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1

Transcript profiling of differentiating xylem of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood formation (xylogenesis) is a critical developmental process for all woody land plants. As an initial step to understand the molecular basis for temporal and spatial regulation of xylogenesis and the effect of the expression of individual genes on physical and chemical properties of wood, microarray and realtime RTPCR analyses were performed to monitor gene expression during xylogenesis under various developmental and environmental conditions. The specific objectives established for this study were: Objective 1. Microarray analysis of genes preferentially expressed in differentiating xylem compared to other tissues of loblolly pine (see Chapter II); Objective 2. Microarray analysis of seasonal variation in gene expression for loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) from different geographical sources (see Chapter III); Objective 3. Realtime RTPCR analysis of loblolly pine AGP and AGPlike genes (see Chapter IV). Based on the results from this study, candidate genes may be further studied for association with significant traits, used for genetic modification of wood properties, or included in future studies to further examine the molecular mechanisms of wood formation.

Yang, Suk-Hwan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Gene Expression and Association Analyses of Stress Responses in Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The molecular mechanisms underlying disease-resistance and drought-resistance in forest trees are not well understood. Linking variation in gene expression with genetic polymorphisms and with variations in disease- and drought-resistance phenotypes can provide information about these complex traits. We used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect variations in the expression of 88 disease- and drought-responsive genes within an association population of 354 loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.). Using association genetics approaches, we then linked 3,938 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes with gene expression phenotypes to identify novel disease- and drought-responsive genes. To further examine differences in gene expression induced by drought, Fusarium circinatum (responsible for pitch canker disease), and drought F. circinatum, the expression of 114 genes identified through comparative and association genetics approaches was analyzed on a subset of 24 loblolly pine trees possessing a range of pitch canker- and drought-resistance phenotypes. Significant differences in the uninduced expression of all 88 genes measured on the association population were observed among loblolly pine trees. Principal component analysis showed that some variation within the association population could be accounted for by population substructure of geographic origin. Hierarchical clustering of genes based on uninduced expression did not consistently group together functionally similar genes probably because expression was collected on unstressed stem tissue. This was supported in the smaller expression study as correlations between expression values of genes in the same functional networks were usually stronger when induced by a treatment compared with correlations between the uninduced expression of genes in the control group. Gene expression frequently changed by up to 4-fold in response to one or more treatments, but PtMYB12 was the only gene that exhibited a statistically significant change in response to treatments. ANOVA analyses of gene expression controlling for pitch canker resistance and for water use efficiency phenotypes identified differentially expressed genes suggesting that they may be contributing to these phenotypes. Finally, association genetics approaches detected 101 significant associations between SNPs in 94 candidate genes potentially involved in stress responses and 27 gene expression phenotypes.

Seeve, Candace Marie

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Accelerated Stem Growth Rates and Improved Fiber Properties of Loblolly Pine: Functional Analysis Of CyclinD from Pinus taeda  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sustained supply of low-cost, high quality raw materials is essential for the future success of the U.S. forest products industry. To maximize stem (trunk) growth, a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell divisions within the cambial meristem is essential. We hypothesize that auxin levels within the cambial meristem regulate cyclin gene expression and this in turn controls cell cycle progression as occurs in all eukaryotic cells. Work with model plant species has shown that ectopic overexpression of cyclins promotes cell division thereby increasing root growth > five times. We intended to test whether ectopic overexpression of cambial cyclins in the cambial zone of loblolly pine also promotes cell division rates that enhance stem growth rates. Results generated in model annual angiosperm systems cannot be reliably extrapolated to perennial gymnosperms, thus while the generation and development of transgenic pine is time consuming, this is the necessary approach for meaningful data. We succeeded in isolating a cyclin D gene and Clustal analysis to the Arabidopsis cyclin D gene family indicates that it is more closely related to cyclin D2 than D1 or D3 Using this gene as a probe we observed a small stimulation of cyclin D expression in somatic embryo culture upon addition of auxin. We hypothesized that trees with more cells in the vascular cambial and expansion zones will have higher cyclin mRNA levels. We demonstrated that in trees under compressive stress where the rates of cambial divisions are increased on the underside of the stem relative to the top or opposite side, there was a 20 fold increase in the level of PtcyclinD1 mRNA on the compressed side of the stem relative to the opposite. This suggests that higher secondary growth rates correlate with PtcyclinD1 expression. We showed that larger diameter trees show more growth during each year and that the increased growth in loblolly pine trees correlates with more cell divisions in the cambial meristem as expected. We isolated a promoter from a cambial specific gene and commenced development of transformation protocols for loblolly pine. Since our results show that cyclin D expression correlates with increased growth we continued with experiments to demonstrate the effect of cyclin overexpression upon tree growth. Vectors which constitutively express the cyclin D cDNA were constructed and transformed into a transgenic pine system through the collaboration with Forest Research, New Zealand. The transformation system for Pinus radiata is well established and we hoped to gain phenotypic information in a closely related pine, rather than await development of a robust loblolly pine transformation method. Transformation experiments were conducted by a biolistic method developed at Forest Research, NZ. A total of 78 transgenic embryogenic lines were generated and bulked up with a good representation of transgenic lines per construct. Transformed calli were originally identified by resistance to the antibiotic Geneticin contained in the medium. The transgenic nature of the selected lines was subsequently confirmed using histochemical GUS staining. To date, 10 out of 13 selected transgenic lines have produced embryos and we are currently harvesting the first transgenic plantlets. At present time 22 of those plantlets have been moved to GMO facilities. We will soon develop a strategy for assessing potential phenotypic differences between the transclones and non-transformed controls. Transgenic plants are being grown to a stage (approx. 1 year) when meaningful phenotypic evaluation can be conducted. The recent availability of 10,000 element loblolly pine cDNA microarray will permit the evaluation of cyclinD overexpression upon gene expression in transgenic Pinus.

Dr. John Cairney, School of Biology and Institute of Paper Science and Technology @ Georgia Tech, Georgia Institute of Technology; Dr. Gary Peter, University of Florida; Dr. Ulrika Egertsdotter, Dept. of Forestry, Virgina Tech; Dr. Armin Wagner, New Zealand Forest Research Institute Ltd. (Scion Research.)

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Population Structure, Association Mapping of Economic Traits and Landscape Genomics of East Texas Loblolly Pine ( Pinus taeda L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) is an ecologically and economically important southern pine, distributed across the southeastern United States. Its genetic improvement for breeding and deployment is a major goal of the Western Gulf Forest Tree Improvement Program (WGFTIP) hosted by the Texas A&M Forest Service. Rapid advances in genomics and molecular marker technology have created potential for application of Marker Assisted Selection (MAS) and Genomic Selection (GS) for accelerated breeding in forest trees. First-generation selection (FGS) and second- generation selection (SGS) breeding populations of loblolly pine from east Texas were studied to estimate the genetic diversity, population structure, linkage disequilibrium (LD), signatures of selection and association of breeding traits with genetic markers using a genome-wide panel of 4264 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Under- standing the genetic basis of local adaptation is crucial to disentangle the dynamics of gene flow, drift and selection and to address climate change. Bayesian mixed linear models and logistic regression were used to associate SNP variation with geography, climate, aridity and growth season length and markers with strong correlations were investigated for biological functions. Relatively high levels of observed (Ho = 0.1780.198) and expected (He = 0.180-0.198) heterozygosities were found in all populations. The amount of inbreeding was very low, and many populations exhibited a slight excess of heterozygotes. The population substructure was weak, but FST indicated more pronounced differentiation in the SGS populations. As expected for outcrossing natural populations, the genome-wide LD was low, but marker density was insufficient to deduce the decay rate. Numerous associations were found between various phenotypes and SNPs, but few remained significant after false positive correction. Signatures of diversifying and balancing selection were found in markers representing important biological functions. Strong correlations supported by Bayes factors were found between various environmental variables and several SNPs. Logistic regression found hundreds of significant marker-environment associations, but none remained significant after false-positive correction, which was likely too stringent and will require further investigation. Annotations of significant markers implicated them in crucial biological functions. These results present the first step in the application of MAS to the WGFTIP for loblolly pine genetic improvement and will contribute to the knowledgebase necessary for genomic selection technology. Results from environmental association study provide important information for designing breeding strategies to address climate change and for genetic conservation purposes.

Chhatre, Vikram E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Site Index Curves for Direct-Seeded Loblolly and Longleaf Pines in Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Site Index Curves for Direct-Seeded Loblolly and Longleaf Pines in Louisiana Quang V. Cao, School index equations were developedfor direct-seeded loblollypine (Pinus taeda L.) and longleaf pine (Pinus- term height projection for direct-seeded loblolly and longleaf pine stands in Louisiana. South. J. Appl

Cao, Quang V.

6

A physiological and morphological analysis of the effects of nitrogen supply on the relative growth rates of nine loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) clones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of nitrogen supply on relationships of relative growth rate (RGR) to leaf physiology, structural and non-structural carbon partitioning, and nitrogen- and water-use efficiencies were examined in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) clonal lines differing in growth potential. Nine 18-month-old loblolly pine clones were grown in a climate-controlled greenhouse for 20 weeks under two contrasting nitrogen (N) regimes (50 and 250 ppm) and a growth analysis was carried out. Higher nitrogen increased plant RGR and largely resulted in proportional shifts in biomass from roots and stems to needles. The RGR of plants receiving higher nitrogen was increased primarily through increased leaf area ratio (LAR), which was increased through higher leaf mass fraction (LMF) and not through changes in needle morphology. Although concentrations of needle glucose in plants receiving 250 ppm N were 22 percent higher than plants receiving lower N, total non-structural carbohydrate concentrations in needles of plants receiving 50 ppm N were nearly double that of clones receiving 250 pm N, primarily due to starch accumulation of the nitrogen-deficient plants. Plants receiving 250 ppm N also had 39 and 18 percent lower starch in the coarse and fine roots, respectively. Plants receiving higher nitrogen were also more water-use efficient, but had lower photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency. LAR, net assimilation rate (NAR), specific leaf area (SLA), and LMF were all positively correlated with RGR, but the main influence on RGR differences among clones was LAR. In addition, leaf-level rates of photosynthesis and respiration were positively correlated with RGR; however, faster-growing clones did not exhibit greater carbon economy at the leaf level. Both instantaneous water-use efficiency (A/E) and ?13C were positively correlated with RGR and photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency was negatively correlated with RGR. The identification of physiological and morphological traits underpinning differences in RGR among clones and how these traits are affected by nitrogen supply provides new information on trait correlations within species and parallels broader patterns observed among species.

Stover, Corey Michael

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Intensive culture of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings on poorly drained sites in the Western Gulf region of the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant acreage of poorly drained sites occurs in the Western Gulf region of the United States. These sites experience standing water through much of the winter and spring, resulting in poor seedling survival. In addition, the sites occasionally experience a summer drought that affects tree growth. This study was designed to determine the effects of intensive forest management on seedling growth and physiology, and to enhance seedling performance under these harsh conditions. Fertilization, chemical vegetation control and mechanical site preparation were used in different combinations to test the effects of these intensive forest management tools on seedling above- and below-ground growth, survival, water status, gas exchange attributes, and nutrient concentrations in the foliage and soil solution. Ten sites were established in southern Arkansas in 1998 and 1999 to monitor loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedling performance in three consecutive growing seasons between 1998 and 2000. Fertilization, chemical vegetation control and mechanical site preparation increased above-ground growth. Growth increment from mechanical site preparation was comparable to that from fertilization. Survival was not affected by any treatment. Fertilization enhanced root growth, more so in the shallow soil layers. Subsoil bulk density greatly restricted root growth, resulting in decreased above-ground growth. Chemical vegetation control made more soil water available to the seedlings during drought, resulting in increased seedling water potential. The effect of chemical vegetation control on seedling water potential was absent in the early growing season when soil moisture was abundant. Seedlings on plots treated with bedding-plus-fertilizer or bedding alone experienced stomatal closure at times of severe water stress while those treated with chemical vegetation control were able to continue net carbon dioxide assimilation. Fertilization did not increase needle nutrient concentrations, but increased needle weight, thereby increasing total nutrient content. Fertilization increased base cation concentrations in the soil solution, but had no effect on nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. Intensive forest management was found to be a viable tool for optimum loblolly pine seedling growth and survival on poorly drained sites in the Western Gulf region of the United States.

Rahman, Mohd Shafiqur

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A comparison of selection and breeding strategies for incorporating wood properties into a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) elite population breeding program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heritability of microfibril angle (MFA) in loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., and its genetic relationships with height, diameter, volume and specific gravity were examined in two progeny tests with known pedigrees. Significant general combining ability (GCA), specific combining ability (SCA), and SCA x block effects indicated that there are both additive and non-additive genetic influences on MFA. Individual-tree narrow-sense heritability estimates were variable, ranging from 0.17 for earlywood (ring) 4 MFA to 0.51 for earlywood (ring) 20 MFA. Genetic correlations between MFA, specific gravity and the growth traits were non-significant due to large estimated standard errors. Multiple-trait selection and breeding in a mainline and elite population tree improvement program were simulated using Excel and Simetar (Richardson 2001). The effects of four selection indices were examined in the mainline population and the effects of seven selection indices and four breeding strategies were examined in the elite population. In the mainline population, selection for increased growth caused decreased wood quality over time. However, it was possible to maintain the overall population mean MFA and mean specific gravity at levels present in the base population by implementing restricted selection indices. Likewise, selection for improved wood quality in the elite population resulted in decreased growth unless restricted selection indices or pulp indices derived from those of Lowe et al. (1999) were used. Correlated phenotypic responses to selection on indices using economic weights and heritabilities were dependent on breeding strategy. When a circular mating system (with parents randomly assigned to controlled-crosses) was used, the index trait with a higher economic weight was more influential in determining correlated responses in non-index traits than the index trait with a lower economic weight. However, when positive assortative mating was used, the index trait with a greater variance was more influential in determining correlated responses in non-index traits than the index trait with a lower variance regardless of economic weight.

Myszewski, Jennifer Helen

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Simulated biomass and soil carbon of loblolly pine and cottonwood plantations across a thermal gradient in southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization were simulated for a 25-year loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation and for three consecutive 7-year short-rotation cottonwood (Populus deltoides) stands. Simulations were conducted for 17 locations in the southeastern United States with mean annual temperatures ranging from 13.1 to 19.4 C. The LINKAGES stand growth model, modified to include the "RothC" soil C and soil N model, simulated tree growth and soil C status. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased cumulative cottonwood aboveground biomass in the three rotations from a site average of 106 to 272 Mg/ha in 21 years, whereas the equivalent site averages for loblolly pine were unchanged at 176 and 184 Mg/ha in 25 years. Location results, compared on the annual sum of daily mean air temperatures above 5.5 C (growing-degree-days), showed contrasts. Loblolly pine biomass increased whereas cottonwood decreased with increasing growing-degree-days, particularly in cottonwood stands receiving N fertilization. The increment of biomass due to N addition per unit of control biomass (relative response) declined in both plantations with increase in growing-degree-days. Average soil C in loblolly pine stands increased from 24.3 to 40.4 Mg/ha in 25 years and in cottonwood soil C decreased from 14.7 to 13.7 Mg/ha after three 7-year rotations. Soil C did not decrease with increasing growing-degree-days in either plantation type suggesting that global warming may not initially affect soil C. Nitrogen fertilizer increased soil C slightly in cottonwood plantations and had no significant effect on the soil C of loblolly stands.

Luxmoore, Robert J [ORNL; Tharp, M Lynn [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

herbicides, burning, and high-density loblolly pine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kudzu is an aggressive, nonnative vine that currently dominates an estimated 810,000 ha of mesic forest communities in the eastern United States. To test an integrated method of weed control, abundances of kudzu and other plant species were compared during 4 yr after six herbicide treatments (clopyralid, triclopyr, metsulfuron, picloram 1 2,4-D, tebuthiuron, and a nonsprayed check), in which loblolly pines were planted at three densities (0, 1, and 4 seedlings m22) to induce competition and potentially delay kudzu recovery. This split-plot design was replicated on each of the four kudzu-dominated sites near Aiken, SC. Relative light intensity (RLI) and soil water content (SWC) were measured periodically to identify mechanisms of interference among plant species. Two years after treatment (1999), crown coverage of kudzu averaged , 2% in herbicide plots compared with 93% in the nonsprayed check, and these differences were maintained through 2001, except in clopyralid plots where kudzu cover increased to 15%. In 2001, pine interference was associated with 33, 56, and 67% reductions in biomass of kudzu, blackberry, and herbaceous vegetation, respectively. RLI in kudzu-dominated plots (4 to 15% of full sun) generally was less than half that of herbicide-treated plots. SWC was greatest in tebuthiuron plots, where total vegetation cover averaged 26% compared with 77 to 111% in other plots. None of the treatments eradicated kudzu, but combinations of herbicides and induced pine competition delayed its recovery.

T.B. Harrington; L.T. Rader-Dixon; J.W. Taylor, Jr.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Exploiting Genetic Variation of Fiber Components and Morphology in Juvenile Loblolly Pine.  

SciTech Connect

In order to ensure the global competitiveness of the Pulp and Paper Industry in the Southeastern U.S., more wood with targeted characteristics have to be produced more efficiently on less land. The objective of the research project is to provide a molecular genetic basis for tree breeding of desirable traits in juvenile loblolly pine, using a multidisciplinary research approach. We developed micro analytical methods for determine the cellulose and lignin content, average fiber length, and coarseness of a single ring in a 12 mm increment core. These methods allow rapid determination of these traits in micro scale. Genetic variation and genotype by environment interaction (GxE) were studied in several juvenile wood traits of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Over 1000 wood samples of 12 mm increment cores were collected from 14 full-sib families generated by a 6-parent half-diallel mating design (11-year-old) in four progeny tests. Juvenile (ring 3) and transition (ring 8) for each increment core were analyzed for cellulose and lignin content, average fiber length, and coarseness. Transition wood had higher cellulose content, longer fiber and higher coarseness, but lower lignin than juvenile wood. General combining ability variance for the traits in juvenile wood explained 3 to 10% of the total variance, whereas the specific combining ability variance was negligible or zero. There were noticeable full-sib family rank changes between sites for all the traits. This was reflected in very high specific combining ability by site interaction variances, which explained from 5% (fiber length) to 37% (lignin) of the total variance. Weak individual-tree heritabilities were found for cellulose, lignin content and fiber length at the juvenile and transition wood, except for lignin at the transition wood (0.23). Coarseness had moderately high individual-tree heritabilities at both the juvenile (0.39) and transition wood (0.30). Favorable genetic correlations of volume and stem straightness were found with cellulose content, fiber length and coarseness, suggesting that selection on growth or stem straightness would results in favorable response in chemical wood traits. We have developed a series of methods for application of functional genomics to understanding the molecular basis of traits important to tree breeding for improved chemical and physical properties of wood. Two types of technologies were used, microarray analysis of gene expression, and profiling of soluble metabolites from wood forming tissues. We were able to correlate wood property phenotypes with expression of specific genes and with the abundance of specific metabolites using a new database and appropriate statistical tools. These results implicate a series of candidate genes for cellulose content, lignin content, hemicellulose content and specific extractible metabolites. Future work should integrate such studies in mapping populations and genetic maps to make more precise associations of traits with gene locations in order to increase the predictive power of molecular markers, and to distinguish between different candidate genes associated by linkage or by function. This study has found that loblolly pine families differed significantly for cellulose yield, fiber length, fiber coarseness, and less for lignin content. The implication for forest industry is that genetic testing and selection for these traits is possible and practical. With sufficient genetic variation, we could improve cellulose yield, fiber length, fiber coarseness, and reduce lignin content in Loblolly pine. With the continued progress in molecular research, some candidate genes may be used for selecting cellulose content, lignin content, hemicellulose content and specific extractible metabolites. This would accelerate current breeding and testing program significantly, and produce pine plantations with not only high productivity, but desirable wood properties as well.

Hou-min Chang, John F. Kadla, Bailian Li, Ron Sederoff,

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Exploiting Genetic Variation of Fiber Components and Morphology in Juvenile Loblolly Pine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study has found that loblolly pine families differed significantly for cellulose yield, fiber length, fiber coarseness, and less for lignin content. The implication for forest industry is that genetic testing and selection for these traits is possible and practical. With sufficient genetic variation, we could improve cellulose yield, fiber length, fiber coarseness, and reduce lignin content in Loblolly pine. With the continued progress in molecular research, some candidate genes may be used for selecting cellulose content, lignin content, hemicellulose content and specific extractible metabolites. This would accelerate current breeding and testing program significantly, and produce pine plantations with not only high productivity, but desirable wood properties as well.

Hou-min Chang, John F. Kadla, Bailian Li, Ron Sederoff,

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Environmental Influences on Wood Chemistry and Density of Populus and Loblolly Pine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the study are to: (1) determine the degree to which physical and chemical wood properties vary in association with environmental and silvicultural practices in Populus and loblolly pine and (2) develop and verify species-specific empirical models in an effort to create a framework for understanding environmental influences on wood quality.

Tuskan, G.A.

2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Deposition of H15NO3 vapour to white oak, red maple and loblolly pine foliage: experimental observations and a generalized model  

SciTech Connect

Nitric acid vapour enriched with {sup 15}N (H{sup 15}NO{sub 3}) was volatilized into the cuvette of an open-flow gas exchange system containing red maple (Acer rubrum L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), or loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedling shoots to facilitate direct measurements of total foliar deposition, and subsequent assessments of the rate of HNO{sub 3} movement across the cuticle (transcuticular uptake). Total H{sup 15}NO{sub 3} vapour deposition to foliar surfaces ranged from <5 to 27 nmol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} the variability being largely accounted for by differences in HNO{sub 3} concentrations and leaf conductance. Mean whole-leaf conductance to HNO{sub 3} ranged between 0.9 and 3.4 mm s{sup -1} for hardwoods and between 6 and 34 mm s{sup -1} for loblolly pine. Of the total H{sup 15}NO{sub 3} vapour deposited to leaves, an average of 39 to 48% was immediately 'bound' into hardwood foliage whereas only 3% was bound to loblolly pine needles. This implies that rain events might extract greater amounts of HNO{sub 3}-derived nitrate in throughfall from conifer canopies as compared to hardwood canopies. Post-exposure H{sup 15}NO{sub 3} uptake rates across the leaf cuticle increased with surface nitrate concentrations, but were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower (O06 to 0.24 nmol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) than total HNO{sub 3}, deposition during exposures. A generalized leaf-level model of HNO{sub 3} deposition to foliage capable of simulating deposition pathways to sorption sites on the leaf surface, and to the metabolically active leaf interior via transcuticular or stomatal pathways is formulated and suggested for use in planning future work on HNO{sub 3} deposition.

Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fertilization Increases Below-Ground Carbon Sequestration of Loblolly Pine Plantations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FERTILIZATION INCREASES BELOW-GROUND FERTILIZATION INCREASES BELOW-GROUND CARBON SEQUESTRATION OF LOBLOLLY PINE PLANTATIONS K.H. Johnsen 1,2 , J.R. Butnor 1 , C. Maier 1 , R. Oren 3 , R. Pangle 4 , L. Samuelson 5 , J. Seiler 4 , S.E. McKeand 6 , and H.L Allen 6 1 Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 3041 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA 2 email: kjohnsen@fs.fed.us, ph: 919-549-4012, fax: 919-549-4047 3 School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 4 Dept. of Forestry, Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA 24061 5 School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 6 College of Natural Resources, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 Abstract The extent of fertilization of southern pine forests is increasing rapidly; industrial

16

The Fractionation of Loblolly Pine Woodchips Into Pulp For Making Paper Products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to test the PureVision biomass fractionation technology for making pulp from loblolly pine. A specific goal was to produce a pulp product that is comparable to pulp produced from the kraft process, while reducing the environmental effects of the kraft process, known to be a highly pollutant process. The overall goal of the project was met by using the biomass fractionation concept for making pulp product. This proof-of-concept study, done with Southern pine pinchips as feedstock, evaluated NaOH concentration and residence time as variables in single-stage cocurrent pulping process. It can be concluded that 1% NaOH is adequate for effective delignification using the PureVision process; this is about ? of that used in the kraft process. Also, the PureVision process does not use sulfur-based chemicals such as N2S and hence, is environmentally more benign.

Kiran Kadam, PhD

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Foliar leaching, translocation, and biogenic emission of 35S in radiolabeled loblolly pines  

SciTech Connect

Foliar leaching, basipetal (downard) translocation, and biogenic emission of sulfur (S), as traced by {sup 35}S, were examined in a field study of loblolly pines. Four trees were radiolabeled by injection with amounts of {sup 35}S in the MBq range, and concentrations in needle fall, stemflow, throughfall, and aboveground biomass were measured over a period of 15-20 wk after injection. The contribution of dry deposition to sulfate-sulfur (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-S) concentrations in net throughfall (throughfall SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-S concentration minus that in incident precipitation) beneath all four trees was >90%. Calculations indicated that about half of the summertime SO{sub 2}2 dry deposition flux to the loblolly pines was fixes in the canopy and not subsequently leached by rainfall. Based on mass balance calculations, {sup 35}S losses through biogenic emissions from girdled trees were inferred to be 25-28% of the amount injected. Estimates based on chamber methods and mass balance calculations indicated a range in daily biogenic S emission of 0.1-10 {micro}g/g dry needles. Translocation of {sup 35}S to roots in nongirdled trees was estimated to be between 14 and 25% of the injection. It is hypothesized that biogenic emission and basipetal translocation of S (and not foliar leaching) are important mechanisms by which forest trees physiologically adapt to excess S in the environment.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development and Validation of Marker-Aided Selection Methods for Wood Property Traits in Loblolly Pine and Hybrid Poplar  

SciTech Connect

Wood properties influence pulp and paper quality. Certainly, overall pulp yields are directly related to the cellulose content, changes in hemicellulose content are associated with changes in pulp cohesiveness, and pulping efficiency is related to lignin content. Despite the importance of wood properties on product quality, little progress has been made in improving such traits because current methods of assessing wood and fiber characteristics are time-consuming, expensive, and often imprecise. Genetic improvement of wood and fiber properties has been further hampered by the large size of trees, delayed reproductive maturity and long harvest cycles. Recent developments in molecular genetics will help overcome the physical, economic and biological constraints in assessing and improving wood properties. Genetic maps consisting of numerous molecular markers are now available for loblolly pine and hybrid poplar. Such markers/maps may be used as part of a marker-aided selection and breeding effort or to expedite the isolation and characterization of genes and/or promoters that directly control wood properties. The objectives of this project are: (1) to apply new and rapid analytical techniques for assessing component wood properties to segregating F2 progeny populations of loblolly pine and hybrid poplar, (2) to map quantitative trait loci and identify molecular markers associated with wood properties in each of the above species and (3) to validate marker-aided selection methods for wood properties in loblolly pine and hybrid poplar.

Tuskan, G.A.

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) (1985) (NDP-009) image Data Investigators R. J. Luxmoore, R. J. Norby, E. G. O'Neill, D. G. Weller, J. M. Ells, and H. H. Rogers From June 28 to October 29 in 1982, Virginia pine seedlings were exposed to elevated CO2 levels in open-top growth chambers at one of four concentrations (75, 150, 300, and 600 ppm above ambient). Plant dry weight; height; stem diameter; and chemical contents of leaf, stem, and root tissues were measured before and after exposure. Soil variables were also characterized. These data illustrate the short-term physical and chemical response of Virginia pine seedlings to elevated levels of CO2. The data are in seven files: initial dry weights before exposure (844 kB), dry weights after

20

Quantifying And Predicting Wood Quality Of Loblolly And Slash Pine Under Intensive Forest Management Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The forest industry will increasingly rely on fast-growing intensively managed southern pine plantations to furnish wood and fiber. Intensive silvicultural practices, including competition control, stand density control, fertilization, and genetic improvement are yielding tremendous gains in the quantity of wood production from commercial forest land. How these technologies affect wood properties was heretofore unknown, although there is concern about the suitability of fast-grown wood for traditional forest products. A four year study was undertaken to examine the effects of these intensive practices on the properties of loblolly and slash pine wood by applying a common sampling method over 10 existing field experiments. Early weed control gets young pines off to a rapid start, often with dramatically increased growth rates. This response is all in juvenile wood however, which is low in density and strength. Similar results are found with early Nitrogen fertilization at the time of planting. These treatments increase the proportion of juvenile wood in the tree. Later, mid-rotation fertilization with Nitrogen and Phosphorus can have long term (4-8 year) growth gains. Slight reductions in wood density are short-lived (1-2 years) and occur while the tree is producing dense, stiff mature wood. Impacts of mid-rotation fertilization on wood properties for manufacturing are estimated to be minimal. Genetic differences are evident in wood density and other properties. Single family plantings showed somewhat more uniform properties than bulk improved or unimproved seedlots. Selection of genetic sources with optimal wood properties may counter some of the negative impacts of intensive weed control and fertilization. This work will allow forest managers to better predict the effects of their practices on the quality of their final product.

Richard F. Daniels; Alexander Clark III

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Scots Pine (pinus sylvestris L.) on Shingle Fields: A Dendrochronologic Reconstruction of Early Summer Precipitation in Mideast Sweden  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees growing on shingle fields offer a unique possibility to reconstruct precipitation and study climate variability in the fairly humid eastern part of central Sweden. Tree-ring characteristics were compared ...

Karin Jnsson; Christer Nilsson

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

A biologically-consistent stand growth model for loblolly pine in the Piedmont physiographic region, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate, nutrition and carbon cycling modules for studying the effects of a changing environment. Key words: Pinus taeda, state space,, hybrid model, carbon, climate change, forest nutrition 1. Introduction, vegetation control, or genetic improvement. In- creasingly, there is interest in predicting responses to cli

García, Oscar

23

Growth responses of mature loblolly pine to dead wood.manipulations.  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale manipulations of dead wood in mature Pinus taeda L. stands in the southeastern United States included a major one-time input of logs (fivefold increase in log volume) created by felling trees onsite, annual removals of all dead wood above >10 cm in diameter and >60 cm in length, and a reference in which no manipulations took place. We returned over a decade later to determine how these treatments affected tree growth using increment cores. There were no significant differences in tree density, basal area or tree diameters among treatments at the time of sampling. Although tree growth was consistently higher in the log-input plots and lower in the removal plots, this was true even during the 5 year period before the experiment began. When growth data from this initial period were included in the model as a covariate, no differences in post-treatment tree growth were detected. It is possible that treatment effects will become apparent after more time has passed, however.

Ulyshen, Michael D.; Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Assessing the Significance of Above- and Belowground Carbon Allocation of Fast- and Slow-Growing Families of Loblolly Pine - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this project we experimentally evaluated the below-ground biomass and carbon allocation and partitioning of four different fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine located in Scotland County, NC, in an effort to increase the long-term performance of the crop. The trees were subjected to optimal nutrition and control since planting in 1993. Destructive harvests in 1998 and 2000 were used for whole?plant biomass estimates and to identify possible family differences in carbon acquisition (photosynthesis) and water use efficiency. At regular intervals throughout each year we sampled tissues for carbohydrate analyses to assess differences in whole-tree carbon storage. Mini rhizotron observation tubes were installed to monitor root system production and turnover. Stable isotope analysis was used to examine possible functional differences in water and nutrient acquisition of root systems between the various families. A genetic dissection of root ontogenic and architectural traits, including biomass partitioning, was conducted using molecular markers to better understand the functional implications of these traits on resource acquisition and whole-plant carbon allocation.

Topa, M. A.; Weinstein, D. A.; Retzlaff, W. A.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Mill study of the quality yield, and mechanical properties of plywood produced from fast-grown loblolly pine  

SciTech Connect

Veneers were cut from 37 fast-grown pines 20-25 year old and from 27 trees with average growth rates in East Texas. After drying, the veneer was used to make plywood panels with a variety of assembly criteria. The yield and grade of veneer were substantially less from the fast-grown trees with a large core of juvenile wood, than from the slower-grown trees of similar size. The greatest reduction was in veneer grade, with fast-grown trees yielding less than 1% of input volume as grade C or better, while control trees exceeded 20%. Plywood made from fast-grown trees had mechanical properties that were marginal for the species, especially in stiffness and MOE. Bending strength was reduced, but less so. It is concluded that use of fast-grown, short-rotation trees will preclude the production of higher grade panels.

MacPeak, M.D.; Burkhart, L.F.; Weldon, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Why Sequence Loblolly Pine BACs?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Sederoff (North Carolina State Univ.), and Daniel S. Rokhsar (DOE JGI). Program: CSP 2009 Home > Sequencing > UC logo DOE logo Contact Us Credits Disclaimer Access...

