skinner, Stephens andWilbanks. 2005. Jeffery Pine Mixed Conifer Fire History and Forest Structure With and Without Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Scott L.

    and Forest Structure With and Without Fire Suppression and Harvesting. JFSP Final Report Project 01 harvcested and limited fire suppression began in the 1970's. The forests in the eastern Sierra Nevada have). The current fire-free interval is unusually long (pfire return intervals in the forests

  2. How surface fire in Siberian Scots pine forests affects soil organic carbon in the forest floor: Stocks, molecular structure, and conversion to black carbon (charcoal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Preston, Caroline M; Schmidt, Michael W. I; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2003-01-01

    Ecological effects of forest fires, Bot. Rev. , 26, 483 –1 ] In boreal forests, fire is a frequent disturbance andal. , 1999]. Risk of forest fires was high during the entire

  3. Fatigue analysis of single-span and two-span solid-sawn, creosote-treated southern pine railroad bridge stringers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comardo, Angelique France

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the performance and reliability of existing timber bridges that have been subjected to heavy axle load (HAL) operations. Specifically, the study focuses on the behavior of a single-span ...

  4. Deriving a Framework for Estimating Individual Tree Measurements with Lidar for Use in the TAMBEETLE Southern Pine Beetle Infestation Growth Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stukey, Jared D.

    2011-02-22

    , individual bole height (IBH), diameter at breast height (DBH), length of crown (CrHT), and age for use in TAMBEETLE; (2) to estimate individual tree age using lidar-estimated height and site index provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA...

  5. The effect of time-since-treatment and other factors on the perceived scenic beauty of southern pine-oak forest plots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gritter, Molly Kay

    1997-01-01

    year 2 was-3.01 while the mean from year 6 was 40.3 1. This finding is consistent with research that has found larger d diminished evidence of human manipulation to trees, increased natural complexity, an promote higher scenic-beauty values. Treatment...

  6. Breeding pond selection and movement patterns by eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in relation to weather and edaphic conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Cathyrn, H.; Tanner, George, W.

    2004-08-31

    Cathryn H. Greenberg and George W. Tanner. 2004. Breeding pond selection and movement patterns by eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in relation to weather and edaphic conditions. J. Herp. 38(4):569-577. Abstract: Eastern Spadefoot Toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) require fish-free, isolated, ephemeral ponds for breeding but otherwise inhabit the surrounding uplands, commonly xeric longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ?wiregrass (Aristida beyrichiana). Hence both pond and upland conditions can potentially affect their breeding biology, and population persistence. Hardwood invasion due to fire suppression in sandhills could alter upland and pond suitability by higher hardwood density and increased transpiration. In this paper we explore breeding and neonatal emigration movements in relation to weather, hydrological conditions of ponds, and surrounding upland matrices. We use 9 years of data from continuous monitoring with drift fences and pitfall traps at 8 ephemeral ponds in 2 upland matrices: regularly-burned, savanna-like sandhills (n = 4), and hardwood-invaded sandhills (n = 4). Neither adult nor neonate captures differed between ponds within the 2 upland matrices, suggesting that they are tolerant of upland heterogeneity created by fire frequency. Explosive breeding occurred during 9 periods and in all seasons; adults were captured rarely otherwise. At a landscape-level rainfall, maximum change in barometric pressure, and an interaction between those 2 variables were significant predictors of explosive breeding. At a pond-level, rainfall, change in pond depth during the month prior to breeding, and days since a pond was last dry were significant predictors of adult captures. Transformation date, rather than weather, was associated with neonatal emigrations, which usually were complete within a week. Movement by first-captured adults and neonates was directional, but adult emigrations were apparently not always toward their origin. Our results suggest that Spadefoot Toads are highly adapted to breeding conditions and upland habitat heterogeneity created by weather patterns and fire frequency in Florida sandhills.

  7. Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new sequences from the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    the Tasmanian blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae). DNAe.g. , Panax [17], Eucalyptus [18], and Gossypium [19].ORF133), Pinus (ORF75a), Eucalyptus (ORF113) and Nymphaea.

  8. Volatile organic compounds from vegetation in southern Yunnan Province, China: Emission rates and some potential regional implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    in the genera Bambusa, Elaeis, Eucalyptus, Hevea, Pinus, ande.g. Bambusa spp. and Eucalyptus spp. ) are also projectedpotential such as Hevea, Eucalyptus, Arecaceae (Palmae),

  9. Computer News, Volume 19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    See How to use pine for a quick and simple pine tutorial for the basics. For those who insist ... I go back to the Folders List and get to my INBOX. I scroll down to ...

  10. The Chimalapas Region, Oaxaca, Mexico: a high-priority region for bird conservation in Mesoamerica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigü enza, Adolfo G.; Herná ndez-Bañ os, Blanca E.; Escalona-Segura, Griselda; Rebó n-Gallardo, Fanny; Rodrí guez-Ayala, Emir; Figueroa-Esquivel, Elsa M.; Cabrera-Garcí a, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    The Chimalapas region, in eastern Oaxaca, Mexico, holds lowland rainforests, tropical dry forests, and cloud forests typical of the Neotropics, as well as montane pine and pine-oak forests more typical of the Nearctic. ...

  11. Versatile Benchmarking for Concurrent Production System Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaral, José Nelson

    Joydeep Ghosh (amaral@madona.pucrs.br) (ghosh@pine.ece.utexas.edu) Departamento de Eletrâ??onica Dept

  12. Serializability Improves Parallel Execution of Production System Jos'e Nelson Amaral \\Lambda Joydeep Ghosh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaral, José Nelson

    Joydeep Ghosh (amaral@madona.pucrs.br) (ghosh@pine.ece.utexas.edu) Departamento de Eletrâ??onica Dept

  13. The role of naturally occurring waterholes in determining the distribution of Florida Key Deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Yeon

    2009-05-15

    (Big Pine Key Inn Station, 1953) Data on Big Pine Key and the Volume of Daily Fresh Water Shortage on Big Pine Key (From the Result of 1-Year Base Line Simulation)................................................................................ 26...). I used two precipitation data sets to parameterize dv1, one consisting of daily precipitation (inches) from January 1 to December 31, 1953 from the Big Pine Key Inn weather station and one from January 1 to December 31, 2001 from the Key West...

