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1

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various… (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Loami, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loami, Illinois: Energy Resources Loami, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.6756064°, -89.846771° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6756064,"lon":-89.846771,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Characterization of the 3-D Properties of the Fine-Grained Turbidite 8 Sand Reservoir, Green Canyon 18, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the internal organization of the Lower Pleistocene 8 Sand reservoir in the Green Canyon 18 field, Gulf of Mexico, helps to increase knowledge of the geology and the petrophysical properties, and hence contribute to production management in the area. Interpretation of log data from 29 wells, core and production data served to detail as much as possible a geological model destined for a future reservoir simulation. Core data showed that the main facies resulting from fine-grained turbidity currents is composed of alternating sand and shale layers, whose extension is assumed to be large. They correspond to levee and overbank deposits that are usually associated to channel systems. The high porosity values, coming from unconsolidated sediment, were associated to high horizontal permeability but generally low kv/kh ratio. The location of channel deposits was not obvious but thickness maps suggested that two main systems, with a northwest-southeast direction, contributed to the 8 Sand formation deposition. These two systems were not active at the same time and one of them was probably eroded by overlying formations. Spatial relationships between them remained unclear. Shingled stacking of the channel deposits resulted from lateral migration of narrow, meandering leveed channels in the mid part of the turbidite system. Then salt tectonics tilted turbidite deposits and led to the actual structure of the reservoir. The sedimentary analysis allowed the discrimination of three facies A, B and E, with given porosity and permeability values, that corresponded to channel, levee and overbank deposits. They were used to populate the reservoir model. Well correlation helped figure out the extension of these facies.

Plantevin, Matthieu Francois

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Coal-sand attrition system and its` importance in fine coal cleaning. Eighth quarterly report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The research efforts on the importance of a coal-sand attrition continued with work in four categories: Continuous grinding tests using steel media; fracture tests on coal samples compacted at different pressure; SEM-Image analysis of feed and ground product coal samples; zeta potential measurements of coal samples ground by different media, and flotation test of coal samples ground by different media. Results are described.

Mehta, R.K.; Schultz, C.W.

1993-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Silica Sand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the molds and cores in foundries that make steel castings, and for casting gray iron, brass, aluminum and magnesium metals. Since silica sand has a very high melting point, it is...

6

New method for sand control and well stimulation in unconsolidated dirty sands  

SciTech Connect

A new technique, the Solder Glass sand consolidation well completion method, has been developed which allows unlimited drawdown and improves productivity in wells completed in unconsolidated formations containing shales and clays. This technique eliminates the problems of sand production and fines migration by artificially consolidating a volume of reservoir sand near the wellbore. The consolidation is resistant to high temperature, chemical attack, and degradation resulting from high velocity fluid flow. Additionally, porosity and permeability in the consolidated volume of reservoir sand are improved as a result of irreversible dehydration of clays. 12 refs.

Aslesen, K.S.; Short, C.J.; Terwilliger, P.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Team Sand Point (SP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this flight report is to summarize the field activities of the ShoreZone aerial video imaging (AVI) survey conducted out of Sand Point and Cold Bay in

Team Cold Bay (cb

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Tar Sands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tar Sands Tar Sands Jump to: navigation, search More info on OpenEI Oil and Gas Gateway Federal Environmental Statues Federal Oil and Gas Statutes Oil and Gas Companies United States Oil and Gas Boards International Oil and Gas Boards Related Reports Keystone Pipeline System Canada's Oil Sands Royal Society of Canada: Environmental and Health Impacts of Canada's Oil Sands Industry Dictionary.png Tar Sands: A resource, found in particular abundance in Canada, where viscous petroleum is mixed in with a layer of sand, clay, and water. The form of petroleum is often referred to as "bitumen". The resource has only recently been considered part of the world's oil reserves Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tarsands1.png About Tar Sands The Tar Sands, also referred to as Oil Sands, or Bitumen Sands, are a

9

Sand consolidation methods  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for consolidating unconsolidated mineral particles including sand in a subterranean petroleum formation penetrated by a well in fluid communication with at least a portion of the formation. It comprises: providing a sand consolidating fluid comprising a polymerizable monomer, diluent for the monomer, and a nonvolatile strong acid catalyst capable of causing polymerization of the monomer at fluid injection temperatures; mixing the sand consolidating fluid with steam to form a multiphase treating fluid; injecting the treating fluid into the formation to occupy the void space of at least a portion of the formation adjacent to the well; and allowing the injected fluids to remain in the formations for a period of time sufficient to accomplish at least partial polymerization of the monomer, forming a permeable consolidated mass around the wellbore. Also described is a method for forming a fluid impermeable zone in a permeable, subterranean oil-containing formation adjacent to a wellbore penetrating the formation.

Friedman, R.H.; Surles, B.W.; Fader, P.D.

1990-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

10

PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sand consolidation method  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of treating a subterranean, unconsolidated sand and petroleum-containing formation whose temperature is less than 200{degrees}F penetrated by at least one well, which is in fluid communication with at least a portion of the unconsolidated sand-containing subterranean formation, in order to form a permeable barrier in the treatment zone around the well which restrains the movement of sand particles into the well while permitting the passage of formation fluids including petroleum therethrough. It comprises introducing a non aqueous gas into the treatment zone of the formation to reduce the water content of the portion of the formation where the permeable barrier is to be formed to less than 5 percent by volume based on the volume of pore space to be treated; introducing an effective volume of treating fluid into the treatment zone, comprising a compound which is capable of being acid catalyzed to undergo condensation polymerization at formation temperatures, an anhydride of a strong acid, and a diluent for the polymerizable compound and the anhydride; and allowing the treating fluid to remain in the treatment zone for a period of time sufficient to ensure substantially complete polymerization.

Friedman, R.H.; Surles, B.W.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sand Hills EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- - Office Name and State goes here Environmental Assessment Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility Albany County, Wyoming May 2011 High Desert District Rawlins Field Office The BLM's multiple-use mission is to sustain the health and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. The Bureau accomplishes this by managing such activities as outdoor recreation, livestock grazing, mineral development, and energy production, and by conserving natural, historical, cultural, and other resources on public lands. BLM/WY/PL-11/035+1430 WY-030-EA09-314 Contents Chapter Page Acronyms and Abbreviations .................................................................................................. ix

14

Guide to Preparing SAND Reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Guide to Preparing SAND Reports contains guidelines for producing SAND Reports and other information releases. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulations and Sandia policy. The Guide includes in Section 1, policies for protecting and reproducing official information at Sandia, SAND number information, and Review & Approval procedures; in Section 2, basic writing instructions, which are illustrated in an annotated sample report; in Section 3, an explanation of the format, layout, and graphics of SAND Reports and a table that details the markings and legends needed for report covers and title pages; in Section 4, the procedures for reproducing and distributing SAND Reports; and in Section 5, information on presentations and conference papers, journal articles, book chapters, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia's preferred style, usage, and grammar; equations; report references; and trademarks and copyrights. 4 May 1998 Intentionally Left Blank May 1998 5 Conten...