27

TREE-RING DATING OF OLD-GROWTH LONGLEAF PINE (PINUS PALUSTRIS MILL.) LOGS FROM AN EXPOSED TIMBER CRIB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a timber crib dam. Inspection revealed these logs to be old-growth longleaf pines, which are now rare and Grashot 1976; Stahle 1979; Bortolot et al. 2001; Mann 2002; Grissino-Mayer and van de Gevel 2007), infer to help date other historical structures and prehistoric archaeological sites (Stahle 1979) and create

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

28

Pine Tree Growth Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pine Tree Growth Locations Pine Tree Growth Locations Name: Amielee Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do pine trees not grow south of the equator? Replies: Dear Amielee, The natural distribution of the pines is the northern hemisphere: http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/tree/eukaryotes/green_plants/embryophytes/conif ers/pinaceae/pinus/pinus.html However, pines have become introduced into the southern hemisphere through cultivation: http://www.woodweb.com/~treetalk/Radiata_Pine/wowhome.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, Ph.D. Hi Amielee Some pine trees do live south of the equator but we (I live in Australia) do not have the huge forests of native conifers that you have in the northern hemisphere. Even in the northern hemisphere conifers are only found in two forest types: 1. Tiaga

29

CHRONIC IRRADIATION OF SCOTS PINE TREES (PINUS SYLVESTRIS) IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE: DOSIMETRY AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 years old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y{sup -1}) to approximately 7 Gy y{sup -1} in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Highlights from ThreeHighlights from Three Decades of Loblolly PineDecades of Loblolly Pine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ft33 of wood andof wood and that stand N demand and soil N supply varythat stand N demand and soil N current productivitythan current productivity Intensive Plantations? Natural Stands #12;Estimated Maximum

31

Comparison of Red-Cockaded Woodpecker (Piciodes borealis) Nestling Diet in Old-Growth and Old-Field Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automatic cameras were used to record adult woodpecker diets in old-growth and old-field longleaf pine in the South. Roaches were the number one prey for the woodpeckers based on either biomass or numbers. The latter ranged from 37% to 57% of the prey numbers and 55%-73% of the biomass. Morisita's index of similarity between old-field and old growth varied from 0.89 to 0.95. The authors conclude that the prey base is similar in both conditions and that old-growth provides similar foraging habitat.

Hanula, J.L.; Engstrom, R.T.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ELEVATED CO{sub 2} IN A PROTOTYPE FREE-AIR CO{sub 2} ENRICHMENT FACILITY AFFECTS PHOTOSYNTHETIC NITROGEN RELATIONS IN A MATURING PINE FOREST  

SciTech Connect

A maturing loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest was exposed to elevated CO{sub 2} in the natural environment in a perturbation study conducted over three seasons using the free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) technique. At the time measurements were begun in this study, the pine canopy was comprised entirely of foliage which had developed under elevated CO{sub 2} conditions (atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] {approx} 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}). Measurements of leaf photosynthetic responses to CO{sub 2} were taken to examine the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on photosynthetic N nutrition in a pine canopy under elevated CO{sub 2}. Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} response curves (A-c{sub i} curves) were similar in FACE trees under elevated CO{sub 2} compared with counterpart trees in ambient plots for the first foliage cohort produced in the second season of CO{sub 2} exposure, with changes in curve form detected in the foliage cohorts subsequently produced under elevated CO{sub 2}. Differences in the functional relationship between carboxylation rate and N{sub a} suggest that for a given N{sub a} allocated among successive cohorts of foliage in the upper canopy, V{sub c max} was 17% lower in FACE versus Ambient trees. The authors also found that foliar Rubisco content per unit total protein derived from Western blot analysis was lower in late-season foliage in FACE foliage compared with ambient-grown foliage. The results illustrate a potentially important mode of physiological adjustment to growth conditions that may operate in forest canopies. Their findings suggest that mature loblolly pine trees growing in the field may have the capacity for shifts in intrinsic nitrogen utilization for photosynthesis under elevated CO{sub 2} that are not dependent on changes in leaf N. While carboxylation efficiency per unit N apparently decreased under elevated CO{sub 2}, photosynthetic rates in trees at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations {approx} 550 pmol mol{sub {minus}1} are still enhanced compared to trees grown and measured at the current ambient CO{sub 2} concentration when compared at a common N status. The findings from this prototype study suggest a need for continued examination of internal feedbacks at the whole-tree and ecosystem level in forests that may influence long-term photosynthetic responses to elevated CO{sub 2}.

ELLSWORTH,D.S.; LA ROCHE,J.; HENDREY,G.R.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Elevated CO{sub 2} in a prototype free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment facility affects photosynthetic nitrogen relations in a maturing pine forest  

SciTech Connect

A maturing loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest was exposed to elevated CO{sub 2} in the natural environment in a perturbation study conducted over three seasons using the free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) technique. At the time measurements were begun in this study, the pine canopy was comprised entirely of foliage which had developed under elevated CO{sub 2} conditions (atmospheric CO{sub 2} {approx} 550 {micro}mol/mol{sup {minus}1}). Measurements of leaf photosynthetic responses to CO{sub 2} were taken to examine the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on photosynthetic N nutrition in a pine canopy under elevated CO{sub 2}. Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} response curves (A-c{sub i} curves) were similar in FACE trees under elevated CO{sub 2} compared with counterpart trees in ambient plots for the first foliage cohort produced in the second season of CO{sub 2} exposure, with changes in curve form detected in the foliage cohorts subsequently produced under elevated CO{sub 2}. Differences in the functional relationship between carboxylation rate and N{sub a} suggest that for a given N{sub a} allocated among successive cohorts of foliage in the upper canopy, V{sub c max} was 17% lower in FACE versus Ambient trees. The authors also found that foliar Rubisco content per unit total protein derived from Western blot analysis was lower in late-season foliage in FACE foliage compared with ambient-grown foliage. The results illustrate a potentially important mode of physiological adjustment to growth conditions that may operate in forest canopies. Findings suggest that mature loblolly pine trees growing in the field may have the capacity for shifts in intrinsic nitrogen utilization for photosynthesis under elevated CO{sub 2} that are not dependent on changes in leaf N. Findings suggest a need for continued examination of internal feedbacks at the whole-tree and ecosystem level in forests that may influence long-term photosynthetic responses to elevated CO{sub 2}.

Ellsworth, D.S.; LaRoche, J.; Hendrey, G.R.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Performance and value of CAD-deficient pine- Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The southern US produces 58% of the nation's timber, much of it grown in intensively managed plantations of genetically improved loblolly pine. One of the fastest-growing loblolly pine selections made by the NCSU-Industry Cooperative Tree Improvement Program, whose progeny are widely planted, is also the only known natural carrier of a rare gene, cadn1. This allele codes for deficiency in an enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of lignin precursors. This study is to characterize this candidate gene for marker-assisted selection and deployment in the breeding program. This research will enhance the sustainability of forest production in the South, where land-use pressures will limit the total area available in the future for intensively managed plantations. Furthermore, this research will provide information to establish higher-value plantation forests with more desirable wood/fiber quality traits. A rare mutant allele (cad-n1) of the cad gene in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) causes a deficiency in the production of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). The effects of this allele were examined by comparing wood density and growth traits of cad-n1 heterozygous trees with those of wild-type trees in a 10-year-old open-pollinated family trial growing under two levels of fertilization in Scotland County, North Carolina. In all, 200 trees were sampled with 100 trees for each treatment. Wood density measurements were collected from wood cores at breast height using x-ray densitometry. We found that the substitution of cad-n1 for a wild-type allele (Cad) was associated with a significant effect on wood density. The cad-n1 heterozygotes had a significantly higher wood density (+2.6%) compared to wild-type trees. The higher density was apparently due to the higher percentage of latewood in the heterozygotes. The fertilization effect was highly significant for both growth and wood density traits. While no cad genotype x treatment interactions was found for any of the traits studied, in the fertilized plots, the effect of the cad-n1 allele on wood density was reduced. The study indicates that the cad-n1 allele could be a valuable gene to the pulp and paper industry for the purpose of enhancing pulp yields through increasing wood density. Stem growth and wood density associated with a mutant null (cad-n1) allele were examined in three 15-year-old loblolly pine diallel tests, established on two sites in the southern United States. In each diallel test, one or two cad-n1 heterozygous parents were crossed with five unrelated wild-type parents, to produce five or ten full-sib families. In all, 839 trees from 20 full-sib families in four genetic backgrounds (a cad-n1 heterozygote x 5 unrelated trees) were sampled, genotyped at the cad locus, and assessed for growth and wood density traits. In a combined analysis of all four genetic backgrounds, we found evidence for effects of increased wood density associated with the cad-n1 allele at age 15 (p=0.03) years and height growth at ages 6 (p=0.03) and 15 (p=0.005). There were large differences in the cad-n1 effects for the various growth and wood traits among the diallel tests. This variation may be due to either different genetic backgrounds among the parents of the different diallel tests, or for different growing environments at the field sites. Even though the cad-n1 effect on growth and wood density was significant across genetic backgrounds, the effect was variable among full-sib families within backgrounds. We speculate that certain wild-type alleles from second parents specifically interact with cad-n1 producing large positive effects. In addition, pleiotropic effects on growth and wood density appear to be associated with the cad-n1 allele. While substantial gains are possible through deployment of trees carrying cad-n1, these gains may be family-specific and should be verified for each cross through field testing.

Bailian Li; Houmin Chang; Hasan Jameel

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

pine (mail utility info)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pine (mail utility info) pine (mail utility info) Basics, FAQ, etc, On our UNIX machines, module load pine The line module load pine should ALSO be in the file ~/.rc/user_modules (The pine module also includes pico) pine usage with IMAP4 (UNIX) Moving pine email files into IMAP4 LBNL UNIX info on pine links to Pine Information Center Pine 4.2.1/Solaris: Forwarding as attachment; the following procedure has proved successful for at least some users: Check the option "enable-full-header-cmd". To get to this option, 1. M (Main Menu) 2. S (Setup) "Choose a setup task from the menu below :" 3. C (Configure) 4. Scroll down to "Advanced Command Preferences", and press "X" to set "enable-full-header-cmd". It looks like this: ================================================================

36

Predictions of individual-tree and whole-stand attributes for loblolly pine plantations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. T. A. Hargrove, Manager of Champion's Newberry Office; Mr. Ellis Davenport, Champion Timber Marker

Cao, Quang V.

37

An investigation of the kinetics for the fast pyrolysis of loblolly pine woody biomass .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the search for fossil fuel alternatives the production of bio-oil through the pyrolysis of biomass is one method which has shown evidence of scalability, (more)

Williams, Alexander W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Simple Model to Predict Scalar Dispersion within a Successively Thinned Loblolly Pine Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bark beetles kill millions of acres of trees in the United States annually by using chemical signaling to attack host trees en masse. As an attempt to control infestations, forest managers use synthetic semiochemical sources to attract beetles to ...

Steven L. Edburg; Gene Allwine; Brian Lamb; David Stock; Harold Thistle; Holly Peterson; Brian Strom

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Pine Tree Seed Germination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pine Tree Seed Germination Pine Tree Seed Germination Name: Debbie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I live in an area with many pine trees and pine cones. I would like to start seedlings to replace the older trees as I lose them. How do I do it? I have searched the internet for how but have yet to find an anwser. I've examined the pine cones and am at a loss, where are the seeds? I have soft long needle trees with medium pine cones, I have Hemlock trees with small cones and I have very sharp long needle trees with longer, narrow cones. Do the cones have to have already fallen off the tree before using seeds? Thank you!! Replies: Dear Debbie, The following may be helpful: http://www.uidaho.edu/cfwr/forres/nursery/research/research/projects.htm http://www.walden.org/thoreau/writings/seeds/dispersion_01.htm

40

Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program <...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This data set presents measured values of plant diameter and height, biomass of plant components, and nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc) concentrations from a study of the effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen fertilization on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) conducted in open-top chambers in Placerville, California, from 1991 through 1996. This data set contains values from 1991 through 1993.

Johnson, D.W. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center]|[Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture; Ball, J.T. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center; Walker, R.F. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture; Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Search for major genes with progeny test data to accelerate the development of genetically superior loblolly pine. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the progress of the three tasks of this project. The tasks are: (1) develop genetic models and analytical methods; (2) molecular confirmation of major gene segregation; and (3) develop strategies for marker-assisted breeding.

NONE

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Collins Pine Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Collins Pine Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Collins Pine Biomass Facility Facility...

44

Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.  

SciTech Connect

Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

SSA Old Jack Pine Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSA-OJP) SSA-OJP) View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-OJP site. The road to the OJP site The flux tower and the hut The truss tower connected to the flux tower by cables The flux tower< The canopy access tower The SRC meteorology tower The under-canopy flux station The moss-covered jack pine tree The ground cover at the OJP site Aerial view of the SSA-Old Jack Pine site looking to the northeast. The Flux Tower at SSA-Old Jack Pine site. The Sodar site. The NOAA sodar located near the Old Jack Pine in the SSA. The under-canopy radiation track This is a 14 meter-long metal track in the forest with a mobile radiometer out on an arm on a small motorized cart (visible at the center of the picture) that travels through the forest taking measurements of PAR and net radiation.

46

Pine Mountain Builders | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pine Mountain Builders Pine Mountain Builders Place Pine Mountain, GA Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Pine Mountain Builders is a company located in Pine Mountain, GA. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Pine_Mountain_Builders&oldid=379448" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863719699

47

Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the woodterpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DENDROCLIMATOLOGICAL ANALYSIS AND FIRE HISTORY OF LONGLEAF PINE (Pinus palustris Mill.) IN THE ATLANTIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Congress; federal, state, and local governmental organiza- tions; Native Americans; grassroots citizen-level radioactive waste management issues, including grassroots citi- zen groups, environmental groups, and Native American groups. Chapter 1 - Background 3 #12;Board Interactions with Congress On March 14, 1994, Board

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

49

Growth and chemical responses to CO{sub 2} enrichment - Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana Mill.)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have been increasing over the past several decades and are projected to continue increasing for several more decades. Because of the fundamental role of CO{sub 2} in the physiology of all green plants, changes in plant growth and productivity are expected. There is ample experimental evidence illustrating an increase in photosynthesis and growth with increasing CO{sub 2} concentrations. However, much of this evidence is based on short term results and optimal growth and nutrient conditions. Kramer raised the question of whether plants growing in natural environments, which are probably more often limited by water or nutrient (especially nitrogen) deficiencies than by low CO{sub 2}, will respond to rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. This package covers one segment of the research performed to determine whether the proposed mechanism occurs with elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations.

Luxmoore, R.J.; Norby, R.J.; Neill, E.G.O.; Weller, D.G. [and others

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Climate Warming and Drought Effects on Pinus and Juniperus Species: Contrasting Drought Tolerance Traits Limit Function and Growth in Tree Seedlings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Junipers and pines exhibit contrasting patterns of growth decline and mortality with climate change-type warming and drought; yet, the underlying physiological mechanisms are not fully understood. Does warming exacerbate the effects of drought on gas exchange physiology and growth? Do the combined effects of drought and warming differ for pines and junipers? To what extent do isohydric vs. anisohydric responses to water limitation in pines and junipers constrain net leaf CO2 exchange and plant growth response to drought and warming? To address these questions, we compared responses of leaf gas exchange and growth in seedlings of juniper (Juniperus scopulorum, J. virginiana) and pine (Pinus edulis, P. taeda) species of contrasting arid and mesic origin in a study of combined warming (ambient, +1.8 C) and enhanced summer drought (long-term mean, -40%). Warming and enhanced summer drought each reduced photosynthesis and growth and effects were largely independent, suggesting that warming exacerbates drought effects on growth. Enhanced summer drought and warming had distinct impacts on photosynthetic carbon gain that were differentially revealed depending upon soil water content. Warming reduced light-saturated net photosynthesis (Asat) under low soil water contents, whereas carry-over effects of drought treatment were evident under well-watered conditions. Short-term soil drying led to greater reduction of Asat in pines (-51%) rather than junipers (-30%). Under short-term water-limited conditions, Asat and gs were about two-times higher for junipers compared to pines. Relative growth rate of junipers declined with warming (-28%) and drought (-50%) treatments. In contrast, pine growth and Asat declined more with warming than drought. Only P. edulis exhibited increased mortality in response to warming and drought, reaching 75% in the combined warming and drought treatment. Diminished sensitivity of R to water limitations, coupled with steeper reductions in Asat with decreasing soil water content in isohydric pines compared to anisohydric junipers could account for the greater sensitivity of pines to warming and drought under climate change.

Lenoir, Katherine Judith

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Search for major genes with progeny test data to accelerate the development of genetically superior loblolly pines. Quarterly report [July - September 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report describes the progress made on the 3 research tasks of the project. The 3 research tasks are: (1) Develop genetic models and analytical methods; (2) Molecular confirmation of major gene segregation; and (3) Develop strategies for marker-assisted breeding.

Li, Bailian

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Running Title: C and N Allocation in Pine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A long standing challenge has been understanding how plants and ecosystems respond to shifts in the balance of resource availabilities. The continuing rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2} will induce changes in the availability and use of several terrestrial ecosystem resources. We report on the acquisition and allocation of carbon and nitrogen in Pinus ponderosa Laws. seedlings grown at three levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (370, 525, and 700 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) and three levels of soil nitrogen supply in a controlled environment experiment. Nitrogen was applied (0, 100, and 200 {micro}g N g soil{sup -1}) at planting and again at week 26 of a 58-week, 4-harvest experiment. At the final harvest, plants grown with variety low available soil nitrogen showed no significant response to atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Plants at higher N levels responded positively to CO{sub 2} with the highest biomass at the middle CO{sub 2} level. Plants growing at the lowest N levels immediately allocated a relatively large portion of their nitrogen and biomass to roots. Plants growing at near present ambient CO{sub 2} levels allocated relatively little material to roots when N was abundant but moved both carbon and nitrogen below-ground when N was withheld. Plants growing at higher CO{sub 2} levels, allocated more C and N to roots even when N was abundant, and made only small shifts in allocation patterns when N was no longer supplied. In general, allocation of C and N to roots tended to increase when N supply was restricted and also with increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} level. These allocation responses were consistent with patterns suggesting a functional balance in the acquisition of above-ground versus below-ground resources. In particular, variation in whole tree average nitrogen concentration can explain 68% of the variation ratio of root biomass to shoot biomass across the harvests. The capability to respond to temporal variation in nutrient conditions, the dynamics of nutrient uptake, and the dynamics of nutrient use were all seen to be influenced by the interplay between previous N supply, previous C supply, and the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The data suggest that in an elevated CO{sub 2} atmosphere ponderosa pine seedlings will have higher root biomass and be likely to capture more N compared to seedlings today. Further, the combined growth and allocation responses of Ponderosa pine at elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in higher growth per unit N (nitrogen productivity) and lower N per gram of tissue (all tissues not just leaves) when nitrogen was not in abundant supply.

Ball, J. Timothy

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Application of composted pulp and paper mill sludge to a young pine plantation  

SciTech Connect

Disposing of sludge recovered from the effluent stream of pulp and paper mills has traditionally involved landfilling. Shortages in landfill space and increasingly stringent environmental regulations in many countries have forced the industry to seek alternative disposal options. The authors assessed the feasibility of compost-recycling a primary pulp and paper mill sludge (PMS) for use as a nutrient-releasing mulch in plantation forestry. The effects of the composted PMS on the growth, nutrition, water relations, and week suppression in a 3-yr-old plantation of radiata pine (Pinus radiata D.Don) on an infertile sandy soil in southern Tasmania were assessed. Compost was applied to the surface without incorporation in 0.5-m wide bands in tree rows at rates of 0, 20, 40, and 60 metric t ha{sup {minus}1} (dry matter). One year after application of compost, the percentage increase in stem diameter was 40 to 66% greater than that achieved in untreated plots, with better growth at the highest compost application rate. Improved growth of radiata pine after application of compost was primarily attributable to a 17 to 37% increase in the concentration of foliar N and to decreased water stress in amended plots. Nitrogen released from the compost was mostly absorbed by plant roots within the first 20 cm of the soil profile, with no significant movement beyond this depth range. Application of compost prepared from PMS to young stands of radiata pine was found to be acceptable recycling alternative for this material, capable of improving plantation productivity.

Jackson, M.J.; Line, M.A.; Wilson, S.; Hetherington, S.J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Pinyon Pines II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pinyon Pines II Pinyon Pines II Jump to: navigation, search Name Pinyon Pines II Facility Pinyon Pines II (Alta IX) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi Pass CA Coordinates 35.01917213°, -118.3031845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.01917213,"lon":-118.3031845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

Pinyon Pines I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pinyon Pines I Pinyon Pines I Jump to: navigation, search Name Pinyon Pines I Facility Pinyon Pines I (Alta VII) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi Pass CA Coordinates 35.01917213°, -118.3031845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.01917213,"lon":-118.3031845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Pine Ridge Job Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Job Corp Job Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Pine Ridge Job Corp Facility Pine Ridge Job Corp Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Pine Ridge Job Corp Energy Purchaser Omaha Public Power District Location Pine Ridge Job Corp Coordinates 42.68121684°, -102.9838818° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.68121684,"lon":-102.9838818,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Pine Tree Development Zones Program (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pine Tree Development Zones program offers eligible businesses the chance to reduce, and sometimes eliminate, state taxes for up to ten years. There is a statutory requirement of hiring a...

58

Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farmer owned investment and management team which developed and manages the Pine Lake ethanol plant. References Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

59

Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Comfort Advantage Plus Homes with Heat Pumps: $500 Comfort Advantage Homes with Heat Pumps: $300 Additional Heat Pump: $150 Provider Southern Pine Electric Power Association Southern Pine Electric Power Association offers the Comfort Advantage Home Program which provides rebates on heat pumps to new homes which meet certain Comfort Advantage weatherization standards. To qualify for this rebate the home must have:

60

Pine Tree Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pine Tree Wind Farm Pine Tree Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pine Tree Wind Farm Facility Pine Tree Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Developer Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Energy Purchaser Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Location North of Mojave CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mapping Pine Mortality by Aerial Photography,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Forest Service, for use of aerial survey data; Fred P. Haifl, William T. McClelland, and Michael SMapping Pine Mortality by Aerial Photography, Umstead State Park, North Carolina United States Carolina State Highway Department, for aerial photography by his staff; Coleman Doggett, North Carolina

Standiford, Richard B.

62

Lightning, fire and longleaf pine: Using natural disturbance to guide management.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract The importance of lightning as an ignition source for the fire adapted longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem is widely recognized. Lightning also impacts this system on a smaller scale by causing individual tree mortality. The objective of this study was to determine mortality due to lightning and other agents in longleaf stands on the Ocala National Forest in central Florida and to quantify lightning ignited fire. Mortality from lightning was also tracked in longleaf stands on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Lightning killed more trees than any other agent with a mean mortality of nearly 1 tree/3 ha/yr in Florida and 1 tree/8 ha/yr in South Carolina. The probability of a tree being struck by lightning increased as a function of tree height at both sites, i.e. lightning preferentially removed the largest trees from the stand. In addition lightning strikes were clumped within stands, sometimes killed multiple trees with a single strike, and often hit trees on the edge of existing gaps. The combination of these processes means gaps suitable for regeneration within longleaf stands are created quite rapidly. This information provides guidelines for the development of selection harvest systems based on this natural disturbance. Although lightning activity was greatest during the summer months in Florida and most fires occurred in June, the probability of a strike causing a fire was highest in February to May. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Kenneth W. Outcalt

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Stand biomass dynamics of pine plantations and natural forests on dry steppe in Kazakhstan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass dynamics were studied in isolated relict stands of scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) on the dry steppe of Kazakhstan (53-54N) where potential evaporation is 500-600 mm/yr and the rainfall is 250-260 mm/yr. Samples were taken from 7 plots in natural stands on sandy forest soils (age 13-110 years) and 10 plots in plantations on dark-chestnut-coloured soils (age 5-50 years). Nine or 10 sample trees were taken from each plot, giving a total of 68 and 96 sample trees in natural and plantation stands respectively. Root systems were excavated and fractionated in 11 plots. Analyses indicated that the stability of these stands becomes critical at 10-20 yrs, when foliage biomass reaches its maximum (7-13 t/ha dry weight), both in plantations and natural stands. Self-regulating mechanisms in natural stands provide stability that may not develop in some plantations. Natural stands may show an abrupt decrease in foliage biomass at the time of canopy closure, but it increases again by age 40-50 yrs. In plantations this critical period may cause die-back and may trigger stand collapse before maturity. Stem and root biomass increases monotonically and does not depend upon stand origin. The total biomass production is influenced by ground water level and the presence of and depth to the clay layer underlying the sandy sediments.

Vladimir A. Usoltsev; Jerome K. Vanclay

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE- SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine Community propose to prepare a feasibility study for

65

Big Pine, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigPine,California&oldid227766" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

66

Big Pine Key, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigPineKey,Florida&oldid227765" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here...

67

Behind the pine curtain: community theatres of Deep East Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"Behind the Pine Curtain" is a common term that has come to identify the region known as Deep East Texas. The purpose in writing this (more)

Vaughn, Patrick Clay

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Association between severity of prescribed burns and subsequent activity of conifer-infesting beetles in stands of longleaf pine  

SciTech Connect

A randomized complete block experiment was performed to measure the effect of prescribed, dormant-season burns of three different levels of severity (measured as fuel consumption and soil surface heating) on subsequent insect infestation and mortality of mature longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Multiple-funnel traps baited with a low release rate of turpentine and ethanol were used to monitor activity of certain coniferophagous beetles. Non-aggressive species, including the root beetles Hylastes salebrosus Eichhoff and H. tenuis Eichhoff, the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus pubescens Zimmermann, the reproduction weevil Pachylobius picivorus (Germar), and buprestid borers, were attracted to burned plots in numbers that correlated positively with burn severity. Beetle attraction to burned sites was greatest in the first weeks post-burn and disappeared by the second year. Two potential tree-killing bark beetles, Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier) and Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), were trapped in significant numbers but exhibited no attraction to burned plots. Tree mortality correlated significantly with the severity of the burns and amounted to 5% of stems in the hottest burn treatment after 3 years. The majority of the mortality was observed in the second and third years post-burn. Attacks of Ips and Dendroctonus bark beetles were apparent on nearly all dead or dying trees, and evidence suggested that root pathogens may have contributed to tree susceptibility to beetle attack and mortality. Our data indicate that selection of burn regimes that reduce or eliminate consumption of duff (e.g., favoring heading fires over backing fires) could significantly reduce mortality of longleaf pine managed for long rotations Published by Elsevier B.V.

Sullivan, Brian, T; Fettig, C. J.; Otrosina, William, J.; Dalusky, Mark, J.; Berrisford, C.W.

2003-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

Microsoft Word - Tall_Pines_CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lee Watts Lee Watts Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game for purchase of the Tall Pines Property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-061-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 51 North Range 3 West Section 2 and Township 52 North Range 3 West Section 35, in Kootenai County, Idaho. Parcel is located on the northeastern shore of Hayden

70

Spectral identification of ozone-damaged pine needles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Needles were collected from ponderosa and Jeffrey pine trees at three sites in the Sierra Nevada, and were assembled into 504 samples and grouped according to five dominant live needle conditions-green, winter fleck, sucking insect damage, scale insect ...

A. V. Di Vittorio; G. S. Biging

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

MountainPineBeetle For more information about the management of mountain pine beetle, contact your nearest office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spraying before mid-July is one method of keeping uninfected but susceptible pines protected. Solar: Solar. This can be done with or without plastic and requires six to eight weeks of warm weather. A thinned

72

Impact of Screening on Behavior During Storage and Cost of Ground Small-Diameter Pine Trees: A Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Whole comminuted trees are known to self-heat and undergo quality changes during storage. Trommel screening after grinding is a process that removes fines from the screened material and removes a large proportion of high-ash, high-nutrient material. In this study, the trade-off between an increase in preprocessing cost from trommel screening and an increase in quality of the screened material was examined. Fresh lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) was comminuted using a drum grinder with a 10-cm screen, and the resulting material was distributed into separate fines and overs piles. A third pile of unscreened material, the unsorted pile, was also examined. The three piles exhibited different characteristics during a 6-week storage period. The overs pile was much slower to heat. The overs pile reached a maximum temperature of 56.88 degrees C, which was lower than the maximum reached by the other two piles (65.98 degrees C and 63.48 degrees C for the unsorted and fines, respectively). The overs also cooled faster and dried to a more uniform moisture content and had a lower ash content than the other two piles. Both piles of sorted material exhibited improved airflow and more drying than the unsorted material. Looking at supply system costs from preprocessing through in-feed into thermochemical conversion, this study found that trommel screening reduced system costs by over $3.50 per dry matter ton and stabilized material during storage.

Erin Searcy; Brad D Blackwelder; Mark E Delwiche; Allison E Ray; Kevin L Kenney

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Why sequence Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fusiforme? Forests are major carbon sink in terrestrial ecosystems and are significant source of biomass for producing cellulosic biofuels. Loblolly and slash pines are the...

74

Experimental analysis of stove top designs for pine needle combustion in a semi-gasifier burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The motivation behind this project was to develop a better understanding of the role that the stove top plays in a stove where pine needles are the main fuel source. Pine needles have distinct characteristics in their ...

Roqu, Alyssa J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Characteristics of pine needle combustion in a semi-gasifier burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The motivation behind this report was to develop a stronger understanding of pine needle combustion behavior in a semi-gasifier, in order to ultimately design an effective pine needle cook stove for people in the developing ...

Fang, Liane Jessica

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

PINON PINE: An advanced IGCC demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Pinon Pine Power Project is a second generation integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, located at Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPC) Tracy Station, 17 miles east of Reno, Nevada. The project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT). SPPC intends to operate the plant in base-load mode to supply approximately 100 megawatts electric (MWe) to the transmission grid. This plant will be the first full-scale integration of several advanced technologies: an air-blown KRW gasifier; full-stream hot gas desulfurization using a transport reactor system with a zinc-based sorbent; full-stream, high-temperature ceramic filters for particulate removal; the General Electric Model MS6001FA (617A) Gas Turbine Engine/generator, and a 950 pound per square inch absolute (psia), 950{degrees}F steam turbine generator. This paper reviews the overall configuration and integration of the gasification and power islands components, which yield the plant`s high efficiency. Current status of the project is addressed.

Freier, M.D.; Jewell, D.M. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Motter, J.W. [Sierra Pacific Power Co., Reno, NV (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Microsoft Word - CX Memo LaPineShunt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michael Gilchrist Michael Gilchrist Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: LaPine Substation Shunt Reactor Addition Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: LaPine, Deschutes County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to add equipment at its LaPine Substation in Deschutes County, Oregon to improve regional transmission voltage stability and increase transmission network efficiency. The site is located on land managed by the U.S. Forest Service. BPA would install a 230-kilovolt (kV) shunt reactor bank, bus bar and associated electrical work in the northeast corner of the substation tract. The substation fenceline and groundmat would be

78

Slash Pine Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Place Georgia Utility Id 17290 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Outdoor Lighting 100 Watt HPS Security Light Lighting Outdoor Lighting 1000 Watt HPS Flood Light* Lighting Outdoor Lighting 1000 Watt MH Flood Light* Lighting Outdoor Lighting 1500 Watt MH Flood Light* Lighting Outdoor Lighting 175 Watt HPS Security Light Lighting Outdoor Lighting 250 Watt HPS Security Light Lighting

79

Pine Tree Extension Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pine Tree Extension Wind Farm Pine Tree Extension Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pine Tree Extension Wind Farm Facility Pine Tree Extension Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Developer Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Energy Purchaser Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Location North of Mojave CA Coordinates 35.076651°, -118.255291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.076651,"lon":-118.255291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

PinonPine IGCC Power Project: A DOE Assesment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Piñon Pine IGCC Power Project Piñon Pine IGCC Power Project A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2003/1183 December 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 West Third Street, Suite 1400 Tulsa, OK 74103-3519 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pulp Biomass Facility Pulp Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility Facility Alabama Pine Pulp Sector Biomass Location Monroe County, Alabama Coordinates 31.5119068°, -87.460397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.5119068,"lon":-87.460397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Pembroke Pines, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pembroke Pines, Florida: Energy Resources Pembroke Pines, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.0031465°, -80.223937° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.0031465,"lon":-80.223937,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

Southern Pines, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pines, North Carolina: Energy Resources Pines, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.1740471°, -79.3922539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1740471,"lon":-79.3922539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

84

Southern Pine Elec Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pine Elec Power Assn Pine Elec Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 17647 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Agriculture/Farm Multi-Phase Commercial Commercial General Service (Under 75 kVA) Commercial Commercial Large General Service (75 kVA - 1000 kVA) Commercial Commercial/Small power Commercial Distributed Generation Rider Commercial Industrial General Service (Under 75 kVA) Industrial Industrial Large General Service (75 kVA - 1000 kVA) Primary Voltage

85

White Pine County, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pine County, Nevada: Energy Resources Pine County, Nevada: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.5564495°, -114.524264° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5564495,"lon":-114.524264,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

86

City of Pine Bluffs, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bluffs, Wyoming (Utility Company) Bluffs, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Pine Bluffs Place Wyoming Utility Id 15051 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electrical Household Residential General Electrical Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1250/kWh Commercial: $0.1050/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Pine_Bluffs,_Wyoming_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410

87

Pine Tree Fitchburg Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fitchburg Biomass Facility Fitchburg Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pine Tree Fitchburg Biomass Facility Facility Pine Tree Fitchburg Sector Biomass Owner Suez Renewable Energy NA Location Westminster, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.5459227°, -71.9106308° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5459227,"lon":-71.9106308,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Pine Tree Bethlehem Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bethlehem Biomass Facility Bethlehem Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pine Tree Bethlehem Biomass Facility Facility Pine Tree Bethlehem Sector Biomass Owner Suez Renewable Energy NA Location Bethlehem, New Hampshire Coordinates 44.27998°, -71.690941° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.27998,"lon":-71.690941,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Pine Lake, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pine Lake, Georgia: Energy Resources Pine Lake, Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7937162°, -84.2060309° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7937162,"lon":-84.2060309,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Pine Mountain, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Pine Mountain, GA) (Redirected from Pine Mountain, GA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6759423°, -84.1149163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6759423,"lon":-84.1149163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Experimental investigation and systems modeling of fractional catalytic pyrolysis of pine .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The fractional catalytic pyrolysis of pine was studied both experimentally and through models. A preliminary stage economic analysis was conducted for a wood chip pyrolysis (more)

Goteti, Anil Chaitanya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Pinon Pine Power Project. Annual report, August 1992--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report has been prepared to present the status of the Pinon Pine Power Project, a nominal 104 MWe (gross) integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant addition to Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPCo) system. This project will also serve as a demonstration project cost-shared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and SPPCo under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. The goal of the CCT Program is to demonstrate advanced coal utilization technologies that are energy efficient and reliable and that are able to achieve substantial reductions in emissions as compared with existing coal technologies. The Pinon Pine Power Project will demonstrate an IGCC system utilizing the Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) fluidized-bed gasification process operating in an air-blown mode with in-bed desulfurization and hot gas clean-up with a western bituminous coal. The Pinon Pine Power Project will be constructed and operated at SPPCo`s Tracy Power Station, an existing power generation facility located on a rural 724-acre plot approximately 17 miles east of Reno, NV.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

''The control of lignin synthesis''  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project we tested the hypothesis that regulation of the synthesis of lignin in secondary xylem cells in conifer trees involves the transport of glucosylated lignin monomers to the wall of xylem cells, followed by de-glucosylation in the cell wall by monolignol-specific glucosidase enzymes, which activates the monomers for lignin polymerization. The information we gathered is relevant to the fundamental understanding of how trees make wood, and to the applied goal of more environmentally friendly pulp and paper production. We characterized the complete genomic structure of the Coniferin-specific Beta-glucosidase (CBG) gene family in the conifers loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and partial genomic sequences were obtained in several other tree species. Both pine species contain multiple CBG genes which raises the possibility of differential regulation, perhaps related to the multiple roles of lignin in development and defense. Subsequent projects will need to include detailed gene expression studies of each gene family member during tree growth and development, and testing the role of each monolignol-specific glucosidase gene in controlling lignin content.