  14. FOREST SERVICE U.S.DEPARTMENT O F AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILES Figure l-For seed germinatiou tests, Digger pine cones were collected porn stands withia the mtur

  15. Creep deformation and buttressing capacity of damaged ice shelves: theory and application to Larsen C ice shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borstad, C. P; Rignot, E.; Mouginot, J.; Schodlok, M. P

    2013-01-01

    based Mosaic of Antarc- tica (MOA) data sets: Continent-widePine Island Glacier, Antarc- tica, suggests cause for recent

  16. PROMOTE YOUR RESEARCH Located in the spectacular landscape of northern British Columbia, UNBC is one of Canada's best small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    on the mountain pine beetle, sustainable forest management practices, bio-energy and the bio-economy

  17. 4, 66916718, 2004 VOC emissions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Temperature and light dependence of the VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen 1 , H. Hakola 1.tarvainen@fmi.fi) 6691 #12;ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract

  18. Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose. The most common species for this purpose are pine, spruce and birch in the Nordic countries and eucalyptus and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    will become increasingly important to mankind when pursuing to replace oil-based products with renewable and sanitary fibre products. Chemical pulping processes yield various by-products of which lignin-containing black liquor is used for energy production and extractives can be further processed for example

  19. Welcome to the spring 2011 edition of the South Carolina Forest Steward. Some of the articles you will find in this issue include new developments in Dutch Elm disease, a longleaf pine cost share program, and water quality.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Welcome to the spring 2011 edition of the South Carolina Forest Steward. Some of the articles you with them in thanking Bob Scott for all that he has done for South Carolina forestry. We are moving totaling $90,000 over three years. "More than 75 percent of South Carolina's natural resources

  20. Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose. The most common species for this purpose are pine, spruce and birch in the Nordic countries and eucalyptus and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose diverse novel processes for separating cellulose, hemi cellulose and lignin from biomass. Biorefineries

  1. Has fire suppression increased the amount of carbon stored in western U.S. forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellows, Aaron W.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Davis. Chang, C. -R. (1996), Ecosystem responses to fire andvariations in fire regimes, Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project:1990), Simulating cumulative fire effects in ponderosa pine/

  2. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is designing and demonstrating a high productivity system to harvest, process, and transport woody biomass from southern pine plantations. The final product will be a system...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by Subject environmental sciences (7) ecosystems (5) forests (4) soils (4) trees (4) water (4) climates (3) hydraulics (3) pines (3) transport (3) air (2) carbon (2) conifers...

  4. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-01-01

    linseed oil, similar oils, and products containing or coatedaldehydes and skin oil oxidation products. A model of massreactions with cleaning products, a pine-oil general-purpose

  5. Associative Memories Provide an Efficient Control Mechanism for a Parallel Production System Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaral, José Nelson

    @pine.ece.utexas.edu) Departamento de Eletrâ??onica Dept. of Electr. and Comp. Engineering Pontif'icia Universidade Cat'olica do RGS

  6. PRESENTATION TITLE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 June 2011 BUILDING STRONG Topics Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation Tulsa Vision 2025 Dam Safety Issues Keystone Pine Creek Robert S....

  7. College of Natural Resources The Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    : Financial Viability of Southern Pine Beetle Prevention Measures in an Emerging Bio-Energy Market 3:30-4:00 p

  8. C:\\Work 102004\\2006 Projections\\NV Projections Review 2008 v45...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    stages of permitting and development. Development of renewable energy resources with wind projects in Elko, Washoe, and White Pine Counties other projects include geothermal in...

  9. Eucalyptus fuel dynamics, and fire hazard in the Oakland hills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coats, W J

    2014-01-01

    species, 70 (78%) Eucalyptus trees were introduced toa two-year study of eucalyptus stand densities, caloricgroves of freeze-damaged eucalyptus and pine trees killed 25

  10. Pulp Production in Fray Bentos: Uruguayan Forest Development as a Source of Diplomatic Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoorl, Daniel Mateo

    2012-01-01

    of size and species of pine and eucalyptus. Departments withhectares (64, 250 acres) of eucalyptus forests planted andmillion tons of bleached eucalyptus per year. 3 The initial

  11. baepgig-pinon | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Program: Pion Pine IGCC Power Project PDF-335KB (June 1992) PAPERS AND...

  12. The spatial structure of antagonistic species affects coevolution in predictable ways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibert, JP; Gibert, JP; Pires, MM; Thompson, JN; Guimarães, PR

    2013-01-01

    bacteriophage interaction. Evo- lution 62:1830–1839.and Aleppo pines. Journal of Evo- lutionary Biology 18:348–across selection mosaics. Evo- lution 54:1102–1115. ———.

  13. Life history and habitat associations of the broad wood cockroach, Parcoblatta lata (Blattaria: Blattellidae) and other native cockroaches in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2002-06-18

    Wood cockroaches are an important prey of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered species inhabiting pine forests in the southern United States. These woodpeckers forage on the boles of live pine trees, but their prey consists of a high proportion of wood cockroaches, Parcoblatta spp., that are more commonly associated with dead plant material. Cockroach population density samples were conducted on live pine trees, dead snags and coarse woody debris on the ground. The studies showed that snags and logs are also important habitats of wood cockroaches in pine forests.

  14. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations Feedstock Supply and Logistics: Biomass as a Commodity Feedstock Supply and Logistics:Biomass as a Commodity...

  15. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and demonstrating a high productivity system to harvest, process, and transport woody biomass from southern pine plantations. auburnprojectabstract1.pdf More Documents &...

  16. CX-012818: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    La Pine-Chiloquin Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41887 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. REFERENCES Adkins, Craig R.; Hinesley, L. Eric; Blazich, Frank A. 1984.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . comp. 1983. Silvicultural systems for the major forest types of the United States. Agric. Handb. 445 University Extension Service; 63-97. Coker, A. 1984. Nitrogen status of Pinus radiata seedlings after

  18. Son Bosc, un dels tresors de Mallorca, en perill!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    / DIRECCIÓN GENERAL DE LA OFICINA DE CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO Tipo de polen Urtica Gramíneas Pinus Morella roquera Manacor Formentera Eivissa Polen en el aire (previsión hasta el 19 de junio de 2008) SO2 (Dióxido de

  19. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Pinus ponderosa, Eucalyptus saligna, Quercus gambelli,chem-phys.org/acp/6/81/ Eucalyptus J. P. Greenberg et al. :from vegetation pyrolysis Eucalyptus wood µ gC emission/gC/

  20. Competitive outcomes between two exotic invaders are modified by direct and indirect effects of a native conifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aschehoug, Erik

    species and did not alter com- petitive outcomes. Pinus litter and litter leachate inhibited both species litter leachate were also strong and leachate eliminated the competitive effect of Centaurea on Bromus

  1. Community & Education Photo Gallery | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments responseScience SHERWOODAMF/GNDRAD _ Loblolly

  2. Community Chest | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments responseScience SHERWOODAMF/GNDRAD _ LoblollyCommunity

  3. Parking Lot Parking Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    RussellLn. Hopkins Parking Structure Regents Road West Parking Lot P703 Regents Road East Parking Lot P704 Regents Road Northeast Parking Lot P705 Parking Gilman Parking Structure La Jolla Farms RoadPinesRd. RegentsRoad GeneseeAvenue Genesee Avenue NorthTorreyPinesRoad Pangea Dr. Pangea Parking Lot Voigt Drive