Tamara Locke Editor; Tamara K. Locke

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the pretreatment of monazite sand with sodium hydroxide. When momazite sand is reacted with sodium hydroxide, the thorium, uranium, and rare earths are converted to water-insoluble hydrous oxides; but in the case of uranium, the precipitate compound may at least partly consist of a slightly soluble uranate. According to the patent, monazite sand is treated with an excess of aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, and the insoluble compounds of thorium, uranium, and the rare earths are separated from the aqueous solution. This solution is then concentrated causing sodium phosphate to crystallize out. The crystals are removed from the remaining solution, and the solution is recycled for reaction with a mew supply of momazite sand.

Calkins, G.D.

1957-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hydraulic fracturing with a refractory proppant for sand control  

SciTech Connect

A sand control and heat transfer method is described for use in a borehole having an unconsolidated or loosely consolidated oil or gas reservoir which is otherwise likely to introduce substantial amounts of sand into the borehole, comprising: (a) providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; (b) perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one of longitudinal, in-line perforations; (c) hydraulically fracturing the reservoir by injecting a fracturing fluid containing a fine grain fused refractory material which comprises substantially silicon carbide or silicon nitride, and a clay stabilizing agent; (d) injecting a proppant comprising a gravel packing fused refractory material comprised substantially of silicon carbide or silicon nitride into the fracture, whereby a first layer of fine grain fused refractory material is held in place along the entire face of the fracture by a second layer of gravel packing fused refractory material also extending along the entire length of the fracture thereby excluding fines; and (e) producing oil or gas from the reservoir through the fracture into the borehole casing via a thermal oil recovery method which proppant and layers provide for increased heat transfer into the formation.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.; Stowe, L.R.

1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fine Grained Robotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine grained robotics is the idea of solving problems utilizing multitudes of very simple machines in place of one large complex entity. Organized in the proper way, simple machines and simple behaviors can lead to emergent ...

Flynn, Anita M.

18

Canyon dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative to the FB-Line scrap recovery dissolver was desired for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) residues from the plutonium reduction process due to the potential generation of hydrogen gas concentrations above the lower flammability limit. To address this concern, a flowsheet was developed for the F-Canyon dissolvers. The dissolvers are continually purged with nominally 33 SCFM of air; therefore the generation of flammable gas concentrations should not be a concern. Following removal of crucible fragments, small batches of the remaining sand fines or slag chunks containing less than approximately 350 grams of plutonium can be dissolved using the center insert in each of the four annular dissolver ports to address nuclear criticality safety concerns. Complete dissolution of the sand fines and slag chunks was achieved in laboratory experiments by heating between 75 and 85 degrees Celsius in a 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M (hydrogen) fluoride solution. Under these conditions, the sand and slag samples dissolved between 1 and 3 hours. Complete dissolution of plutonium and calcium fluorides in the slag required adjusting the dissolver solution to 7.5 wt% aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN). Once ANN was added to a dissolver solution, further dissolution of any plutonium oxide (PuO2) in successive charges was not practical due to complexation of the fluoride by aluminum. During the laboratory experiments, well mixed solutions were necessary to achieve rapid dissolution rates. When agitation was not provided, sand fines dissolved very slowly. Measurement of the hydrogen gas generation rate during dissolution of slag samples was used to estimate the amount of metal in the chunks. Depending upon the yield of the reduction, the values ranged between approximately 1 (good yield) and 20% (poor yield). Aging of the slag will reduce the potential for hydrogen generation as calcium metal oxidizes over time. The potential for excessive corrosion in the dissolvers was evaluated using experimental data reported in the literature. Corrosion data at the exact flowsheet conditions were not available; however, the corrosion rate for 304L stainless steel (wrought material) corrosion coupons in 10M nitric acid/0.01M hydrofluoric acid at 95 degrees Celsius was reported as 21 mils per year. If the fluoride in the dissolver is complexed with aluminum, the corrosion rate will decrease to approximately 5 mils per year.

Rudisill, T.S.; Gray, J.H.; Karraker, D.G.; Chandler, G.T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Definition: Tar Sands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Tar Sands Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Tar Sands A resource, found in particular abundance in Canada, where viscous petroleum is mixed in with a layer of sand, clay, and water. The form of petroleum is often referred to as "bitumen". The resource has only recently been considered part of the world's oil reserves View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Oil sands, tar sands or, more technically, bituminous sands, are a type of unconventional petroleum deposit. The oil sands are loose sand or partially consolidated sandstone containing naturally occurring mixtures of sand, clay, and water, saturated with a dense and extremely viscous form of petroleum technically referred to as bitumen (or colloquially tar due to

20

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sand consolidation method employing latex  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of treating a subterranean, unconsolidated sand and petroleum containing formation penetrated by at least one well, which is in fluid communication with at least a portion of the unconsolidated sand containing subterranean formation. This forms a flexible, permeable barrier around the well which restrains the movement of sand particles into the well while permitting the passage of formation fluids including petroleum there through. The method comprises: a. forming a predetermined quantity of a treating fluid comprising a water external phase emulsion having as its dispersed or discontinuous phase, a predetermined amount of an oil-insoluble rubber. The emulsion also contains a predetermined quantity of a material which hydrolyzes at reservoir temperature to form an acid; b. injecting the treating fluid into the formation to be consolidated; and c. leaving the fluid undisturbed in the formation for a predetermined period of time sufficient to allow the emulsion to break so the oil insoluble rubber coats the sand grains, forming a competent permeable barrier around the wellbore.

Friedman, R.H.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Characteristics and Applications of Copper Stamp Sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical, physical properties and antimicrobial activity of stamp sand were investigated, ... Characterization of Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Powders for ...

23

METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering thorium, uranium, and rare earth values from monazite sand. The monazite sand is first digested with sulfuric acid and the resulting "monazite sulfate" solution is adjusted to a pH of between 0.4 and 3.0, and oxalate anions are added causing precipitation of the thorium and the rare earths as the oxalates. The oxalate precipitate is separated from the uranium containing supernatant solution, and is dried and calcined to the oxides. The thorium and rare earth oxides are then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is contacted with tribntyl phosphate whereby an organic extract phase containing the cerium and thorium values is obtained, together with an aqueous raffinate containing the other rare earth values. The organic phase is then separated from the aqueous raffinate and the cerium and thorium are back extracted with an aqueous medium.

Welt, M.A.; Smutz, M.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Recent government efforts regarding tar sands  

SciTech Connect

Conclusions from a workshop on tar sands are discussed. The workshop participants came to 3 conclusions: any oil-impregnated rock that is mined or quarried and then processed on the surface should be considered tar sands; some physical parameter should be used to differentiate tar sands from heavy oils, e.g., viscosity; and the dividing line between tar sands and heavy oil should be a point above which there is not currently significant commercial production. The resulting definition states that tar sand is any consolidated or unconsolidated rock other than coal, oil shale, or gilsonite, that contains a hydrocarbonaceous material with a gas-free viscosity, measured at reservoir temperature, greater than 10,000 cp, or contains a hydrocarbonaceous material that is extracted from the mined or quarried rock. Some consideration of resuming tar sands leasing also is discussed.