Carlson, John E.

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess sedimentation began affecting the wetland dynamics of Pine Gully in Seabrook, Texas during the first quarter of 2004. This sedimentation was sudden and became a serious problem for the dynamics of the Pine Gully wetland because the fine, well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment chocking. The main purpose of this study is to determine the new source and mechanism of sedimentation in Pine Gully, document changes from sedimentation, and determine a solution to prevent future sedimentation. Sedimentation in Pine Gully and coastal areas adjacent to Pine Gully has occurred in a region that has experienced subsidence and sea level rise. The sedimentation in Pine Gully is a direct result of new and sustained sediment at the mouth of Pine Gully. These new sediments are transported into Pine Gully by displacement waves from ships moving through the Houston Ship Channel. Beach renourishment at Wright Beach, located a half mile north of Pine Gully, occurred as Pine Gully experienced sedimentation. Construction of a breakwater at the mouth of Pine Gully and subsequent removal of sediment in Pine Gully itself is ultimately the solution to revitalizing the wetland to its pre-sedimentation state. Replanting of native vegetation killed off by sedimentation is recommended and would hasten the recovery of the wetland. Documenting the effects of this unique sedimentation in Pine Gully has implications for the future. Beach renourishment or coastal projects that may contribute excess sediment to the coastline should be concerned with unintended effects they may cause. Although an historically eroding shoreline exists, the effects of excess sedimentation can be severe. A coastal study should be done before sediment is added to the shoreline to identify any areas within the sphere of influence of the project. Ecosystems determined to be within the sphere of influence by a coastal study should implement preventative measures at those locations to avoid an ecological disaster similar to that in Pine Gully.

Culver, Wesley Richard

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Pinon pine project. Annual report, January 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

This annual report has been prepared to present the status of the Pinon Pine Project, a nominal 107 MWe (gross) coal-fired integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant addition to Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPCo) system. This project will also serve as a demonstration project cost-shared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and SPPCo under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. The goal of the CCT Program is to demonstrate advanced coal utilization technologies that are energy efficient, reliable and able to achieve substantial reductions in emissions as compared with existing coal technologies. The Pinon Pine Project will demonstrate an IGCC system utilizing the Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) fluidized-bed gasification process operating in an air-blown mode with in-bed desulfurization and hot gas clean-up with a western bituminous coal as the design fuel. Testing will also be performed on a high-sulfur eastern coal. The Pinon Pine Project will be constructed and operated at SPPCo`s Tracy Power Station, an existing power generation facility located on a rural 724-acre plot approximately 17 miles east of Reno, NV. This new unit will be designated as Tracy Unit No. 4. SPPCo, the project participant, has contracted with the Foster Wheeler USA Corporation (FW USA) for the overall project management, engineering, procurement and construction of the project. FW USA in turn has subcontracted with The M.W. Kellogg Company (MWK) for the engineering and procurement of key components for the Gasifier Island.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Pinon Pine Power Project. Annual report, January--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

This annual report has been prepared to present the status of the Pinon Pine Project, a nominal 107 MWe (gross) integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant addition to Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPCo) system. This project is a demonstration project cost-shared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and SPPCo under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. The goal of the CCT Program is to demonstrate advanced coal utilization technologies that are energy efficient and reliable and that are able to achieve substantial reductions in emissions as compared with existing coal technologies.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

White Pine Co. Public School System Biomass Conversion Heating Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The White Pine County School District and the Nevada Division of Forestry agreed to develop a pilot project for Nevada using wood chips to heat the David E. Norman Elementary School in Ely, Nevada. Consideration of the project was triggered by a ''Fuels for Schools'' grant that was brought to the attention of the School District. The biomass project that was part of a district-wide energy retrofit, called for the installation of a biomass heating system for the school, while the current fuel oil system remained as back-up. Woody biomass from forest fuel reduction programs will be the main source of fuel. The heating system as planned and completed consists of a biomass steam boiler, storage facility, and an area for unloading and handling equipment necessary to deliver and load fuel. This was the first project of it's kind in Nevada. The purpose of the DOE funded project was to accomplish the following goals: (1) Fuel Efficiency: Purchase and install a fuel efficient biomass heating system. (2) Demonstration Project: Demonstrate the project and gather data to assist with further research and development of biomass technology; and (3) Education: Educate the White Pine community and others about biomass and other non-fossil fuels.

Paul Johnson

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

White Pine Co. Public School System Biomass Conversion Heating Project  

SciTech Connect

The White Pine County School District and the Nevada Division of Forestry agreed to develop a pilot project for Nevada using wood chips to heat the David E. Norman Elementary School in Ely, Nevada. Consideration of the project was triggered by a ''Fuels for Schools'' grant that was brought to the attention of the School District. The biomass project that was part of a district-wide energy retrofit, called for the installation of a biomass heating system for the school, while the current fuel oil system remained as back-up. Woody biomass from forest fuel reduction programs will be the main source of fuel. The heating system as planned and completed consists of a biomass steam boiler, storage facility, and an area for unloading and handling equipment necessary to deliver and load fuel. This was the first project of it's kind in Nevada. The purpose of the DOE funded project was to accomplish the following goals: (1) Fuel Efficiency: Purchase and install a fuel efficient biomass heating system. (2) Demonstration Project: Demonstrate the project and gather data to assist with further research and development of biomass technology; and (3) Education: Educate the White Pine community and others about biomass and other non-fossil fuels.

Paul Johnson

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Price sensitivity of bioethanol produced in New Zealand from Pinus radiata wood  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis conducted of designs for industry-scale ethanol production facilities that use both hexoses and pentoses to produce 97 to 107 tonnes of anhydrous ethanol per day from 960 tonnes of Pinus radiata wood of 50% moisture content (480 oven-dried tonnes). Various process options and available technologies were considered for cost comparisons. The base case plant design was used to assess the probable importance of not fermenting thee wood pentose fraction. When pentose sugars were not fermented, the ethanol price increased from $0.71/L to $0.75/L. The influence of various economic factors on selling price is assessed.

Manderson, G.J.; Spencer, K.; Paterson, A.H.J. (Massey Univ., Palmerston North (New Zealand). Dept. of Biotechnology); Qureshi, N. (Dept. of Food Sciences, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana, Urbana, IL (US)); Jansen, D.E. (Biochemical Processing Centre, Biotechnology Div., DSIR, Palmerston North (NZ))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Southern Pine Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elec Coop, Inc Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Southern Pine Elec Coop, Inc Place Alabama Utility Id 17646 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Security Light: 100 Watt High Pressure Sodium (HPS) Lighting Security Light: 175 Watt Mercury Vapor Lighting Security Light: 400 Watt High Pressure Sodium (HPS) Lighting Security Light: 400 Watt Mercury Vapor Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.1140/kWh Commercial: $0.0956/kWh Industrial: $0.0928/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An Assessment of the Potential for Remanufacturing Out-of-Service Southern Pine Utility Poles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI engaged The Beck Group (BECK), a forest products consulting firm located in Portland, Oregon, to estimate the supply and quality of out-of-service Southern Pine utility poles and to assess the potential for remanufacturing/reusing and marketing out-of-service utility poles into various solid, roundwood and other products. This report principally identifies the potential volumes and condition of out-of-service utility poles from cooperating utilities that use primarily Southern Pine poles. The report...

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Effect of Local Atmospheric Circulations on Daytime Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over a Pinus elliottii Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The daytime net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) was measured in an even-aged slash pine plantation in northern Florida from 1999 to 2001 using the eddy covariance technique. In August 2000, two clear-cuts were formed approximately 1 km west of ...

H. W. Loescher; G. Starr; T. A. Martin; M. Binford; H. L. Gholz

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effective pine bark composting with the Dome Aeration Technology  

SciTech Connect

In South Africa garden refuse is primarily disposed of in domestic landfills. Due to the large quantities generated, any form of treatment would be beneficial for volume reduction, waste stabilization and resource recovery. Dome Aeration Technology (DAT) is an advanced process for aerobic biological degradation of garden refuse and general waste [Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999a. Advantages of dome aeration in mechanical-biological waste treatment. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Cagliari, 4-8 October 1999; Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999b. Mechanical-biological waste stabilization by the dome aeration method. Environment Protection Engineering 25 (3/99). Mollekopf, N., Brummack, J., Paar, S., Vorster, K., 2002. Use of the Dome Aeration Technology for biochemical stabilization of waste prior to landfilling. In: Proceedings of the Wastecon 2002, Waste Congress and Exhibition, Durban, South Africa.]. It is a non-reactor open windrow composting process, with the main advantage being that the input material needs no periodic turning. A rotting time of only 3-4 months indicates the high efficiency. Additionally, the low capital/operational costs, low energy inputs and limited plant requirements provide potential for use in aerobic refuse stabilization. The innovation in the DAT process is the passive aeration achieved by thermally driven advection through open windrows caused by temperature differences between the degrading material and the outside environment. This paper investigates the application of Dome Aeration Technology to pine bark composting as part of an integrated waste management strategy. A full-scale field experiment was performed at the Bisasar Road Landfill Site in Durban to assess the influence of climate, waste composition and operational conditions on the process. A test windrow was constructed and measurements of temperature and airflow through the material were taken. The process monitoring revealed that prevailing climatic conditions in a subtropical location do not affect the high efficiency of this technology. However, the composition of the input material can be detrimental for production of high quality compost because of a lack of nitrate.

Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)]. E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za; Polster, Andreas [Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Process Engineering and Environmental Technology, Helmholtzstrasse 14, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Belowground and aboveground biomass in young postfire lodgepole pine forests of contrasting tree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Belowground and aboveground biomass in young postfire lodgepole pine forests of contrasting tree as 40% of live biomass in coniferous forests is located belowground, yet the effect of tree density on biomass allocation is poorly understood. We developed allometric equations using traditional harvesting

Turner, Monica G.

105

Medical Leaves Administration 365 Pine Tree Road, Ithaca, New York 14850  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Leaves Administration 365 Pine Tree Road, Ithaca, New York 14850 Request for Accommodation. Contents of this request are confidential and will not be shared by any staff member of Medical Leaves your disability, including medical documentation, will not be shared, unless authorized by you.) Union

Wang, Z. Jane

106

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

107

Phytostabilization of a landfill containing coal combustion waste.  

SciTech Connect

The establishment of a vegetative cover to enhance evapotranspiration and control runoff and drainage was examined as a method for stabilizing a landfill containing coal combustion waste. Suitable plant species and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and chemical stabilization were evaluated. A randomized plot design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five surface amendments (treatments) was implemented. The three blocks included (1) ripping and compost amended, (2) ripping only, and (3) control. Surface treatments included (1) topsoil, (2) fly ash, (3) compost, (4) apatite, and (5) control. Inoculated loblolly (Pinus taeda) and Virginia (Pinus virginiana) pine trees were planted on each plot. After three growing seasons, certain treatments were shown to be favorable for the establishment of vegetation on the basin. Seedlings located on block A developed a rooting system that penetrated into the basin media without significant adverse effects to the plant. However, seedlings on blocks B and C displayed poor rooting conditions and high mortality, regardless of surface treatment. Pore-water samples from lysimeters in block C were characterized by high acidity, Fe, Mn, Al, sulfate, and traceelement concentrations. Water-quality characteristics of the topsoil plots in block A, however, conformed to regulatory protocols. A decrease in soil-moisture content was observed in the rooting zone of plots that were successfully revegetated, which suggests that the trees, in combination with the surface treatments, influenced the water balance by facilitating water loss through transpiration and thereby reducing the likelihood of unwanted surface runoff and/or drainage effluent.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Donald; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon Jun; Newman, Lee; Czapka, Stephen; Blake, John

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Microsoft Word - CX-PilotButte-LaPineWoodPoleFY12_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2012 30, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project PP&A Project No.: 2188 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities ... include ... replacement of wood poles. Location: Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 transmission line located in Deschutes County, Oregon, at the following structures: Mile Structure 5 7 6 5 7 4 16 7 16 8 17 5 18 1 18 3 21 3 21 8 25 3 30 5 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace 12 deteriorating wood pole

109

Leisure Village West-Pine Lake Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West-Pine Lake Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources West-Pine Lake Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.0046518°, -74.2707509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0046518,"lon":-74.2707509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

110

Microsoft Word - CX-PilotButte-LaPine-WoodPoles-FY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2013 3, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2484 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance Location: Deschutes County, Oregon, at the following structures: Mile Structure 3 1 3 2 7 3 7 5 9 2 11 3 13 5 13 8 14 1 15 1 16 3 16 5 21 7 21 9 22 2 22 4 22 5 23 5 27 2 Proposed by: BPA Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace 19 deteriorating wood pole structures along its Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1, 230-kilovolt transmission line located in Deschutes County, Oregon. The 19 structures

111

Impact of thermal pretreatment on the fast pyrolysis conversion of Southern Pine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Thermal pretreatment of biomass ranges from simple (nondestructive) drying to more severe treatments that cause devolatization, depolymerization and carbonization. These pretreatments have demonstrated promise for transforming raw biomass into feedstock material that has improved milling, handling, storage and conversion properties. In this work, southern pine material was pretreated at 120, 180, 230 and 270 degrees C, and then subjected to pyrolysis tests in a continuous-feed bubbling-fluid bed pyrolysis system. Results: High pretreatment temperatures were associated with lower specific grinding energies, higher grinding rates and lower hydrogen and oxygen contents. Higher pretreatment temperatures were also correlated with increased char production, decreased total acid number and slight decrease in the oxygen content of the pyrolysis liquid fraction. Conclusion: Thermal pretreatment has both beneficial and detrimental impacts on fast pyrolysis conversion of pine material to bio-oil, and the effect of thermal pretreatment on upgrading of pyrolysis bio-oil requires further attention.

Tyler L. Westover; Manunya Phanphanich; Micael L. Clark; Sharna R. Rowe; Steven E. Egan; Christopher T Wright; Richard D. Boardman; Alan H. Zacher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Microsoft Word - CX-LaPine-ChiloquinWoodPoleFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: La Pine-Chiloquin No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project PP&A Project No.: 2236 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6, Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: La Pine-Chiloquin No. 1 230-kV transmission line in Klamath County, Oregon, at the following structure locations: 11/5, 16/1, 16/4, 17/3, 17/8, 18/2, 18/3, 20/4, 22/2, 22/5, 28/1, 42/3, 43/6, 44/4, and 45/1. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace 15 deteriorating wood pole structures along its La Pine-Chiloquin 230-kV transmission line located in Klamath County,

113

Pinon Pine Power Project. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This annual report has been prepared to present the status of the Pinon Pine Power Project, a nominal 107 MWe (gross) coal-fired integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant addition to Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPCo) system. This project will also serve as a demonstration project cost-shared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and SPPCo under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. The goal of the CCT Program is to demonstrate advanced coal utilization technologies that are energy efficient, reliable and able to achieve substantial reductions in emissions as compared with existing coal technologies. The Pinon Pine Power Project will demonstrate an IGCC system utilizing the Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) fluidized-bed gasification process operating in an air-blown mode with in-bed desulfurization and hot gas clean-up with a western bituminous coal as the design fuel. Testing will also be performed on a high-sulfur eastern coal. The Pinon Pine Power Project will be constructed and operated at SPPCo`s Tracy Power Station, an existing power generation facility located on a rural 724-acre plot approximately 17 miles east of Reno, NV. This new unit is designated as Tracy Unit No. 4.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Core analysis of Chattanooga shale structures west of Pine Mountain fault, Whitley County, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

A 100-ft oriented core from the Chandler 1 well in Whitley County, Kentucky, sampled the entire Chattanooga Shale section 10 mi west of the Pine Mountain fault. Cored slickenlined structures include 76 bedding-plane faults, four strike-slip faults, and 44 thrust faults. One interpreted kink band was encountered. Slickenline trends, fault geometry, interpreted paleo-stress fields, and chronology of structural evolution do not reflect the N30/sup 0/W transposition direction of the Pine Mountain sheet (seated in Chattanooga Shale) or N60/sup 0/E strike of the Pine Mountain fault. For example, 62% of 81 bedding-fault slickenline orientations trend N20/sup 0/-90/sup 0/W with N60/sup 0/-70/sup 0/W dominant. A secondary direction (32% of bedding slickenlines) strikes N40/sup 0/-80/sup 0/E with N60/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E dominant. Only 9% of bedding-fault slickenlines trend N25/sup 0/-35/sup 0/W. In addition, northwest-trending slickenlines formed first on four of five bedding faults containing both major trends. Thrust faults group into five mean attitudes. Four orientations (N31/sup 0/W, 38/sup 0/NE); N40/sup 0/W, 36/sup 0/SW; N15/sup 0/E, 45/sup 0/SE); and N46/sup 0/1E, 42/sup 0/NW) may define two conjugate shear sets that imply horizontal maximum compressive stress directions of N58/sup 0/W and N54/sup 0/E, respectively. The fifth trend (N88/sup 0/W, 48/sup 0/NE) may relate genetically to strike-slip faults oriented N20/sup 0/W and N60/sup 0/E that indicate horizontal maximum compressive stresses oriented N2/sup 0/-18/sup 0/E. Overprinted thrust-fault slickenlines and faults offsetting faults suggest that maximum compressive stresses first acted northwest-southeast, then northeast-southwest and, finally in a north-northeast-south-southwest direction. Furthermore, bedding faults preceded thrust faults. Differences between Pine Mountain sheet structures and those in the core may reflect local Chattanooga thickness variations or the absence of Chattanooga decollement structures.

Kulander, B.R.; Dean, S.L.; Kirr, J.; Feiler, J.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Evaluation of approaches to estimating aboveground biomass in southern pine forests using SIR-C data  

SciTech Connect

Estimation of forest biomass on a global basis is a key issue in studies of ecology and biogeochemical cycling. Forests are a terrestrial sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide and play a central role in regulating the exchange of this important greenhouse gas between the atmosphere and the biosphere. A study was performed to evaluate various techniques for estimating aboveground, woody plant biomass in pine stands found in the southeastern United States, using C- and L- band multiple polarization radar imagery collected by the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) system. The biomass levels present in the test stands ranged between 0.0 and 44.5 kg m{sup {minus}2}. Two SIR-C data sets were used one collected in April, 1994, when the soil conditions were very wet and the canopy was slightly wet from dew and a second collected in October, 1994, when the soils and canopy were dry. During the October mission, pine needles were completely flushed and the foliar biomass was twice as great in the forest stands as in April. Four methods were evaluated to estimate total biomass: one including a straight multiple linear correlation between total biomass and the various SIR-C channels, another including a ratio of the L-band HV/C-band HV channels; and two others requiring multiple steps, where linear regression equations for different stand components were used as the basis for estimating total biomass.

Harrell, P.A.; Haney, E.M.; Christensen, N.L. Jr. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). School of the Environment; Kasischke, E.S.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L.L. [Environmental Research of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Center for Earth Sciences

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil from Pine Sawdust  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to the fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) from softwood biomass in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of operating parameters including temperature, and flow-rate were tested with bio-oil derived from pine wood as recovered and pyrolyzed in the pilot pyrolyzer of Metso Power in Tampere, Finland. Effects of time on stream and catalyst activity were assessed. Details of the process results were presented included product yields and hydrogen consumption. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an initial understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to the Finnish pine bio-oil.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Solantausta, Yrjo

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Synergism of turpentine and ethanol as attractants for certain pine-infesting beetles (Coleoptera)  

SciTech Connect

Responses of seven species of pine-infesting beetles to traps baited with either turpentine, ethanol, turpentine and ethanol released from separate dispensers, or a 1:1 solution of turpentine and ethanol released from one dispenser were assessed in three field experiments. The weevil species, Pachylobius picivorus (Germar), and the cerambycid pine sawyer, Monochamus carolinenis (Olivier), were attracted to turpentine and were unaffected by the addition of ethanol. The ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, responded to ethanol alone but was not attracted to turpentine, nor did the presence of turpentine significantly affects its response to ethanol. The remaining four species) hylobius pales, M. titillator, Dendroctonus terebrans and x. pubescens) displayed responses to turpentine that were enhanced by the addition of ethanol, but in different ways according to the method of deployment. Reasons for increased responses by some species to a solution of turpentine and ethanol over the two released separately are not clear; they may lie in different dosages of evaporation rates of volatiles in the field. Laboratory analyses of trapped headspace volatiles from dispensers containing only turpentine and those containing a solution of turpentine and ethanol revealed no differences in the amounts of four principal monoterpene hydrocarbons (..cap alpha..-pinene, camphene, ..beta..-pinene, and limonene) released over time.

Phillips, T.W.; Wilkening, A.J.; Atkinson, T.H.; Nation, J.L.; Wilkinson, R.C.; Foltz, J.L.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Blister Rust Prevalence in Krummholz Whitebark Pine: Implications for Treeline Dynamics, Northern Rocky Mountains, Montana, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in whitebark pine krummholz in the alpine treeline ecotone east of the Continental Divide on the Blackfeet; Divide Peak (48u679N, 113u389W), situated on the border of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation and Glacier increasingly wind-exposed farther away from the base of the actual peak. Locations east of the Continental

Resler, Lynn M.

119

Analysis of cellulase and polyphenol oxidase production by southern pine beetle associated fungi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the production of extracellular enzymes by fungi associated with southern pine beetle was investigated for the first time. Cellulase and polyphenol oxidase production were analyzed for three beetle associated fungi. Only the mutualistic symbiont Entomocorticium sp. A was found to produce cellulases and polyphenol oxidase. In time course analyses of cellulase production in batch cultures, Entomocorticium sp. A showed maximum activity of 0.109 U/ml and 0.141 U/ml for total cellulase and endoglucanase activity respectively. Polyphenol oxidase production was simultaneous with fungal growth. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase by activity staining suggests that the enzyme is a tyrosinase/catechol oxidase. Enzyme assays in the presence of polyphenol oxidase inhibitors support the results of the activity staining. Keywords: Ceratocystiopsis, Entomocorticium, Ophiostoma, cellulase, tyrosinase/catechol oxidase

Abduvali Valiev; Zumrut B. Ogel; Kier D. Klepzig

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mapping Land-Use Change and Monitoring the Impacts of Hardwood-to-Pine Conversion on the Southern Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two decades, forests in the southeastern United States have undergone dramatic changes as the result of urban sprawl and conversion to intensively managed pine plantations. The Cumberland Plateau, an important ecoregion in the ...

Deborah A. McGrath; Jonathan P. Evans; C. Ken Smith; David G. Haskell; Neil W. Pelkey; Robert R. Gottfried; Charles D. Brockett; Matthew D. Lane; E. Douglass Williams

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Populations of southern pine beetle (SPB) are typically substructured into local aggregations, each with tens of thousands of individual beetles. These  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann) (SPB) populations is hierarchical (Coulson 1979 systematic aerial surveys for spots followed by inspection on the ground. Management decisions (e.g., cut

Ayres, Matthew.P.

122

Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parametric Gasification of Oak Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis Jason Hrdlicka, Calvin Feik, Danny Carpenter, and Marc Pomeroy Technical Report NREL/TP-510-44557 December 2008 Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis Jason Hrdlicka, Calvin Feik, Danny Carpenter, and Marc Pomeroy Prepared under Task No. H2713B13 Technical Report NREL/TP-510-44557 December 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

123

Influence of coarse woody debris on the soricid community in southeastern Coastal Plain pine stands.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shrew abundance has been linked to the presence of coarse woody debris (CWD), especially downed logs, in many regions in the United States. We investigated the importance of CWD to shrew communities in managed upland pine stands in the southeastern United States Coastal Plain. Using a randomized complete block design, 1 of the following treatments was assigned to twelve 9.3-ha plots: removal (n 5 3; all downed CWD _10 cm in diameter and _60 cm long removed), downed (n 5 3; 5-fold increase in volume of downed CWD), snag (n 5 3; 10-fold increase in volume of standing dead CWD), and control (n 5 3; unmanipulated). Shrews (Blarina carolinensis, Sorex longirostris, and Cryptotis parva) were captured over 7 seasons from January 2007 to August 2008 using drift-fence pitfall trapping arrays within treatment plots. Topographic variables were measured and included as treatment covariates. More captures of B. carolinensis were made in the downed treatment compared to removal, and captures of S. longirostris were greater in downed and snag compared to removal. Captures of C. parva did not differ among treatments. Captures of S. longirostris were positively correlated with slope. Our results suggest that abundance of 2 of the 3 common shrew species of the southeastern Coastal Plain examined in our study is influenced by the presence of CWD.

Davis, Justin, C.; Castleberry, Steven, B.; Kilgo, John, C.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Area-Based Mapping of Defoliation of Scots Pine Stands Using Airborne Scanning LiDAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The mapping of changes in the distribution of insect-caused forest damage remains an important forest monitoring application and challenge. Efficient and accurate methods are required for mapping and monitoring changes in insect defoliation to inform forest management and reporting activities. In this research, we develop and evaluate a LiDAR-driven (Light Detection And Ranging) approach for mapping defoliation caused by the Common pine sawfly (Diprion pini L.). Our method requires plot-level training data and airborne scanning LiDAR data. The approach is predicated on a forest canopy mask created by detecting forest canopy cover using LiDAR. The LiDAR returns that are reflected from the canopy (that is, returns> half of maximum plot tree height) are used in the prediction of the defoliation. Predictions of defoliation are made at plot-level, which enables a direct integration of the method to operational forest management planning while also providing additional value-added from inventory-focused LiDAR datasets. In additionRemote Sens. 2013, 5 1221

Mikko Vastaranta; Tuula Kantola; Pivi Lyytikinen-saarenmaa; Markus Holopainen; Ville Kankare; Michael A. Wulder

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With oak and pine feedstocks, the Gasification of Biomass to Hydrogen project maximizes hydrogen production using the Full Stream Reformer during water-gas shift fixed-bed reactor testing. Results indicate that higher steam-to-biomass ratio and higher thermal cracker temperature yield higher hydrogen concentration. NREL's techno-economic models and analyses indicate hydrogen production from biomass may be viable at an estimated cost of $1.77/kg (current) and $1.47/kg (advanced in 2015). To verify these estimates, NREL used the Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), an integrated system of unit operations that investigates biomass thermochemical conversion to gaseous and liquid fuels and chemicals.

Hrdlicka, J.; Feik, C.; Carpenter, D.; Pomeroy, M.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on soils planted with ponderosa pine  

SciTech Connect

The effects of elevated CO{sub 2} (ambient, 525, and 700 {micro}l l{sup -1})and N fertilization (0, 10, and 20 g N m{sup 2} yr{sup -1}) on soil pCO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} efflux, soil solution chemistry, and soil C and nutrients in an open-top chamber study with Pinus ponderosa are described. Soil pCO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} efflux were significantly greater with elevated CO{sub 2}, at first (second growing season) in the 525 {micro}l l{sup -1} and later (fourth and fifth growing seasons) in the 700 {micro}l l{sup -1} CO{sub 2} treatments. Soil solution HCO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations were temporarily elevated in the 525 {micro}l l{sup -1} CO{sub 2} treatment during the second growing season, consistent with the elevated pCO{sub 2}. Nitrogen fertilization had no consistent effect on soil pCO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} efflux, but did have the expected negative effect on exchangeable Ca{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Mg{sup 2+}, presumed to be caused by increased nitrate leaching. Elevated CO{sub 2} had no consistent effects on exchangeable Ca{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Mg{sup 2+}, but did cause temporary reductions in soil NO{sup 3{sup -}} (second growing season). Statistically significant negative effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on soil extractable P were noted in the third and sixth growing seasons. However, these patterns in extractable P reflected pre-treatment differences, which, while not statistically significant, followed the same pattern. Statistically significant effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on total C and N in soils were noted in the third and sixth growing seasons, but these effects were inconsistent among N treatments and years. The clearest effect of elevated CO{sub 2} was in the case of C/N ratio in year 6, where there was a consistent, positive effect. The increases in C/N ratio with elevated CO{sub 2} in year six were largely a result of reductions in soil N rather than increases in soil C. Future papers will assess whether this apparent reduction in soil N could have been accounted for by plant uptake.

Johnson, D.W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Characterization of forest crops with a range of nutrient and water treatments using AISA Hyperspectral Imagery.  

SciTech Connect

This research examined the utility of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications (AISA) hyperspectral imagery for estimating the biomass of three forest crops---sycamore, sweetgum and loblolly pine--planted in experimental plots with a range of fertilization and irrigation treatments on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

Gong, Binglei; Im, Jungho; Jensen, John, R.; Coleman, Mark; Rhee, Jinyoung; Nelson, Eric

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Comparing Simulated and Measured Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes over Snow under a Pine Canopy to Improve an Energy Balance Snowmelt Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the second year of the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX), an eddy covariance (EC) system was deployed at the Local Scale Observation Site (LSOS) from mid-February to June 2003. The EC system was located beneath a uniform pine ...

D. Marks; A. Winstral; G. Flerchinger; M. Reba; J. Pomeroy; T. Link; K. Elder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Solar Treatment for Mountain Pine Beetle Solar treatment may be appropriate in some areas of Colorado to reduce beetle populations in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Treatment for Mountain Pine Beetle Solar treatment may be appropriate in some areas number of logs in high-value areas. There are two options of solar treatment: with plastic sheeting, and without plastic. Below is a brief description on set-up and difficulties when using solar treatment

130

Colorado Bark Beetle Mitigation Fund Helps Our Future Forests 1.5 Million Acres of Colorado's Forests Affected by Mountain Pine Beetle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

long-term sustainable forest management to reduce the impacts of insect and disease outbreaks started, MPB has killed most of the mature pines and beetle populations have decreased. The Real Costs the cost of managing our forests. The role of CSFS is to treat priority acres on state and private lands

131

Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract -The majority of studies investigating the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to forest- floor vertebrates have taken place in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountains, while comparative studies in the southeastern Coastal Plain are lacking. My study was a continuation of a long-term project investigating the importance of CWD as a habitat component for shrew and herpetofaunal communities within managed pine stands in the southeastern Coastal Plain. Results suggest that addition of CWD can increase abundance of southeastern and southern short-tailed shrews. However, downed wood does not appear to be a critical habitat component for amphibians and reptiles. Rising petroleum costs and advances in wood utilization technology have resulted in an emerging biofuels market with potential to decrease CWD volumes left in forests following timber harvests. Therefore, forest managers must understand the value of CWD as an ecosystem component to maintain economically productive forests while conserving biological diversity.

Davis, Justin, Charles

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

13 C n.m.r. Studies of Coal and Coal Extracts [and Discussion] D. E. Wemmer; A. Pines; D. D. Whitehurst; W. R. Ladner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 C n.m.r. Studies of Coal and Coal Extracts [and Discussion] D. E. Wemmer; A. Pines; D. D and Physical Sciences, Vol. 300, No. 1453, New Coal Chemistry. (Mar. 20, 1981), pp. 15-41. Stable URL: http Britain I3Cn.m.r. studies of coal and coal extracts BY D. E. W E M M E R ~ , D. D. W H I T E H U R S T ~A

Pines, Alexander

133

Effects of burning and thinning on species composition and forage production in British Columbia grasslands .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The structural integrity of fire-dependent ecosystems, such as ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl.) and Interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) biogeoclimatic zones in Interior British (more)

Ducherer, Kim Lannette

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Environmental and plant effects of sewage sludge application to forests and pastures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Digested sewage sludge was applied to pastures and tree plantations at 19 to 44 Mg/ha (dry weight) as part of a municipal sludge disposal program. The sludge had low concentrations of heavy metals and traces of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co. Monitoring of soils, soil solutions, and runoff indicated that N, P, heavy metals, and radionuclides were largely retained in the upper 15cm of the soil. Soil solutions had elevated NO/sub 3//sup /minus// concentrations often >100 mg/L, but no significant increases in groundwater NO/sub 3//sup /minus// were found during the first year. Runoff from active sites had elevated concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup /minus// (20--30 mg/L), soluble P (1 mg/L), BOD/sub 5/ (5--30 mg/L), and fecal coliform (up to 14,000 colonies per 100 ml), not unlike runoff from pastures with cattle. Enrichment of organic N (2 times), available (inorganic) N (5 to 10 times), and Bray-P in the upper soils persisted for several years following sludge application. Sludge increased vegetation N concentrations from 1.5% to 2.3% and P concentrations from 0.16% to 0.31%. With the exception of Zn, heavy metals did not accumulate substantially in the vegetation. The sludge addition increased the survival and growth of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.). For a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation future growth improvements are expected based on elevated foliar N concentrations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Van Miegroet, H.; Boston, H.L.; Johnson, D.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

653Ann. For. Sci. 61 (2004) 653659 INRA, EDP Sciences, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

article Allometric biomass equations for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings during the first years (Pinus sylvestris L.) exhibits a considerable biomass build-up in the first four years, with amounts of 7.03 Mg ha­1 for aboveground biomass, and 0.88 Mg ha­1 for coarse root biomass (> 1 mm). Power equations

Recanati, Catherine

136

Bacterial and Archaea Community Present in the Pine Barrens Forest of Long Island, NY: Unusually High Percentage of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Of the few preserved areas in the northeast of United States, the soil in the Pine Barrens Forests presents a harsh environment for the microorganisms to grow and survive. In the current study we report the use of clustering methods to scientifically select the sampling locations that would represent the entire forest and also report the microbial diversity present in various horizons of the soil. Sixty six sampling locations were selected across the forest and soils were collected from three horizons (sampling depths). The three horizons were 0-10 cm (Horizon O); 11-25 cm (Horizon A) and 26-40 cm (Horizon B). Based on the total microbial substrate utilization pattern and K-means clustering analysis, the soil in the Pine Barrens Forest can be classified into four distinct clusters at each of the three horizons. One soil sample from each of the four clusters were selected and archaeal and bacterial populations within the soil studied using pyrosequencing method. The results show the microbial communities present in each of these clusters are different. Within the microbial communities present, microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycle occupy a major fraction of microbial community in the soil. High level of diversity was observed for nitrogen fixing bacteria. In contrast, Nitrosovibrio and Nitrosocaldus spp are the single bacterial and archaeal population respectively carrying out ammonia oxidation in the soil.