  4. The earliest water supply and sewage systems in Vilnius, Lithuania R. Pukien1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was meant for kitchen waste and was assembled in sections. Each section consisted of a flume made up of four supplied with water the newly built grand duke's palace. In the 1540s­1550s major development of the water preserved up to the bark edge. The constructed pine tree-ring series was dated against Vilnius pine

  5. Breach of the northern Rocky Mountain geoclimatic barrier: initiation of range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aukema, Brian

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Breach of the northern Rocky Mountain geoclimatic barrier: initiation of range expansion by the mountain pine beetle Honey-Marie C. de la Giroday1,2 , Allan L. Carroll3 and Brian H is to examine the historical breach of the geoclimatic barrier of the Rocky Mountains by the mountain pine

  6. 2015 Plant Sale Friends & Founders Preview Sale and Reception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , May 9, 2015 - 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ·Location: Centre Furnace Mansion, 1001 East College Avenue; open house and tours of the Centre Furnace Mansion ·Sale information: 814-234-4779, www Site, 2710 West Pine Grove Road, Pennsylvania Furnace, PA 16865 (5 miles west of Pine Grove Mills

  7. Ann. For. Sci. 67 (2010) 806 Available online at: c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2010 www.afs-journal.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2010-01-01

    ) Keywords: radiata pine / allometric equation / biomass / carbon sequestration Abstract · Radiata pine to the need to predict forest carbon stocks and the poten- tial amount of biomass available as a source whereby post-1990 carbon storage in forests can be used as an allowable carbon sink to offset some

  8. 4 p-p.S.DEPARTI\\.IE:MT OF AGRICULTURE '%CY!P. 0,EOX 245.BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 94701

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -pine, rosegum eucalypbs, and Amm- manit eucalyptus. Sevexd other species have good reforestatio.7 Callitvis end- Iicheri (calcauata) + 176.1 Eucalyptus deglupl-a -+ 176.1 Eucalyptus p n d i s + 176-pine Callitvis endkicheri (calcarataj rosegum eucalyptus ficalyptus gandis fill ex Majiden Ammmanit eucdyptus

  9. Laboratoire d'Ecologie gnrale, Brunoy, France Ecological study of a forest humus by observing a small volume. I.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    conducted. The importance of decaying wood in the establishment of mycorrhizal root systems has nevertheless and TRAPPE (1984). The presence of different materials such as pine needles, wood debris, bracken leaflets, faecal pellets and the pine root system in the same small volume of soil enabled us to identify

  10. Stephen Mulkey Janaki Alavalapati

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    biogas, managed pine forestry, soils manage- ment, and afforestation. All market values in this executive -- Biogas produced from livestock wastes--$19.2 million -- Increased management intensity on pine with traditional markets include: -- Biogas as replacement for fossil natural gas--$62.7 million -- Sale of crop

  11. Statewide average major timber product prices started the year on a decline except

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statewide average major timber product prices started the year on a decline except for a slight rise in hardwood pulpwood price. Pine sawlog price continued to fall during the January/February 2008 period. State- wide pine sawlog averaged $35.20/ton, the lowest price since January 2006. This was a 5

  12. Timber prices remained sluggish during May/June 2009. Statewide average stump-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timber prices remained sluggish during May/June 2009. Statewide average stump- age prices of all on hous- ing starts and lumber prices nationally at the end of the period. Statewide pine sawlog prices. The average pine sawlog price was $20.41 per ton for Northeast Texas and $22.60 per ton for Southeast Texas

  13. Wet weather led to higher stumpage prices for hardwood (especially pulpwood) in East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wet weather led to higher stumpage prices for hardwood (especially pulpwood) in East Texas during March/April 2012. Pine saw- log and pulpwood prices remained flat to slightly lower. Higher diesel costs put downward pressure on stumpage prices. Pine sawlog prices averaged $22.11 per ton, 6 percent lower

  14. HOPKINS MARINE STATION 2014 Safety, Security, and Fire Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    : 120 Ocean View Boulevard Pacific Grove Police Department Pacific Grove, CA 93950-3094 580 Pine Avenue Telephone: (831) 655-6200 Pacific Grove, CA 93950 E-mail: information@marine.stanford.edu Telephone: (831 the jurisdiction of the Pacific Grove Police Department. They are located at 580 Pine Avenue, Pacific Grove, CA

  15. HOME GROUNDS & ANIMALS 2014 Home Ornamentals: Weed Management in Home Ornamental Beds 4-89

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    mulches: Use of solid black plastic or a landscape fabric improves weed control compared to an organic mulch alone. Solid black plastic is more effective for weed control than the available landscape fabrics. Organic mulches: Pine bark, hardwood bark, pine straw and wood chips are all good for mulching. Watch soil

  16. Forest soil characteristics under varing tree species in East Texas: implications for sustained productivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David Andrew

    1998-01-01

    for the pine plots and 0. 40 for the oak plots, indicating a 4-yr turnover rate for the pine forest floor and a 2. 5-yr turnover rate for the oak plots. These values are similar to those reported elsewhere. Rochow (1975) found a K value of 0. 57 for oak.... The oak plots were never thinned from the original 3. 7 x 3. 7 m planting spacing. The pine plots appeared to have been mechanically (row) thinned from the onginal 2. 4 X 2. 4 m spacing, but the exact history is unknown. A complete inventory was made...

  17. In Wharton State Forest in New Jersey's Pine Barrens, scientists from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, have just finished building a bridge over the Mullica River. It's so strong it not only can hold the world's heaviest elephant (14,500 pound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the same kinds that are in your recycling bucket at home! There are all kinds of plastics. Consider bridges, and even skyscrapers may be made from recycled plastic. These things will not only last longer, visit www.amipp.rutgers.edu. Plastics? Polymers? Huh? How Do You Build A Bridge From Old Milk Bottles

  18. Final Report to DOE’s Office of Science (BER) submitted by Ram Oren (PI) of DE-FG02-00ER63015 (ended on 09/14/2009) entitled “Controls of Net Ecosystem Exchange at an Old Field, a Pine Plantation, & a Hardwood Forest under Identical Climatic & Edaphic Conditions”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oren, Ram; Oishi, AC; Palmroth, Sari; Butnor, JR; Johnsen, KH

    2014-03-17

    The project yielded papers on fluxes (energy, water and carbon dioxide)between each ecosystem and the atmosphere, and explained the temporal dynamics of fluxes based on intrinsic (physiology, canopy leaf area and structure) and extrinsic (atmospheric and edaphic conditions). Comparisons between any two of the ecosystems, and among all three followed, attributing differences in behavior to different patterns of phenology and differential sensitivities to soil and atmospheric humidity. Finally, data from one-to-three of the ecosystems (incorporated into FluxNet data archive) were used in syntheses across AmeriFlux sites and even more broadly across FluxNet sites.