Pumphrey, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

X-ray computed-tomography observations of water flow through anisotropic methane hydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect

We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to image and quantify the effect of a heterogeneous sand grain-size distribution on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate, as well as the effect on water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand. A 28 cm long sand column was packed with several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with sands of different grain-size distributions. During the hydrate formation, water redistribution occurred. Observations of water flow through the hydrate-bearing sands showed that water was imbibed more readily into the fine sand, and that higher hydrate saturation increased water imbibition in the coarse sand due to increased capillary strength. Hydrate dissociation induced by depressurization resulted in different flow patterns with the different grain sizes and hydrate saturations, but the relationships between dissociation rates and the grain sizes could not be identified using the CT images. The formation, presence, and dissociation of hydrate in the pore space dramatically impact water saturation and flow in the system.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat

Szmolyan, Peter

27

Pelletization of fine coals  

SciTech Connect

The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).

Sastry, K.V.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Continuous fine ash depressurization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for cooling the high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein and a pressure letdown device for depressurization by separating the cooled fine solid particles from a portion of the fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for disposal or handling by downstream equipment.

Liu, Guohai (Birmingham, AL); Peng, Wan Wang (Birmingham, AL); Vimalchand, Pannalal (Birmingham, AL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Trace metals in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens  

SciTech Connect

Fe, Ni, and V are considered trace impurities in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens. In order to understand the importance of these metals, we have examined several properties: (1) bulk metals levels, (2) distribution in separated fractions, (3) size behavior in feeds and during processing, (4) speciation as a function of size, and (5) correlations with rheological properties. Some of the results of these studies show: (1) V and Ni have roughly bimodal size distributions, (2) groupings were seen based on location, size distribution, and Ni/V ratio of the sample, (3) Fe profiles are distinctively different, having a unimodal distribution with a maximum at relatively large molecular size, (4) Fe concentrations in the tar sand bitumens suggest possible fines solubilization in some cases, (5) SARA separated fractions show possible correlations of metals with asphaltene properties suggesting secondary and tertiary structure interactions, and (6) ICP-MS examination for soluble ultra-trace metal impurities show the possibility of unexpected elements such as U, Th, Mo, and others at concentrations in the ppB to ppM range. 39 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

Reynolds, J.G.

1990-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Materials Science and Engineering in the Canadian Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While people have heard about these "tar sands" in the news, relatively few know what oil sands are, and how they are extracted/processed. This presentation ...

31

Generation of sand bars under surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Experiments were performed in a large wave flume to validate the theory and to study additional aspects of sand bar evolution. The wave envelope and bar profile were recorded for low and high beach reflection, ...

Hancock, Matthew James, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources- Oil Shale and Tar Sands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Profiles of Companies Engaged in Domestic Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource and Technology Development

33

Sand-control alternatives for horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that it has been well documented that horizontal completions increase production rates, as much as two to five times those of conventional techniques, because more of the producing formation is exposed to the wellbore. Although productivity improvements are highly sensitive to reservoir parameters, it is becoming generally accepted that optimum horizontal lengths will be 2,000 to 4,000 ft. The length of these completions generally causes the velocity of the fluid at the sandface to be an order of magnitude less than that observed in conventional completions. Because drag forces contributed to sand production, horizontal wells can produce at higher sand-free flow rates than conventional completions in the same reservoir. While it is frequently argued that horizontal wells do not need sand control, the potential for sand production increases significantly as reserves deplete and rock stresses increase. This is becoming more evident today in several major North Sea oil fields with conventional completions. Also, many unconsolidated formations produce sand for the first time with the onset of water production, a typical problem in such areas as the Gulf of Mexico. Operators must decide whether to implement sand control in the original horizontal-completion program because of an immediate concern or because the potential exists for a problem to arise as the well matures.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr. (Baker Sand Control (US))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Foundry Sand Reclamation: CMP Report No. 90-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current environmental regulations have created a situation where the disposal of waste foundry sand has become difficult and expensive. One solution to this problem is the use of a sand reclamation system which "cleans" the sand to a sufficient degree to allow re-use of the sand in the foundry sand system. A large number of sand binder systems are in use for various reasons of cost and performance characteristics. There are also three main methods of sand reclamation and combinations of these. A basic un...

1991-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Frame moduli of unconsolidated sands and sandstones  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the authors investigate the elastic moduli of the empty grain framework (the frame moduli) in unconsolidated sands and consolidated sandstones. The work was done to improve the interpretation of seismic amplitude anomalies and amplitude variations with offset (AVO) associated with hydrocarbon reservoirs. They developed a laboratory apparatus to measure the frame Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus of unconsolidated sands at seismic frequencies (0.2 to 155 Hz) in samples approximately 11 cm long. They used ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements to measure the frame moduli of consolidated sandstones. They found that the correlation coefficient between the frame Poisson's ratio [sigma][sub A] and the mineral Poisson's ratio [sigma][sub M] is 0.84 in consolidated sandstones and only 0.28 in unconsolidated sands. The range of [sigma][sub A] values in unconsolidated sands is 0.115 to 0.237 (mean = 0.187, standard deviation = 0.030), and [sigma][sub A] cannot be estimated without core or log analyses. Frame moduli analyses of core samples can be used to calibrate the interpretation of seismic amplitude anomalies and AVO effects. For use in areas without core or log analyses, the authors developed an empirical relation that can be used to estimate [sigma][sub A] in unconsolidated sands and sandstones from [sigma][sub M] and the frame P-wave modulus.

Spencer, J.W. Jr.; Cates, M.E.; Thompson, D.D. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Quantum Fine-Grained Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regarding the strange properties of quantum entropy and entanglement, e.g., the negative quantum conditional entropy, we revisited the foundations of quantum entropy, namely, von Neumann entropy, and raised the new method of quantum fine-grained entropy. With the applications in entanglement theory, quantum information processing, and quantum thermodynamics, we demonstrated the capability of quantum fine-grained entropy to resolve some notable confusions and problems, including the measure of entanglement and quantumness, the additivity conjecture of entanglement of formation etc, and the definition of temperature for single quantum system.

Wang, Dong-Sheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Architectural characteristics of fine-grained submarine fans: A model applicable to the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submarine fan deposits in the Gulf of Mexico, modern and ancient, fall in the category of fine-grained, low overall sand/shale ratio basin-floor fans. Models published over the years that have been applied to both exploration and production are based on sand-rich fans, most of which were deposited in active margin settings. These models should not be used for the Gulf of Mexico or any other deep water system with similar basinal settings. Observations from the excellent outcrops of the Permian Tanqua Karoo in southwestern South Africa, together with information from the modern Mississippi Fan, and the Jackfork turbidites in Arkansas, enable the construction of a model that addresses the architecture of both the macro and meso-scale depositional features of fine-grained turbidite systems. At the entrance to the basin floor the conduit, carved out across the slope, may start to widen. Most of the density flows moving through do not necessarily occupy the conduit`s entire width. The result is a complex of laterally and vertically stacked channel fills and associated levee-overbank deposits with a good degree of connectivity. The channel fills are mostly massive, whereas the levee deposits are low-contrast, low-resistivity thin-bedded sandstones and shales with high permeability. Such sandstones can be potentially very productive. The channels gradually become smaller and as their influence on directing the heads of turbidity currents decreases, oblong sheet sands are deposited, each having a very large width to thickness ratio and a high sand/shale ratio. The vertical stacking patterns within these sheet sands commonly display lateral offset of individual beds or groups of beds, and therefore form a distinct reservoir type with varying internal fluid-flow characteristics.