Shah, V.; Green, T.; Shah, V.; Shah, S.; Kambhampati, M.; Ambrose, J.; Smith, N.; Dowd, S.; McDonnell, K.; Panigrahi, B.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

PlainsCottonwood QuakingAspen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;BristleconePine #12;Piñon Pine Pinus edulis Description Bark: Gray, smooth and thin when young; red on young trees; nearly 3 inches thick, red-orange and furrowed into large flat scaly plates on mature trees that form tufts near the end of branches. Fruit: Light red-brown cones; 3 to 4 inches long; egg

138

Young Jack Pine Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSA-YJP) The hut, tent, and dirt road from the flux tower The sun photometer on top of the hut The bottom of the YJP flux tower NSA-YJP taken at a low sun angle to show the subtle...

139

Pine Pyrolysis Vapor Phase Upgrading Over ZSM-5 Catalyst: Effect of Temperature, Hot Gas Filtration, and Hydrogen Donor Molecule on the Rate of Deactivation of Catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of primary vapors from pine pyrolysis over a ZSM-5 catalyst was characterized using a micro-reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) to allow on-line measurement of the upgraded vapors. This micro-reacor-MBMS system was used to investigate the effects of hot gas filtration, temperature and hydrogen donor molecules on the rate of deactivation of the UPV2 catalyst. Our results show that the life of catalyst is significantly improved by using better filtration. Temperature had an effect on both product distribution and catalyst deactivation. The hydrogen donor molecules (HDM) used in this study show better reduction in catalyst deactivation rates at high temperatures.

Mukarakate, C.; Zhang, X.; Nimlos, M.; Robichaud, D.; Donohoe, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Measuring the Effects of Disturbance & Climate on the CO2 & Energy Exchange of Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal is to quantify and understand the influence of climate and disturbance on ecosystem processes and thus net carbon uptake by forests. The objective is to combine tower and ground-based observations to quantify the effects of disturbance on processes controlling carbon storage and CO{sub 2} and energy exchange in varying climatic conditions. Specific objectives are: (1) Investigate the effects of logging and fire on carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in chronosequences of ponderosa pine, using consistent methodology; (2) Determine key environmental factors controlling carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in these forests through a combination of measurements and process modeling; and (3) Assess spatial variation of the concentrations and transport in complex terrain. The eddy covariance method is used for measurements of CO2, water vapor, and energy exchanges in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests (burned in 2002 wildfire, 10 year-old stand, 90 year-old mature stand). The mature stand has been an AmeriFlux site since 2000 (following previous flux sites in young and old stands initiated in 1996). In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, a large suite of biological processes and ecosystem properties are determined for the purpose of developing independent forest carbon budgets and NEP estimates; these include photosynthesis, stand respiration, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes, annual litterfall, foliar chemistry, and bole increment, and soil organic matter among other parameters. The measurements are being integrated and evaluated with two ecosystem models (BIOME-BGC and SPA). Such analyses are needed to assess regional terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets. The results will contribute scientific understanding of carbon processes, and will provide comprehensive data sets for forest managers and those preparing national carbon inventories to use in assessments of carbon sequestration in relation to interannual climate variation and disturbance. Frameworks and methodologies developed by the PI will contribute to AmeriFlux Network facility functions for data acquisition, exchange and modeling of results in a broad spectrum of carbon cycle research.

Beverly E. Law; Larry Mahrt

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Diagnosis and correction of soil nutrient limitations in intensively managed Southern pine forests. Quarterly report for the period January-March 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of project status and activities performed during the quarter: (1) Initial error runs were finished and coding was adjusted to account for errors. A documentation manual and users manual have been written and gone through the first editing. The model was presented to the forest industry during a review meeting and adjustments were made to the model based on their input. The model has been sent to interested parties in Canada and Australia to test it and report back on any errors or modifications they feel would be necessary. (2) Based on the laboratory studies, one paper was written and submitted to the Soil and Water Science for internal review. It is currently under internal review. This paper describes a method for measuring resorption isotherms. A second paper that uses this method to investigate desorption isotherms for different soils is in progress. (3) All soil samples have been dried and sieved. All tissue samples have been ground and the ashing of the tissue samples has just begun. (4) A literature search continued focusing on root to shoot relationships of fast growing pine in order to assist the development of the nutrient demand section of the model. This is about 40% done.

Comerford, N.B.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Results of deep exploratory drilling between long and Newark Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada - implications for oil migration in the nearby Yankee gold mine paleohydrothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In mid-1992, a consortium headed by Pioneer Oil and Gas (Midvale, Utah) drilled a deep (6700 ft) exploratory well in the southern Ruby Mountains-Buck Mountain are near the Alligator Ridge mining district in White Pine County, Nevada. The test well is located 1.5 mi southwest of USMX, Inc.'s, Yankee gold mine, an open-pit operation centered on a Carlin-type, sediment-hosted gold orebody noteworthy for containing abundant, fracture-controlled live oil. The Pioneer well as dry, but intersected much of the same stratigraphic section hosting gold at Yankee, thereby providing valuable clues to mechanisms of oil migration at this unusual, oil-bearing precious-metal deposit. Most of the gold at Yankee is hosted by the Devonian Pilot Shale, with a basal argillaceous limestone containing the bulk of the deposit's live oil. The equivalent section in the Pioneer wildcat well is a silty calcareous dolomite. Whereas the basal Pilot limestone at Yankee is rich in thick, locally gold- and arsenic-anomalous calcite veins and modules hosting abundant oil-bearing fluid inclusion, the basal Pilot dolomite in the Pioneer well contains only a few thin calcite-pyrite veinlets devoid of fluid inclusions. Moreover, the Yankee calcite veins have the same light-stable-isotope signatures as hydrothermal carbonate veins near or elsewhere in the Alligator Ridge district. These relationships imply that oil at Yankee migrated in the same hydrothermal system responsible for gold mineralization. Such systems elsewhere in the eastern Basin and Range, given favorable source rocks, traps, seals, and migratory pathways, might well have formed not only gold deposits, but also rich, spatially coincident oil reservoirs.

Pinnell, M.L. (Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (United States)); Hulen, J.B. (Univ. of Utah Research Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Cox, J.W. (USMX, Reno, NV (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Characterization of vegetation properties: Canopy modeling of pinyon-juniper and ponderosa pine woodlands; Final report. Modeling topographic influences on solar radiation: A manual for the SOLARFLUX model  

SciTech Connect

This report is comprised of two studies. The first study focuses on plant canopies in pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine woodland, and waste sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory which involved five basic areas of research: (1) application of hemispherical photography and other gap fraction techniques to study solar radiation regimes and canopy architecture, coupled with application of time-domain reflectometry to study soil moisture; (2) detailed characterization of canopy architecture using stand mapping and allometry; (3) development of an integrated geographical information system (GIS) database for relating canopy architecture with ecological, hydrological, and system modeling approaches; (4) development of geometric models that simulate complex sky obstruction, incoming solar radiation for complex topographic surfaces, and the coupling of incoming solar radiation with energy and water balance, with simulations of incoming solar radiation for selected native vegetation and experimental waste cover design sites; and (5) evaluation of the strengths and limitations of the various field sampling techniques. The second study describes an approach to develop software that takes advantage of new generation computers to model insolation on complex topographic surfaces. SOLARFLUX is a GIS-based (ARC/INFO, GRID) computer program that models incoming solar radiation based on surface orientation (slope and aspect), solar angle (azimuth and zenith) as it shifts over time, shadows caused by topographic features, and atmospheric conditions. This manual serves as the comprehensive guide to SOLARFLUX. Included are discussions on modelling insolation on complex surfaces, the theoretical approach, program setup and operation, and a set of applications illustrating characteristics of topographic insolation modelling.

Rich, P.M.; Hetrick, W.A.; Saving, S.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

SSA Young Jack Pine Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-YJP site. Beginning of the "flagged path" to the tower, from the road The "new trail" to the YJP site, looking towards the site The hut and...

145

Tree-Ring-Based Reconstruction of Precipitation in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, since 1260 a.d  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cores and cross sections from 79 Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) trees at four sites in the Bighorn Basin of north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana were used to develop a proxy for annual (JuneJune) ...

Stephen T. Gray; Christopher L. Fastie; Stephen T. Jackson; Julio L. Betancourt

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Supplementary Material1 "The Atmospheric Potential of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds from Needles of2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Needles of2 White Pine (Pinus strobus) in Northern Michigan" by Toma and Bertman3 4 Table S1: Parameters. The retention time and8 mass spectrum of -phellandrene were obtained using Angelica seed oil (Shiono Koryo9 and -cadinene were identified using Hinoki essential oil12 (Shiono Koryo Kaisha, Ltd.). Germacrene-D-4-ol

Meskhidze, Nicholas

147

Enhanced Raw Materials Forest Products Environmental Influences on Wood Chemistry and Density of Populus and Loblolly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sterility in Forest Trees................................................................................................... 2

Hq Program Managers

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site operations, specifically as associated with lead in surface soil at the abandoned water tank and nickel in surface soils over the northern portion of the parcel from former Bldg. K-1037 smelting operations. Low level detections of organics are also reported in some surface soils including Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) near Blair Road and common laboratory contaminants at randomly distributed locations. However, human health risk from site-related contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are acceptable?though maximum concentrations of lead and nickel and the screening-level ecological risk assessment (SLERA) demonstrate no further ecological evaluation is warranted. The weight of evidence leads to the conclusion Parcel 21d does not require any actions per the FFA.

King, David A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

A 50,000-year record of climate oscillations from Florida and its temporal correlation with the Heinrich events  

SciTech Connect

Oscillations of Pinus (pine) pollen in a 50,000-year sequence from Lake Tulane, Florida, indicate that there were major vegetation shifts during the last glacial cycle. Episodes of abundant Pinus populations indicate a climate that was more wet than intervening phases dominated by Quercus (oak) and Ambrosia-type (ragweed and marsh-elder). The Pinus episodes seem to be temporally correlated with the North Atlantic Heinrich events, which were massive, periodic advances of ice streams from the eastern margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Possible links between the Tulane Pinus and Heinrich events include hemispheric cooling, the influences of Mississippi meltwater on sea-surface temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico, and the effects of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation on currents in the Gulf. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Grimm, E.C. (Illinois State Museum, Springfield (United States)); Jacobson, G.L. Jr.; Maasch, K.A. (Univ. of Maine, Orono (United States)); Watts, W.A. (Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)); Hansen, B.C.S. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States))

1993-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

Luxmoore, R.J.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Woody energy crops in the southeastern United States: Two centuries of practitioner experience  

SciTech Connect

Forest industry experts were consulted on the potential for hardwood tree species to serve as feedstock for bioenergy in the southeastern United States. Hardwoods are of interest for bioenergy because of desirable physical qualities, genetic research advances, and growth potential. Yet little data is available regarding potential productivity and costs. This paper describes required operations and provides a realistic estimate of the costs of producing bioenergy feedstock based on commercial experiences. Forestry practitioners reported that high productivity rates in southeastern hardwood plantations are confined to narrow site conditions or require costly inputs. Eastern cottonwood and American sycamore grow quickly on rich bottomlands, but are also prone to pests and disease. Sweetgum is frost hardy, has few pest or disease problems, and grows across a broad range of sites, yet growth rates are relatively low. Eucalypts require fewer inputs than do other species and offer high potential productivity but are limited by frost to the lower Coastal Plain and Florida. Further research is required to study naturally regenerated hardwood biomass resources. Loblolly pine has robust site requirements, growth rates rivaling hardwoods, and lower costs of production. More time and investment in silviculture, selection, and breeding will be needed to develop hardwoods as competitive biofuel feedstock species. Because of existing stands and fully developed operations, the forestry community considers loblolly pine to be a prime candidate for plantation bioenergy in the Southeast.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Coleman, Mark [USDA Forest Service

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hardwoods for Woody Energy Crops in the Southeast United States:Two Centuries of Practitioner Experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes opinions from forest industry experts on the potential for hardwood tree species to serve as feedstock for bioenergy in the Southeast United States. Hardwoods are of interest for bioenergy because of desirable physical qualities, genetic research advances, and growth potential. Experts observe that high productivity rates in southeastern plantations are confined to limited site conditions or require costly inputs. Eastern cottonwood and American sycamore grow quickly on rich bottomlands where they compete with higher-value crops. These species are also prone to pests and disease. Sweetgum is frost hardy, has few pest or disease problems, and grows across a broad range of sites, yet growth rates are relatively low. Eucalypts require few inputs and offer high potential productivity, but are limited by frost to the lower coastal plain and Florida. More time and investment in silviculture, selection, and breeding will be needed to develop hardwoods as competitive biofuel feedstock species. Loblolly pine has robust site requirements, growth rates rivaling hardwoods and lower costs of production. Because of existing stands and know-how, the forestry community considers loblolly pine to be a prime candidate for plantation bioenergy in the Southeast. Further research is required to study naturally regenerated hardwood biomass resources.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Coleman, Mark [USDA Forest Service

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Woody energy crops in the southeastern United States: Two centuries of practitioner experience.  

SciTech Connect

Forest industry experts were consulted on the potential for hardwood tree species to serve as feedstock for bioenergy in the southeastern United States. Hardwoods are of interest for bioenergy because of desirable physical qualities, genetic research advances, and growth potential. Yet little data is available regarding potential productivity and costs. This paper describes required operations and provides a realistic estimate of the costs of producing bioenergy feedstock based on commercial experiences. Forestry practitioners reported that high productivity rates in southeastern hardwood plantations are confined to narrow site conditions or require costly inputs. Eastern cottonwood and American sycamore grow quickly on rich bottomlands, but are also prone to pests and disease. Sweetgum is frost hardy, has few pest or disease problems, and grows across a broad range of sites, yet growth rates are relatively low. Eucalypts require fewer inputs than do other species and offer high potential productivity but are limited by frost to the lower Coastal Plain and Florida. Further research is required to study naturally regenerated hardwood biomass resources. Loblolly pine has robust site requirements, growth rates rivaling hardwoods, and lower costs of production. More time and investment in silviculture, selection, and breeding will be needed to develop hardwoods as competitive biofuel feedstock species. Because of existing stands and fully developed operations, the forestry community considers loblolly pine to be a prime candidate for plantation bioenergy in the Southeast.

Kline, Keith, L.; Coleman, Mark, D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect

This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision.

David A. King

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Soil carbon sequestration and changes in fungal and bacterial biomass following incorporation of forest residues.  

SciTech Connect

Sequestering carbon (C) in forest soils can benefit site fertility and help offset greenhouse gas emissions. However, identifying soil conditions and forest management practices which best promote C accumulation remains a challenging task. We tested whether soil incorporation of masticated woody residues alters short-term C storage at forested sites in western and southeastern USA. Our hypothesis was that woody residues would preferentially stimulate soil fungal biomass, resulting in improved C use efficiency and greater soil C storage. Harvest slash at loblolly pine sites in South Carolina was masticated (chipped) and either (1) retained on the soil surface, (2) tilled to a soil depth of 40 cm, or (3) tilled using at least twice the mass of organics. At comparative sites in California, live woody fuels in ponderosa pine stands were (1) masticated and surface applied, (2) masticated and tilled, or (3) left untreated. Sites with clayey and sandy soils were compared in each region, with residue additions ranging from 20 to 207 Mg ha_1. Total and active fungal biomass were not strongly affected by residue incorporation despite the high input of organics. Limited response was also found for total and active bacterial biomass. As a consequence, fungal:bacterial (F:B) biomass ratios were similar among treatments at each site. Total soil C was elevated at one California site following residue incorporation, yet was significantly lower compared to surface-applied residues at both loblolly pine sites, presumably due to the oxidative effects of tilling on soil organic matter. The findings demonstrated an inconsequential effect of residue incorporation on fungal and bacterial biomass and suggest a limited potential of such practices to enhance long-term soil C storage in these forests.

Busse, Matt, D.; Sanchez, Felipe G.; Ratcliff, Alice W.; Butnor, John R.; Carter, Emily A.; Powers, Robert F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

NSA-Old Jack Pine Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSA-OJP) Aerial view of the NSA-OJP site during IFC 2. The Rohn tower and investigator hut are in the approximate center of the image with the generator hut at the extreme upper...

157

Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feedwater treatment Boiler Feedwater treatment Steam System Steam System Wastewater Boiler Blowdown Steam Condensate Losses Boiler Freshwater Wastewater Cooling Tower Cooling Tower Blowdown Water Loss by Evaporation;32 Assumption Isothermal mixing => linear constraints tik tik+1 qijk zijk=0,1 Procedure 1. Solve MINLP assuming

Farritor, Shane

158

Effect of species and wood to bark ratio on pelleting of southern woods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six common southern hardwoods and loblolly pine were pelleted in a laboratory pellet mill. The pellet furnishes were blended to test the effect of different wood to bark ratios on pellet durability and production rate. Included was a ratio chosen to simulate the wood to bark ratio found in whole-tree chips. This furnish produced good quality pellets for all species tested. Pelleting of the pure wood of hardwoods was not successful; furnish routinely blocked the pellet mill dies. Pure pine wood, however, did produce acceptable pellets. It was noted that, as lignin and extractive content increased above a threshold level, the precentage of fines produced in a pellet durability test increased. Thus, all pine and tupelo wood/bark mixes produces high fines. This reduces the desirability of the pellets in the marketplace. Further research is necessary to confirm this relationship. This study suggests that both tree species and wood/bark ratio affect the durability of pellets and the rate with which they can be produced in a laboratory pellet mill. 9 references.

Bradfield, J.; Levi, M.P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

SRS - Environmental Report for 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Environmental Report - 2004 Environmental Data - 2004 Soil & Groundwater Closure Solid Waste SREL High-Level Waste Site D&D Forestry Maps SRS Search SRS pine cone The Longleaf Pine The longleaf pine (pinus palustris) is one of the dominant pine species at SRS. Distributed in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains from Virginia to Texas, the trees are common in dry, sandy locations. At maturity, they generally reach 80-120 feet in height and up to two-and-a-half feet in diameter (with a maximum height of 150 feet and diameter of four feet). They produce cones up to 10 inches long. The longleaf is the preferred pine species of the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, and large areas of SRS are managed for the species because of the woodpecker. The trees are harvested for timber, and their pine straw (from needles reaching 15 inches in length) is used extensively in landscaping projects. The 2004 SRS Environmental Report's interactive CD and associated web page were designed by Don Lechner and the report cover by Eleanor Justice-both of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Documentation and Information Services Section - Media Documentation Group. The photograph was taken by Al Mamatey of the company's Environmental Services Section.

160

ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE DOE/OR/01-2531&D2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site operations, specifically as associated with lead in surface soil at the abandoned water tank and nickel in surface soils over the northern portion of the parcel from former Bldg. K-1037 smelting operations. Low level detections of organics are also reported in some surface soils including Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) near Blair Road and common laboratory contaminants at randomly distributed locations. However, human health risk from site-related contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are acceptablethough maximum concentrations of lead and nickel and the screening-level ecological risk assessment (SLERA) demonstrate no further ecological evaluation is warranted. The weight of evidence leads to the conclusion Parcel 21d does not require any actions per the FFA.

David A. King, CHP, PMP

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Director of Live Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many concentrated poultry-producing areas of the USA including the Delmarva Peninsula have shortages of quality pine-base bedding materials. Yet, there are often ample supplies of cost-effective hardwood sawdust (HW) that could supplement this deficit. However, the poultry industry has been reluctant to use HW due to periodic moldinduced respiratory health concerns. A demonstration was implemented to evaluate management strategies for utilizing HW as poultry bedding. On a commercial farm growing roaster chickens; loblolly pine (LP), yellow poplar (YP) and white oak sawdust (WO) were each placed in 2 houses. For each bedding type, 1 house received fresh-cut sawdust (SD) directly from sawmills or SD held in storage for 3 months. One half of each house also received a peracetic acid-base mold inhibitor prior to chick placement. The average moisture content of SD for all species at placement in Flock 1 was 31%. Moisture content of SD obtained directly from sawmills was higher (39%) compared to that which had been in storage for 3 months (23%). While in storage the temperature of the SD averaged 137 F. Storage and the use of the mold inhibitor had

Usda Forest Service; George W. Malone; Daniel Rider; Stephen Collier; Bob James; Allens Hatchery Inc

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Soil carbon, after 3 years, under short-rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Soil carbon contents were measured on a short-rotation woody crop study located on the US Department of Energys Savannah River Site outside Aiken, SC. This study included fertilization and irrigation treatments on five tree genotypes (sweetgum, loblolly pine, sycamore and two eastern cottonwood clones). Prior to study installation, the previous pine stand was harvested and the remaining slash and stumps were pulverized and incorporated 30 cm into the soil. One year after harvest soil carbon levels were consistent with preharvest levels but dropped in the third year below pre-harvest levels. Tillage increased soil carbon contents, after three years, as compared with adjacent plots that were not part of the study but where harvested, but not tilled, at the same time. When the soil response to the individual treatments for each genotype was examined, one cottonwood clone (ST66), when irrigated and fertilized, had higher total soil carbon and mineral associated carbon in the upper 30 cm compared with the other tree genotypes. This suggests that root development in ST66 may have been stimulated by the irrigation plus fertilization treatment.

Sanchez, Felipe, G.; Coleman, Mark; Garten, Charles, T., Jr.; Luxmoore, Robert, J.; Stanturf, John, A.; Wullschleger, Stan, D.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Soil carbon after three years under short rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability  

SciTech Connect

Soil carbon contents were measured on a short-rotation woody crop study located on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site outside Aiken, SC. This study included fertilization and irrigation treatments on five tree genotypes (sweetgum, loblolly pine, sycamore and two eastern cottonwood clones). Prior to study installation, the previous pine stand was harvested and the remaining slash and stumps were pulverized and incorporated 30 cm into the soil. One year after harvest soil carbon levels were consistent with pre-harvest levels but dropped in the third year below pre-harvest levels. Tillage increased soil carbon contents, after three years, as compared with adjacent plots that were not part of the study but where harvested, but not tilled, at the same time. When the soil response to the individual treatments for each genotype was examined, one cottonwood clone (ST66), when irrigated and fertilized, had higher total soil carbon and mineral associated carbon in the upper 30 cm compared with the other tree genotypes. This suggests that root development in ST66 may have been stimulated by the irrigation plus fertilization treatment.

Sanchez, Felipe G. [USDA Forest Service; Coleman, Mark [USDA Forest Service; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Luxmoore, Robert J [ORNL; Stanturf, J. A. [USDA Forest Service; Trettin, Carl [USDA Forest Service; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Pine Grove Mills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7336739°, -77.8855567° 7336739°, -77.8855567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7336739,"lon":-77.8855567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

165

Pine Island Ridge, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0948098°, -80.2739383° 0948098°, -80.2739383° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.0948098,"lon":-80.2739383,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

166

Pine Beach, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9.9359515°, -74.1709735° 9.9359515°, -74.1709735° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9359515,"lon":-74.1709735,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

167

Pine Hill, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3.3075694°, -75.6521271° 3.3075694°, -75.6521271° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.3075694,"lon":-75.6521271,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

168

Pine Mountain Club, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4.8469211°, -119.1567751° 4.8469211°, -119.1567751° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.8469211,"lon":-119.1567751,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

Pine Castle, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida: Energy Resources Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.4719489°, -81.3678477° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.4719489,"lon":-81.3678477,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

170

Pine Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

483784°, -116.6308534° 483784°, -116.6308534° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0483784,"lon":-116.6308534,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

171

Pine Glen, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.0889475°, -78.0566725° 1.0889475°, -78.0566725° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0889475,"lon":-78.0566725,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

Pine County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3087°, -92.8070708° 3087°, -92.8070708° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.0983087,"lon":-92.8070708,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

Pinon Pine IGCC project status update, August 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the recent (August, 1992) execution of the Cooperative Agreement, the major focus of work has been on critical-path environmental permitting activities, both related to the NEPA process as well as state and local activities. Pending approval of the project by the Nevada Public Service Commission, detailed engineering activities will commence in November. Federal funding of the project automatically invokes environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This project will require an Environmental Impact Statement, or EIS, with DOE as the lead agency for the NEPA reviews. The project must also be approved by the Nevada Public Service Commission (PSCN) in the state`s Resource Planning process. As shown in the project schedule, Figure 4 below, SPPCo. expects to have the combustion turbine portion of the plant on line by late 1994, configured as a simple-cycle natural gas machine with either No. 2 diesel or propane being utilized as backup fuel. By phasing construction in this manner, SPPCo. gains approximately 45 MWe of peaking power capacity to match projections of customer loads. The gasifier, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and the balance of the IGCC plant will be commissioned in late 1996. A DOE demonstration period of 42 months is planned.

Motter, J.W.; Pitcher, J.D.; Fankhanel, M.; Campbell, W.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Pinon Pine IGCC project status update, August 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the recent (August, 1992) execution of the Cooperative Agreement, the major focus of work has been on critical-path environmental permitting activities, both related to the NEPA process as well as state and local activities. Pending approval of the project by the Nevada Public Service Commission, detailed engineering activities will commence in November. Federal funding of the project automatically invokes environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This project will require an Environmental Impact Statement, or EIS, with DOE as the lead agency for the NEPA reviews. The project must also be approved by the Nevada Public Service Commission (PSCN) in the state's Resource Planning process. As shown in the project schedule, Figure 4 below, SPPCo. expects to have the combustion turbine portion of the plant on line by late 1994, configured as a simple-cycle natural gas machine with either No. 2 diesel or propane being utilized as backup fuel. By phasing construction in this manner, SPPCo. gains approximately 45 MWe of peaking power capacity to match projections of customer loads. The gasifier, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and the balance of the IGCC plant will be commissioned in late 1996. A DOE demonstration period of 42 months is planned.

Motter, J.W.; Pitcher, J.D.; Fankhanel, M.; Campbell, W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Certification of NIST Standard Reference Material 1575a Pine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to allow degassing of NO2 and CO2. ... Coupled Plasma- Atomic Emission Spectrometry. PH ... Instituto Tecnolgico E Nuclear Sacavem, Portugal ...

176

TMS Foundation Focus, 4 (1): Torrey Pines Golf Course Hosts ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... participants were given the experience of playing the course in much the same condition that saw Tiger Woods seal his victory with an eagle on the 18th hole.

177

How resilient are southwestern ponderosa pine forests after crown fires?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and New Mexico. USDA For. Serv. Bull. 101. 2005 NRC Canadasettlement. Ecol. Monogr. 2005 NRC Canada Covington, W.W.precision. Ecol. Appl. 9: 2005 NRC Canada Savage and Mast

Savage, M; Mast, J N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

PinonPine IGCC Power Project: A DOE Assesment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbine, the IGCC process can also be modified to produce value-added chemicals or transportation fuels from coal by chemical processing of the CO and H 2 in the fuel gas...

179

Pine Valley, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

776°, -90.6204165° 776°, -90.6204165° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.5296776,"lon":-90.6204165,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

Pine Ridge at Crestwood, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge at Crestwood, New Jersey: Energy Resources Ridge at Crestwood, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9545618°, -74.315146° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9545618,"lon":-74.315146,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Pine Valley, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.8214402°, -116.5291841° 2.8214402°, -116.5291841° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8214402,"lon":-116.5291841,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry ­ is it a short term or longer term concern? Are the overall results of MPB in the long term encourage MPB outbreak. Cost of thinning increases - $100/tree at Vail Ski Resort in 2008. The 500,000 acres in 2007 alone with full thinning would cost $1 billion. Need for focused research #12;Positive side

183

Fire Regimes of the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal and Spatial Variability and Implications for Vegetation Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecologists continue to debate the role of fire in forests of the southern Appalachian Mountains. How does climate influence fire in these humid, temperate forests? Did fire regimes change during the transition from Native American settlement to Euro-American settlement? Are fire regime changes resulting in broad vegetation changes in the forests of eastern North America? I used several approaches to address these questions. First, I used digitized fire perimeter maps from Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Shenandoah National Park for 1930-2009 to characterize spatial and temporal patterns of wildfire by aspect, elevation, and landform. Results demonstrate that fuel moisture is a primary control, with fire occurring most frequently during dry years, in dry regions, and at dry topographic positions. Climate also modifies topographic control, with weaker topographic patterns under drier conditions. Second, I used dendroecological methods to reconstruct historical fire frequency in yellow pine (Pinus, subgenus Diploxylon Koehne) stands at three field sites in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The fire history reconstructions extend from 1700 to 2009, with composite fire return intervals ranging from 2-4 years prior to the fire protection period. The two longest reconstructions record frequent fire during periods of Native American land use. Except for the recent fire protection period, temporal changes in land use did not have a significant impact on fire frequency and there was little discernible influence of climate on past fire occurrence. Third, I sampled vegetation composition in four different stand types along a topographic moisture gradient, including mesic cove, sub-mesic white pine (Pinus strobus L.) hardwood, sub-xeric oak (Quercus L.), and xeric pine forests in an unlogged watershed with a reconstructed fire history. Stand age structures demonstrate changes in establishment following fire exclusion in xeric pine stands, sub-xeric oak stands, and sub-mesic white pine-hardwood stands. Fire-tolerant yellow pines and oaks are being replaced by shade-tolerant, fire sensitive species such as red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L. Carr.). Classification analysis and ordination of species composition in different age classes suggest a trend of successional convergence in the absence of fire with a shift from four to two forest communities.

Flatley, William 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Pinus taeda genome is characterized by diverse and highly diverged repetitive sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deep transcriptome or genome sequencing, as well as experi-Three sets of whole genome shotgun sequencing were performedthroughput Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing genomic DNA at a

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

QTL and Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Pinus Taeda L  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reason for the project is to find the genetic factors which control growth at ages closer to commercial harvest (also known as QTL detection). To date, efforts to find genetic factors which control growth have been limited to seedlings. Because tree breeders want to find molecular markers which are linked to traits of direct economic value, finding linkage to factors controlling older-tree growth is more critical than seedling growth. Our current research interest includes both absolute height at ages 10-13 years but also growth trajectory or the rate of growth from seedling to half-rotation.

Claire G. Williams

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

COMMUNITY ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Ectomycorrhiza succession patterns in Pinus sylvestris forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Neary et al. 1999; Certini 2005), affect soil microbial populations (Va´zquez et al. 1993; Mataix-Solera fungus, Tomentella sublilacina, via soil food webs. Mycologia 97:762­769 Mataix-Solera J, Guerrero C

187

Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coleman, M.D., et. al. 2003. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses. Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 26 pp. Abstract: Many researchers have studied the productivity potential of intensively managed forest plantations. However, we need to learn more about the effects of fundamental growth processes on forest productivity; especially the influence of aboveground and belowground resource acquisition and allocation. This report presents installation, establishment, and first-year results of four tree species (two cottonwood clones, sycamore, sweetgum, and loblolly pine) grown with fertilizer and irrigation treatments. At this early stage of development, irrigation and fertilization were additive only in cottonwood clone ST66 and sweetgum. Leaf area development was directly related to stem growth, but root production was not always consistent with shoot responses, suggesting that allocation of resources varies among treatments. We will evaluate the consequences of these early responses on resource availability in subsequent growing seasons. This information will be used to: (1) optimize fiber and bioenergy production; (2) understand carbon sequestration; and (3) develop innovative applications such as phytoremediation; municipal, industrial, and agricultural wastes management; and protection of soil, air, and water resources.