  19. Towards Zero Emissions CO2-Reduction in Mediterranean Social Housing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabate, J.; Peters, C.; Cuchi, A.; Lopez, F.; Sagrera, A.; Wadel, G.; Vidal, J.; Cantos, S.

    2008-01-01

    of lacquered aluminium with interruption of thermal bridge. Exterior carpentry made of laminated Northern pine, controlled forest management and valid certificate. Solar protection Venetian blind of lacquered aluminium with vertical, manually...

  20. ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Benjamin Martin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the sky and twists into a tornado, tossing trucks and plucking up pines. As the rain floods the creeks with runoff, people crawl out from their hiding spaces and begin to assess...

  1. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the high value and multiple uses of isozyme technology for resolving genetic variation in forest o ...........48 Francis C. Yeh An Analysis of Genetic Architecture in Populations of Ponderosa Pine

  2. An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  3. Investigation of the March 5, 2011, Building 488, Brookhaven...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 2011 On Saturday, March 5, 2011 at approximately 10:20 a.m., a Brookhaven National Laboratory Building and Grounds Utility Worker was felling a pine tree while elevated in a...

  4. CX-003519: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Pine Based Biorefinery CenterCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 08/26/2010Location(s): Atlanta, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  5. PRELIMINARY DRAFT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that flows down Pine Ridge further west of Parcel ED-3. Discharges from these ponds enter Poplar Creek, which is part of the Clinch River watershed. The ETTP NPDES permit...

  6. Edge effects in a forest mosaic: implications for oak regeneration in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Barrera, Fabiola

    Forest edges created by scattered-patch clear-cutting have become a common landscape feature in tropical montane forests, including pine-oak and evergreen cloud forests. Forest-edge-pasture gradients were characterised ...

  7. Sources and transport of delta 14C in CO2 within the Mexico City Basin and vicinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959– 1999, Can. J.W. M. : Emissions from forest fires near Mexico City, Atmos.by emissions from forest fires in the pine-savannas that

  8. Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallory, Christy; Sears, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Pine Bluff, Non-Discrimination Policy, http://www.uapb.edu/O RIENTATION A NTI - DISCRIMINATION P OLICIES ON THE W AGESand Gender Identity Discrimination 1998-2008, 84 C HI . -K

  9. Forecasting Recovery Opportunities for the Red-cockaded Woodpecker on Private Lands in Eastern North Carolina Using a Spatial Model of Tree Age 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dube, Amanda M

    2014-11-21

    age model for pines on private lands in eastern North Carolina. Modeling provided a means to spatially and temporally identify recovery opportunities over the next 10 to 40 years, predict locations for potential recruitment clusters within the next 10...

  10. Forest Resources: Creating Roadside Habitat http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for water, nutrients, and space. Eventually, the pine canopy will completely close and stand harvest. Once roadsides are cleared, mow or disk roadside habitat every 2 ­ 3 years to maintain

  11. Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    protection plan in place. While hazardous fuels are only one component of a forest's condition, this new law of mountain pine beetle have reached epidemic proportions in some locations and are dramatically increasing

  12. ent 263 May 2004 were not displayed)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Least (sma Phaceliall) phacelia minutissima B Rubus b usarton's raspberry artonian Spaldi Silene sp ing Ab andis Subalpine fir/ s lasi n bi isWhitebark pine Abi ocarpa/ Pi us al caul N h rass e ia

  13. Current Projects | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630)...

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pine Elec Power Assn","Cooperative",2076084,879654,330078,866352,0 5,"Total sales, top five providers","Cooperative",1652489,1061970,374841,215678,0 " ","Percent of total...

  15. National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program STATEMAP/EDMAP Component: States compete for federal matching funds for geologic mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    MEDICINE LAC QUI PARLE CHIPPEWA RENVILLE KANDIYOHI SWIFT MC LEOD STEARNS POPESTEVENS BIG STONE GRANT POLK PENNINGT ON MARSHALL BELTRAMI WASHINGTON ST LOUIS CROW WING CARLTON PINE RICE OLMSTED

  16. A Comment on the War-Prayer: Mark Twain 'Never Ceased to Grow'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagawara, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    on the Philip- pine-American War. Ed. Jim Zwick. Syracuse:Gabriel Wells, –––. “The War Prayer. ” Mark Twain’s WeaponsNew Perspectives on “The War-Prayer” Essays on “The War-

  17. Brewing Renewable Diesel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    like pine and fir trees, and valued for their fragrance and flavors, such as the smell of green apples, the flavor of hops in beer, or the essential oils found in perfumes. They...

  18. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A, 71: 353360, 2008 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    district of British Columbia, and that three-toed and hairy wood- peckers nest and forage in these pine of this pesticide in both adult and nestling birds. Acute toxicity of MSMA was reported in various lab stud- ies

  19. Distribution and abundance of endangered Florida Key deer on outer islands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Dominque Elijah

    2007-04-25

    -based survey data. All outer islands exhibited estimated abundances considerably below carrying capacities, with larger populations occurring closer to Big Pine Key. Results indicated that other islands and complexes such as Ramrod Key, Water Key...

  20. CX-011220: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Timber Salvage from Pine Ridge Storm Damage CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Oak Ridge Office

  1. Wanda Smith

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wanda lives near Rockwood and is the owner of a convenience store in Pine Orchard. She is a graduate of Harriman High School and is a former member of Head Start, the Morgan County Industrial Board...

  2. 2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philliber, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    ivy, and pampas grass. Eucalyptus and other non-native treenon-native trees such as eucalyptus, pine, fir, and others.cape ivy, and pampas grass. Eucalyptus and other tree stands

  3. Growing Currants and Gooseberries Most varieties of currants and gooseberries (Ribes) are still prohibited in New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    the danger of hard frost has passed and mulch with an inch or two of wood chips, bark or pine needles or so of harvest, refrigerate them to insure maximum storage life. For best quality, however, use fruits

  4. 2011 New England Guide To Chemical Weed and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    or more times the year before planting. Organic mulches such as wood chips, or pine needles conserve. Read and follow label directions and precautions, including mixing, loading, storage and reentry

  5. regurgitated owl Owl nesting habi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regurgitated owl pellets. Owl nesting habi- tat, by comparing vegetation compo- sition and struc- cial and personal fuel wood permits. In ponderosa pine dominated canyon bottoms, approxi- mately 240

  6. King, B. H., Kolyott, K. L., Chesney, A. R. 2013. Livestock bedding effects on two species of parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) of filth flies. Journal of Insect Science. CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Bethia H.

    shavings did not differ from wood pellets and corn cob pellets. In the absence of exposure to hosts, longevity of adult females was reduced in cedar shavings compared to pine shavings and pellets. In contrast

  7. Catalyst specificities in high pressure hydroprocessing of pyrolysis and gasification tars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soltes, E.J.; Lin, S.C.K.; Sheu, Y.H.E.