Bouma, A.H.; Coleman, J.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); DeV Wickens, H. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Sand control method employing special hydraulic fracturing technique  

SciTech Connect

A novel sand control method is disclosed wherein high viscosity, high sand concentration, fracturing fluids are pumped through sets of vertically oriented perforations in borehole casings located in unconsolidated or loosely consolidated pay zones. Various techniques are utilized to insure that sand fills disposed on either side of the borehole casing cover and substantially overlap each borehole casing perforation set. Procedures are then followed to bring the well into production without washing out the sand fills in these areas, whereby the resulting perforation-sand fill configurations effectively control sand production from the treated zone.

Medlin, W.L.; Mullins, L.D.; Zumwalt, G.L.

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

Granular size segregation in underwater sand ripples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental study of a binary sand bed under an oscillating water flow. The formation and evolution of ripples is observed. The appearance of a granular segregation is shown to strongly depend on the sand bed preparation. The initial wavelength of the mixture is measured. In the final steady state, a segregation in volume is observed instead of a segregation at the surface as reported before. The correlation between this phenomenon and the fluid flow is emphasised. Finally, different ``exotic'' patterns and their geophysical implications are presented.

G. Rousseaux; H. Caps; J. -E. Wesfreid

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore space. Although the grains in tight sand samples do notfluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predictflow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Sand Bluff Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sand Bluff Wind Farm Sand Bluff Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sand Bluff Wind Farm Facility Sand Bluff Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Energy Purchaser Direct Energy Location Near Big Spring TX Coordinates 32.201622°, -101.404799° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.201622,"lon":-101.404799,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

The Time of Sands: Quartz-rich Sand Deposits as a Renewable Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rich Sand Deposits as a Renewable Resource Nelson R. Shaffercan even be considered a renewable resource. The reader willbuild our society, and its renewable nature. We are not the

Shaffer, Nelson R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand  

SciTech Connect

There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hydraulic fracturing method employing a fines control technique  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for controlling fines or sand in an unconsolidated or loosely consolidated formation or reservoir penetrated by at least one wellbore where hydraulic fracturing is used in combination with control of the critical salinity rate and the critical fluid flow velocity. The method comprises: (a) placing at least one wellbore in the reservoir; (b) hydraulically fracturing the formation via the wellbore with a fracturing fluid which creates at least one fracture; (c) placing a proppant comprising a gravel pack into the fracture; (d) determining the critical salinity rate and the critical fluid flow velocity of the formation or reservoir surrounding the wellbore; (e) injecting a saline solution into the formation or reservoir at a velocity exceeding the critical fluid flow velocity and at a saline concentration sufficient to cause the fines or particles to be transferred and fixed deep wihtin the formation or reservoir without plugging the formation, fracture, or wellbore; and (f) producing a hydrocarbonaceous fluid from the formation or reservoir at a velocity such that the critical flow velocity is not exceeded deep within the formation, fracture, or wellbore.

Stowe, L.R.

1986-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

46

Flowsheet modifications for dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues in the F-canyon dissolvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial flowsheet for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) was developed for the F- Canyon dissolvers as an alternative to dissolution in FB-Line. In that flowsheet, the sand fines were separated from the slag chunks and crucible fragments. Those two SS{ampersand}C streams were packaged separately in mild-steel cans for dissolution in the 6.4D dissolver. Nuclear safety constraints limited the dissolver charge to approximately 350 grams of plutonium in two of the three wells of the dissolver insert and required 0.23M (molar) boron as a soluble neutron poison in the 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M fluoride dissolver solution. During the first dissolution of SS{ampersand}C fines, it became apparent that a significant amount of the plutonium charged to the 6.4D dissolver did not dissolve in the time predicted by previous laboratory experiments. The extended dissolution time was attributed to fluoride complexation by boron. An extensive research and development (R{ampersand}D) program was initiated to investigate the dissolution chemistry and the physical configuration of the dissolver insert to understand what flowsheet modifications were needed to achieve a viable dissolution process.

Rudisill, T.S.; Karraker, D.G.; Graham, F.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Oil shale and tar sands technology: recent developments  

SciTech Connect

The detailed, descriptive information in this book is based on US patents, issued since March 1975, that deal with the technology of oil shale and tar sands. The book contains an introductory overview of the subject. Topics included are oil shale retorting, in situ processing of oil shale, shale oil refining and purification processes, in situ processing of tar sands, tar sands separation processes.

Ranney, M.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Effects of Sand on the Components and Performance of Electric Submersible Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing world demand for oil has pushed oil companies to extract it from the ocean at extreme depths. With the increase in depth comes an increase in operation costs, especially the deep-sea equipment changeover cost. To be able to push the oil to the ocean surface, Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) are commonly used as artificial lift. The changeover cost of these pumps in deep-water has been estimated to sometimes be as much as forty times the cost of a new pump. One common reason for the failure of ESPs is the erosion and abrasion created by the fine sands that seep through the gravel pack mesh in the well hole. These fine sand particles are most destructive to the bearings and bushings due to their capability to enter the clearances lubricated by the pumped fluid. Over time, the sustained abrasion and erosion in the different components of the ESP will affect the performance of the pump and could lead to its damage. This work describes the design, construction and evaluation of an erosion test rig built at the facilities of the Turbomachinery Laboratory in Texas A&M University. The test rig is capable of introducing 100 mesh (6 mil) sand into the flow loop, measure its concentration and separate it at the exit with minimal water loss. The pump under study is a Baker Hughes 10.25" WJE1000. The performance of the pump is described by measuring the head, flow rate, power and efficiency. The pump is equipped with accelerometers to detect the casing vibration as well as proximity probes in five locations along the pump to detect the internal vibrations of the shaft near the bearings as well as impeller radial movement. The baseline data, to be used for comparison with the worn out pump, has been shown and recommendations for the study method and operation of the rig are given.

Carvajal Diaz, Nicolas 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

I SAND95-2448C  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SAND95-2448C SAND95-2448C eddfigt6qI7-*+ To be presented at the 32"d AIANASMEISAEIASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, Lake Buena Vista, FL, July 1-3, 1996 A SURVEY OF COMBUSTIBLE METALS, THERMITES, AND INTERMETALLICS FOR PYROTECHNIC APPLICATIONS* S. H. Fischer and M. C. Grubelich Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185-1453 ABSTRACT Thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnic applications. Advantage of these systems typically include high energy density, impact insensitivity, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability, and possess insensitive ignition properties. In this paper, we review the applications, benefits, and characteristics

51

SAND76-0260 Unlimited Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAND76-0260 SAND76-0260 Unlimited Release Printed July 1976 . POWER SUPPLIES FOR SPACE SYSTEMS QUALITY ASSURANCE BY SANDIA LABORATORIES Robert L. Hannigan Robert R. Harnar Electronic and Electrical Devices Division 951 2 Sandia Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87115 AB STRAC T This report summarizes the Sandia Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used i n space systems over the past 10 years. Basic elements of this QA program a r e briefly de- scribed and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems f o r which Sandia has had the QA responsibility a r e presented, including SNAP 1 9 (Nimbus, Pioneer, Viking), SNAP 27 (Apollo),