D.R. Coyle; J. Blake; K. Britton; M. Buford; R.G. Campbell; J. Cox; B. Cregg; D. Daniels; M. Jacobson; K. Johnsen; T. McDonald; K. McLeod; E. Nelson; D. Robison; R. Rummer; F. Sanchez; J. Stanturf; B. Stokes; C. Trettin; J. Tuskan; L. Wright; S. Wullschleger

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Soil carbon storage beneath recently established tree plantations in Tennessee and South Carolina, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rates of soil carbon (C) accumulation under 7 recently established tree plantations in Tennessee and South Carolina (USA) were estimated by comparing soil C stocks under the plantations to adjacent reference (nonplantation) sites. Estimated rates of C accumulation in surface (0-40 cm) mineral soil were 40-170 gCm{sup -2} yr{sup -1} during the first decade following plantation establishment. Most soil C at each site was found in mineral-associated organic matter (i.e., soil C associated with the silt-clay fraction). Soils with high sand content and low initial C stocks exhibited the greatest gains in particulate organic matter C (POM-C). Labile soil C stocks (consisting of forest floor and mineral soil POM-C) became an increasingly important component of soil C storage as loblolly pine stands aged. Rates of mineral soil C accumulation were highly variable in the first decade of plantation growth, depending on location, but the findings support a hypothesis that farm to tree plantation conversions can result in high initial rates of soil C accumulation in the southeastern United States.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Quantitative and qualitative measures of decomposition: Is there a link?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decomposition rates of loblolly pine coarse woody debris (CWD) were determined by mass loss and wood density changes for trees that differed in source of mortality (natural, girdle-poison, and felling). Specifically, three treatments were examined: (1) control (CON): natural mortality; (2) CD: 5-fold increase in CWD compared with the CON; and (3) CS: 12-fold increase in snags compared with the CON. The additional CWD in the CD treatment plots and the additional snags in the CS plots were achieved by felling (for the CD plots) or girdling followed by herbicide injection (for the CS plots) select trees in these plots. Consequently,mortality on the CD plots is due to natural causes and felling. Likewise, mortality on the CS plots is due to natural causes and girdle-poison. In each treatment plot, mortality due to natural causes was inventoried since 1997, whereas mortality due to girdle-poison and felling were inventoried since 2001. No significant difference was detected between the rates of decomposition for the CWD on these treatment plots, indicating that source of the tree mortality did not influence rates of decomposition once the tree fell. These experimental measures of decomposition were compared with two decay classification systems (three- and five-unit classifications) to determine linkages. Changes in wood density did not correlate to any decay classification, whereas mass loss had a weak correlation with decay class. However, the large degree of variation limits the utility of decay classification systems in estimating mass loss.

Eaton, Robert, J.; Sanchez, Felipe, G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

MAJOR FOREST COMMUNITY TYPES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT: AFIELD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pine-sassafras-dollarleaf . Slash pine-black cherry-water oak Longleaf pine-turkey oak-wire grass Longleaf pine-turkey oak- bracken fern . Longleaf pine-moneywort . Longleaf...

192

NPP Boreal Forest: Canal Flats, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canal Flats, Canada, 1984 Canal Flats, Canada, 1984 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Comeau, P. G., and J. P. Kimmins. 1999. NPP Boreal Forest: Canal Flats, Canada, 1984. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Above and below-ground biomass and productivity of four lodgepole pine stands (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) were determined near Canal Flats, Canada, during the 1984 growing season. Two stands growing on xeric sites and two stands growing on mesic sites were studied to determine the influence of soil water content on resource allocation to above-ground versus below-ground plant components. The stands were 70-78 years old, unmanaged, and had regenerated naturally following wildfire.

193

Dendroecological analysis of climatic effects on Quercus petraea and Pinus halepensis radial growth using the process-based MAIDEN model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tree species. Tree Physiol. 20: 787797. 2004 NRC CanadaOctober 2003. Published on the NRC Research Press Web sitedoi: 10.1139/X03-253 2004 NRC Canada Can. J. For. Res. 34:

Misson, Laurent

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Testing the ecological stability of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: effects of heat, ash and mycorrhizal colonization on Pinus muricata seedling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal pan and heating it in a soil drying oven. During thesoil heating and ash addition, using a drying oven and ash

Peay, Kabir G.; Bruns, Thomas D.; Garbelotto, Matteo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Overcoming the Recalcitrance of Cellulosic Biomass by Value Prior to Pulping: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-221  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Value Prior to Pulping (VPP) project goal was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of introducing a new value stream into existing pulp and paper mills. Essentially the intent was to transfer the energy content of extracted hemicellulose from electricity and steam generated in the recovery boiler to a liquid transportation fuel. The hemicellulose fraction was extracted prior to pulping, fractionated, or conditioned if necessary, and fermented to ethanol. Commercial adaptation of the process to wood hemicelluloses was a prerequisite for using this less currently valued component available from biomass and wood. These hemicelluloses are predominately glucurono-xylan in hardwoods and galactoglucomannan in softwoods (with a significant softwood component of an arabino-xylan) and will yield fermentation substrates different from cellulose. NREL provided its expertise in the area of fermentation host evaluation using its Zymomonas strains on the CleanTech Partner's (CTP) VPP project. The project was focused on the production of fuel ethanol and acetic acid from hemicellulose streams generated from wood chips of industrially important hardwood and softwood species. NREL was one of four partners whose ethanologen was tested on the hydrolyzed extracts. The use of commercially available enzymes to treat oligomeric sugar extracts was also investigated and coupled with fermentation. Fermentations by NREL were conducted with the Zymomonas mobilis organism with most of the work being performed with the 8b strain. The wood extracts hydrolyzed and/or fermented by NREL were those derived from maple, mixed southern hardwoods, and loblolly pine. An unhydrolyzed variant of the mixed southern hardwood extract possessed a large concentration of oligomeric sugars and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed with a number of enzymes, followed by fermentation. The fermentation of the wood extracts was carried out at bench scale in flasks or small bioreactors, with a maximum volume of 500 mL.

Lowell, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Nitrate removal using compost and pine bark as a carbon source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Emissions resulting from waste degradation processes have a high polluting potential and are responsible for negative impacts on the environment. Landfill leachate is hazardous for (more)

Pisano, Giulia.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Aftershocks of an Explosively Induced Mine Collapse at White Pine, Michigan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(1995). The February 3, 1995 ML 5.1 seismic event in the Trona Mining District of southwestern Wyoming

198

PJMRprobe for dynamic-angle spinning K. T. Mueller, G. C. Chingas, and A. Pines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a pulley attached to the probehead and coupled to a stepping motor outside of the magnet. The choice of a superconducting magnet. This allows the refocusing of nuclear spin magnetization that evolves under anisotropic of motor and gear ratio is based on an analysis of the moments of inertia of the motor and load

Pines, Alexander

199

Selecting indicators of soil, microbial, and plant conditions to understand ecological changes in Georgia pine forests  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing how resource use and management activities affect ecological conditions is necessary to document and understand anthropogenic changes in ecological systems. Resource managers on military installations have the delicate task of balancing the training needs of soldiers effectively with the need to maintain a high quality of ecological conditions. This study considers ways that ecological indicators can provide information on impacts that training has on environmental characteristics that occur at different scales and in different sectors of the environment. The characteristics examined include soil chemistry, soil microbes, and vegetation. A discriminant function analysis was conducted to determine whether ecological indicators could differentiate among different levels of military use. A combination of 10 indicators explained 90% of the variation among plots from five different military use levels. Results indicated that an appropriate suite of ecological indicators for military resource managers includes soil, microbial, and vegetation characteristics. Since many of these indicators are related, managers at this location potentially have freedom to choose indicators that are relatively easy to measure, without sacrificing information.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Sobek, Edward A [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Alexander Pines, 1988 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Chemistry: For his brilliant innovations in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which have led to new ways to prove solid materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Partitioning in trees and soil (PiTS) - a experimental approach to improve knowledge of forest carbon dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Summary The dynamics of rapid changes in carbon (C) partitioning within forest ecosystems are not well understood, which limits improvement of mechanistic models of C cycling. Our objective was to inform model processes by describing relationships between C partitioning and accessible environmental or physiological measurements, with a special emphasis on belowground C flux. We exposed eight 7-year-old loblolly pine trees to air enriched with 13CO2 and then implemented adjacent light shade (LS) and heavy shade (HS) treatments in order to manipulate C uptake and flux. A soil pit was dug adjacent to the trees to provide greater access belowground. The impacts of shading on photosynthesis, plant water potential, sap flow, basal area growth, root growth, and soil C exchange rate (CER) were assessed for each tree over a three-week period. The progression of the 13C label was concurrently tracked from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots, and soil CO2 efflux. The HS treatment significantly reduced C uptake, sap flow, stem growth and root standing crop, and resulted in greater residual soil water content to 1 m depth. Sap flow was strongly correlated with CER on the previous day, but not the current day, with no apparent treatment effect on the relationship. The 13C label was immediately detected in foliage on label day (half-life = 0.5 d), progressed through phloem by day 2 (half-life = 4.7 d), roots by day 2-4, and subsequently was evident as respiratory release from soil which peaked between days 3-6. The 13C of soil CO2 efflux was strongly correlated with phloem 13C on the previous day, or two days earlier. These data detail the timing and relative magnitude of C flux through a young pine stand in relation to environmental conditions. Refinement of belowground sampling will be necessary to adequately separate and quantify the flux of recently fixed C into roots, and fate of that new C as respiratory, mycorrhizal or exudative release, storage or partitioning into new root biomass.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL; Childs, Joanne [ORNL; Evans, R [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Multiscale Simulation of a Prescribed Fire Event in the New Jersey Pine Barrens using ARPS-CANOPY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke prediction products are one of the tools used by land management personnel for decision-making regarding prescribed fires. This study documents the application to a prescribed fire of a smoke prediction system that employs ARPS-CANOPY, a ...

Michael T. Kiefer; Warren E. Heilman; Shiyuan Zhong; Joseph J. Charney; Xindi Bian; Nicholas S. Skowronski; John L. Hom; Kenneth L. Clark; Matthew Patterson; Michael R. Gallagher

203

Hydraulic constraints on photosynthesis in subtropical evergreen broad leaf forest and pine woodland trees of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

127:445 Zimmermann MH (1978) Hydraulic architecture of some South Florida Hydraulic conductivity PhotosyntheticArgentina Introduction Plant hydraulic characteristics have

Jones, Tim J.; Luton, Corene D.; Santiago, Louis S.; Goldstein, Guillermo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Blister Rust Incidence in Treeline Whitebark Pine, Glacier National Park, U.S.A.: Environmental and Topographic Influences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blackfeet wind project will not be discussed beyond what is listed in Table 1. California Using funds from opportunities and result in more effective use of state funds. !" Incentives for wind power and closed) for wind and closed-loop biomass. Section 3 discusses production incentives ­ the most common performance

Resler, Lynn M.

205

An exploration of perceived benefits of recreation in the Pine Valley District of the Dixie National Forest .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Public land agencies are mandated to incorporate Ecosystem Management practices into forest planning and management. The human dimensions of Ecosystem Management, including recreation and amenity (more)

Kaufman, Andrew Jay, 1963-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hydraulic constraints on photosynthesis in subtropical evergreen broad leaf forest and pine woodland trees of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER Hydraulic constraints on photosynthesis in subtropicalwater transport and photosynthesis represents the trade-offwater transport and photosynthesis to evaluate hydraulic

Jones, Tim J.; Luton, Corene D.; Santiago, Louis S.; Goldstein, Guillermo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Denitrification rates in a wastewater-irrigated forest soil in New Zealand  

SciTech Connect

Denitrification is considered to be an important N removal process in land-based wastewater treatment systems, although in situ denitrification rates have rarely been reported. The authors investigated the contribution of denitrification to N removal in a land treatment system by measuring in situ denitrification rates for 12 mo in a Monterey pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) forest irrigated with tertiary-treated wastewater. The variability of denitrification rates was investigated using a nested field design that divided the land treatment system into four spatial components (irrigation block, topographic position, field site, and sample plot) and two temporal components (sample period, sample day). Denitrification was measured using undisturbed soil cores collected daily, for six consecutive days on 21 occasions throughout the year. Soil moisture content, NO{sub 3} concentration, available C, denitrifying enzyme activity, and temperature also were measured. The annual denitrification rate in the irrigated soil was 2.4 kg N ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1}, and only slightly higher than the unirrigated soil. Temporal effects contributed more than spatial effects to the overall variation in denitrification rates. Multiple regression analysis showed that soil factors could only explain 29% of the variation in denitrification rates. Soil water-filled porosity was low in the land treatment system, and less than the critical threshold value determined in a laboratory study. The authors concluded that denitrification in this land treatment system studied was limited by excessive aeration in the free-draining soils.

Barton, L.; McLay, C.D.A.; Schipper, L.A.; Smith, C.T.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples  

SciTech Connect

This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Labbe, Nicole [ORNL; Wagner, Rebekah J. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

210

Linking ecosystem scale vegetation change to shifts in carbon and water cycling: the consequences of widespread pion mortality in the Southwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The southwestern United States experienced an extended drought from 1999-2002 which led to widespread coniferous tree mortality. Pion-juniper (PJ) woodlands, which occupy 24 million ha throughout the Southwest, were extremely vulnerable to this drought. An abrupt die-off of 40 to 95% of pion pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% of juniper (Juniperus monosperma) across 1.5 million ha triggered rapid and extensive changes in the structure of PJ woodlands with potentially large, yet unknown, consequences for ecosystem services and feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate system. Given the spatial extent of PJ woodlands (3rd largest biome in the US) and climatic predictions of increased frequency and intensity of drought in the region, it is crucial to understand the consequences of these disturbances on regional carbon and energy dynamics, biogeochemical processes and atmospheric CO2. The overall objective of our research was to quantify what impact widespread mortality of pion trees has for carbon and water cycling in PJ woodlands. Our specific objectives for this proposal were: 1) Quantify the carbon, water and energy exchange trajectory after mortality in PJ woodlands; 2) Determine the mechanisms controlling the response and recovery of ecosystem production and respiration processes following large-scale pion mortality; 3) Use the relationships we measure between ecosystem structure and function PJ woodlands recover from mortality to scale the results of our study up to the regional scale.

Litvak, Marcy Ellen [University of New Mexico

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

FOURIER TRANSFORM MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSFORM MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR G. Drobny, A. Pines, S.TRANSFO~~ MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR G. Drobny, A. Pines, S.

Drobny, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Continuous Measure of Gross Primary Production for the Conterminous U.S. Derived from MODIS and AmeriFlux Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oklahoma (ARM) Metolius intermediate aged ponderosa pine (MI) Metolius new young pine (MN) Brookings (Bro) Freeman Ranch Mesquite Juniper (FRM) Wind

Xia, Jingfeng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Universit du Maine Le Mans cole doctorale SCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not accepted him. At MIT, it didn't take long for Pines to find his way to the lab of John Waugh. Pines still litera- ture on NMR. "I was very fortunate to have worked with John Waugh," says Pines. "He is a great, and recently, the combination of MRI with microfluidics." In 1984, two of Pines's mentors, John Waugh and Erwin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY & ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY 945  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Third Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. Maruo Guillen. 2001. Is globalization civilizing

Sheridan, Jennifer

215

Soil microbial community response to precipitation change in a semi-arid ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities regulate many belowground carbon cycling processes; thus, the impact of climate change on the struc- ture and function of soil microbial communities could, in turn, impact the release or storage of carbon in soils. Here we used a large-scale precipitation manipulation ( 18%, 50%, or ambient) in a pi on-juniper woodland (Pinus edulis-Juniperus mono- sperma) to investigate how changes in precipitation amounts altered soil microbial communities as well as what role seasonal variation in rainfall and plant composition played in the microbial community response. Seasonal variability in precipitation had a larger role in determining the composition of soil microbial communities in 2008 than the direct effect of the experimental precipitation treatments. Bacterial and fungal communities in the dry, relatively moisture-limited premonsoon season were compositionally distinct from communities in the monsoon season, when soil moisture levels and periodicity varied more widely across treatments. Fungal abundance in the drought plots during the dry premonsoon season was particularly low and was 4.7 times greater upon soil wet-up in the monsoon season, suggesting that soil fungi were water limited in the driest plots, which may result in a decrease in fungal degradation of carbon substrates. Additionally, we found that both bacterial and fungal communities beneath pi on pine and juniper were distinct, suggesting that microbial functions beneath these trees are different. We conclude that predicting the response of microbial communities to climate change is highly dependent on seasonal dynam- ics, background climatic variability, and the composition of the associated aboveground community.

Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pockman, William [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Climate and the autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) at Mountain Birch (Betula pubecens ssp. czerepanovii) Treelines in northern Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this investigation were to determine the impact of climate on mountain birch (Betula pubecens ssp. czerepanovii (Orlova)) growth and to develop a regional chronology of autumnal moth outbreaks. To accomplish the objective, cores of mountain birch were taken from 21 sites in Norrbotten, Sweden. Tree-ring chronologies were developed for each site. Climatic influences were determined by correlating ring widths to climatic variables (average monthly temperature, average monthly precipitation and NAO). Outbreaks were recovered from the ring width indices using the non-host method with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris (L.)) as the non-host. This method removes the climatic influence on growth to enhance other factors. Patterns of synchrony and regional outbreaks were detected using regression and cluster analysis techniques. The primary climatic influences on the tree ring growth of mountain birch are June and July temperatures; precipitation during October is of secondary importance. Climate explained 46% of yearly tree ring width variation. Outbreaks of the autumnal moth occur at varying time intervals depending on the scale of study. Intervals between outbreaks on the tree level are twice as long as at the plot level. On the regional scale plots within the same valley had more similar outbreak intervals and magnitudes of outbreaks. Elevation is a driver in determining the length of outbreaks and length between outbreaks. The percent monocormicity of a plot is also a determining factor of the length between outbreaks. This study is the first regional scale study on climate and outbreaks of the autumnal moth on mountain birch. The results complement research being conducted on autumnal moth larval densities and will help in modeling and assessing the effects of outbreaks with increasing climatic change.

Young, Amanda B.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effectiveness of three bulking agents for food waste composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rather than landfilling, composting the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes recycles the waste as a safe and nutrient enriched soil amendment, reduces emissions of greenhouse gases and generates less leachate. The objective of this project was to investigate the composting effectiveness of three bulking agents, namely chopped wheat (Triticum) straw, chopped mature hay consisting of 80% timothy (milium) and 20% clover (triphullum) and pine (pinus) wood shavings. These bulking agents were each mixed in duplicates at three different ratios with food waste (FW) and composted for 10 days using prototype in-vessel composters to observe their temperature and pH trends. Then, each mixture was matured in vertical barrels for 56 days to measure their mass loss and final nutrient content and to visually evaluate their level of decomposition. Chopped wheat straw (CWS) and chopped hay (CH) were the only two formulas that reached thermophilic temperatures during the 10 days of active composting when mixed with FW at a wet mass ratio of 8.9 and 8.6:1 (FW:CWS and FW:CH), respectively. After 56 days of maturation, these two formulas were well decomposed with no or very few recognizable substrate particles, and offered a final TN exceeding the original. Wood shavings (WS) produced the least decomposed compost at maturation, with wood particles still visible in the final product, and with a TN lower than the initial. Nevertheless, all bulking agents produced compost with an organic matter, TN, TP and TK content suitable for use as soil amendment.

Adhikari, Bijaya K. [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada); Barrington, Suzelle [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)], E-mail: suzelle.barrington@mcgill.ca; Martinez, Jose [Cemagref, Rennes Regional Centre, 7 avenue du Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); King, Susan [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

2013 GRC Poster Session Presenter & Title Easel Suppression of transpiration due to cloud immersion in a seasonally dry Mexican weeping pine plantation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Kinetics of Domestic and Non-domestic Coal, Locally Sourced Biomass Waste, and Their Blends 12

Pohl, Karsten

219

In Situ NMR Analysis of Fluids Contained in Sedimentary Rock Thomas M. de Swiet,* Marco Tomaselli,* Martin D. Hurlimann, and Alexander Pines*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Situ NMR Analysis of Fluids Contained in Sedimentary Rock Thomas M. de Swiet,* Marco Tomaselli of pore fluids may be obtained in situ by magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which is normally used for solid samples. 1 H MAS­NMR spectra of water and crude oil in Berea sandstone

Pines, Alexander

220

Deriving a Framework for Estimating Individual Tree Measurements with Lidar for Use in the TAMBEETLE Southern Pine Beetle Infestation Growth Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall goal of this study was to develop a framework for using airborne lidar to derive inputs for the SPB infestation growth model TAMBEETLE. The specific objectives were (1) to estimate individual tree characteristics of XY location, individual bole height (IBH), diameter at breast height (DBH), length of crown (CrHT), and age for use in TAMBEETLE; (2) to estimate individual tree age using lidar-estimated height and site index provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO); and (3) to compare TAMBEETLE simulation results using field measurements and lidarderived measurements as inputs. Diameter at breast height, individual bole height, and crown length were estimated using lidar with an error for mean measurements at plot level of 0.16cm, 0.19m, and 1.07m, respectively. These errors were within root mean square error (RMSE) for other studies at the study site. Age was estimated using the site index provided by SSURGO and the site index curves created for the study area with an RMSE of 4.8 years for mean plot age. Underestimation of tree height by lidar and error in the site index curve explained 91% of the error in mean plot age. TAMBEETLE was used to compare spot growth between a lidar-derived forest map and a forest map generated by TAMBEETLE, based on sample plot characteristics. The lidar-derived forest performed comparably to the TAMBEETLE generated forest. Using lidar to map forests can provide the large spatial extents of the TAMBEETLE generated forest while maintaining the spatially explicit forest characteristics, which were previously only available through field measurements.

Stukey, Jared D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

California Cuckoo Wasps in the Family Chrysididae (Hymenoptera)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Panamint Springs; 13 mi. n Trona; Lone Pine; Death Valley;San Bernardino Co. : Trona. Map 89. California distribution

Kimsey, Lynn S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

PHOSPHORUS IN ALUM AMENDED POULTRY LITTER SYSTEMS: DISTRIBUTION, SPECIATION, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a pine forest (33), during formation of compost (142), and after application of compost (42). Succession

Sparks, Donald L.

223

Risk of pollen allergy in Nerja (southern Spain): a pollen calendar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pinus halepensis Miller, the most characteristic bushes being Buxus ... wind blows off the sea; periods of calm are infrequent (14.4%). ... Spieksma's model (

224

The effect of an integrated catchment management plan on the greenhouse gas balance of the Mangaotama catchment of the Whatawhata Hill Country Research Station.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An integrated catchment management plan implemented in the Mangaotama catchment of the Whatawhata Research Station in 2001 demonstrated that Pinus radiata forestry on marginal land, (more)

Smiley, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Colorado State University Cooperative Extension. 2/99.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Colorado. Injured pines also can be attacked by the red turpentine beetle (D. valens). Mountain pine beetles in pines by the shape of the hind wing cover (Figure 1, top). In side view, it is gradually curved. The wing cover of Ips or engraver beetles, another common group of bark beetles attacking conifers

226

Competition Comments Commentaires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-native disease called the white pine blister rust that has killed many of these trees in the Park. Climate change is a non-native fungal disease introduced to North America in 1910 called the white pine blister rust (Tomback et al. 2001). The blister rust soon spread throughout most of the range of the whitebark pine

Le Roy, Robert J.

227

Cavity availability and use in hardwood forests with emphasis on wood ducks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability and use of cavities were examined on Tony Houseman State Park and Wildlife Management Area at Blue Elbow Swamp (HWMA), Orange County, Texas, during 1999. Random 0.25-ha plots were used to inventory cavities by size and estimate cavity use by vertebrates. Tree species, number of cavities by entrance size, stems per ha, basal area, and total cavities were recorded in 23, 15, and 15 plots in the cypress-tupelo (Taxodium distichum-Nyssa aquatica), mixed hardwood, and pine-oak (Pinus spp.-Quercus spp.) forest stands, respectively. Cavities with entrance dimensions suitable for entry by wood ducks (Aix sponsa) were inspected for suitability as wood duck nesting sites. Total cavity densities were similar between forest stands, but cypress-tupelo contained significantly (P = 0.000) more large-size cavities and mixed hardwoods produced the greatest density of small cavities. Tree species important for cavity production varied by forest stand. Regardless of species or stand, larger diameter and dead trees provided cavities in greater proportions than their availability in forest stands. Suitable wood duck nesting cavities were found at densities (0.0-26.7 cavities/100 ha) comparable to other forest stands at similar latitudes. Wood ducks were captured using grain-baited, swim-in traps. Backpack (n = 13) and implant (n = 20) radio-transmitters were attached to wood duck hens in 1999 and 2000, respectively. A combined total of 404 hen locations was obtained over 1,352 days. No active nests were located at HWMA during this study and hens used forest stands differently between years. Seasonal activity ranges were 246.1 ha 187.9 ha and 437.0 ha 117.6 ha in 1999 and 2000, respectively, and were different between years (P = 0.032). Water levels were significantly (P = 0.000) different between years and were suspected to have influenced hen activity. This study proposes that managers inventory cavity availability in forest stands to identify important cavity producing trees. Low cavity densities exist in forest stands at lower latitudes and sound management must be implemented to promote and retain cavity trees. Additional research is needed to quantify the effect of water levels and habitat conditions on wood duck use of forest stands.

Wolter, Derrick Wayne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Aeromagnetic Survey At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes The regional aeromagnetic map (Fig. 4) reveals a large north-trending magnetic high associated with the Pueblo Mountains and the Pine Ridge Range. This high...

229

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 CX-004383: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pine Hall Brick Company Energy Efficiency Improvements for Lighting, Kiln and Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning...

230

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Program: Pion Pine IGCC Power Project PDF-335KB (June 1992) PAPERS AND...

231

Drill Press Speed Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operating speeds (RPM) Accessory Softwood (Pine) Hardwood (Hard Maple) Acrylic Brass Aluminum Steel Shop Notes Twist drill bits 116" - 316" 14" - 38" 716"- 58" 11...

232

Application of atomic magnetometry in magnetic particle detection  

Application of atomic magnetometry in magnetic particle detection S. Xu, a ! M. H. Donaldson, and A. Pines b ! Department of Chemistry , U niversity of California at ...

233

Minnesota - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Pine Bend Refinery, located in the Twin Cities suburbs, ... Prairie Island nuclear power plant's units 1 and 2 had their licenses renewed in June ...

234

Columbia-SA.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory Cali - June 30, 2011 Norman, Science (2011) Norman, Handbook of Magnetism (2007) Norman, Pines & Kallin, Adv. Phys. (2005) Norman & Pepin, Rep....

235

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

236

Electricity Subsector Cyb ersecurity Risk Management ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SCADA Network OT Systems Power Operations - Energy Mgmt Partial 2 ... Monitor Concentrator Substations (all) Varies N/A PineOpsNetwork vary ...

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

Magnetic resonance detection: spectroscopy and imaging of lab ...  

ley in Physical Chemistry under the guidance of Alex Pines in the spring of 2008. His research focus at Berkeley was in devel-oping novel detection ...

238

Comparing nocturnal eddy covariance measurements to estimates of ecosystem respiration made by scaling chamber measurements at six coniferous boreal sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Springer-Verlag, New Manitoba, J. Geophys. Res. , thisin Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada, Tree Physiol. , VEMAPjack pine (old) in northern Manitoba and 600, 480, and 310 g

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Invasive Plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be most problematic in disturbed areas such as clearings and openings along roads, under transmission lines, beside waterfronts, and in areas with dead pines. Some can, however,...

240

Nacimiento Reservoir San Antonio Reservoir Searles Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake (Dry) TRONA WE ST END MCG EN SE ARLE S 190 395 RANDS BURG BA RREN RIDG E PINE T REE WIND FA RM LO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

THE TRANSPOSED CRITICAL TEMPERATURE RANKINE THERMODYNAMIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pines, "Program GEOTHM, a Thermodynamic Process Program forand R. L. Fulton, "The Thermodynamic and Cost Benefits of aof Elec- tric Power, Thermodynamic and Economic Design

Pope, William L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Volatile organic chemical emissions from structural insulated panel (SIP) materials and implications for indoor air quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fiberboard, hardboard and plywood are the predominantliterature for OSB and for plywood, a composite wood productthe predominant southern pine plywood, as it typically is

Hodgson, Alfred T.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and phase of the wood combustion process. Forsberg et al. [from fireplace combustion of wood. Environ. Sci. Technol.formation from the combustion of pine wood. Energ. Fuel.

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied: A9, A11 Date: 05132010 Location(s): Lone Pine, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 13, 2010 CX-002320: Categorical Exclusion...

245

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Feasibility of geothermal application...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of geothermal applications for greenhousing and space heating on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map |...

246

Ex-Situ High Resolution NMR and MRI - Lawrence Berkeley ...  

Alexander Pines and colleagues have opened the way to high resolution ex situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

247

Intervention: U.S. Bases in the Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the presence of nuclear weapons in the Philip pines,the Philippines and to store nuclear weapons there, withoutauthorized ceiling on nuclear weapons deploy ment in the

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Georgia's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia. Registered Energy Companies in Georgia's 3rd congressional district Pine Mountain Builders Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeorgia%27s3rdcongressi...

249

NEWTON's Botany Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coloration and Energy Double Pine Cones Botanical Beard Carbon Dioxide Amounts and Photosynthesis Plant Phases Red Oak Reproduction Propagation of "Star Fish" Banana Placentation...

250

Life history and habitat associations of the broad wood cockroach, Parcoblatta lata (Blattaria: Blattellidae) and other native cockroaches in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wood cockroaches are an important prey of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered species inhabiting pine forests in the southern United States. These woodpeckers forage on the boles of live pine trees, but their prey consists of a high proportion of wood cockroaches, Parcoblatta spp., that are more commonly associated with dead plant material. Cockroach population density samples were conducted on live pine trees, dead snags and coarse woody debris on the ground. The studies showed that snags and logs are also important habitats of wood cockroaches in pine forests.

Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

2002-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Available Technologies: Portable, High Resolution NMR/MRI in ...  

Multidimensional imaging for medical diagnosis, ... The Berkeley Lab method combines elements of two previous inventions by the Pines research group, RF field ...

252

TIME DOMAIN MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison with Single Quantum NMR C. Frequency Selectiveli, A. Bax, "Two Dimensional NMR" , Delft University Press,G. Bodenhausen, Prog. in NMR Spec. A. Pines, D. Wemmer, J.

Weitekamp, D.P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Researches on Reduction Roasting of Low-grade Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a kind of abundant biomass, pine black charcoal, was firstly used as a substitute for coals to reduce low-grade manganese oxide ores.

254

RADIOCARBON DATING - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and Douglas fir, sequoia and bristlecone pine for later periods now document ...... mates (Dubiel and Smoot, 1994), such as monsoons with short wet seasons...

255

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Authority","Federal",3886876,"-","-",3886876,"-" "4. Southern Pine Elec Power Assn","Cooperative",2128184,976549,334932,816703,"-" "5. Coast Electric Power Assn","Cooperative",1754...

256

Comprehensive carbon footprint analysis of the value chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mill Energy for chemicals Production of chemicals and fillers Pine supply Energy wood supply Spruce supply Chemicals and f illers Energy f or chemicals Energy f or p&p mill Pine supply Pulp and paper manuf, which are based on domestic wood supply increase the quantity and improve quality of raw material

257

Forest Service -U.S. Department of Agriculture Prescribed Burning in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Service - U.S. Department of Agriculture Prescribed Burning in the Interior Ponderosa Pine, California 94701 #12;Gordon, Donald T. 1967. Prescribed burning in the interior ponderosa pine type., illus. (U. S. Forest Serv. Res. Paper PSW- 45 ) Three prescribed burns, made in 1959-62, in the in

Standiford, Richard B.

258

County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pine County Pine County White Pine County Board of County Commissioners Board of County Commissioners February 10, 1998 W. Eric J. Fygi U.S. Department of Energy Office of General Counsel GC-52 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585 Subject: Department of Energy (DOE) Price-Anderson Act Comments from White Pine County, Nevada Dear Mr. Fygi: Thank you for providing White Pine County with the opportunity to comment concerning the continuation or modifications of the provisions of the Price-Anderson Act. We understand that these comments will be used to assist the Department of Energy in preparing a required report to Congress. You will note in reviewing our comments that the views of many "Affected Units of Government" in Nevada are similar to each other and that we have worked together in developing

259

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Piñon Pine IGCC Power Project - Project Brief [PDF-313KB] Piñon Pine IGCC Power Project - Project Brief [PDF-313KB] Sierra Pacific Power Company, Reno, NV PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Piñon Pine IGCC Project, Final Technical Report [PDF-14.1MB] (Jan 2001) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Piñon Pine Power Project Annual Reports August 1992 - December 1993 [PDF-2.4MB] January - December 1994 [PDF-2.3MB] January - December 1995 [PDF-3.1MB] January - December 1996 [PDF-6.1MB] CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Piñon Pine IGCC Power Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-321KB] (Dec 2002) Topical Report Number 8: The Piñon Pine Power Project [PDF-850KB] (Dec 1996) Design Reports Tracy Power Station-Unit No. 4 Piñon Pine Power Project Public Design Report [PDF-4.7MB] (Dec 1994)

260

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. 2nd quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The completed geochemical analysis of groundwater in the Pine Creek area for evaluation of the geothermal potential of this location is presented. Also included is an environmental constraints analysis of Pine Creek noting any potential environmental problems if a geothermal system was developed onsite. Design of a geothermal system is discussed for site-specific applications and is discussed in detail with equipment recommendations and material specifications. A preliminary financial, economic, and institutional assessment of geothermal system located totally on Union Carbide property at Pine Creek is included. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Willens, C.A.; Walter, K.M.; Carrico, R.L.; Lowe, G.D.; Lacy, S.B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE Conducts Annual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INSIDE 2 Collider Detectors Emerge 3 KTeV Tests Cesium Iodide Calorimeter 4 Annual Funding Cycle Begins 5 DOE Moves Toward U.S.-CERN Collaboration 8 Pine Street Entrance to...

262

Comparisons of Interception Loss from Tropical and Temperate Vegetation Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multilayer crop model is used to investigate interception loss from oak, pine, wheat and grass canopies. It is shown that the evaporative properties of the full oak canopy are similar to those of the evergreen tropical rain forest. Evaporation ...