    1987-04-01

    Over a period of several years, the Department of Forest Science at Texas A and M University has been conducting studies in the hydroprocessing (catalytic high pressure hydrotreating or hydrodeoxygenation accompanied by hydrocracking) of pyrolytic tars produced in biomass pyrolysis and gasification. Upgrading through hydroprocessing results in good yields of volatile hydrocarbon and phenolic products. This paper compares the performance of twenty different catalysts selected for hydroprocessing of a pine pyrolysis oil, describes the use of noble metal catalysts with tars produced from nine different biomass feedstocks (oil from pine pyrolysis and the tars from pine wood chip, pine plywood trim, pecan shell, peanut shell, sugarcane bagasse, corncob, rice hull, and cottonseed hull gasification), and compares the use of several catalysts in a trickle bed reactor for kinetic studies of the hyroprocessing reaction.

  8. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lanes to Kirk Road at the intersection with Pine Street. The county will also add pedestrian walkways across Kirk Road. Fermilab will post staff around the clock at the Wilson...

  9. The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Qian

    2012-01-01

    High Pressure Oxygen Gasifier, Report SERI/TP-234-1455R,Smith, Pinon pine project gasifier startup. In proceedingsthe type and conditions of the gasifier design. This is of

  10. Peer Review Summary Document (12/4/2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of large mammals, anthropogenic effects on large mammals, population ecology of ursids. Charge Submitted The sample used in the report was stratified by proportion of whitebark pine in home range for the habitat

  11. Reynolds Homestead Forestry Resources Research Center407HomesteadLane,Critz,VA24082276-694-4135www.arec.vaes.vt.edu/reynolds-homestead Physical Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossing BMP's Percy Montecinos Tom Fox Fertilizing and weed control effects on Pine sp College of Natural-263 College of Natural Resources #12;Reynolds Homestead Forestry Resources Research Center407HomesteadLane,Critz,VA24082

  12. Obama Administration Announces Job-Creating Grid Modernization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Minnesota and Wisconsin: This double- circuit capable 345 kV transmission line will run between a new substation near Hampton, Minnesota, a new substation north of Pine...

  13. CX-012804: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Butte-La Pine #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41912 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. Population genetic structure of Conophthorus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA haplotypes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menard, Katrina Louise

    2006-10-30

    observed with some species (Kelley et al. 1999, Kerdelhue? et al. 2002, Jordal et al. 2002). However, lineage diversification among other species, including Conophthorus spp., has shown little association with host (Cognato et al. 2003, Cognato et al...) with an automatically recording flight mill. Journal of Applied Entomology, 112, 138-145. Jenkins, M.J. (1984) Effect of Western White pine cone production variability on mountain pine cone beetle populations. Great Basin Naturalist, 44(2), 310-312. Jordal, B...

  15. INHABITANTS OF LANDSCAPE SCARS: SUCCESSION OF WOODY PLANTS AFTER LARGE, SEVERE FOREST FIRES IN ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarigal, Kevin

    IN ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO SANDRA L. HAIRE* AND KEVIN MCGARIGAL Department of Natural Resources Conservation years after the La Mesa fire in New Mexico. Species that reproduce from off-site seed, including Pinus los cambios de clima y de re´gimen de incendios en la sucesio´n de comunidades de plantas es crucial

  16. Ann. For. Sci. 64 (2007) 649656 Available online at: c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2007 www.afs-journal.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007-01-01

    Pinus halepensis Mill. forests have been seriously affected by significant forest fires in the past the reproductive characteristics of P. halepensis after forest fires, six locations were selected in four areas is an intensely anthropized area where forest fires are associated with the landscape. This is one

  17. Original article Effects of osmotic priming using aerated solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Effects of osmotic priming using aerated solutions of polyethylene glycol 74078, USA (received 15-2-1988; accepted 7-6-1988) Summary — Osmotic priming with aerated could be upgraded to handle large quantities of seed. seed — germination - Pinus taeda- osmotic

  18. ISSN 1067 4136, Russian Journal of Ecology, 2015, Vol. 46, No. 1, pp. 5158. Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2015. 1 1. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Weimin

    and herbage) carbon stor age on carbon sequestration of a natural secondary Pinus tabulaeformis forest understory carbon storage. To quantify the effects of understory on carbon sequestration in a natural in this carbon (C) sink (Wang et al. 2009). Carbon distribution in forest ecosystems is an impor tant part

  19. 20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stott, Lowell

    20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18 O composition (18 O) of sub- annual tree cellulose samples of Pinus kesiya growing at 1,500 m elevation on Doi Chiang Dao in northern Thailand. The cellulose 18 O values exhibit a distinctive annual cycle

  20. The effects of fire and tephra deposition on forest vegetation in the Central Cascades, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Colin

    The effects of fire and tephra deposition on forest vegetation in the Central Cascades, Oregon watershed and to examine the short-term effects that tephra deposition have on forest composition and fire Pinus forest with Artemisia as a common understory species. Fire episodes occurred on average every 115

  1. Evidence for a new introduction of the pitch canker fungus Fusarium circinatum in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evidence for a new introduction of the pitch canker fungus Fusarium circinatum in South Africa E. T (FABI), University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 South Africa Fusarium circinatum causes pitch canker of Pinus species in many parts of the world. The fungus was first recorded in South Africa in 1990

  2. Application of tree rings [dendrochemistry] for detecting historical trends in air Hg concentrations across multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    ). Additional sources include cement production, oil and ore processing, mining (lead, zinc, pig iron, steel to millennia) at time steps of B5 years. Keywords Pinus Á National Park Á Proxy for air pollution Á Mining, artisanal mining and coal combus- tion are considered the two major sources of Hg emissions (UNEP 2013

  3. Fun at the Fusarium circinatum Genome Annotation Jamboree (24 27 May 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in many countries where Pinus spp. are grown as non-natives. One example is found in South Africa where establishment in the country. It has also moved from the nursery environment to plantations in South Africa Africa. This work has developed to a point where knowledge of the genome of the pathogen has become

  4. Dinamica poblacional de la plaga Sirex noctilio: endemias y epidemias Juan C.Corley, Jos M.Villacide y Julieta Bettinelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Dinamica poblacional de la plaga Sirex noctilio: endemias y epidemias Juan C.Corley, José M forestaciones de Pinus radiata, cerca del 1900, ocasionando daños menores hasta el primer estallido poblacional árboles debilitados. Esto hace que a bajas densidades sea, en apariencia, beneficiosa ya que ejerce un

  5. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  6. The Problem of Philippine Independence and Japan: The First Three Decades of American Colonial Rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Grant K.

    1972-01-01

    that the Filipinos will make a mess of it. History has not shown them capable of self-government." In addi tion, Kaneko scoffed at any idea of Japanese designs on the Philip pines. He pointed out that Japan had its own troubles in Taiwan, Korea, and Sakhalin... that the Filipinos will make a mess of it. History has not shown them capable of self-government." In addi tion, Kaneko scoffed at any idea of Japanese designs on the Philip pines. He pointed out that Japan had its own troubles in Taiwan, Korea, and Sakhalin...