52

Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Penney, W.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Western gas sands: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on western gas sands is conducted by the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Technology Center to encourage the development of very low permeability gas sands in the western United States. The current search is an outgrowth of earlier Government research on tight sands in which nuclear and massive hydraulics fracturing stimulations were tested without definitive results. Based on input from the gas industry, universities, and geologic and engineering consulting firms, activites were broadened to include fundamental research and development. Consequently, the focus of the research for the last several years has been on improving diagnostic instruments for evaluating reservoir and stimulation performances, interpreting geophysical and engineering data, and stimulation techniques. Intergrated geologic studies of three depositional basins that contain tight lenticular sandstone units have also been pursued as part of this new effort. To date, the following tentative conclusions have been formulated: The permeability of the tight gas sands can be as much as three to four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional gas deposits. Nineteen western geologic basins and trends have been identified that contain significant volumes of tight gas. Gas resources in the priority geologic basins have been estimated as follows: Piceance Basin, 420 Tcf.; Greater Green River Basin, 4971 Tcf.; and Uinta Basin, 21 Tcf. The critical parameters for successfully developing tight sandstone resources are the presence of natural fractures within a reservoir and the effective propped length of hydraulically induced fractures. Stimulation technology is presently insufficient to efficiently recover gas from lenticular, tight reservoirs. 15 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Bureau of Land Management, with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct, operate, and maintain the Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility on private and federal lands in Albany County, Wyoming. If the proposed action is implemented, Western would interconnect the proposed facility to an existing transmission line.

55

Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised  

SciTech Connect

This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

Locke, T.K. [ed.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We work on the family of topologies for the Minkowski manifold M. We partially order this family by inclusion to form the lattice \\Sigma(M), and focus on the sublattice Z of topologies that induce the Euclidean metric space on every time axis and every space axis. We analyze the bounds of Z in the lattice \\Sigma(M), in search for its supremum. Our conclusion --that such a supremum does not belong in Z-- is compared with constructive proofs of existence of the fine topology, defined as the maximum of Z and conceived to play an essential role in contemporary physical theories. Essential mathematical and physical questions arise.

Norberto Sainz

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

57

Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience  

SciTech Connect

For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

None, None

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems Speaker(s): Allen Robinson Date: November 11, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Combustion systems such as motor vehicles and power plants are major sources of fine particulate matter. This talk describes some of the changes in fine particle emissions that occur as exhaust from combustion systems mix with background air. This mixing cools and dilutes the exhaust which influences gas-particle partitioning of semi-volatile species, the aerosol size distribution, and the fine particle mass. Dilution sampling is used to characterize fine particle emissions from combustion systems because it simulates the rapid cooling and dilution that occur as exhaust mixes with the atmosphere. Results from dilution sampler

59

Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials  

SciTech Connect

This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

Stauffer, H.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming 81: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming Location of the proposed Sand Hills Wind Project, near Laramie, Wyoming Location of the proposed Sand Hills Wind Project, near Laramie, Wyoming Summary The Bureau of Land Management, with DOE's Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct, operate, and maintain the Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility on private and federal lands in Albany County, Wyoming. If the proposed action is implemented, Western would interconnect the proposed facility to an existing transmission line. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. List of Available Documents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative - Residential Heat Pump Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative - Residential Heat Pump Loan Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative - Residential Heat Pump Loan Program Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative - Residential Heat Pump Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount 7% interest rate 5 or 10 year pay schedule maximum of $12,000 Provider Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative The Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative offers a heat pump loan program to eligible residential members. To qualify, members must have had power with Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative for at least one year, have the home electric bill and deeds in the same name, and pass a credit check. Heat pumps must be installed by a [http://www.smec.coop/heatpumpcontractors.htm

62

Unconsolidated sand grain shape, size impact frac-pack design  

SciTech Connect

The shape and size of sand grains, as well as the saturating fluid, influence the mechanical properties of unconsolidated sands and need to be considered in frac-pack design. These mechanical properties of unconsolidated properties of unconsolidated sands play an important role in determining the geometry of frac-pack treatments. Stress-strain curves obtained for unconsolidated sands at elevated stresses show highly nonlinear hysteretic behavior. The impact of these findings on frac-pack design can be significant. The nonlinear elastic properties of unconsolidated sand can give rise to some unique features in the pressure response and in the fracture geometry that may not be observed in hard rocks. This article focuses on the impact of mechanical properties of poorly consolidated and unconsolidated sands on the geometry of frac packs. The paper discusses frac packs, mechanical properties (Young`s modulus, shear failure) and effective treatments.

Wang, E.; Sharma, M.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

Oil shales and tar sands: a bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Five thousand one hundred forty-two citations of reports, journal articles, patents, conference papers, and monographs resulting from research on oil shales and tar sands are presented. These citations and approximately 5100 additional citations are a part of the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base. The citations, with abstracts, are arranged by subject category. Within the categories references to reports are listed in alphanumeric order by report number. Other citations follow in inverse chronological order. Five indexes are provided: Corporate, Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number.

Grissom, M.C. (ed.)

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Flotation behavior of digested asphalt ridge tar sands  

SciTech Connect

The hot water process for Utah tar sands differs from that used for Canadian tar sands due to inherent differences in respective bitumen viscosities and the nature of bitumen-sand association. Although contact angle measurements of solvent extracted Asphalt Ridge bitumen indicated moderate hydrophobicity, air bubble attachment to the bitumen concentrate is not possible. This suggests that flotation separation is dependent on air bubble entrapment. Improved separation at higher flotation temperatures was due to the decrease in bitumen viscosity. 16 refs.

Smith, R.J.; Miller, J.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SANDIA REPORT SAND93-1076  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SANDIA SANDIA REPORT SAND93-1076 * u_qo UnlimitedRelease 1 Pdnted November 1993 :ii l Standard Testing Procedures for Optical Fiber and Unshielded Twisted Pair at Sandia National Laboratories R. L. Adams Pe,_e,d by Sand!a Nm#ocml L.abomlodN Albuquerque, NewMexlooI71U and Uvermore,California$M860 for the UnitedStatesDepartment ofEnergy underContract DE.ACOI-MALIIf_D SF2900Q(8-81 } _IITRIEIUTION OF THiS DGCU,VltZNT 18 UNLIMITED k Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their c_ntractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability

66

Microstructural characterization of a Canadian oil sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The microstructure of oil sand samples extracted at a depth of 75 m from the estuarine Middle McMurray formation (Alberta, Canada) has been investigated by using high resolution 3D X-Ray microtomography ($\\mu$CT) and Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy (CryoSEM). $\\mu$CT images evidenced some dense areas composed of highly angular grains surrounded by fluids that are separated by larger pores full of gas. 3D Image analysis provided in dense areas porosity values compatible with in-situ log data and macroscopic laboratory determinations, showing that they are representative of intact states. $\\mu$CT hence provided some information on the morphology of the cracks and disturbance created by gas expansion. The CryoSEM technique, in which the sample is freeze fractured within the SEM chamber prior to observation, provided pictures in which the (frozen) bitumen clearly appears between the sand grains. No evidence of the existence of a thin connate water layer between grains and the bitumen, frequently mentioned in th...