J. G. Lockwood; P. J. Sellers

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

similar defoliation, but damage is not confined to new growth. Hosts Scots and red pine are commonly in May. #12;Adults are thick-waisted, stout-bodied wasps with clear wings; they are approximately 5

264

Folk and Barn Dancing at Fermilab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

barn is the second building on the right. To get there from the west: turn east onto Pine Street from Kirk Road in Batavia. Pass the 15 story high rise building and continue on...

265

Jefferson Lab's Workbench Projects - Go Far Car Ramps - Component...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(roughly 3 feet needed) 1 6 pine board (roughly 1 foot needed) 14" thick oak or poplar plywood (a section 4 feet long and 7 58" wide needed) 6 3 38" screw hook (2...

266

Mechanisms of Plant-Fungi Symbiosis Characterized by DOE JGI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

birch, fir, and pine forests of North America and is a common symbiont of Populus, the poplar tree whose genome was determined by the JGI in 2006 The analysis of the...

267

National Environmental Policy Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory (ORNL) CX-ORR-13-007 SC 9172013 Timber Salvage from Pine Ridge Storm Damage CX-ORR-13-008 SC 9252013 Office of Secure Transportation Multiple Actions...

268

Microsoft Word - FINAL 2012HydropowerCouncilAgenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Southwestern Federal Hydropower Council BLAKELY MOUNTAIN DAM PROJECT OFFICE Mountain Pine, Arkansas June 12 - 13, 2012 Tuesday, June 12 1:00 p.m. Welcome Vicksburg District...

269

1_multipart_xF8FF_2_Dec_2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the source of some of the carbon that would be transferred by decay into the soil - in forest plots infused with computer-controlled CO2 simulating mid-century air. "Pine forests...

270

Public Comment re Price-Anderson Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Price-Anderson Act Public Comment re Price-Anderson Act Department of Energy (DOE) Price-Anderson Act Comments from White Pine County, Nevada. The views of many "Affected Units of...

271

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co. White Pine Mine, Michigan, Ontonagon Whitedelph Mine,tholeitic lavas of northern Michigan, J. Petrology, v. 13,the Ahmeek Quadrangle, Michigan, U.S. Geol. Survey map GQ-

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Jefferson Lab's Workbench Projects - The Ring Fling Machine ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cord (18 AWG, 3 conductor) fuse holder (1" 14 " fuse, 20 amp capacity) 8 amp, 240 volt fast acting fuse (1 14" 14 ") 1 4 plank of white pine (roughly 4 feet needed)...

273

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Pressure Oxygen Gasifier, Report SERI/TP-234-1455R,Smith, Pinon pine project gasifier startup. In proceedingsthe type and conditions of the gasifier design. This is of

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Textile-Based Sensor Development for the Continuous Monitoring of Proper Orthopedic Cast Fit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constructing a platform out of plywood and two by two inchLength Pipe N/A 3x4x0.5 Plywood Sheet N/A 2x2x8 Pine

Umsted, Carson Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Empirical Methods in Antitrust Litigation: Review and Critique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

683 (N.D.Ga. 1991). In re Plywood Antitrust Litigation, 655as is illus trated by the Plywood Antitrust Litigation. Theprices for Southern pine plywood harmed competition. A test

Baker, Jonathan B.; Rubinfeld, Daniel L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. , Pyrolysis of pine wood in a slowly heating fixed-bedheating rate, some destruction and deep opening in the char structure were observed compared with the original wood

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

University of Florida | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

grant to research pine-based biofuels New gene chip may help detect, treat West Nile virus in horses and humans UF teamed with USF, FSU and UCF to build the DOE Solar Decathlon...

278

Microsoft Word - S05212_2008 Post-Closure InspRpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

savannas, pine lands, and sandy bogs (Photo A-8.). It contributes to desirable plant diversity at the site. 2.4.3 Gopher Tortoise Habitat During the timber survey, two gopher...

279

An Experiment with an Advanced Surface Parameterization in a Mesobeta-Scale Model. Part III: Comparison with the HAPEX-MOBILHY Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this last part, a detailed comparison of the model predictions with all the HAPEX-MOBILHY dataset available within a mesoscale subdomain is carried out. The simulation subdomain encompasses a fraction of a pine forest and of a nearby ...

J. Noilhan; P. Lacarrre; P. Bougeault

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The butterfly clock : illuminating the molecular mysteries of monarch migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each fall, the entire monarch butterfly population of the Eastern United States and Canada funnels into a handful of oyamel pine groves in Michoacan, Mexico, to weather the winter months. Each spring, the butterflies mate ...

Rice, Jocelyn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CooperativeEducationProgram: Mary Berry, Coordinator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-5872 Graduate Council Dr.EdwardPines,Chair Dr.MaryHoke,ViceChair Graduate Student Services: Valerie Pickett 1, 2013. Blake Curtis, Appointed Regent from Clovis for term expiring January 1, 2011. Chris Anaya

Castillo, Steven P.

282

CX-010434: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LaPine Substation Shunt Reactor Addition CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

283

CX-008167: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-008167: Categorical Exclusion Determination La Pine-Chiloquin Number 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 03212012 Location(s): Oregon...

284

CX-010593: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-010593: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine 1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06132013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s):...

285

CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07302012 Location(s): Oregon...

286

EMSL: Science: GC: Membrane Biology - Advisory Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committee CHAIR - Dr. Jack Johnson, SCRIPPS Department of Molecular Biology 10550, N. Torrey Pines Road La Jolla, CA 92037 Ph. 858-784-2947 Fx. 858-784-8660...

287

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spruce Pines Installation of a roof-top 560kWDC Solar PV system and boiler replacement with new supply distribution. NC must comply with SHPO Programmatic Agreement Otis Mills...

288

High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues using projected Magic Angle Spinning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues using486-5744 pines@berkeley.edu NMR spectroscopy of biologicalAbstract: High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject

Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to High- Resolution ex Situ NMR Spectroscopy, Science, 293,A. Pines, High- resolution NMR of biological tissues usingP. Mansfield and P. G. Morris, NMR Imaging in Biomedicine,

Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

NMR Detection Using Laser-Polarized Xenon as a Dipolar Sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Budinger, G. Navon, A. Pines, NMR of laser-polarized xenonEnhancement o of solution NMR and MRI with laser-polarizedA using laser-induced NMR polarization enhancement, J. Am.

Granwehr, Josef; Urban, Jeffry T.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alexander

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Gasification of in-Forest Biomass Residues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Described is a laboratory-scale continuous-feed supercritical water gasification (SCWG) system. The system is operated using real-world Ponderosa Pine sawmill residues at high biomass loadings, short (more)

Faires, Kenneth B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Capacity, production, and manufacturing of wood-based panels in north America. Forest Service general technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report is an informational report about four wood-based panel industries particleboard, oriented strandboard, medium density fiberboard, and Southern Pine plywood. Items highlighted are trends in manufacturing and new plant costs, industry manufacturing capacity, and location. Recent data show the greatest amount of growth taking place in the oriented strandboard sector. Modest rates of growth are occuring in the Southern Pine Plywood, particleboard, and medium density fiberboard sectors.

Spelter, H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Late Holocene and modern pollen records from three sites in Shannon and Carter Counties, southeast Missouri Ozarks  

SciTech Connect

Palynological investigations of a small sinkhole bog (Buttonbush Bog) and two archaeological sites (Round Spring Shelter, Round Spring Site 23SH19 and Gooseneck Site 23CT54) located in Shannon and Carter counties, Missouri provide a 3,100 year record of vegetational change. Bryophytic polsters and surface samples were also collected in Shannon and Carter counties in the southeast Missouri Ozarks to determine modern pollen rain. A 302-cm core retrieved from Buttonbush Bog has a basal data of 3,130 [+-] 100 yr B.P. and a date of 1,400 [+-] 100 yr B.P. at 52--56 cm. The Buttonbush Bog pollen sequence is divided into three pollen-assemblage zones. The pollen spectra from Buttonbush Bog indicate that pine did not become well established in the southeast Missouri Ozarks until after 3,100 yr B.P. Zone 1 (the oldest) represents a mixed oak forest with minor components of pine and hickory. In Zone 2, pine values increase, indicating a shift to a pine-oak forest. The pollen sequence from Round Spring Shelter is divided into two pollen-assemblage zones. The lower zone (Zone 1) suggests the presence of a pine-oak forest in the vicinity of Round Spring prior to an Ambrosia rise at the top of the sequence in Zone 2. Regional pollen rain and variation in the local pollen rain are reflected by modern pollen spectra extracted from the bryophytic polsters surface samples. In this area the average regional pollen rain is dominated by pine, oak, hickory, and Ambrosia. The data are consistent with the mosaic of pine-oak and oak-hickory-pine forests characteristic of this region.

Huber, J.K. (Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Archaeometry Lab.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 SULPHUR #2SULPHUR #2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

),MPa Pressurized gasification Pressurized combustion Atmospheric processes CaCO3 CaO 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 750 800 850 900 950 1000 1050 TEMPERATURE, °C p(CO2),MPa Pressurized gasification Pressurized sorbents : the Pithe Piññon Pine (NV) coal gasification projecton Pine (NV) coal gasification project

Zevenhoven, Ron

295

Atmospheric H2 energetic fertilization to soil microorganisms in a forest ecosystem Laura K. Meredith1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information Petersham, MA, USA 42°N 72°W 186 m temperate Pinus strobus ring structure Liberia, Costa Rica 10°N, Petersham, MA, permitted us to take samples and to access their climatological and phenological datasets

Entekhabi, Dara

296

lms3046FER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

June 6 and 12, 2013 Inspector SM Stoller, Ohio EPA, ODH June 6 and 12, 2013 Inspector SM Stoller, Ohio EPA, ODH Area Paddys Run East, SWU, SWRB, South Field Sub-Area Type of Finding Follow Up No. Location (Use Map Whenever Possible) GPS? Unauthorized Use Disturbance Vegetation Other Description Photo? (File No.) Corrected Maintenance Req'd Cont. Observation 1 South pines deer fence X Hole in fence X 2 South pines deer fence X Hole in fence X 3 South pines/PRE X Reed canary grass X 4 South field - west X Deer fence gate missing X 5 Well 22108 well pad X Exposed wires 1-130612 X 6 Well 33253 X Miscellaneous debris on pad 2-130612 X 7 South field deer fence - west X Fence down X 8 South field deer fence - east X Fence overgrown - remove X

297

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Although commonly obscured by simple shear, pure shear fabrics occur locally within many metamorphic core complexes. The cover rocks to the Raft River metamorphic core complex exposed within the Black Pine Mountains display an early coaxial strain history which developed prior to the formation of low-angle fault-bounded allochthons. At higher structural levels this is documented by pressure shadows with straight sutures, and

298

Tr8cover.jpg:Corel PHOTO-PAINT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 The Piñon Pine Power Project Demonstration of an Advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plant A report on a project conducted jointly under a cooperative agreement between: The U.S. Department of Energy and Sierra Pacific Power Company DECEMBER 1996 Cover image: Photo of the Piñon Pine Power Project during construction. Sierra Pacific P 0 W E R C 0 M P A N Y Preparation and printing of this document conforms to the general funding provisions of a cooperative agreement between Sierra Pacific Power Company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The funding contribution of the industrial participant permitted inclusion of multicolored artwork and photographs at no additional expense to the U.S. Government. The Piñon Pine Power Project Introduction and Executive Summary ....................................................................

299

Multidisciplinary research program directed toward utilization of solar energy through bioconversion of renewable resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in this multidisciplinary research program. Genetic selection of superior trees, physiological basis of vigor, tissue culture systems leading to cloning of diploid and haploid cell lines are discussed in the Program A report. The physiological basis of enhanced oleoresin formation in southern pines when treated with sublethal concentrations of the herbicide paraquat was investigated in Program B. In Program C, metabolic changes in the stems of slash pine, in vivo, after application with paraquat were determined. The use of phdoem and xylem tissue slices as a laboratory model for studying paraquat associated- and normal-terpene synthesis in pines is discussed. The biochemistry and physiology of methane formation from cellulose during anaerobic fermentation are discussed in the Program D report. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SD-TRIBE-OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE OF THE PINE RIDGE SD-TRIBE-OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE OF THE PINE RIDGE RESERVATION, SOUTH DAKOTA Location: Tribe SD-TRIBE-OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE OF THE PINE RIDGE RESERVATION, SOUTH DAKOTA SD American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Oglala Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to sponsor an outreach initiative to address the need to increase the rate and total number of low-income residential energy retrofits. The Tribe proposes to target mobile homes manufactured prior to 1976. The Tribe would assist Tribal members with acquisition, preparation, and submission of South Dakota Weatherization Assistance Program enrollment applications, provide an energy efficiency and conservation coordinator for the nine districts that make up the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Research on: A. Reclamation of borrow pits and denuded lands; B. Biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae of forest trees  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report furnishes a list of compiled and ongoing studies and a list of publications which resulted from the research accomplished by Institute scientists and other collaborators. The research accomplished can be placed in four categories: I. Research on borrow pit rehabilitation with 12 publications; II. Research on artificial regeneration of southern pines with 34 publications; III. Research on artificial regeneration of eastern hardwoods with 16 publications; and IV. Cooperative research with the University of Georgia on biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae with 5 publications. Major accomplishments of this research are: 1. Procedures to successfully reclaim borrow pits with sludge, subsoiling and seedlings with specific mycorrhizae. 2. Protocols to successfully artificially regenerate southern pines (particularly ling leaf pine) and certain eastern hardwoods. 3. Basic understanding of the biochemistry of mycorrhizae and the discovery of a new pathway for sucrose utilization in plants. 67 refs.

Marx, D.H. (comp.)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

303

Community Advisory Council, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Community Advisory Council The Community Advisory Council Council Members > Don Garber Affiliated Brookhaven Civic Organizations Margaret Malloy American Physical Society Arnie Peskin Brookhaven Retired Employee Association Jim Heil Brookhaven Senior Citizens Office Adrienne Esposito Citizens Campaign for the Environment Christine Birben Colonial Woods / Whispering Pines Paul Ziems Coram Civic Association Michael Giacomaro East Yaphank Civic Association Jean Mannhaupt Emeritus Ed Kaplan Friends of Brookhaven Mary Joan Shea Huntington Breast Cancer Coalition Karen Blumer Individual Greg Bush Individual Iqbal Chaudhry Individual Jane Corrarino Individual Scott Krsnak Int'l Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Rita Biss Lake Panamoka Civic Association Richard Amper Long Island Pine Barrens Society David Sprintzen

304

Modeling data with multiple time dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large class of problems in time series analysis can be represented by a set of overlapping time series with different starting times. These time series may be treated as different probes of the same underlying process. Such probes may follow a characteristic ... Keywords: Dendrochronology, Douglas fir, Dual-time dynamics, El Malpais, Generalized additive models, Global climate change, Non-linear dynamics, Non-linear modeling, Pinon pine, Ponderosa pine, Portfolio forecasting, Retail lending, SETI@home, Scenario-based forecasting, Search for extraterrestrial intelligence, Time series, Tree rings

Joseph L. Breeden

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL 1909 Pushnik, J.C., R.S. Demaree, J.L.J. Houpis, W.B. Flory, S.M. Bauer, and P.D. Anderson. 1995. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa. Journal of Biogeography 22(2-3):249-254. The impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinus ponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased CO2 conditions (525 mu L L(-1) and 700 mu L L(-1)) for 6 months. These trees exhibited morphological, physiological and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls (350 mu L L(- 1)). Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no

306

Albedo of a Forest Modeled as a Plane with Dense Protrusions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed that treats, in a simplified way, the reflection of the direct solar radiation by a surface consisting of a soil-plane and protruding vertical plant elements, such as needles of pine trees or stalks of a wheat field. Such a ...

J. Otterman

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Integrated Energy Policy Report Subsidiary Volume: PUBLIC INTEREST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Integrated Energy Policy Report Subsidiary Volume: PUBLIC INTEREST Energy Policy Report Cheri Davis Gerald Pine Jennifer Williams Mike Messenger Pamela Doughman Sylvia Interest Energy Strategies Report was completed under the auspices of the Ad Hoc Integrated Energy Policy

308

PROCESS FOR THE CONCENTRATION OF ORES CONTAINING GOLD AND URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A process is described for concentrating certain low grade uranium and gold bearing ores, in which the gangue is mainly quartz. The production of the concentrate is accomplished by subjecting the crushed ore to a froth floatation process using a fatty acid as a collector in conjunction with a potassium amyl xanthate collector. Pine oil is used as the frothing agent.

Gaudin, A.M.; Dasher, J.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 93, pp. 48274832, May 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pines Road, San Diego, CA 92037 Communicated by Mario R. Capecchi, University of Utah, Salt Lake City to conditions that generate DNA dam- age. Nuclear injection of linearized plasmid DNA, circular DNA with a large are initiated by chromosome breakage. Through induction of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, a p53-dependent

Gleeson, Joseph G.

310

Land reclamation beautifies coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

Coblentz, B. [MSU Ag Communications (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Active Turbulence and Scalar Transport near the ForestAtmosphere Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent velocity, temperature, water vapor concentration, and other scalars were measured at the canopyatmosphere interface of a 1314-m-tall uniform pine forest and a 33-m-tall nonuniform hardwood forest. These measurements were used to ...

Gabriel G. Katul; Chris D. Geron; Cheng-I. Hsieh; Brani Vidakovic; Alex B. Guenther

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 595 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern North from pine infested with an Ips sp. in Indonesia. In addition, two unknown species have been collected that the isolates from Indonesia and those from Eastern North America represent three previously un described taxa

313

Principal Length Scales in Second-Order Closure Models for Canopy Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Triaxial sonic anemometer velocity measurements vertically arrayed at six levels within and above a pine forest were used to examine the performance of two second-order closure models put forth by Wilson and Shaw and by Wilson. Based on these ...

Gabriel G. Katul; Wei-han Chang

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Thermal Conductivity for a Linear Anharmonic System  

SciTech Connect

A model has been proposed wherein self consistent phonon theory together with the thermodynamic perturbation theory is employed to determine a trial Hamiltonian is employed to determine thermodynamic parameters based on pining as well as nearest neighbor quadratic-quartic interactions.

Pasrija, Ritu [Department of Physics, DAV College, Abohar-152116 (India); Kanika [Dasmesh Girls College, Badal (Muktsar)-152113 (India); Srivastava, Sunita [Deparment of Physics, Panjab University Chandigarh-160014 (India)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Abstracts EuroDendro 2004 [P] Poster [L] Lecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%. The greatest effect of fertilization by double phosphogypsum dose (10 t/ha) ­ increment rise by 39-47%, compared to the control. Having fertilized with 5 t/ha of phosphogypsum, pine annual radial increment has grown by 11-30%, while with a mixture of phosphogypsum (5 t/ha) and superphosphate (100 kg

316

GEOSPATIOTEMPORAL DATA MINING IN AN EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR FOREST THREATS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and limited resources of agencies such as the USDA Forest Service to conduct aerial surveys and ground it to identify areas in Colorado, USA, where an ongo- ing mountain pine beetle outbreak has caused significant of the second tier, consisting of higher reso- lution monitoring through airborne overflights--called Aerial

Mills, Richard

317

APPENDIX C Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Protect Forests From Harm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on insect and disease activity in the state. Because the current aerial survey is conducted by different1 APPENDIX C ­ Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Data Gaps Protect Forests From Harm o. Need updated LANDFIRE data on the current condition of Colorado's lodgepole pine forests. Need a fuel

318

Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: April 6, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and intensity of insect and disease activity continues to be a concern in many forests. Aerial surveys recorded#12;Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: April 6, 2005 The 2004 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests explores the unique issues and chal- lenges of sustaining and managing ponderosa pine

319

LAGUNITACOURT ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RO O M W ILLO W PINE CORDURA VENTURA GovernorsCorner SCHIFF ROBINSON ADAMS RICKER CENTER POTTER BEEF AKCREEK CLU B ADM IN- O FFICE RENTAL O FFICE EUCALYPTUS RO O M STUDIO ARTISTS #1 OBSERVATORY-710 MANZANITA DO M ANNEX MAINT. CTR. HOUSING ESCONDITE SLAVIANSKII GATE ENTRANCE 13-030 (UNITS 1-54) 10

Quake, Stephen R.

320

in construction Munger Graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Auxiliary Library (SAL) Dining Services340 315 Cobb Track & Angell Field Varian Physics Sequoia Hall William Lou Henry Hoover House Vaden Health Center Bing Nursery School Stanford Community Recreation CAMPUSDREAST SERRA ST ROTH WY NELSO N M ALL LAN E B LANEC STANFORD AVE LASUENMALL PINE HILL RD NE PAM PAS LN

Gross, James J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

National Water Program Impact Report, 2005-2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in whitebark pine krummholz in the alpine treeline ecotone east of the Continental Divide on the Blackfeet; Divide Peak (48u679N, 113u389W), situated on the border of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation and Glacier National Park and the Blackfeet Nation for arranging collection permits and Ward McCaughey and the Forestry

322

Native American Support Programs Task Force Changing Winds: Service to Native American Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in whitebark pine krummholz in the alpine treeline ecotone east of the Continental Divide on the Blackfeet; Divide Peak (48u679N, 113u389W), situated on the border of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation and Glacier increasingly wind-exposed farther away from the base of the actual peak. Locations east of the Continental

Maxwell, Bruce D.

323

Automatic Collection of Related Terms from the Web Satoshi Sato and Yasuhiro Sasaki  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic Collection of Related Terms from the Web Satoshi Sato and Yasuhiro Sasaki Graduate School@pine.kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp Abstract This paper proposes a method of collect- ing a dozen terms that are closely re- lated to a given seed term. The proposed method consists of three steps. The first step, compiling corpus step, collects

324

Feasibility of High-Density Climate Reconstruction Based on Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Collected Tree-Ring Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study introduces a novel tree-ring dataset, with unparalleled spatial density, for use as a climate proxy. Ancillary Douglas fir and pion pine tree-ring data collected by the U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA ...

R. Justin DeRose; Shih-Yu Wang; John D. Shaw

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

FSC-Watch: FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global warming FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Pine Falls operations has helped destroy production of recycled paper. Manitoba is now left with a huge pile of collected paper, which can either be burned or landfilled, or shipped to more distant recycling facilities, all of which will increase greenhouse gas emissions. The pulp and paper industry is one

326

ORIGINAL PAPER Natural Fiber Reinforced Poly(vinyl chloride) Composites: Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, electric wires, window profiles, siding, etc. Recently, wood fiber reinforced PVC is getting more popular straw, rice husk, and pine fiber) and loading level of styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene (SEBS) block copolymer on composite properties was investigated. Mechanical analysis showed that storage modulus

327

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for the physical properties of kraft black liquors. Interim report No.3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The black liquor properties program has conducted a systematic collection data of properties, liquor composition, and lignin characteristics. Complete data, except for some density data, has been collected for Slash Pine black liquors made by experimental pulping at a total of 25 different pulping conditions that cover the entire range used for commercial pulping. In addition, complete data has been collected for some mill liquors and partial properties or composition data has been collected on Slash Pine black liquors made at 16 different pulping conditions and some mill liquors. Data reduction methods have been developed or extended for correlation of viscosity, heat capacity, heat of dilution, and density. Correlation of properties to pulping conditions and of composition to pulping conditions has begun. In most cases, data reduction methods have been developed that are fundamentally based and that have been shown to be generally applicable to all black liquors. While it has not proven to be possible to include research for comprehensive correlations for properties for liquors from other species, we have shown that the behavior of liquors made from other species is similar to that which has been explored extensively for Slash Pine liquors. This report reviews the methods used, describes examples of data reduction methods that have been developed, and presents some preliminary results for correlation of liquor composition and properties to pulping conditions for Slash Pine black liquors.

Fricke, A.L.; Dong, D.J.; Schmidl, G.W.; Stoy, M.A.; Zaman, A.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Foliar response of ten tree species exposed to SO/sub 2/ air pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on the relative susceptibility to SO/sub 2/ damage among 4 birch species - Scotch, Austrian, and eastern white pines, white ash, black cherry, and hybrid poplar - is reported. Controlled exposures were performed and the percentages of plants injured and the percentages of leaf areas damaged were recorded.

Biggs, A.R.; Davis, D.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Jill Ann Marshall The University of Texas, Austin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, R., Weaver, E.C. & Gans, D.M. (2010). Women and men of the Manhattan Project. The Physics Teacher, A.J. & Martin, H.T. (2010). Pre-service teachers' conceptions and enactments of Project Based Journal, 19(1), 45-76. Marshall, J.A., Pine, B. & Taylor, W.W.L (2007). INSPIRE: A VLF radio project

Lightsey, Glenn

330

CX-003124: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24: Categorical Exclusion Determination 24: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003124: Categorical Exclusion Determination A1 to CDF Paving Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/08/2010 Location(s): Batavia, Illinois Office(s): Fermi Site Office, Science Existing Road D pavement from Road A1 east to CDF has degraded to the extent that spot repairs and pavement patching are no longer cost effective options. This proposed project would result in repaving Road D from Pine Street east to CDF and realignment of the Road D/Road A1/A2 and Pine Street intersection. The project would also include the installation of a new storm sewer and grading of new drainage swales. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003124.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003196: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010393: Categorical Exclusion Determination

331

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 24, 2011 June 24, 2011 CX-006081: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brookston Wind Turbine Study CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/24/2011 Location(s): Brookston, Indiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office June 23, 2011 CX-006309: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Pembroke Pines CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Pembroke Pines, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 23, 2011 CX-006349: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio-City-Cuyahoga Falls CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 23, 2011 CX-006347: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-City-Chapel Hill, Town of

332

Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Product Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partners Inc Advanced Materials Partners Inc Pine Partners Inc Advanced Materials Partners Inc Pine Street New Canaan Connecticut Venture investor http www amplink com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Akeida Capital Management Akeida Capital Management New York New York Financing Environmental Projects http www akeidacapital com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Ardour Capital Ardour Capital th ave New York New York http www ardourcapital com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Asia West LLC Asia West LLC One East Weaver Street Greenwich Connecticut Strategic investor in environmental technologies http www asiawestfunds com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area BEV Capital BEV Capital Tresser Blvd th Floor Stamford Connecticut Venture capital firm http www bevcapital com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Battelle Ventures Battelle Ventures Carnegie Center Suite Princeton

333

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Categorical Exclusion Determination 22: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-Tribe-Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine Community CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Lone Pine, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 13, 2010 CX-002320: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Dakota-Tribe-Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): North Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 13, 2010 CX-002317: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada-Tribe-Summit Lake Paiute Tribe CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 13, 2010 CX-002316: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Alabama Quassarte Tribe

334

CX-004077: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

77: Categorical Exclusion Determination 77: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004077: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacement of a Relay/Transfer Trip Rack at Redmond Substation and a Transfer Trip Panel at LaPine Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): Redmond, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration proposes to replace the relaying and transfer trip on the Pilot Butte lines out of both Redmond and LaPine substations. The existing powerline carrier transfer trip includes some equipment in the substation yard located just below or mounted to the deadend structure for the line. That equipment in the substation yard will be removed for this project and is the only work outside of the control house at each substation. No ground disturbing activities would occur.

335

CX-003519: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19: Categorical Exclusion Determination 19: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003519: Categorical Exclusion Determination Southern Pine Based Biorefinery Center CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): Atlanta, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Georgia Technical Research Corporation proposes to use the Department of Energy funds to develop on the Georgia Institute of Technology campus an integrated southern pine wood to biofuels/biomaterials processing facility that will test advanced integrated wood processing technologies at the laboratory scale. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003519.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003537: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003541: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005779

336

CX-005020: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

020: Categorical Exclusion Determination 020: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005020: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game For Purchase of the Tall Pines Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 01/05/2011 Location(s): Kootenai County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 203-acre Tall Pines property by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDF&G). BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The property is being acquired because of its outstanding wetlands and upland forest natural resource values. The acquisition will provide an opportunity to enhance, restore, and manage high quality habitat for bird species such as

337

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 13, 2010 May 13, 2010 CX-002322: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-Tribe-Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine Community CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Lone Pine, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 13, 2010 CX-002320: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Dakota-Tribe-Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): North Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 13, 2010 CX-002317: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada-Tribe-Summit Lake Paiute Tribe CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 13, 2010 CX-002316: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Alabama Quassarte Tribe

338

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-52): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (03/22/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2002 22, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-52) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on the Ashe-Marion #2 (138/1-150/2), Buckley- Marion (12/1-24/2), McNary-Santiam (109/1-119/3), and John Day-Marion (49/4-50/5) Transmission Line Corridors. Location: The project area lies between Maupin and Pine Grove Oregon, and is in the Redmond Region. The project area begins at on the Ashe-Marion at structure 138/1 and terminates at Wapinitia Road, Pine Grove. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the

339

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 5270 of 29,416 results. 61 - 5270 of 29,416 results. Download CX-005788: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connecticut-City-Milford CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 05/10/2011 Location(s): Milford, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005788-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006309: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Pembroke Pines CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Pembroke Pines, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006309-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002422: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technical Consultant and Audit Services CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): Attleboro, Massachusetts

340

CX-006309: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006309: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Pembroke Pines CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Pembroke Pines, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Energy efficiency retrofits at Academic Village?modify existing water-cooled chiller with an air-cooled chiller system, install thermal storage tanks with heat exchangers, and modify existing energy management system and 2) energy efficiency retrofits at Forman Human Services Campus?replace water-cooled chiller system. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006309.pdf More Documents & Publications Enforcement Letter, WEL-2013-02 CX-002233: Categorical Exclusion Determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B2.5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 23, 2011 June 23, 2011 CX-006309: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Pembroke Pines CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Pembroke Pines, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 23, 2011 CX-006349: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio-City-Cuyahoga Falls CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 23, 2011 CX-006347: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-City-Chapel Hill, Town of CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Chapel Hill, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 23, 2011 CX-006331: Categorical Exclusion Determination Massachusetts-City-Springfield

342

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 2430 of 28,905 results. 21 - 2430 of 28,905 results. Download CX-002322: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-Tribe-Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine Community CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Lone Pine, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002322-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002228: Categorical Exclusion Determination Manchester Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 05/11/2010 Location(s): Manchester, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002228-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004787: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee-County-Blount CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1

343

Biomass, Leaf Area, and Resource Availability of Kudzu Dominated Plant Communities Following Herbicide Treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens the forests of the southern U.S. Five herbicides were tested with regard to their efficacy in controlling kudzu, community recover was monitored, and interactions with planted pines were studied. The sites selected were old farm sites dominated by kudzu.These were burned following herbicide treatment. The herbicides included triclopyr, clopyralid, metsulfuron, tebuthiuron, and picloram plus 2,4-D. Pine seedlings were planted the following year. Regression equations were developed for predicting biomass and leaf area. Four distinct plant communities resulted from the treatments. The untreated check continued to be kudzu dominated. Blackberry dominated the clopyradid treatment. Metsulfron, trychlopyr and picloram treated sites resulted in herbaceous dominated communities. The tebuthiuron treatment maintained all vegetation low.

L.T. Rader

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

www.mdpi.org/ijms Pyrolysis of Softwood Carbohydrates in a Fluidized Bed Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In the present work pyrolysis of pure pine wood and softwood carbohydrates, namely cellulose and galactoglucomannan (the major hemicellulose in coniferous wood), was conducted in a batch mode operated fluidized bed reactor. Temperature ramping (5 C/min) was applied to the heating until a reactor temperature of 460 C was reached. Thereafter the temperature was kept until the release of non-condensable gases stopped. The different raw materials gave significantly different bio-oils. Levoglucosan was the dominant product in the cellulose pyrolysis oil. Acetic acid was found in the highest concentrations in both the galactoglucomannan and in the pine wood pyrolysis oils. Acetic acid is most likely formed by removal of O-acetyl groups from mannose units present in GGM structure.

Atte Aho; Narendra Kumar; Kari Ernen; Bjarne Holmbom; Mikko Hupa; Tapio Salmi; Dmitry Yu. Murzin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

salmon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Salmon, Mississippi, Site of Salmon, Mississippi, Site Site Description and History The Salmon, Mississippi, Site, also called the Tatum Dome Test Site, is a 1,470-acre tract of land in Lamar County, Mississippi, 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg. The nearest town is Purvis, about 10 miles east of the site. The site is in a forested region known as the long-leaf pine belt of the Gulf Coastal Plain. Elevations in the

346

Sigma Mesa: Background elemental concentrations in soil and vegetation, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979, soil and vegetation samples were collected on Sigma Mesa to provide background data before construction on the mesa. Elemental data are presented for soil, grass, juniper, pinon pine, and oak. None of the data looks out of the ordinary. The purpose of the sampling program was to acquire, before any disturbance, a set of data to be used as background for future impact analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Gladney, E.S.; Brooks, G.H. Jr.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Proceedings of the flat-plate solar array project research forum on photovoltaic metallization systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Photovoltaic Metallization Research Forum, under the sponsorship of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Flat-Plate Solar Array Project and the US Department of Energy, was held March 16-18, 1983 at Pine Mountain, Georgia. The Forum consisted of five sessions, covering (1) the current status of metallization systems, (2) system design, (3) thick-film metallization, (4) advanced techniques and (5) future metallization challenges. Twenty-three papers were presented.