  7. Forest structure of the big Thicket Scenic Area, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Daniel Harrison

    1974-01-01

    , Cahaba series. Lob- lolly pine, water oak, black gum, and red maple are the dominant species visible. Interior view of stand 3, Lucy series. The large tree is southern magnolia and the under- story is redbay. Interior view of the bayhead stand (12...-hardwood forest which originally encompassed an area of two million acres (McLeod 1967). It contains elements of the oak-pine and southeastern ever- green forest regions of Braun (1950) and represents the westernmost extent of the southern mixed hardwood...

  8. Egyptian cottonworm Spodoptera littoralis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    , pines, poplars, potatoes, radish, roses, soybeans, spinach, sunflowers, taro, tea, tobacco, tomatoes; newly hatched larvae are blackish-grey to dark green; mature larvae are reddish-brown or whitish mm long; initially green with reddish abdomen, then turn to dark reddish-brown. Eggs : Whitish

  9. Cultivation and Care of Trees on the Farm in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, H. (Helge)

    1922-01-01

    years in the peach-grow- ing region of the Great Lakes than anywhere in Texas.. Forest belts are more efficient protectors of fruit trees against the extremes of both summer and winter. The severity of the blizzard, "Part 11, Section 1, Frost... .............................. Regions of Rainfall in Texas 19 Species of Forest Trees for West Texas ..................... 21 Red Cedar ............................................. 21 Pines .................................................. 22 Cypresses...

  10. Original article Biomass and nutrient cycling of a highly productive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Biomass and nutrient cycling of a highly productive Corsican pine stand on former 14 April; accepted 22 September 1997) Abstract - Biomass and nutrient cycling were examined in a 62 on a coarse and dry sandy soil with low exchangeable nutrient pools. Total aboveground biomass was estimated

  11. QUANTITATIVE MEASURES IN MORPHOLOGY & MORPHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pines Road Turn right at Muir College Drive Turn into parking lot of your choice (see parking Loading zone Reserved Special event reserved The closest parking lots to the Cognitive Science Bldg), Room 003 PARKING Parking is free on Saturdays and Sundays. You can park without charge

  12. 6 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ necessitates the steady supply fast-growing pine offers. Unlike the small parcels owned by most private the majority of forestland in the South consists of these small parcels owned by private landowners, buyers can timing and type into a reliable supply chain. The dealer buys trees from the landowner, contracts

  13. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184 Federal Listing: None State Listing 1989). Natu- ral vegetation commonly occurring in these New Hampshire sandy soils include white pine't occur in Vermont or Maine. New Hampshire's peripheral population of hognose snakes is state threatened

  14. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10 Associated Species: Timber rattlesnake. Foss, Audubon Society of New Hampshire Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Appalachian oak pine forest systems are found mostly below 900 ft elevation in southern New Hampshire south

  15. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218 Federal Listing: None State Listing: None Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Authors: Kim A. Tuttle and M. N. Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game grass- lands, pine barrens, blueberry barrens, and grassy hilltops (Klemens 1993, New Hampshire Reptile

  16. Geology of an area between Bluff and Honey Creeks, Mason County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Joseph Francis

    1954-01-01

    ahelo aeaber Rergan Creak Xiaoatoai comber ttelge conga%one Noecbor Riley f cRtiabian Lien go'ICnbain conge'iceco Reebok Cap Ronntain linea tone aeebor Hickory conge%one aoiber Pre&aabri, an eye%one Zgnoone reoke pine~ino4 gre4itk Oearee...

  17. FOR HOME REPAIR AND CONSTRUCTION A home located within the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) may be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the roof is a large surface, capable of catching burning embers. The embers may get lodged between of catching embers during a wildfire. A roof also can collect dead vegetation such as pine needles and leaf (with soffit vents) The primary function of the eave is to protect the home from rainwater. However

  18. Characterization of the pitch canker fungus, Fusarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of the pitch canker fungus, Fusarium circinatum, from Chile A. Jacobs a*, T and pine. These species are characterized by the typical Fusarium subglutinans (Wollenw. and Reinking and Marasas f. sp. pini Correll et al.] is characterized by the presence of sterile coils and the formation

  19. Street Tree Inventory Report and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shade trees other than pines in street tree planting projects. * Locate and remove the estimated 40: * Shenandoah has 999 public trees that occupy 73% of the available planting sites. * The tree population and planting. * Conduct an annual Arbor Day celebration and involve local groups. * Craft a public tree care

  20. Reforestation: Shear and Rake for Site Preparation http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reforestation: Shear and Rake for Site Preparation http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1 Benefits sprouting thus reducing competition with planted pines. Regardless of the planting method, ridding the site of debris will help facilitate a better planting job. Sites that have been sheared and raked can be wildland

  1. Timber Management: Prescribed Burning for Woody Control http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with pines. · Prepares sites for future tree planting or natural regen- eration. · Increases sunlight to forest floor, producing more grass, flowering annuals plants and seeds for wildlife. · Reduces risks- vesting timber. · Most nutrients are returned to the soil in a more read- ily available form for plants

  2. Fire Information: Overview of Prescribed Burning http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Benefits: · Controls low quality hardwoods and shrubs that com- pete with pines. · Prepares sites for future tree planting or natural regen- eration. · Increases sunlight to forest floor, producing more grass, flowering annuals plants and seeds for wildlife. · Reduces risks of annosus root rot and brown

  3. Subarctic warming: Results from the global treeline project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siren, G.; Shen, S.

    1996-12-31

    The authors reported last year at the 6th Global Warming Science and Policy Conference (GW6), April 3--6, 1995, San Francisco USA, the Global Treeline Project (BLECSCO) has definitively established the northward movement in the 20th century of the northernmost limit for pine trees in Finland. this movement is due to climate warming. The Finnish Forest Research Institute has been working on this problem between 1951 and 1996. The authors have observed over half a century the movements of the coniferous treeline. The subarctic pine tree line is used as a permanent bioindicator of climate change. The dynamic pine tree line in the subarctic of Finland serves as a reliable indicator of expected climate change in the future as well as of climatic fluctuations in the past. The FFRI has tracked comprehensively seed year frequencies, performed dendrochronological studies, fire studies, and ecological studies since the abundant seed year of 1948--50 to the present, and discovered that climate change has favored the northward movement of the pine limit. The authors report the detailed scientific methodology, data, and conclusions.