Dinh, Hong Doan; Nauroy, Jean-François; Tang, Anh-Minh; Souhail, Youssef; 10.1139/T2012-072

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

68

Thermal reclaimer apparatus for a thermal sand reclamation system  

SciTech Connect

A thermal reclaimer apparatus is disclosed for thermally removing from the used foundry sand the organic matter that is present therein. The subject thermal reclaimer apparatus includes chamber means in which the used foundry sand is heated to a predetermined temperature for a preestablished period in order to accomplish the burning away of the organic matter that the used foundry sand contains. The chamber means includes inlet means provided at one end thereof and outlet means provided at the other end thereof. Feed means are cooperatively associated with the pipe means and thereby with the inlet means for feeding the used foundry sand through the inlet means into the chamber means. The subject thermal reclaimer apparatus further includes rotating means operative for effecting the rotation of the chamber means as the used foundry sand is being heated therein. The chamber means has cooperatively associated therewith burner means located at the same end thereof as the outlet means. The burner means is operative to effect the heating of the used foundry sand to the desired temperature within the chamber means. Tumbling means are provided inside the chamber means to ensure that the used foundry sand is constantly turned over, i.e., tumbled, and that the lumps therein are broken up as the chamber means rotates. Lastly, the used foundry sand from which the organic matter has been removed leaves the chamber means through the outlet means.

Deve, V.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Triaxial behavior of sand-mica mixtures using genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates an application of genetic programming (GP) for modeling of coarse rotund sand-mica mixtures. An empirical model equation is developed by means of GP technique. The experimental database used for GP modeling is based on a laboratory ... Keywords: Genetic programming, Leighton Buzzard Sand, Mica, Modeling, Triaxial testing

Ali Firat Cabalar; Abdulkadir Cevik

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sand Mountain Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Electric Coop Mountain Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Sand Mountain Electric Coop Place Alabama Utility Id 16629 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Drainage Pumping Station LS - Outdoor Lighting Service Lighting RS - Residential Service Residential Schedule GSA - General Power Service - Part 1 Commercial Schedule GSA - General Power Service - Part 2 Commercial Schedule GSA - General Power Service - Part 3 Commercial Schedule GSB Commercial Schedule GSD Commercial

72

Direct Production of Silicones From Sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

Beattie, Alan G. (Corrales, NM); Bohon, W. Mark (Frisco, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Sand control in horizontal wells in heavy-oil reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in horizontal-well technology has greatly improved the potential for heavy oil recovery. Such recovery may be hampered, however, by sanding problems associated with most heavy-oil reservoirs. These reservoir sands are mostly unconsolidated and may lead to severe productivity-loss problems if produced freely. This paper offers recommendations for sand control in three Canadian heavy-oil reservoirs. Experimental evidence has shown that minimizing the annular space between the casing and the open hole is important, especially in the case of smaller wire space, lower oil viscosity, and thinner pay zone. Several types of wire-wrapped screens and flexible liners were tested for sand control. Only flexible liners reduced sand production to a negligible amount.

Islam, M.R. (Nova Husky Research Corp. (CA)); George, A.E. (Energy, Mines, and Resources (CA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

Westhoff, James D. (Laramie, WY); Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

1988-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

77

High resolution sequence stratigraphic and reservoir characterization studies of D-07, D-08 and E-01 sands, Block 2 Meren field, offshore Niger Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meren field, located offshore Niger Delta, is one of the most prolific oil-producing fields in the Niger Delta. The upper Miocene D-07, D-08 and E-01 oil sands comprise a series of stacked hydrocarbon reservoirs in Block 2 of Meren field. These reservoir sandstones were deposited in offshore to upper shoreface environments. Seven depositional facies were identified in the studied interval, each with distinct lithology, sedimentary structures, trace fossils, and wire-line log character. The dominant lithofacies are (1) locally calcite-cemented highly-bioturbated, fine-grained sandstones, (middle to lower shoreface facies); (2) cross-bedded, fine- to medium-grained well-sorted sandstones (upper shoreface facies); (3) horizontal to sub-horizontal laminated, very-fine- to fine-grained sandstone (delta front facies); (4) massive very-fine- to fine-grained poorly-sorted sandstone (delta front facies); (5) muddy silt- to fine-grained wavy-bedded sandstone (lower shoreface facies); (6) very-fine- to fine-grained sandy mudstone (lower shoreface facies); and (7) massive, silty shales (offshore marine facies). Lithofacies have distinct mean petrophysical properties, although there is overlap in the range of values. The highest quality reservoir deposits are cross-bedded sands that were deposited in high-energy upper shoreface environments. Calcite cements in lower shoreface facies significantly reduce porosity and permeability. Integration of core and wire-line log data allowed porosity and permeability to be empirically determined from bulk density. The derived equation indicated that bulk density values could predict 80% of the variance in core porosity and permeability values. Three parasequence sets were interpreted, including one lower progradational and two upper retrogradational parasequence sets. The progradational parasequence set consists of upward-coarsening delta front to upper shoreface facies, whereas the upward-fining retrogradational parasequence sets are composed of middle to lower shoreface deposits overlain by offshore marine shales. The limited amount of core data and the relatively small area of investigation place serious constraints on stratigraphic interpretations. Two possible sequence stratigraphic interpretations are presented. The first interpretation suggests the deposits comprise a highstand systems tract overlain by a transgressive systems tract. A lowstand systems tract is restricted to an incised valley fill at the southeastern end of the study area. The alternate interpretation suggests the deposits comprise a falling stage systems tract overlain by transgressive systems tract.

Esan, Adegbenga Oluwafemi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Determination of critical cracking temperature of oil sands at low temperature conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research is intended to predict the viscoelastic behavior of oil sand mixesunder low temperature conditions. The oil sand used in this project is a… (more)

Chandika, Charan kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Computabilities of Fine-Continuous Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a sequential-based definition of locally uniformly Fine-computable functions together with a definition of effective locally uniform convergence. This definition of computability makes some discontinuous functions, which may diverge, computable. ...

Takakazu Mori

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The apparent surface roughness of moving sand transported by wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive analytical model of aeolian sand transport in saltation. It quantifies the momentum transfer from the wind to the transported sand by providing expressions for the thickness of the saltation layer and the apparent surface roughness. These expressions are for the first time entirely derived from basic physical principles. The model further predicts the sand transport rate (mass flux) and the impact threshold shear velocity. We show that the model predictions are in very good agreement with experiments and numerical state of the art simulations of aeolian saltation.

Thomas Pähtz; Jasper F. Kok; Hans J. Herrmann

2011-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Study of Pelletization of Manganese Ore Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ores, fine manganese fines are characterized by large amount and low price. ... A Study of Coal-Based Direct Reduction of Composite Binder Magnetite ...

83

Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India Title Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in...