None

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

The flash pyrolysis and methanolysis of biomass (wood) for production of ethylene, benzene and methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} and with the non-reactive gases He and N{sub 2} is being determined in a 1 in. downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000{degrees}C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol fuel production. With methane, flash methanolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000{degrees}C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the yields based on pine wood carbon conversion are up to 25% for ethylene, 25% for benzene, and 45% for CO, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood; the yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, and for pine, the ratio is 7.5 times higher. The mechanism appears to be a free radical reaction between CH{sub 4} and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicates a potentially economical competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 10 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Causes of interannual variability in ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange in a northern Wisconsin forest using a Bayesian model calibration  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km(2) regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER and GEP to be -290 +/- 89, 408 +/- 48, and 698 +/- 73 gC m(-2), respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447 m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then re-aggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Butler, Martha [Pennsylvania State University; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Cook, Bruce D [University of Minnesota, St Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide fluxes across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for regional scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER and GEP to be 290 89, 408, 48, and 698, 73 gC m-2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then reaggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Desai Ankur R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Cook, Bruce D [University of Minnesota, St Paul; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Euskirchen, Eugenie S [University of Alaska; Gough, Christopher M [Ohio State University; Martin, Jonathan G [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Schmid, Hans Peter [Indiana University; Tang, Jianwu [Chicago Botanical Garden, Glencoe, Illiinois; Wang, Weiguo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Influence of Vegetation and Seasonal Forcing on Carbon Dioxide Fluxes Across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for Regional Scaling  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in the Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystematmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens, and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER, and GEP to be ?290 89, 408 48, and 698 73 gC m?2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER, and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447 m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then re-aggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER, and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error, and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Ankur R.; Noormets, Asko; Bolstad, Paul V.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, Bruce D.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S.; Gough, Christopher; Martin, Jonathan G.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Schmid, Hans P.; Tang, Jianwu; Wang, Weiguo

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

CHE 210D: Principles of Modern Molecular Simulation Methods, S12 UCSB Department of Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.00 206.00 207.00 208.00 209.00 210.00 WHAM (Pen Y Pigyn) WHAM (Cwrt) WHAM (The Glyn) WHAM (Llyn Sarnau) WHAM (Bryn Merllyn) WHAM (Ffrith Wood) WHAM (Great Barnetts) WHAM (Sierra Pines) WHAM (Cc-Cwm Kenfig) WHAM (Cc-Margam) WHAM (Cc-Penhydd) WHAM (Cc-Garw) WHAM (Cc-Rheola) WHAM (Cc-Glyncastle) WHAM (Nant Yr

Shell, M. Scott

353

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wheat straw char 500 22.1 97.9 2.2 0.0 3.5 19.0 Pine char 500 22.5 87.7 2.6 0.0 3.1 278.5 Corn stover lignin char 500 38.5 87.2 2.3 1.7 3.3 11.7 White oak char 500 6.1 68.0 3.1 0.0...

354

Global health education in U.S. Medical schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health, International Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, University of Virginia, Virginia, USA. 3Department of Family & Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, International Community Medicine Track... , Middlesex Hospital Family Medicine Residency, Middletown, Connecticut, USA. 8Global Health Programs; Department of Medicine, McGill University Medical School, 1020 Pine Ave West, Room 42, Montreal, QC H3A 1A2, Canada. 9Department of Family Medicine, BUFM...

Khan, Omar A; Guerrant, Richard; Sanders, James; Carpenter, Charles; Spottswood, Margaret; Jones, David S; OCallahan, Cliff; Brewer, Timothy F; Markuns, Jeffrey F; Gillam, Stephen; ONeill, Joseph; Nathanson, Neal; Wright, Stephen

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

6 47-5051-54 7876747371 11912  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

394 355 39 5 39 9 35 3 35 1 228 220 218 214 19 9 16 5 163 15 9 15 7 15 5 15 3 15 2 N M C D E H F 38-200 RANGE FACILITY GOLF DRIVING DINING HOUSE) POLYA RO O M W ILLO W PINE CORDURA VENTURA Governors ANDERSON TREAT(EAST (AMERICANSTUDIES) YOSTHOUSE O A KC R EEK C LU B A D M IN - O FFIC E REN TA L O FFIC E

Quake, Stephen R.

356

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Fall 2008, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

As part of its Native American outreach, DOE?s Wind Powering America program produces a newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events. This issue features an interview with Dave Danz, a tribal planner for the Grand Portage Band of Chippewa in northeastern Minnesota, and a feature on the new turbine that powers the KILI radio station on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of polypropylene/wood flour ecocomposites. Evaluation of silane as coupling agent  

SciTech Connect

The effects of Pinus Sylvestris wood flour as filler in polypropylene matrix was evaluated. The mechanical properties and the morphology of different wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPC) were studied. The composites materials were prepared with several amounts of wood flour from 10 to 30% wt. Mechanical properties show that the wood flour incorporation increases the rigidity of the composites. Morphological analysis indicates that agglomerates are formed, with amounts exceeding 30% of wood flour. For the silane--treated composites, the dispersion of the filler into the polypropylene (PP) matrix improved. Shore D hardness of the composites is decreased with the addition of the coupling agent.

Bouza, R.; Barral, L.; Abad, M. J.; Montero, B. [Grupo de Polimeros, Dpto. de Fisica, E.U.P. Ferrol, Universidad de A Coruna, Avda. 19 de Febrero s/n, 15405 Ferrol (Spain)

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Natural Resource Management, Environmental Protection Division (EPD),  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPD Home EPD Home Site Details Home Page Management Amphibians Birds Fish Invertebrates Mammals Plants Pictures Reptiles Research/Internships Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Natural Resource Management at Brookhaven National Laboratory Welcome to BNL's Natural Resources web site! Within this web site you will find interesting information concerning the Natural Resources program (what we are doing and plan to do), plant and animal species found onsite, great photos of our habitat and wildlife, management issues we are dealing with, and links to other sites of interest. Introduction The Laboratory is located in a section of the Oak/Chestnut forest region of the coastal Plain of Long Island, New York. Forest types are typically oak-pine or pine-oak. BNL property constitutes roughly five percent of the 404.7 sq-km (100,000 acre) Pine Barrens on Long Island. Because of the general topography and porous soil, there is little surface runoff or open water. Upland soils tend to be very well drained, while depressions form ephemeral coastal plain ponds. Hence, a mosaic of wet and dry areas on site are correlated with variations in topography and depth to the water table. Without fires or other disturbances, vegetation would follow the normal moisture gradient closely. In actuality, vegetation onsite is in various stages of succession, reflecting the history of disturbances to the area, the most important of which are land clearing, fire, local flooding, and draining.

359

Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

Anderson, T.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Walton, B.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Population genetic structure of Conophthorus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA haplotypes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pine cone beetles (Conophthorus sp.) are serious pests of many forest ecosystems since they burrow into pine cone tissues for egg deposition, causing the death of the seeds. Management of these beetles in natural and commercial stands of pines has been problematic due to lack of understanding about species limits and distribution. This study was conducted to investigate the phylogeography and phylogenetics of the genus. Several species represented by disjunct populations appear to be monophyletic including Conophthorus edulis, C. mexicanus, C. coniperda, and C. conicollens, whereas C. ponderosae is polyphyletic with many distinct clades isolated by geography. This study explored whether host use or geography has played a greater role in the diversification of this genus, focusing on the polyphyletic C. ponderosae and the monophyletic C. edulis. In the first study, 751bp of the mtDNA CO1 gene were sequenced to reconstruct a phylogeny of the genus, and the distribution and host use were compared to investigate whether these factors were significantly associated. The second study addressed population structure and possible historical influences on the C. edulis and C. ponderosae populations using a nested clade analysis of the mtDNA haplotypes. Despite potential limitations due to sampling, several conclusions could be drawn. Three separate haplotype networks were found for the C. ponderosae haplotypes, indicating that there have been at least three lineages that have associated with P. ponderosa. Geography was significantly associated with the phylogeny at greater distances (>900km), but host use was not significant. At the species level, association with geography is variable. Population structure for C. ponderosae at the species level is minimal, and suggests that there has not been much time for lineage sorting of the haplotypes based on the nested clade analysis as compared to C. edulis.

Menard, Katrina Louise

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Smoke and toxic species analyses from controlled combustion of wood impregnated with guayule resin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dominant commercial treatments currently used for wood preservation are pentachlorophenols (PCP), creosote, and chromium copper arsenicals. These wood preservatives present many studied and documented environmental and toxicological problems with both use of the products themselves, and with the production of secondary reaction contaminants. Furthermore, several of these preservatives are considered priority pollutants according to the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and are heavily regulated. The need for an environmentally benign combined fire/rot retardant treatment for wood that will effectively reduce both fire and decay is clearly evident. Guayule resin, a co-by-product during rubber extraction from the guayule shrub, is being explored by us as a natural, biodegradable wood rot and fire retardant with potential commercial applications. Wood impregnated with guayule resin has survived over eight years in tropical soils, free of rot, decay, and insect infestations. This study qualitatively analyzed the treated and untreated wood samples for ignitability, flame spread, toxic fumes, and smoke generation. Ignitability of the wood sample of fixed geometry was quantified by measuring the time required for ignition of treated samples vs. untreated samples. Flame spread was measured after ignition with a propane flame by a simple stopwatch-ruler technique. Smoke mass was determined in an Arapahoe Smoke Chamber as per ASTM D-4100. Analysis of the fumes involved continuous CO, C02, NOx, SOx, and 02 analyses using the Bacharach Instrument Model 300. Cascade impaction was used to determine the particle size distribution of the smoke and for smoke mass determination. Respirable particles were assessed by utilizing the Anderson 2000 Inc. 1 AFCM Ambient Particle Fractionating Sampler. Inflections of guayule-impregnated and untreated pine are indeed minor with respect to all aspects investigated. Ignition data indicated guayule-impregnated pine did not ignite as quickly as untreated pine. Evidence conveys favorable consideration for further research of wood preservation with guayule resin.

Smith, Lonnie

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

Biggs, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Property:County | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County County Jump to: navigation, search Property Name County Property Type String Description County Name Pages using the property "County" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Akutan Geothermal Project + Aleutians East Borough, AK + Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project + White Pine County, NV + Alum Geothermal Project + Esmerelda County, NV + Aurora Geothermal Project + Mineral County, NV + B Bald Mountain Geothermal Project + Lassen County, CA + Baltazor Springs Geothermal Project + Humboldt County, NV + Barren Hills Geothermal Project + Lyon, NV + Black Rock I Geothermal Project + Imperial County, OR + Black Rock II Geothermal Project + Imperial County, CA + Black Rock III Geothermal Project + Imperial County, CA +

364

CX-004383: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83: Categorical Exclusion Determination 83: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004383: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pine Hall Brick Company Energy Efficiency Improvements for Lighting, Kiln and Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/02/2010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Involves installing more efficient lighting, replacing old heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, upgrading kiln pressure controls, and changing operational processes, to increase energy efficiency and reduce energy needs. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004383.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001793: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000382: Categorical Exclusion Determination

365

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

366

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

367

JGI - CSP Sequencing Plans for 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 For status information, see the Genome Projects section. Organism Proposer Affiliation Eukaryotes Resequencing Trichoderma reesei Why? Scott Baker Pacific Northwest National Lab Rhizopogon salebrosus (ectomycorrhizal fungus) Why? Thomas Bruns University of California, Berkeley Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (lignin-degrading fungus) Why? Daniel Cullen USDA Forest Products Laboratory Gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Why? Maria Ghirardi Natl. Renewable Energy Lab. Paralvinella sulfincola (polychaete worm) Why? Peter Girguis Harvard Univ. Thalassiosira rotula (diatom) Why? Bethany Jenkins Univ. of Rhode Island Dendroctonus frontalis (southern pine beetle) ESTs Why? Scott Kelley San Diego State Univ. Botryococcus braunii (Oil-Producing Green Microalga) cDNA

368

FINAL REPORT: EDDY-COVARIANCE FLUX TOWER AND TRACER TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA PROPOSAL: FROM TOWER TO PIXEL: INTEGRATION OF PATCH-SIZE NEE USING EXPERIMENTAL MODELING FOOTPRINT ANALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory has been funded since October of 2000 to provide assistance to the University of Georgia in conducting footprint analyses of individual towers based on meteorology and trace gas measurements. Brookhaven researchers conducted air flow measurements using perfluorocarbon tracers and meteorological instrumentation for three experimental campaigns at an AmeriFlux research site maintained by Dr. Monique Leclerc near Gainesville, FL. In addition, BNL provided assistance with remote data collection and distribution from remote field sites operated by Dr. John Hom of the US Forest Service in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and at FACE research sites in North Carolina and Wisconsin.

LEWIN,K.F.; NAGY, J.; WATSON, T.B.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

370

Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Bronte Park, Buckland and Fentonbury); 12 from West Pencil Pine, an area on the disease front; and 35 from the DFTD- free northwestern coast region. The deletion is most prevalent in the northwest (found in 54.8% of tested individuals), followed by West... genetically disparate populations in the north- west and that the incidence of disease in these popula- tions is much lower than in similar populations in the east [33]. This gene deletion may be advantageous for the following reasons. First, the loss of Saha...

Cheng, Yuanyuan; Stuart, Andrew; Morris, Katrina; Taylor, Robyn; Siddle, Hannah; Deakin, Janine; Jones, Menna; Amemiya, Chris T; Belov, Katherine

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

6 47-5051-54 7876747371 11912  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 39 9 35 3 35 1 228 220 218 214 19 9 16 5 163 15 9 15 7 15 5 15 3 15 2 N M C D E H F 38 373665 0 65 FACILITY GOLF DRIVING DINING HOUSE) POLYA RO O M W ILLO W PINE CORDURA VENTURA GovernorsCorner SCHIFF TREAT(EAST (AMERICANSTUDIES) YOSTHOUSE O A KC R EEK C LU B A D M IN - O FFIC E REN TA L O FFIC E EU C

Quake, Stephen R.

372

An economical and market analysis of Canadian wood pellets.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study systematically examined the current and future wood pellet market, estimated the cost of Canadian torrefied pellets, and compared the torrefied pellets with the conventional pellets based on literature and industrial data. The results showed that the wood pellet industry has been gaining significant momentum due to the European bioenergy incentives and the rising oil and natural gas prices. With the new bioenergy incentives in USA, the future pellets market may shift to North America, and Canada can potentially become the largest pellet production centre, supported by the abundant wood residues and mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested trees.

Peng, J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of the engineering and economic feasibility study of utilizing geothermal energy for the mining and processing of tungsten ore at the Union Carbide-Metals Division Pine Creek tungsten complex near Bishop, Calfironia is reviewed. Results of geophysical data analysis including determination of assumed resource parameters are presented. The energy utilization evaluation identifies potential locations for substituting geothermal energy for fossil fuel energy using current technology. Preliminary analyses for local environmental and institutional barriers to development of a geothermal system are also provided.

Lane, C.K.; Erickson, M.V.; Lowe, G.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Local and Regional Economic Benefits from Forest Products Production Activities at the Savannah River Site: 1955-Present  

SciTech Connect

SRS was established in 1951 as a nuclear materials production facility; however, decline in the defense mission budget at SRS has created a major economic impact on the community in the Central Savannah River Area. SRS has been offsetting these effects by producing revenue (80 million dollars to date) from the sale of forest products since 1955 primarily trees, but also pine straw. Revenue has been re-invested into the infrastructure development, restoration and management of natural resources. Total asset value of the forest-land has increased from 21 million to over 500 million dollars in the same period.

Teeter, L.; Blake, J.I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Program: Self-Guided Tours  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Self-Guided Tours Self-Guided Tours Description: The following options are currently available to visitors who do not plan to take a guided tour. Wilson Hall If permitted by the current security conditions, visitors to the laboratory are welcome to visit the ground floor and atrium of Wilson Hall, the 16-story administrative building. The atrium offers an exhibit, a cafeteria and an information desk. The floors 2 to 16 are closed to the public. To take a tour of the 15th-floor viewing area, please sign up for a guided tour (see information above). Prairie Trails and Buffalo Viewing If permitted by the current security conditions, visitors to the lab can walk along a couple of prairie trails near the Pine Street entrance (west side of the lab) including the Margaret Pearson Interpretive Trail, a quarter mile self-guiding nature trail through a portion of Fermilab's restored prairie. Located on the north side of the Pine Street exit of the site, the trail is open to the public daily from 6:00 AM to 8 PM.

378

LAI References and Summaries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cart Sign In/Register Quick Data Search Help icon Go NASA Meatball Cart Sign In/Register Quick Data Search Help icon Go NASA Meatball No JAVASCRIPT Capabilities. This site will not function without JavaScript. Please use the Web Product Tree. or anonymous FTP at ftp://daac.ornl.gov/data. Global Leaf Area Index Data from Field Measurements, 1932-2000 References and summaries for literature on leaf area index (reviews, methodology, etc.) Barclay, H. J. (1998) Conversion of total leaf area to projcted leaf area in lodgepole pine and Douglas-fir. Tree PHysiology 18, 185-193. Summary It is noted that three distinct definitions of leaf area index (LAI) in the literature have no predictable relationship with each other. Conversion factors were derived, from total LAI to projected LAI of horizontal leaves and to projected LAI for inclined leaves of lodgepole pine and coastal Douglas-fir, enabling comparison of results from different studies. An algorithm was derived to allow determination of these factors based on twig angles and the angles that the foliage subtends with the twig. The conversion factor was more sensitive to differences in vertical angles of the twigs than to twig rotation or foliar arrangement on the twig.

379

Ten-year growth of woody species planted in reclaimed mined banks with different slopes  

SciTech Connect

In landscape reconstruction in an opencast coal mine, a gradient of slopes can be obtained. The slope gradient can affect different processes, such as plant growth, especially in semi-arid conditions. On the other hand, to favor the heterogeneity of habitats and ensure long-term restoration, late successional woody species have been planted but with heterogeneous results. In this study, the effect of a slope gradient (from 11.4 to 15.5 degrees) on the growth and survival of five Mediterranean woody species 10 years after the reconstruction of mining banks was evaluated. Slope gradient reduced height growth significantly from 10 cm degree{sup -1} (lentish) to 25 cm degree{sup -1} (pine) in 10-year- old woody species. This gradient also reduced basal diameter growth from 0.22 mm degree{sup -1} (juniper) to 0.58 mm degree{sup -1} (pine). Survival and slope were not significantly correlated. Growth and survival of the 10-year- old woody species were equal to or higher than those of the same species in other afforestations in semi-arid conditions. This outcome demonstrates the adequacy of species and applied techniques of restoration that allow a long-term reliability of reclaimed mine slopes.

Badia, D.; Valero, R.; Gracia, A.; Marti, C.; Molina, F. [Escuela Politecnica Superior, Huesca (Spain)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Pyrolysis of Wood and Bark in an Auger Reactor: Physical Properties and Chemical Analysis of the Produced Bio-oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-oil was produced at 450C by fast pyrolysis in a continuous auger reactor. Four feed stocks were used: pine wood, pine bark, oak wood, and oak bark. After extensive characterization of the whole bio-oils and their pyrolytic lignin-rich ethyl acetate fractions by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), calorific values, viscosity dependences on shear rates and temperatures, elemental analyses, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, water analyses, and ash content, these bio-oils were shown to be comparable to bio-oils produced by fast pyrolysis in fluidized bed and vacuum pyrolysis processes. This finding suggests that portable auger reactors might be used to produce bio-oil at locations in forests to generate bio-oil on-site for transport of the less bulky bio-oil (versus raw biomass) to biorefineries or power generation units. The pyrolysis reported herein had lower heat transfer rates than those achieved in fluidized bed reactors, suggesting significant further improvements are possible.

Ingram, L.; Mohan, D.; Bricka, M.; Steele, P.; Strobel, D.; Crocker, D.; Mitchell, B.; Mohammed, J.; Cantrell, K.; Pittman, C. U. Jr.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Combustion characteristics of Douglas Fir planer shavings. Technical progress report No. 4, September 16, 1977--September 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant quantities of wood residue fuels are presently being used in industrial steam generating facilities. Recent studies indicate that substantial additional quantities of wood residue fuels are available for energy generation in the form of steam and/or electricity. A limited data base on the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels has resulted in the installation and operation of inefficient combustion systems for these fuels. This investigation of the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels was undertaken to provide a data base which could be used to optimize the combustion of such fuels. Optimization of the the combustion process in industrial boilers serves to improve combustion efficiency and to reduce air pollutant emissions generated in the combustion process. This report presents data on the combustion characteristics of Douglas Fir planer shavings. The data were obtained in a pilot scale combustion test facility at Oregon State Univerisity. Other technical reports present data on the combustion characteristics of: Douglas Fir bark, Red Alder sawdust, Red Alder bark, Ponderosa pine bark, Hemlock bark, and Eastern White Pine bark. An executive summary report is also available which compares the combustion characteristics of the various fuel species.

Junge, D.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Relationships between dead wood and arthropods in the Southeastern United States.  

SciTech Connect

The importance of dead wood to maintaining forest diversity is now widely recognized. However, the habitat associations and sensitivities of many species associated with dead wood remain unknown, making it difficult to develop conservation plans for managed forests. The purpose of this research, conducted on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina, was to better understand the relationships between dead wood and arthropods in the southeastern United States. In a comparison of forest types, more beetle species emerged from logs collected in upland pine-dominated stands than in bottomland hardwood forests. This difference was most pronounced for Quercus nigra L., a species of tree uncommon in upland forests. In a comparison of wood postures, more beetle species emerged from logs than from snags, but a number of species appear to be dependent on snags including several canopy specialists. In a study of saproxylic beetle succession, species richness peaked within the first year of death and declined steadily thereafter. However, a number of species appear to be dependent on highly decayed logs, underscoring the importance of protecting wood at all stages of decay. In a study comparing litter-dwelling arthropod abundance at different distances from dead wood, arthropods were more abundant near dead wood than away from it. In another study, grounddwelling arthropods and saproxylic beetles were little affected by large-scale manipulations of dead wood in upland pine-dominated forests, possibly due to the suitability of the forests surrounding the plots.

Ulyshen, Michael, Darragh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Education Office / Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Science / Managed by Universities Research Association, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education Office / Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Education Office / Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Science / Managed by Universities Research Association, Inc. Kirk Road and Pine Street / M.S. 226 / P.O. Box 500 / Batavia, IL 60510 / 630.840.3092 / www-ed.fnal.gov Physics Workshop and Field Trip for Grades 6-9 Sampler Introduction "Beauty" and "Charm" are the fanciful names of two of six fundamental particles called quarks. Part of the experimental verification for the existence of quarks was carried out at Fermilab. However, this unit was titled Beauty and Charm at Fermilab with a second meaning in mind. Fermilab, as any visitor will attest, is a place of beauty-a high-rise main building with architec- ture inspired by a French cathedral and set on a prairie-like plain reminiscent of early Illinois. In

387

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oregon | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 1, 2012 August 1, 2012 CX-008976: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Start - Development of a National Liquid Propane (Autogas) Refueling Network CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, Texas, Washington Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 30, 2012 CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 25, 2012 CX-008873: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oregon State University- Natural Gas Self-contained Home Filling Station CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Colorado, Michigan Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

388

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

389

Data:4d6b40a1-5f24-4498-aeb9-74bf9e8dfa99 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a1-5f24-4498-aeb9-74bf9e8dfa99 a1-5f24-4498-aeb9-74bf9e8dfa99 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southern Pine Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Light: 100 Watt High Pressure Sodium (HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.southernpine.org/ourServices/depositsAndFees.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

390

Dispersal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dispersal Dispersal Nature Bulletin No. 675-A April 15, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SEED DISPERSAL Plants that scatter their seeds widely have a better chance to survive than those which do not. Different kinds spread their seeds in various special ways. Many seeds ride the wind. Maple seeds spin away like little helicopters with a single wing. In a strong breeze they can travel a city block. Those of the elm are small papery disks with a seed in the center. The ash seed and its wing resembles a canoe paddle. In the basswood a few seeds are suspended beneath a large flat blade that glides through the air. Ripe, dry pine cones open and release winged seeds hidden between the cone scales.

391

JGI - 2009 Genome Sequencing Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 2, 2008 July 2, 2008 Pine Tree, Boat-Boring Bivalve "Bugs", Duck Weed, Oil-Producing Microalgae, Stinkbird Gut, 40 Others Top DOE Joint Genome Institute 2009 Genome Sequencing Targets WALNUT CREEK, CA-In the continuing effort to tap the vast, unexplored reaches of the earth's microbial and plant domains for bioenergy and environmental applications, the DOE Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has announced its latest portfolio of DNA sequencing projects that it will undertake in the coming year. The 44 projects, culled from nearly 150 proposals received through the Community Sequencing Program (CSP), represent over 60 billion nucleotides of data to be generated through this biodiversity sampling campaign-roughly the equivalent of 20 human genomes. "The scientific and technological advances enabled by the information

392

Native Evergreens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evergreens Evergreens Nature Bulletin No. 173-A December 12, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NATIVE EVERGREENS There are few native evergreens in this region. Your Christmas tree -- unless it is one of those glistening imitations -- is likely to be a young spruce, balsam fir, or Scotch pine from Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota or Canada, perhaps a Douglas fir from the northwest. Long years ago, at Christmas time in many parts of rural Illinois, it was customary to search the hillsides and pastures for a well-shaped young cedar to be brought home as a Christmas tree. Or, if there was none, a young oak. They were decorated with strings of popcorn, cranberries and tinsel, chains of colored paper, and lighted with candles wired to the branches.

393

NETL: Science Bowl Information - Southwestern PA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Bowl Information > Science Bowl Information - South West PA Science Bowl Information > Science Bowl Information - South West PA Educational Initiatives Science Bowl Information - Southwestern PA Facebook Visit us on Facebook CLICK ON IMAGE TO SEE LARGER VIEW SWPA SWPA SWPA 2012 SWPA Science Bowl Results Congratulations! North Allegheny High School and Ingomar Middle School The finals for the SWPA Science Bowl were held on March 7th. The winner of the SWPA High School Science Bowl is North Allegheny High School. The winner of the SWPA Middle School Science Bowl is Ingomar Middle School Team 2 from the North Allegheny School District. The final team results are High School: 1st - North Allegheny HS 2nd - Mt. Lebanon HS 3rd - Baldwin HS 4th - Pine-Richland HS Middle School: 1st - Ingomar MS Team 2 (North Allegheny School District)

394

Aeromagnetic Survey At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey, 1978)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey, 1978) Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Baltazor Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The regional aeromagnetic map (Fig. 4) reveals a large north-trending magnetic high associated with the Pueblo Mountains and the Pine Ridge Range. This high probably relates to the Mesozoic intrusive rocks, and is partially interrupted by a northeast-trending feature in the vicinity of the KGRA. The flight line nearest the hot spring recorded a low opposite the hot spring, suggesting that there may be a local magnetic low

395

Data:07f78f8f-a33a-4414-add9-cd8d2c7ac364 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f8f-a33a-4414-add9-cd8d2c7ac364 f8f-a33a-4414-add9-cd8d2c7ac364 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Randolph Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: L23 - 40 FT CLASS 5 Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available to individual members located on the Cooperative's distribution system. Mercury vapor lights are only available at existing locations. RATE - MONTHLY All night outdoor lighting service using overhead conductors and the Cooperative's standard lighting package equipment mounted on 30-foot Class 6, treated pine poles.

396

Data:4e224828-ed9b-4a6f-9a22-753484c89121 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ed9b-4a6f-9a22-753484c89121 ed9b-4a6f-9a22-753484c89121 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southern Pine Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Light: 400 Watt High Pressure Sodium (HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.southernpine.org/ourServices/depositsAndFees.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

397

Advanced Materials Partners Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Advanced Materials Partners Inc Name Advanced Materials Partners Inc Address 45 Pine Street Place New Canaan, Connecticut Zip 06840 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Venture investor. Year founded 1987 Phone number (203) 966-6415 Website http://www.amplink.com/ Coordinates 41.1450129°, -73.4967805° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1450129,"lon":-73.4967805,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

031 - 2040 of 9,640 results. 031 - 2040 of 9,640 results. Download CX-005422: Categorical Exclusion Determination La Pine Chiloquin and Brasada Harney Number 1 Transmission Line Right-of-Ways CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/15/2011 Location(s): Klamath County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005422-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005965: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alvey District Wood Poles: Eugene-Lane Number 1, Eugene-Alvey Number 2, and Hawkins-Alvey Number 1 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/20/2011 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005965-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002273: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 961 Refurbishments (Tech Area IV)

399

Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO Home About Current Projects Contract Management Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630) 840-3285 Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Office of Science (SC) has a NEPA Compliance Officer on staff to coordinate all NEPA compliance and support matters at its laboratories. Responsibilities include managing the review and approval of NEPA documentation of SC Headquarter programs, and working with Department of Energy (DOE) Science programs and other DOE Headquarters Program Offices

400

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PHOTON SCIENCES PHOTON SCIENCES Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Environmental Management Systems Number: PS-ESH-0059 Revision: 1 Effective: 6/6/2012 Page 1 of 3 The only official copy of this document is on line on the PS website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the effective date on the PS website. Lori Stiegler Approved By: Andrew Ackerman *Approval signatures on file with master copy. Revision Log Frequently Asked Questions about Environmental Management Systems Background: BNL's location in the heart of the L.I. Pine Barrens and in a deep ground water recharge area provides strong incentive to ensure proper control of the environmental aspects of all work done on site. BNL management has committed to an Environmental Management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

LIST OF 361 ACORN COUNCIL AFFLILIATES, SUBSIDIARIES AN ALLIED ORGANIZATION (Note: The word ACORN is not always included in the associated entity name)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

361 ACORN COUNCIL AFFLILIATES, SUBSIDIARIES, AND ALLIED 361 ACORN COUNCIL AFFLILIATES, SUBSIDIARIES, AND ALLIED ORGANIZATIONS (Note: The word "ACORN" is not always included in the associated entity name) 1. Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) 2. ACORN National Office: Brooklyn, NY 3. ACORN Bronx, NY 4. ACORN Brooklyn, NY 5. ACORN Buffalo, NY 6. ACORN Hempstead, NY 7. ACORN HOUSING CORPORATION Brooklyn, NY 8. PROJECT VOTE Brooklyn, NY 9. MHANY Brooklyn, NY 10. ACORN National Office: Washington, D.C. 11. ACORN Washington, DC 12. ACORN HOUSING CORPORATION Washington, DC 13. ACORN Political 1334 G St, NW Suite B Washington, DC 20005 14. AISJ Washington, DC 15. ACORN National Office: Little Rock, AR 16. ACORN Pine Bluff, AR 17. ACORN Housing Corporation Little Rock, AR

402

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 19, 2010 July 19, 2010 Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification Brief filed before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the proceeding on DOE's applciation to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; DOE opposes the motion of Washington, South Carolina, Aiken County, and White Pine County to disqualify Commissioners Magwood and Ostendorff from voting on the appeal of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board's denial of DOE's motion to withdraw its application. July 12, 2010 Re: NBP RFI: Communications Requirements CTIA - The Wireless Association® ("CTIA")1 submits this response to the Department of Energy's ("DOE") Request for Information ("RFI") regarding the communications requirements of utilities pursuant

403

The Life History of a Pond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of a Pond History of a Pond Nature Bulletin No. 617 November 12, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE LIFE HISTORY OF A POND In the Palos division of the Forest Preserve District there is an extraordinary number of ponds and sloughs Many were created by damming the outlets from wet places; some were originally farm ponds that we have restored. The largest and probably oldest pond is located in Swallow Cliff Woods, west of the picnic area in a grove of white pines planted about 40 years ago. The pond is dying. Like most others, if undisturbed, after fifty years or so it will be forgotten because in its place there will be trees willows, cottonwoods, soft maples, and probably swamp white and bur oaks. Indeed, at one time it had already filled up until, after being drained by tile, corn was grown there.

404

Data:Cb9045d2-7c37-44d6-8f23-e99dad99a1be | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d2-7c37-44d6-8f23-e99dad99a1be d2-7c37-44d6-8f23-e99dad99a1be No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1986/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate 1 Residential Sector: Residential Description: Applicable to all residential consumers and churches for all uses, and to other consumers with a demand of 10 KW or less subject to the established rules and regulations of the Cooperative. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments String representation "To compute the ... ) $ 0.039/kWh" is too long. Applicability

405

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

406

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification Brief filed before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the proceeding on DOE's applciation to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; DOE opposes the motion of Washington, South Carolina, Aiken County, and White Pine County to disqualify Commissioners Magwood and Ostendorff from voting on the appeal of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board's denial of DOE's motion to withdraw its application. Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification More Documents & Publications 3116 Public Meeting Summaries - November 2006

407

Data:8812191f-96e9-43aa-b810-a6aeb2dd90e4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

191f-96e9-43aa-b810-a6aeb2dd90e4 191f-96e9-43aa-b810-a6aeb2dd90e4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1997/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting 1000 Watt MH Flood Light* Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to Members for dust to dawn outdoor lighting, in close proximity to existing overhead secondary circuits. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Additional Charges can be applied. Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

408

Data:8381fd32-725b-4f1f-98ba-75db5554d37b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fd32-725b-4f1f-98ba-75db5554d37b fd32-725b-4f1f-98ba-75db5554d37b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1997/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting 1000 Watt HPS Flood Light* Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to Members for dust to dawn outdoor lighting, in close proximity to existing overhead secondary circuits. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Additional Charges can be applied. Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

409

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-I -I I ,I ORNLIRASA-9215 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317AEX) Results of the Radiological Survey at the former ALCOA New Kensington Works, Pine and Ninth Streets, New Kensington, Pennsylvania (ANK002) R. D. Foley and K. S. Brown Date Issued - October 1992 Investigation Team R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager W. D. Cottrell - Project Director R. D. Foley - Field Survey Supervisor Survey Team Members P. F. Titter R: A. Matbis Work performed by the MEASUREMENT APPLICATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT GROUP Prepared by the OAK RlDOE NATtONAL LALaORATORY Oak Ridge. Tennessee 378314285 " ' managed by MARTlN MARtm-r* t?,NERGY SYSTEMS. INC.