  4. Alexander X. Niemiera Biographical Sketch Department of Horticulture, Virginia Polytechnic and State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    .T. Taylor, and J.H. Shreckhise. 2014. Urea hydrolysis in pine tree substrate is affected by urea and lime substrate is affected by urea and lime rate. HortScience 48 (Supplement): S391. #12;England, K.M., Niemiera

  5. Using Compost For more information on selection, planting, cultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Using Compost in Your Landscape For more information on selection, planting, cultural practices Conservation. Shrubs and Trees Add compost to the soil around your shrubs and trees. In late spring, place about 1 inch of compost around the plants. Cover this with a mulch of shredded pine nee- dles, straw

  6. Effect of Accelerated Drying on the Reduction of Salmonella on Almonds by Thermal and Electron Beam Irradiation Pasteurization Treatments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed, Zahra Hassan

    2013-08-08

    and Salmonella outbreaks???.?????.?? 10 Almonds???????????????????.??? 11 Chocolate and coconut?????????????.?.?? 12 Peanut????????????????????...?.? 13 Pine nut???????????????????.???. 15 Sesame seed or helva??????????????.??? 16 Tahini and helva....590 billion pounds of almonds that worth about billions of dollars (ABC 2009). Like most nuts, almonds are of low moisture; therefore do not support the growth of microorganisms. However, Salmonella can recover and survive at extreme environmental...

  7. D I G E S T Public Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of the Army, Installations, Energy & Environment: www.army.mil/asaiee ARMY EARTH DAY aec.army.mil/Outreach/PublicInitiatives Installations, by Marnie Miller-Keas 15 Huntsville Center Helps Clean Up Ex-Artillery Range, by William S Initiative on Sampling for Lead in Drinking Water - Part 1, by Richard Morris 21 Restorating of Longleaf Pine

  8. THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wood grown in South Africa. In the 2011/12 MY pine accounted for 51 percent of the total planted area Plantations An estimated 1,268,443 hectares was planted to timber in South Africa in the 2011/12 MY. About 51 percent of the total timber area was planted with softwoods and 49 percent with hardwoods. Figure 1 below

  9. Ritual elements : a cemetery in Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefers, Kathleen Marie

    1995-01-01

    "As pines keep the shape of the wind even when the wind has fled and is no longer there So walls guard the shape of man even when man has fled and is no longer there. " -- George Seferis. The walls we make are the culmination ...

  10. Local deformations and incommensurability of high quality epitaxial graphene on a weakly interacting transition metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    parameter mismatch when cooling down the sample from the graphene preparation temperature to the measurement to the preparation conditions. All these effects are consistent with initial growth and subsequent pining of grapheneLocal deformations and incommensurability of high quality epitaxial graphene on a weakly

  11. f((JN\\ : Proc, II1~t. .fz,r r{~urCJ.J (Prl\\fv,J4t/~11 J /~q 7 LCA-rtaAj usc I &\\c5D)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a Petri Dish: Cultured Neural Networks for Studying Neural Computation Steve M. Potter, Scott E. Fraser networks, and provide insight into the function of intact nervous systems. #12;Wired Petri Dish The Pine, network properties of living neural circuits. These cultures exhibit many of the properties of neural

  12. Soil Science Society of America Journal This work was presented at the 12th North American Forest Soils Conference, Whitefish, MT, 1620

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    Soils Conference, Whitefish, MT, 16­20 June 2013, in the Production Systems for Biomass and Bioenergy silvicultural practices used, and when combined with suitable site preparation techniques and the deployment fourfold higher aboveground pine biomass than the C treatment (7.7 Mg ha-1); the untreated CF (17.9 Mg ha-1

  13. Crailo House, page 1 of 9 Dendrochronological dates for the Crailo House, Rensselaer, NY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    samples from floor support timbers in what is now the boiler room. Six cores were taken in the attic, from dormer windows, a beam against the east wall, and two rafters in the section two stories above the boiler). Pitch pine was used mainly in the boiler room beams and the roof rafters of the attic of the addition

  14. Laboratory Evaluation and Ranked Preference Assessment of Subterranean Termites Coptotermes Formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) on Pecan Cultivars of Carya Illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swain, Christopher R.

    2010-07-14

    . Mean number of termites present on multiple wood types (2 pecan cultivars, chinaberry and southern yellow pine) at 1 h, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 hrs...????????????????????????????..25 ? 1? ? INTRODUCTION...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Roger E. Gold Committee Members, Leon H. Russell Pete D. Teel...

  15. florida land steward A Quarterly Newsletter for Florida Landowners and Resource Professionals spring/summer 2013 volume 2, no. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    , Mitigation and Adaptation Project By Leslie Boby, Extension Associate, Southern Regional Extension Forestry of carbon stored in pine plantations. Traditionally, research is done on specific components of a system and on the unique partnerships (research cooperatives/forestry ex- tension system) that the group could leverage

  16. Drill Press Speed Chart Recommended operating speeds (RPM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    Drill Press Speed Chart Recommended operating speeds (RPM) Accessory Softwood (Pine) Hardwood (Hard Maple) Acrylic Brass Aluminum Steel Shop Notes Twist drill bits 1/16" - 3/16" 1/4" - 3/8" 7/16"- 5/8" 11 1000 600 350 Lubricate drill with oil when cutting steel 1/8" or thicker. Use center punch on all holes

  17. The Philippines Squid Fishery: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Philippines Squid Fishery: A Review ANICETO M. HERNANDO, Jr. and EFREN ED. C. FLORES Aniceto M of Fisheries, University of the Philip- pines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines 3004. Efren Ed. C. Flores is Chairman, Department of Marine Fisheries, College of Fisheries, Uni- versity of the Philippines, Diliman

  18. Xeriscape...Landscape Water Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welsh, Douglas F.; Welch, William C.; Duble, Richard L.

    2007-04-27

    covering the soil surface around plants. Mulches can be organic materials such as pine bark, compost and woodchips; or inor- ganic materials such as lava rock, limestone or permeable plastic (not sheet plastic). Use a mulch wherever possible. A good mulch...

  19. FORESTRY INVESTMENTS 8 October 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Russia Up to 1bn m3 of biomass has been infested in British Columbia by the Mountain Pine Beetle It is expected significant declines in sustainable harvests in both N.W. Russia and the Russian Far East, Southern Hemisphere and China has taken market share and exports from these regions is estimated to have

  20. A continuous ultrasonic scanner for lumber grading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayhew, Stephen Allison

    1996-01-01

    stress wave characteristics in lumber, 2) verify the use of ultrasonics for predicting the long-span tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of Southern Pine lumber. The lumber sample contained 225 pieces of nominal 51 mm (2 in.) x 152 mm (6 in.) x 5...