84

GASIFICATION IN THE CANADIAN OIL SANDS:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Long Lake integrated bitumen and upgrading project, now under construction by OPTI Canada Inc. and Nexen Inc., is the first application of large-scale gasification in Canada. It also represents the first implementation of a gasification project in conjunction with a heavy oil recovery and upgrading project. The Canadian oil sands are a vast petroleum resource that currently produces over one million barrels per day (bpd) using proven mining and in-situ recovery technologies. Production is projected to rise to over two million bpd by the end of the decade. However the large volumes of natural gas normally needed by the bitumen recovery and upgrading facilities are a significant barrier to economic development of the resource. The Long Lake Project uses a unique combination of technologies to provide a solution to the natural gas supply and cost issue. A key component is a gasification facility using the Shell Gasification Process (SGP) which is integrated with the bitumen upgrading to convert the liquid asphaltene by-product stream into hydrogen for the secondary upgrading step and syngas fuel. An Air Liquide air separation unit (ASU) will provide

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Getty mines oil sands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large deposit of oil-laden diatomaceous earth in the McKittrick oil field 40 miles west of Bakersfield, California, has resisted all efforts at production by standard means. Getty Oil Co. is in the pilot phase of a project to recover the Diatomite's oil by an open pit mining operation. It also could have significant implications for other California oil fields, possibly setting the stage for the mining of oil sands in shallow fields like Kern River, S. Belridge, and Lost Hills to maximize oil recovery. A report on the project is summarized. The Diatomite is estimated to have 500 million bbl of oil in reserves, of which 380 million bbl are recoverable. The estimated amount of recoverable oil exceeds the McKittrick field's cumulative production of 240 million bbl. A pilot plant was built to test solvent extraction method of recovering heavy oil. The multistep process involves a series of 6 extractors. The Lurgi retorting plant employs a 2-step heating process to separate hydrocarbons from crushed ore.

Rintoul, B.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Western Gas Sands Project. Status report  

SciTech Connect

The progress during December, 1977 of the major government sponsored endeavors undertaken to increase gas production from the low permeability gas sands of the western United States is summarized. The USGS is continuing geological and geophysical studies in the four major western basins to better characterize the resource base. Shipping arrangements for the core donated to the USGS by Inexco WASP (a well drilled for possible nuclear explosive stimulation in Wyoming) have been made, and cores for macrofossil and ostracode analysis from the Bowdoin Dome area have been collected. The National Laboratories, funded by DOE, are continuing their work in the area of research and development. The emphasis is on the development of new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics, mathematical modeling and data analysis. Field tests and demonstrations active in the Uinta and Piceance Basins are Gas Producing Enterprises (GPE) Natural Buttes, Wells No. 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, and 22; Mobil Research and Development, Well No. F-31-13G; and Rio Blanco Natural Gas Company, Well No. 498-4-1. Colorado Interstate Gas Company has initiated activity on its project with the installation of equipment, and Mitchell Energy Company's proposal to conduct an MHF test in the Cotton Valley lime gas reservoir in Texas is nearing the contract negotiation stage.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

RFC Sand Creek Development LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RFC Sand Creek Development LLC RFC Sand Creek Development LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name RFC Sand Creek Development LLC Place Aurora, Colorado Zip 80014 Product Subsidiary of Republic Financial Corporation set up to invest in Sand Creek Energy LLC, a planned gas to liquid facility. Coordinates 39.325162°, -79.54975° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.325162,"lon":-79.54975,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Sand Ridges and Dunes in the Calumet Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

when the U. S. Steel corporation purchased 8000 acres of sand dunes and swamps for its mills and a new city, Gary, you can still see ridge after ridge paralleling the lake shore...

89

Sand Dunes Hot Spring Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sand Dunes Hot Spring Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Sand Dunes Hot Spring Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sand Dunes Hot Spring Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Sand Dunes Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Hooper, Colorado Coordinates 37.7427775°, -105.8752987° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

90

CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND96-2555 UC-1243 Unlimited Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND96-2555 UC-1243 Unlimited Release A Study of Productionlnjection Data from Slim Holes and Large-Diameter Wells at the Takigami Geothermal Field, Kyushu,...

91

The effects of psammophilous plants on sand dune dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Psammophilous plants are special plants that flourish in sand moving environments. There are two main mechanisms by which the wind affects these plants: (i) sand drift exposes roots and covers branches--the exposed roots turn into new plants and the covered branches turn into new roots; both mechanisms result in an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes; (ii) strong winds, often associated with sand movement, tear branches and seed them in nearby locations, resulting in new plants and an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes. Despite their important role in dune dynamics, to our knowledge, psammophilous plants have never been incorporated into mathematical models of sand dunes. Here, we attempt to model the effects of these plants on sand dune dynamics. We construct a set of three ordinary differential equations for the fractions of surface cover of regular vegetation, biogenic soil crust and psammophilous plants. The latter reach their optimal growth under (i) specific sand drift or (ii) specific wind power. We show that psammophilous plants enrich the sand dune dynamics. Depending on the climatological conditions, it is possible to obtain one, two, or three steady dune states. The activity of the dunes can be associated with the surface cover--bare dunes are active, and dunes with significant cover of vegetation, biogenic soil crust, or psammophilous plants are fixed. Our model shows that under suitable precipitation rates and wind power, the dynamics of the different cover types is in accordance with the common view that dunes are initially stabilized by psammophilous plants that reduce sand activity, thus enhancing the growth of regular vegetation that eventually dominates the cover of the dunes and determines their activity.

Golan Bel; Yosef Ashkenazy

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Western gas sands project status report  

SciTech Connect

The Western Gas Sands Project Plan, Project Implementation Plans and Project Plan Document FY 78 are in various stages of preparation. Information gathering by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) of the initial data base for many of the project activities is nearing completion. Some base maps are complete and field investigations in the principal areas of interest are being conducted. Research and development by Energy Research Centers and National Laboratories were directed toward new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics experiments, mathematical modeling, and data analysis. The Uinta Basin in Utah and Piceance Basin in Colorado have ongoing massive hydraulic fracture (MHF) experiments in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas formations. These are: CER Corporation, MHF 3; Gas Producing Enterprises, Natural Buttes No. 14, 18, 19, 20; Mobil Oil, F-31-13G; and Rio Blanco Natural Gas, 498-4-1. Colorado Interstate Gas Company has been awarded a contract to determine if productivity in low permeability reservoirs can be improved by reducing the interstitialwater saturation. They will be using two wells, the Sprague No. 1 and Miller No. 1, completed in the Dakota J formation in the Wattenberg Field in north central Colorado. All of the massive hydraulic fracture wells, with the exception of the Pacific Transmission well, have been fractured as planned. The Mobil and GPE No. 14, 18, and 20 wells show significant improvement as compared to original flow rates. The Mobil well is being tested for additional MHF treatments. Sandia Laboratories is continuing their research program in hydraulic fracturing at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS).

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Table J.5. Uranium Kd values selected from literature for development of look-up table. /g) Solution Soil Identification Reference / Comments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 1.98 Hanford Groundwater Trench 8 Loamy Sand Kaplan and Serne (1995, Part. Sat. Column, 40%) 8.3 0.49 Hanford Groundwater Trench 8 Loamy Sand Kaplan and Serne (1995, Part. Sat. Column, 40%) 8.3 2.81 Hanford Groundwater Trench 8 Loamy Sand Kaplan and Serne (1995, Part. Sat. Column, 38%) 8.3 0.62 Hanford Groundwater

96

DOE/EA-1584: Final Environmental Assessment for Sand Point Wind Installation Project, Sand Point, Alaska (September 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sand Point Wind Installation Project Sand Point, Alaska DOE/EA -1584 U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 September 2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 1 1.1 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES....................................................................................................... 1 1.2 BACKGROUND .................................................................................................... 1 1.3 PURPOSE AND NEED.......................................................................................... 2 1.4 PUBLIC SCOPING AND CONSULTATION.......................................................