410

salmon.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Salmon, Mississippi, Site Salmon, Mississippi, Site Site Description and History The Salmon, Mississippi, Site, also called the Tatum Dome Test Site, is a 1,470-acre tract of land in Lamar County, Mississippi, 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg. The nearest town is Purvis, about 10 miles east of the site. The site is in a forested region known as the long-leaf pine belt of the Gulf Coastal Plain. Elevations in the area range from about 240 to 350 feet above sea level. The site overlies a salt formation called the Tatum Salt Dome. Land around the Salmon site has residential, industrial, and commercial use, although no one lives within the boundary of the site itself. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense conducted two

411

Microsoft Word - TLR3.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Overall structure of human TLR3 ECD. The Figure 1. Overall structure of human TLR3 ECD. The N-terminal region is colored blue, the 23 canonical LRRs are in yellow and the C-terminal region is in pink. N-linked sugars that are observed in the electron density maps are shown in ball-and-stick. (From Choe et al. 2005). Structure of Human Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3) Ligand- binding Domain Jungwoo Choe 1 , Matthew S. Kelker 1 , Ian A. Wilson 1 1 Department of Molecular Biology and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 Innate immunity is the front line host defense that acts within minutes of infection to counter invasion by microorganisms. Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family recognize conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns from virus, bacteria, fungi

412

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-004359: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Mexico-Tribe-Santa Ana Pueblo CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/03/2010 Location(s): Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 3, 2010 CX-004358: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Mexico-Tribe-Pueblo of Laguna Utility Authority CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 11/03/2010 Location(s): Laguna, New Mexico Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 2, 2010 CX-004383: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pine Hall Brick Company Energy Efficiency Improvements for Lighting, Kiln and Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/02/2010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

413

Availability and abundance of prey for the red-cockaded woodpecker.  

SciTech Connect

Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 11. Prey, Fire, and Community Ecology. Pp 633-645. Abstract: Over a 10-year period we investigated red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) prey use, sources of prey, prey distribution within trees and stands, and how forest management decisions affect prey abundance in South Carolina, Alabama, Georgia and Florida. Cameras were operated at 31 nest cavities to record nest visits with prey in 4 locations that ranged in foraging habitat from pine stands established in old fields to an old-growth stand in South Georgia. Examination of nearly 12,000 photographs recorded over 5 years revealed that, although red-cockaded woodpeckers used over 40 arthropods for food, the majority of the nestling diet is comprised of a relatively small number of common arthropods.

Hanula, James, L.; Horn, Scott.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Microsoft PowerPoint - SW Fed Hydro Conference Jun 12 presentation Final [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects Impacting Federal Projects Impacting Federal Power Tulsa District Tulsa District Beau Biffle Beau Biffle 13 June 2012 BUILDING STRONG ® Topics Topics  Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation  Tulsa Vision 2025  Dam Safety Issues ► Keystone ► Pine Creek ► Tenkiller  Lake Eufaula Advisory Committee  Lake Eufaula Advisory Committee  Tenkiller Downstream Fishery Issues  Broken Bow Seasonal Pool Update - Cultural Broken Bow Seasonal Pool Update Cultural Resources Impacts  Arkansas River Navigation Improvement BUILDING STRONG ®  Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan Update Interior Least Tern Operations and H bit t C ti Habitat Creation  2011 Breeding Season Survey Results: - Arkansas River System: 517 adults, 358 fledglings. Season totals exceeded

415

References to Astrophysics Papers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

References to Astrophysics Papers References to Astrophysics Papers References to Astrophysics Papers Edward Tufte claims the most common number of references to scientific papers is zero. My five papers in astrophysics published from 1992 to 1996 continue to receive citations. Major ones are listed below. Mineo, S.; Rappaport, S.; Steinhorn, B.; Levine, A.; Gilfanov, M.; Pooley, D., 2013, The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 771, Issue 2, article id. 133, 12 pp. Spatially Resolved Star Formation Image and the Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Population in NGC 2207/IC 2163 Junqueira, T. C.; Lépine, J. R. D.; Braga, C. A. S.; Barros, D. A 2013, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Volume 550, id.A91. A new model for gravitational potential perturbations in disks of spiral galaxies. An application to our Galaxy.

416

CX-006917: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

917: Categorical Exclusion Determination 917: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006917: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning and Lighting Retrofits CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/23/2010 Location(s): Davie, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory 1) Develop an energy efficiency and conservation strategy; 2) technical consultant to develop Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Sustainability Action Plan, 3) heating, ventilating, and air conditioning retrofits at the Police Department Building, and 4) lighting and control retrofits at Pine Island Park and Shenandoah Park. CX-006917.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007043: Categorical Exclusion Determination

417

Data:0fed954c-4d54-4a4f-8f69-9f4aaf66d18b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fed954c-4d54-4a4f-8f69-9f4aaf66d18b fed954c-4d54-4a4f-8f69-9f4aaf66d18b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Randolph Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: L23 - 35 FT CLASS 6 Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available to individual members located on the Cooperative's distribution system. Mercury vapor lights are only available at existing locations. RATE - MONTHLY All night outdoor lighting service using overhead conductors and the Cooperative's standard lighting package equipment mounted on 30-foot Class 6, treated pine poles.

418

Data:2f469589-b5c0-40d6-bed3-832ed2f7c78a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

69589-b5c0-40d6-bed3-832ed2f7c78a 69589-b5c0-40d6-bed3-832ed2f7c78a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1997/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting 400 Watt HPS Flood Light Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to Members for dust to dawn outdoor lighting, in close proximity to existing overhead secondary circuits. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Additional Charges can be applied. Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

419

Data:8a6072d5-dbda-47fb-a54e-7eb1eb932b74 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2d5-dbda-47fb-a54e-7eb1eb932b74 2d5-dbda-47fb-a54e-7eb1eb932b74 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1997/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting 250 Watt HPS Security Light Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to Members for dust to dawn outdoor lighting, in close proximity to existing overhead secondary circuits. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Additional Charges can be applied. Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

420

Data:Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1986/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate 3 Medium Commercial - 50 kW to 300 kW Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to all three-phase consumers for all uses, with a demand of 50 kW or greater, but less than 300 kW, subject to the established rules and regulations of the Cooperative. Where three-phase service is unavailable single-phase service may be provided under this schedule at option of the Cooperative. Source or reference: ISU Documentation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CX-000520: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Categorical Exclusion Determination 20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000520: Categorical Exclusion Determination 690-N (Ford Building) Fire System Isolation and Sanitary Sewer Grouting CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 09/02/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Firewater service to Building 690-N (the Ford Building) will be rendered unavailable by cutting and capping the firewater header to the building. Preparation for excavation and isolation will necessitate the removal of some existing vegetation (pine tree) for the fire system isolation to proceed. Additionally, all access points to the sanitary sewer lines from inside Building 690-N will be grouted closed. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000520.pdf More Documents & Publications

422

CX-005422: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

422: Categorical Exclusion Determination 422: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005422: Categorical Exclusion Determination La Pine Chiloquin and Brasada Harney Number 1 Transmission Line Right-of-Ways CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/15/2011 Location(s): Klamath County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. crossarms, insulators, guy anchors) along the subject transmission lines. Pole replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to minimize ground disturbance. If necessary, an auger will be used to remove any loose soil from the existing hole prior to new wood pole replacement. Landing construction is not planned or anticipated at these locations.

423

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 4, 2013 June 4, 2013 CX-010433: Categorical Exclusion Determination Memaloose Meadows Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/04/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration June 3, 2013 CX-010436: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tri-Cities Maintenance Headquarters Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration June 3, 2013 CX-010435: Categorical Exclusion Determination De Moss Substation Expansion CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration June 3, 2013 CX-010434: Categorical Exclusion Determination LaPine Substation Shunt Reactor Addition CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

424

Microsoft Word - Cover Page - Exhibit 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Northern Pass Project General Area Map of South Section o ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . ! . # * # * # * # * # * # * # * # * # * Laconia S/S Garvins S/S Webster S/S Oak Hill S/S Pine Hill S/S Merrimack S/S Deerfield S/S Greggs Falls S/S Proposed Converter Station § ¨ ¦ 93 § ¨ ¦ 89 § ¨ ¦ 293 § ¨ ¦ 393 £ ¤ 3 £ ¤ 4 £ ¤ 202 £ ¤ 4 £ ¤ 202 ! ( 11 ! ( 106 ! ( 132 ! ( 28 ! ( 13 ! ( 121 ! ( 107 ! ( 101 ! ( 3 ! ( 129 ! ( 202 ! ( 126 ! ( 114 ! ( 103 ! ( 27 ! ( 140 ! ( 77 ! ( 127 ! ( 43 ! ( 156 ! ( 28 ! ( 152 ! ( 28 ! ( 107 ! ( 107 ! ( 107 ! ( 13 ! ( 28 ! ( 11 MERRIMACK COUNTY BELKNAP COUNTY ROCKINGHAM COUNTY HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY STRAFFORD COUNTY CARROLL COUNTY Concord Municipal Airport Alton Tilton Raymond Suncook Concord Belmont Laconia Hooksett Boscawen Franklin Goffstown Northwood New Boston Manchester Pittsfield Northfield Pinardville South Hooksett Alton Concord Bow Loudon Deerfield Gilmanton Gilford Epsom Barnstead

425

Michigan Town Committed to Sustainable Future | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan Town Committed to Sustainable Future Michigan Town Committed to Sustainable Future Michigan Town Committed to Sustainable Future May 14, 2010 - 10:04am Addthis Charlevoix, MI is using Recovery Act funds for energy upgrades | Photo courtesy Charlevoix, Michigan, City Manager | Charlevoix, MI is using Recovery Act funds for energy upgrades | Photo courtesy Charlevoix, Michigan, City Manager | Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Charlevoix, Mich., sits on a stretch of land between Lake Michigan and Lake Charlevoix along the Pine River. It's a scenic atmosphere that both summer vacationers and local residents have worked to protect, city manager Rob Straebel says. "The community here has been proactive in creating a sustainable future," he says. Citizens are taking steps to become a more environmentally-conscious

426

Fermi Site Office Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Home Home Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO Home About Current Projects Contract Management Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630) 840-3285 Fermi Site Office Pictured Right: Fermi view to the Northeast Fermi View to Northeast 1 of 2 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Fermi Site Office (FSO) is an organization within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science with responsibility to oversee and manage the Management and Operating (M&O) contract for the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois. FNAL is one of ten Office of Science Laboratories and is a single-program

427

1980's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

's 's The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov Award Laureates 1980's Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page 1988 Mary K. Gaillard Richard T. Lahey, Jr. Chain Tsuan Liu Gene H. McCall Alexander Pines Joseph S. Wall 1987 James W. Gordon Miklos Gyulassy Sung-Hou Kim James L. Kinsey J. Robert Merriman David E. Moncton 1986 James J. Duderstadt Helen T. Edwards Joe W. Gray C. Bradley Moore Gustavus J. Simmons James L. Smith

428

Jobs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

About » Field Offices » FSO Home » About » About » Field Offices » FSO Home » About » Jobs Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (887KB) Jobs Current Projects Contract Management Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630) 840-3285 About Jobs Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Current Open Federal Positions The Fermi Site Office is located in Batavia, Illinois. All open federal positions listed below are posted on USAJobs.gov External link . (Fermi Site Office Organization Chart .pdf file (887KB)) Position Details Job Number Opened Closes No positions in FSO are currently open Important note: Please read job opportunity announcements carefully to identify the

429

Contract Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Contract Contract Management Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO Home About Current Projects Contract Management Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630) 840-3285 Contract Management Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The FSO Business and Contract Support Team implements the timely execution of all Fermi Research Alliance management and operating contract modifications and oversees initiatives for effective administration of Laboratory procurement, property, human resources, budget, accounting and financial management, internal audit, industrial relations, and Contractor performance requirements under the contract. The Team interacts regularly

430

About | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

About About Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (887KB) Jobs Current Projects Contract Management Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630) 840-3285 About Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page FSO Mission The Fermi Site Office (FSO) manages the Department of Energy (DOE) performance-based management and operating contract for the safe, secure, effective, and efficient operation of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). FSO supports the Office of Science (SC) mission to foster, formulate, and support forefront basic and applied research programs which advance the science and technology foundations

431

PRESENTATION TITLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Impacting Federal Projects Impacting Federal Power Tulsa District Dan Brueggenjohann 12 June 2013 BUILDING STRONG ®  Interpretation/Application of CERM-F-2013-18  303(d) Listing of Broken Bow Tailwaters  Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation  Tulsa Vision 2025  Dam Safety Issues ► Keystone, Pine Creek, Robert S. Kerr, Denison  Lake Eufaula Advisory Committee  Tenkiller Downstream Fishery Issues  Broken Bow Seasonal Pool Update - Cultural Resources Impacts  Arkansas River Navigation Improvement  Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan Update BUILDING STRONG ® Interpretation/Application of CERM-F-2013-18  Situation - New Resource Management regulation to increase the capitalization threshold for power marketing agency assets.

432

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To the People of New York: To the People of New York: We, the undersigned, are proud to designate 530 acres of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) as the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Reserve) as a protected habitat for the enjoyment of future generations. This acreage is located in the eastern portion of BNL, within the Core Preservation Area of the Pine Barrens. The Reserve will be managed to preserve its natural state, and conserve and enhance its natural attributes and resources, and restrict future development. In addition, the Reserve will be made available for educational activities, and for nondestructive ecological research. In the 1970's, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ceded 2,300 acres of the north tract of BNL to the State of New York and the Town of Brookhaven. The additional acreage being set aside today contains

433

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 16680 of 28,905 results. 71 - 16680 of 28,905 results. Download CX-007148: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gila Substation Electrical Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 05/03/2011 Location(s): Yuma County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007148-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008167: Categorical Exclusion Determination La Pine-Chiloquin Number 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 03/21/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008167-categorical-exclusion-determination Download The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Status Update http://energy.gov/em/downloads/us-nuclear-waste-technical-review-board-status-update

434

Property:HeatRate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HeatRate HeatRate Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "HeatRate" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AES Mendota Biomass Facility + 17,873.6 + APS Biomass I Biomass Facility + 8,911 + Acme Landfill Biomass Facility + 12,916.67 + Adrian Energy Associates LLC Biomass Facility + 13,170.6 + Agrilectric Power Partners Ltd Biomass Facility + 17,327.1 + Al Turi Biomass Facility + 15,600.2 + Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility + 15,826.23 + Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility + 11,913.9 + Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility + 10,500 + American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility + 10,886.8 + American Ref-Fuel of Delaware Valley Biomass Facility + 18,674.9 +

435

CX-004608: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004608: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chippewa Tribe of Minnesota on behalf of the Mille Lacs Band Renewable Energy Technologies on Government Buildings CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 01/08/2010 Location(s): Tower, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The Mille Lacs Band of the Chippewa Tribe would utilize Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funds to install renewable energy systems (three 1.2 kilowatt Windspire? vertical axis wind turbines and 2 solar paneling systems) on 4 government buildings on the reservation: ? Mille Lacs Band Tribal College, (wind) ? Nay Ah Shing Upper/Lower School (solar) ? Mille Lacs Band Community Center (wind) ? Department of Education Charter School (Pine Grove Leadership Academy) (solar/wind) Solar systems would be

436

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2012 July 30, 2012 CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 30, 2012 CX-008890: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bonneville Power Administration/Washington Department of Natural Resources Access Road Improvements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 27, 2012 CX-008676: Categorical Exclusion Determination Four AT&T Wireless Communication Site Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B1.19 Date: 07/27/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

437

"Modern" Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Modern" Coal Plants "Modern" Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 331-A February 7, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation "MODERN" COAL PLANTS The Age of Cycads, when those strange tree-like plants predominated, began during the Triassic Period of the earth's geological history, reached its peak during the 60 million years of the Jurassic Period which followed, and ended during the first part of the Cretaceous Period that began about 95 million years ago. During the Jurassic, in addition to Cycades, there were also many species of ginkgos, and conifers which were the ancestors of our modern sequoias and pines. The ginkgo or "Maidenhair Tree", which we have imported from China and Japan, is the only one remaining of that tribe -- "a living fossil".

438

NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973 Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Morrison, I. K., and N. W. Foster. 2001. NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil were determined for a 30-year old pine forest in northern Ontario, Canada, and a detailed nutrient budget published. The 30-year old stand was compared with nearby 20-year old and 65-year old stands, all of which were growing on a glaciofluvial flat. Net primary productivity (NPP) was not directly estimated, but data exist on above-ground tree growth and litterfall.

439

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X - B2.5 Safety and environmental improvements of a facility, replacement/upgrade of facility components 1) Develop an energy efficiency and conservation strategy; 2) technical consultant to develop Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Sustainability Action Plan, 3) heating, ventilating, and air conditioning retrofits at the Police Department Building, and 4) lighting and control retrofits at Pine Island Park and Shenandoah Park. The original forms were signed by Gary Hartman on behalf of EERE on 3/23/2010. The original CX determination form is attached. Oak Ridge Office EEC Strategy, HVAC and Lighting Retrofits FL- City- Davie Print Form for Records Submit to Website Submit via Email Billie Newland Digitally signed by Billie Newland DN: cn=Billie Newland, o, ou,

440

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 26340 of 28,904 results. 31 - 26340 of 28,904 results. Article U.S. Department of Energy Moves Forward with Final Performance Requirements for Yucca Mountain Canister System Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the release of final performance requirements for the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister for disposal of spent... http://energy.gov/articles/us-department-energy-moves-forward-final-performance-requirements-yucca-mountain-canister Download CX-001246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Retrofits and Traffic Signal Lighting Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Pine Bluff, Arkansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001246-categorical-exclusion-determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

891 - 19900 of 28,905 results. 891 - 19900 of 28,905 results. Download CX-008890: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bonneville Power Administration/Washington Department of Natural Resources Access Road Improvements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008890-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008891-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-009199: Categorical Exclusion Determination Access Road Improvement For the Kalispell-Kerr Number 1, 115-kilovolt (kV)

442

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X - B2.5 Safety and environmental improvements of a facility, replacement/upgrade of facility components X - B2.5 Safety and environmental improvements of a facility, replacement/upgrade of facility components 1) Energy Efficiency Retrofits, including high efficiency lighting upgrade, HVAC efficiency improvements and building weatherization, 2) upgrade of traffic signals to LED. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Program EE Retrofits, and Traffic Signal Lighting Upgrades Pine Bluff Arkansas Dec 10, 2009 Print Form for Records Submit to Website Submit via Email Billie Newland Digitally signed by Billie Newland DN: cn=Billie Newland, o=Energy Enterprise Solutions, ou, email=Billie.Newland@hq.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.03.16 12:11:06 -04'00' Submit to Webmaster

443

Data:1eb97ce4-35bb-42e2-8844-13792c86e87e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5bb-42e2-8844-13792c86e87e 5bb-42e2-8844-13792c86e87e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Rate LMS-8 Load Management Service Sector: Commercial Description: Rate LMS-8 Load Management Service Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

444

Data:030dcfda-8aab-4982-9feb-6a788da53eb8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30dcfda-8aab-4982-9feb-6a788da53eb8 30dcfda-8aab-4982-9feb-6a788da53eb8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1997/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting 100 Watt HPS Security Light Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to Members for dust to dawn outdoor lighting, in close proximity to existing overhead secondary circuits. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Additional Charges can be applied. Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

445

NREL: News Feature - Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices May 24, 2010 Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player. When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But that's what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus. In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S.

446

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-004104: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program Conductor Optimized Rotary Energy Mega-Watt Scale Direct Wind Generator CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 09/29/2010 Location(s): Ronan, Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 28, 2010 CX-004168: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.2, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/28/2010 Location(s): Brevard County, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 27, 2010 CX-004077: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacement of a Relay/Transfer Trip Rack at Redmond Substation and a Transfer Trip Panel at LaPine Substation

447

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Comments on DOE's NOI re Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Public Comments on DOE's NOI re Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Comments by the United States Enrichrnent Corporation (USEC) in response to DOE's Notice of Inquiry (N0l) on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation. 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (July 27, 2010). July 27, 2011 WA_2006_007_SOLVEY_OLEXIS_SpA_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_.pdf July 27, 2011 Public Comment re Price-Anderson Act Department of Energy (DOE) Price-Anderson Act Comments from White Pine County, Nevada. The views of many "Affected Units of Government" in Nevada are similar to each other and that we have worked together in developing comments. In fact, many of our comments will be identical to those made by

448

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2010 6, 2010 CX-003271: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas-City-Missouri City CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Missouri City, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003270: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee-County-Maury CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Maury County, Tennessee Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003269: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribe-Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003266: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada-County-Washoe

449

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 4200 of 29,416 results. 91 - 4200 of 29,416 results. Download CX-008880: Categorical Exclusion Determination Celilo Converter Station Curtain Wall Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/08/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008880-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008890: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bonneville Power Administration/Washington Department of Natural Resources Access Road Improvements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008890-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project

450

Why Sequence Rhizopogon salebrosus?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhizopogon salebrosus? Rhizopogon salebrosus? On October 3, 1995, smoke from the remains of an illegal campfire was spotted at Point Reyes National State Park in northern California. Over the next week, just over 12,000 acres burned, most of it concentrated at Mt. Vision in Point Reyes National Seashore, and several dozen homes were razed. Some 70 percent of the plant life in the area ranging from northern coastal scrub and salt marsh to Bishop pines and Douglas firs was lost. By the time the fire was declared under control on October 16, over 2,000 firefighters had been involved in the effort to quash the flames. Point Reyes National Park after 1995 fire Copyright Bruce Farnsworth/NPS Mycorrhizal fungi such as Rhizopogon salebrosus play a key role in maintaining various ecosystems. R. salebrosus is usually among the fungi

451

My initial thoughts are, first, that, as you pointed out last week, the question put to the three Commissioners was whether they would object to the policy decision to withdraw the license application, not whether they had firm positions on the legality  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BEFORE THE COMMISSION In the Matter of U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (High Level Waste Repository Construction Authorization Application) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) July 19, 2010 Docket No. 63-001-HLW U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S RESPONSE TO THE MOTION FOR RECUSAL/DISQUALIFICATION The States of Washington and South Carolina, Aiken County, and White Pine County ("Movants"), in an opportunistic and untimely attempt to disable this Commission from performing its statutory duties, have filed a Motion for Recusal/Disqualification ("Motion") to remove Commissioners Magwood and Ostendorff from considering any issue associated with the appeal of LBP-10-11. 1 There is no basis in law or fact for this Motion, and it should be promptly denied. Indeed, in the circumstances presented here, granting the motion would be an abdication

452

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 5450 of 26,764 results. 41 - 5450 of 26,764 results. Page Timesharing Agreements The Acquisition Management Division (IM-13) leads the teleprocessing services program which is a centrally managed Headquarters program and voluntary to the field offices to gain the advantages of... http://energy.gov/cio/guidance/it-acquisition/timesharing-agreements Download Financial and Activity Report- December 25, 2009 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-december-25-2009 Download EIS-0285-SA-143: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-143-supplement-analysis Download CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/30/2012

453

Data:83b44cd3-b331-43c7-89e9-d01dedb2a18a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cd3-b331-43c7-89e9-d01dedb2a18a cd3-b331-43c7-89e9-d01dedb2a18a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Randolph Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: UL23 - HPS 100W Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available to individual members located on the Cooperative's distribution system. Mercury vapor lights are only available at existing locations. RATE - MONTHLY All night outdoor lighting service using underground conductors and the Cooperative's standard lighting package equipment mounted on 30-foot Class 6, treated pine poles requiring 150 feet or less of secondary underground conductor.

454

Bird Habitats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Habitats Bird Habitats Bird Habitats The avian nest box monitoring network is located in northern New Mexico to investigate the health and condition of bird populations that nest in bird houses on the Pajarito plateau. April 12, 2012 Avian nest box on LANL land Boxes are placed in the open ponderosa pine forest of the canyons and piñon-juniper woodland on the Pajarito plateau mesas. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The monitoring data are used in a population viability analysis that can determine the status of the population and potential impacts of contaminants. Who nests in our network? More than two dozen North American bird species prefer to nest in bird houses. At LANL, we provide nestboxes for the following native bird

455

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-004383: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pine Hall Brick Company Energy Efficiency Improvements for Lighting, Kiln and Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/02/2010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 2, 2010 CX-004382: Categorical Exclusion Determination Van Wingerden International Energy Efficiency Improvements for Climate Control System CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/02/2010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 2, 2010 CX-004378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Genetic Improvement of Switchgrass CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/02/2010

456

ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Benjamin Martin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Martin Martin Engineering student fuses together satellite data to aid in emergency response Benjamin Martin Benjamin Martin, an engineering student at the Univ. of Tennessee enrolled in the Higher Education Research Experiences program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is trying to improve emergency response by developing computer codes to fuse together two different kinds of satellite image data. In the event of a man-made or natural disaster, Martin's codes could be used to enable a comparison of pre- and post-disaster images to determine areas with the highest level of damage. A funnel cloud falls from the sky and twists into a tornado, tossing trucks and plucking up pines. As the rain floods the creeks with runoff, people crawl out from their hiding spaces and begin to assess damage. With phone

457

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Federal Register 7 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 124 / Tuesday, June 30, 2009 / Notices ADDRESSES: Submit comments related to the project by any of the following methods: * E-mail: Nextlight_Primm_NV_SEP@blm.gov * Fax: (702) 515-5010, attention Gregory Helseth. * Mail: BLM, Las Vegas Field Office, Attn: Gregory Helseth, 4701 North Torrey Pines Drive, Las Vegas, NV 89130-2301. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information and/or to have your name added to the mailing list, contact Gregory Helseth, Renewable Energy Project Manager, at (702) 515-5173; or e-mail at Nextlight_Primm_NV_SEP@blm.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: NextLight Renewable Power, LLC, has submitted two applications for rights-of-way for the construction, operation, maintenance, and termination of two

458

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa When Cities Lead: The Los Angeles Experience Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa -45% -40% -35% -30% -25% -20% -15% -10% -5% 0% Municipal Citywide 2004 2010 2013* 2020* "Green LA" 2030 Goal (*Projected) Reduction in Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions Percentage Change from 1990 Baseline Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa Pine Tree The nation's largest municipally owned wind farm Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2010 Goal Total Electricity Generated from Renewables Percentage Share Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa Port of LA: Clean Trucks Program Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa -80% -70% -60% -50% -40% -30% -20% -10% 0% Nitrogen Oxides Sulfur Oxides

459

The Entire Botany Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Botany Archives Botany Archives Botany Archives, Since May 2000 Table of Contents: Ginseng Caterpillars and Pin Oaks Seaweed and Nutrition Blue Leaves Walnut Problems Italian Trees Purple Plants Poplar Up-date European Tree Design Planting Magnolia Trees Schoolyard Plants Poplar Droppings Fungi Spores Woodland Adaptations Growing Lichen Apple Tree Maturity Horse Poison Plants Honeysuckle Poison Old Trees Leaking Popular Cottonwood Infestation Tulip Tree Seeds Bald Cypress Ecology Maple Recovery Leaf Minors Catalpa Problem Berm Enhancement Organic Gardening Ailing Burr Oak Damaged Cypress Tree Reed Ridding Berm Enhancement Tulip Tree Flowering Lichens Weed Seeds Plants at Night Kombu Seaweed Plants at Night Crab Grass Phloem Physiology Elm Disease Bark Thickness Poison Sumac Growing Fields Killing Pine Trees

460

Data:6eb02ab7-90ee-45ff-a806-0fa8908178ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2ab7-90ee-45ff-a806-0fa8908178ad 2ab7-90ee-45ff-a806-0fa8908178ad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1987/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate SS1 Seasonal Service (Three phase) Sector: Commercial Description: To all electric service of one standard voltage required on a Seasonal Customer's premises at one point and metered at or compensated to that voltage. A Seasonal Customer is defined as a permanently connected customer with a recurring seasonal pattern or service requirements. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loblolly pine pinus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Data:C5911952-982f-4421-baff-d447fdcc439c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

11952-982f-4421-baff-d447fdcc439c 11952-982f-4421-baff-d447fdcc439c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1987/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate SS1 Seasonal Service (Single Phase) Sector: Commercial Description: To all electric service of one standard voltage required on a Seasonal Customer's premises at one point and metered at or compensated to that voltage. A Seasonal Customer is defined as a permanently connected customer with a recurring seasonal pattern or service requirements. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent:

462

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 129) Ashe-Marion #2 [Mile 150-157]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 129 Ashe-Marion #2 [Mile 150-157] Elizabeth Johnson Natural Resource Specialist- TFR/The Dalles Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Ashe-Marion #2 500 kV transmission line from structure 150/2 through structure 157/7 (reference line). The Buckley-Marion #1 transmission line is also present within the proposed corridor. Right of way width averages 135 feet. Location: The project location is within Wasco County, Oregon near the city of Pine Grove, and is within the Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-

463

Microsoft Word - 7A1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Figure 1 Crystal structure of the 7A1 Fab' cocaine complex with the secondary structure of the antibody light (L) and heavy (H) chains colored in cyan. Substrate cocaine is also shown in spheres with yellow carbons, blue nitrogen, and red oxygens in the active site. High Resolution Snapshots for the Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine Catalytic Antibody Xueyong Zhu 1 , Tobin J. Dickerson 2,3 , Claude J. Rogers 2,3 , Gunnar F. Kaufmann 2,3 , Jenny M. Mee 2,3 , Kathleen M. McKenzie 2,3 , Kim D. Janda 2,3,4,* and Ian A. Wilson 1,4,* Departments of Molecular Biology 1 and Chemistry 2 and Immunology 3 , and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology 4 , The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Cocaine is a powerful addictive stimulant that affects the brain, and abuse of cocaine has

464

Crystal Structure of an Anthrax Toxin -Host Cell Receptor Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eugenio Santelli1, Laurie A. Bankston1, Stephen H. Leppla2 & Robert C. Liddington1 Eugenio Santelli1, Laurie A. Bankston1, Stephen H. Leppla2 & Robert C. Liddington1 1Program on Cell Adhesion, The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, U.S.A. 2Microbial Pathogenesis Section, National Insitute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, U.S.A. Fig. 1a: Mechanism of anthrax toxin entry into host cells. Fig. 1b: Two orthogonal views of the PA-cmg2 complex. Cmg2 is shown in blue. PA domains are colored yellow (I), red (II), gray (III) and green (IV). Figs 1b and 2 were created using the UCSF Chimera package8. Infection by Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, involves the action of a secreted three-component toxin thought to disrupt host immune defences. Two of these components, lethal factor (LF) and oedema

465

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

269: Categorical Exclusion Determination 269: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribe-Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003266: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada-County-Washoe CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Washoe County, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003264: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nebraska-Tribe-Ponca Tribe of Nebraska CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Nebraska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003263: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana-Tribe-Blackfeet Tribe CX(s) Applied: B5.1

466

Heinsight Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heinsight Solutions Heinsight Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Heinsight Solutions Name Heinsight Solutions Address 217 Pine Street Place Fort Collins, Colorado Zip 80524 Sector Efficiency Product Skylight and solar water heating installation Website http://www.heinsightsolutions. Coordinates 40.5891279°, -105.0765009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5891279,"lon":-105.0765009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

467

Data:Fcae03ca-4b17-4d93-be74-9c0f67ecd3bc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fcae03ca-4b17-4d93-be74-9c0f67ecd3bc Fcae03ca-4b17-4d93-be74-9c0f67ecd3bc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Randolph Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2007/04/10 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR LIGHTING SCHEDULE 7,000 L- MV Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available to individual members located on the Cooperative's distribution system. Mercury vapor lights are only available at existing locations. RATE - MONTHLY All night outdoor lighting service using overhead conductors and the Cooperative's standard lighting package equipment mounted on 30-foot Class 6, treated pine poles.

468

Data:4b6c896c-4591-46d4-a417-dd8a59e5274e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

96c-4591-46d4-a417-dd8a59e5274e 96c-4591-46d4-a417-dd8a59e5274e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Randolph Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: L23 - 9000L - HPS Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available to individual members located on the Cooperative's distribution system. Mercury vapor lights are only available at existing locations. RATE - MONTHLY All night outdoor lighting service using overhead conductors and the Cooperative's standard lighting package equipment mounted on 30-foot Class 6, treated pine poles.

469

CX-003269: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003269: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribe-Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The Oglala Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to sponsor an outreach initiative to address the need to increase the rate and total number of low-income residential energy retrofits. The Tribe proposes to target mobile homes manufactured prior to 1976. The Tribe would assist Tribal members with acquisition, preparation, and submission of South Dakota Weatherization Assistance Program enrollment applications, provide an energy efficiency and

470

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 1970 of 26,777 results. 61 - 1970 of 26,777 results. Download CX-005422: Categorical Exclusion Determination La Pine Chiloquin and Brasada Harney Number 1 Transmission Line Right-of-Ways CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/15/2011 Location(s): Klamath County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005422-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Technical Standards, CFAST-Code Guidance- July 23, 2004 DOE-EH-4.2.1.4-CFAST-Code Guidance, CFAST Computer Code Application Guidance for Documented Safety Analysis http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/technical-standards-cfast-code-guidance-july-23-2004 Download CX-002690: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pajarito Road Right-Of-Way Shift at TA-50 and TA-55 CX(s) Applied: B1.13 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): New Mexico

471

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MI-TRIBE-NOTTAWASEPPI HURON BAND OF THE POTAWATOMI MI-TRIBE-NOTTAWASEPPI HURON BAND OF THE POTAWATOMI Location: Tribe MI-TRIBE- NOTTAWASEPPI HURON BAND OF THE POTAWATOMI MI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Funds for incremental costs associated with building three LEED certified homes on the Pine Creek Reservation and acquiring technical services for project management services for their construction (incremental costs are for purchasing materials for foundation walls, lumber [sealants and energy heel truss], additional framing required, geothermal heat pump, plumbing, insulation, landscaping, LEED supervision and general conditions) Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 *-For the complete