  1. Companies That Have Recently Recruited Texas MPAs Acquest Advisors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    Management Plains Capital Bank PPHB Energy Investment Bank Prudential Capital Group (Energy Finance Group Finance A+ Federal Credit Union AIG AllianceBernstein Amegy Bank American Express AmRisc Amstar Group Management Hines Interests Houlihan Lokey Hyperion Homes #12;Finance (continued) Pine River Capital

  2. postdoc:Postdoc Program:Career Fair:2013:2013_LAHotel_Info.doc Hotel Info in Los Alamos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    postdoc:Postdoc Program:Career Fair:2013:2013_LAHotel_Info.doc Hotel Info in Los Alamos of hotels in Los Alamos: Adobe Pines Bed & Breakfast 2101 Loma Linda Dr. Los Alamos, NM 87544 505-661-8828 Canyon Inn 80 Canyon Rd. Los Alamos, NM 87544 505-662-9595 800-662-2565 Comfort Inn 2455 Trinity Dr. Los

  3. Air Pollution Impacts in the Mixed Conifer Forests of Southern California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts in the Mixed Conifer Forests of Southern California1 Patrick J. Temple, Andrzej Bytnerowicz, Mark E. Fenn, and Mark A. Poth2 Abstract Air pollution, principally in the form.) and Jeffrey (P. jeffreyi Grev. and Balf.) pines on the western side of the pollution deposition gradient

  4. Damage and Mortality Assessment of Redwood and Mixed Conifer Forest Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    347 Damage and Mortality Assessment of Redwood and Mixed Conifer Forest Types in Santa Cruz County left with tough decisions on how to treat tree damage and mortality compounded by the Pine Mountain a method for evaluating damage and mortality. Qualitative criteria for evaluating stand damage focused

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE The Impact of Forest Thinning on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Initiative, or 4FRI) will result in thinning of ponderosa pine forests in the upper watershed, with potential system while thinning has the potential to increase annual water supply by 8%. This repre- sents and hydropower generation. Introduction At the close of the first decade of this century, a special issue

  6. Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 595 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern North from pine infested with an Ips sp. in Indonesia. In addition, two unknown species have been collected that the isolates from Indonesia and those from Eastern North America represent three previously un described taxa

  7. College of Natural Resources Department of Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    :55 Keynote Speech - Fralin Auditorium Forests: What Role in America's Energy Future? Dr. Al Sample, President Pine Fanfan Weng - Emerging Biomass Markets and Land Use Presentation Judges Jennifer Gagnon Dr in Northern Ontario, Canada Charley Kelly ­ Vegetation controls on Nitrogen Cycling and Retention: Soil

  8. Int. J. Data Mining and Bioinformatics , Vol. x, No. x, xxxx Copyright 200x Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haarslev, Volker

    Int. J. Data Mining and Bioinformatics , Vol. x, No. x, xxxx Copyright © 200x Inderscience and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 1140 Pine Avenue West Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1A3 Canada., Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8 Canada E-mail: haarslev@cse.concordia.ca Abstract: Ontologies play a crucial role

  9. Global shape processing involves a hierarchy of integration stages Jason Bell a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    , McGill University, 687 Pine Av. West, H4-14, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1A1 b Dept. of Psychology, University of Leuven, Tiensestraat 102, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium a r t i c l e i n f o Article history & Wilson, 2006, 2010). Traditionally, line drawings of objects have been used to deter- mine which parts

  10. BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH AND 6TH FLOOR) AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    1ST FLOOR ENTRANCE ELEVATOR WASHROOMS BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH MCINTYRE MEDICAL SCIENCES BUILDING 3655 SIR WILLIAM OSLER PINE AVENUE PROMENADESIRWILLIAMOSLER ACCESSIBLE BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH AND 6TH FLOOR) AND SOUTH ENTRANCE (1ST FLOOR) ALL

  11. Forest Management Helps Save Chadron State Park from Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Forest Management Helps Save Chadron State Park from Fire OVER THE PAST HALF-CENTURY, wildfire has Creek Fire on its deadly rampage across the Pine Ridge. The good news is that due to active forest no infrastructure and its forest survived the fire intact. About 90 percent of the Park burned, with the majority

  12. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 29 (2006) 105117 Electron-nuclear cross polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 29 (2006) 105­117 Electron-nuclear cross polarization V from an unpaired electron to neighboring nuclei via electron-nuclear cross polarization (e­Hahn cross polarization (CP) process introduced by Pines et al., that is widely used in solid-state nuclear

  13. The impacts of urbanization on endangered florida key deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harveson, Patricia Moody

    2006-04-12

    of peninsular Florida. Key deer range is restricted to the Lower Florida Keys with approximately 60% residing on Big Pine Key and 15% residing on No Name Key which have undergone rapid human population growth and development over the past 30 years. Urban...

  14. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-702-1, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), Robert Mitchell (2), Gregory Starr (3), and Jason McGee (2) (1) University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom of Alabama, USA Keywords: carbon, longleaf pine, eddy-covariance, soil moisture, hydraulic architecture biomass across the gradient and diurnal measurements of leaf water potential/ambient photosynthesis from

  15. Perceiving light versus material Frederick A.A. Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    Perceiving light versus material Frederick A.A. Kingdom McGill Vision Research, 687 Pine Av. W. Rm s t r a c t Humans rarely confuse variations in light intensity, such as shadows, shading, light sources to discriminate light from material. These cues include luminance relations, figural relations, 3D-shape, depth

  16. Evaluation of the effects of a highway improvement project on Key deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braden, Anthony Wayne

    2006-10-30

    Deer-vehicle collisions (DVCs) along a 5.6-km segment of United States Highway 1 (US 1) on Big Pine Key (BPK), Florida responsible for approximately 26% of endangered Florida Key deer (Odocoileus virginianus clavium) annual mortalities. The Florida...

  17. Research Program Summary Dr. Donald L. Rockwood (.70 Research FTE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    studies with Eucalyptus, cottonwood, cypress, and slash pine. Eucalyptus species that grow very rapidly Eucalyptus makes a desirable landscape mulch. Tree improvement studies with each SRWC species identify genetic variation that is very important in achieving highest productivity, particularly in Eucalyptus

  18. COMPOSITES AND MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS SCREW-HOLDING CAPACITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and ness, bending stiffness and strength), wood species (pine vs. sweetgum) had an millworkmarkets nificantly alter the screw-holding capac- els were cut for bending modulus of elas- (screw or nail for the study. This paper (No. 98-22-0213) is published with the approval of the 2AmericanSociety for Testing

  19. Woodland Route 72 Dump EPA ID#: NJD980505879

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and harvesting of cedar and pine for wood products. Residents rely on ground water for drinking, household use water extraction and treatment system, with reinjection of the treated water back into the aquifer also buried. In addition to numerous chemical contaminants in soil and water, some areas of the site

  20. Dating the Glass Lake Dugout by Dendrochronology (NY State Museum #CN-37516)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    Dating the Glass Lake Dugout by Dendrochronology (NY State Museum #CN-37516) Carol Griggs, Dendrochronology Lab, Cornell University, cbg4@cornell.edu The Glass Lake Dugout was found at the bottom of Glass for the Glass Lake Dugout (Figure 2B). The series was compared with other site and regional white pine