97

Method of tagging sand with ruthenium-103 and the resultant product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure for tagging sand with a radioisotope for use in the study of sediment transport involves the precipitation of a metal radioisotope in the form of an iodide directly on the sand, followed by heating the sand to a temperature sufficient to effect a phase transformation of the sand and a decomposition of the metal iodide, leaving the metal firmly attached to the sand.

Case, Forrest N. (Oak Ridge, TN); McFarland, Clyde E. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

System for utilizing oil shale fines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Method for manufacturing a well production and sand screen assembly  

SciTech Connect

A method for forming and assembling a well production and sand screen assembly in a well having a screen therein forming an outer annulus and a wash pipe internally of the screen forming an inner annulus comprising further (A) mounting a high pressure fluid pump means and a valve means on each wash pipe, inner annulus, and outer annulus, and (B) connecting the valve means in fluid communication with the high pressure fluid pump means for controlling the ingress and egress of the high pressure fluids and removed formation material for forming a sand pack in the well and simultaneously for applying and maintaining a positive fluid pressure against the overburden during work in the well for preventing cave-ins and sloughing of the unconsolidated formation well walls until the sand pack is formed.

Widmyer, R.H.

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

100

Process for treating moisture laden coal fines  

SciTech Connect

A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

Davis, Burl E. (New Kensington, PA); Henry, Raymond M. (Gibsonia, PA); Trivett, Gordon S. (South Surrey, CA); Albaugh, Edgar W. (Birmingham, AL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Laboratory Evaluation of Fine-mesh Traveling Water Screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of four years of laboratory evaluations on performance of fine-mesh traveling water screens to protect larval fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). Prior to this study, the biological effectiveness of fine-mesh screens was uncertain because performance data from the few existing facilities that use fine-mesh screens have been highly variable. This project is producing additional data necessary to determine biological efficacy of fine-mesh screens.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

103

Impact of early diagenesis of Eolian reservoirs, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Dune and associated alluvial and playa deposits at Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado, provide an excellent opportunity to study early diagenetic development of vertical and horizontal permeability barriers in recent eolian deposits (> 10 ka). Cements observed include calcite, aragonite, protodolomite(.), amorphous silica, iron hydroxide, smectite, trona, and halite. Cementation is controlled by the availability of water, with several hydrologic subenvironments producing different cements. Evaporative cementation in dunes adjacent to playas is commonly dominated by trona and halite, but calcite, aragonite, and amorphous silica also bind the sediment. These cements are generally most concentrated in fine laminations where capillary action has pulled water into dunes. Iron hydroxides, calcite, and amorphous silica precipitate at the interface between ground water and streams or lakes, where the pH gradient may exceed 5 pH units (pH 5.7-11.5). Subsequent movement of the ground-water table can result in cross-cutting cement zones. Early cementation in dunes prevents deflation and provides a mechanism for preservation of the reservoir unit. Intense cementation may permanently occlude porosity, or leaching may reestablish well-interconnected porosity. An understanding of the extent and composition of early cement zones can be used to improve hydrodynamic models for production and enhanced recovery.

Krystinik, L.F.; Andrews, S.; Fryberger, S.G.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Enhancing permeability in oil shale and applications to tar sands  

SciTech Connect

Explosive fracturing and rubblization are used to enhance oil shale permeability. Blasting strategy and results are discussed, in particular the Geokinetics blasting. The field data desired are listed. Comments are offered on the extension of the blasting techniques to tar sands. (DLC)

Schamaun, J.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Mechanism of acoustic emissions from booming sand dunes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The classical elastic mechanics shows that the fundamental frequency of a sand grain chain is similar to the typical frequency of acoustic emission generated by the booming dunes. The "song of dunes" is therefore considered to originate from the resonance of grain chains occurring within a solid layer only several centimeters thick.

Zhen-Ting Wang

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

106

CO{sub 2}/sand fracturing in low permeability reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are: to demonstrate the effectiveness of a non-damaging liquid, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in creating sand-propped hydraulic fractures in ``tight`` gas bearing formations within the Appalachian Basin; and to compare and rank the gas production responses from wells treated with liquid CO{sub 2} with other types of treatments (shooting, water based, nitrogen, etc.). The preliminary results are encouraging, and although only a few months of production is available, the rate of gas production from the CO{sub 2} treated candidate wells is greater than that from the control wells. The CO{sub 2}/sand fracs appear to be 56 percent better than the nitrogen fracs in Pike County. In addition, the CO{sub 2}/sand fracs are 4.8 times better than conventional shot wells in the Pike County study area. It should be recognized that these results are from a very limited data set and overall conclusions may change as more control wells are added to the analysis. From a stimulation process achievement viewpoint, the maximum amount of sand pumped is 46,000 pounds at an average concentration of 3.1 pound per gallon. It should be pointed out that additional foam and nitrogen stimulations have recently been performed by the operator in the Pike County area, and subsequent discussions in the future will include additional control wells to the baseline data sets.

Mazza, R.L.; Gehr, J.B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

108

SAND2006-1982J Solid-State Environmentally Safe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery packs in parallel.The commercial target cost is expected to open at $50 per 1.5-volt cellSAND2006-1982J #12;Solid-State Environmentally Safe Battery for Replacing Lithium Batteries 1 Entry with High Power Battery Systems Company 5 Silkin Street, Apt. 40 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Russia

109

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation is presented of the coring program site identification, and drilling and testing activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project (WGSP). Pertinent information for January, February, and March, 1978 is included for each study area. The areas are the Northern Great Plains Province, the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, and the Uinta Basin.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially-saturated sand in the sonic frequency range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands can be viewed as an end-member of the spectrum of naturally-occurring granular materials, with tight

Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially saturated sand in the sonic frequency range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands can be viewed as an end-member of the spectrum of naturally-occurring granular materials, with tight

Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Paleo-Storminess in the Southern Lake Michigan Basin, as Recorded by Eolian Sand Downwind of Dunes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Eolian sand deposited in lakes downwind of coastal sand dunes record a history of paleoclimatic fluctuations. Studies from embayed lakes along the east-central coast of… (more)

Hanes, Barbara E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microcracks saturating the ECC (Fig. 1(b)) before localization. This tight crack width is essential designation M45) along with green ECC mixture proportions (ECC with green foundry sand, ECC with bag house calcinator sand) Mixture proportions, *high-range water reducer M45 M45G M45 Calcin Cement 1 1 1 F-110 sand 0

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

114

Velocities of deep water reservoir sands De-hua Han, University of Houston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale, which is not focus for this study. Sorting HP Shale ShallowDeep Sorting HP Shale Sorting HP Shale sands. Grain density is 2.65 gm/cc, typical for clean sands. Measured gas permeability ranged from 100 have revealed gradual effect of clay content on porosity and velocity of shaly sands and sandy shales

115

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Examination of pulverized waste recycled glass as filter media in slow sand filtration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate the pulverization of waste recycled glass to produce glass sand for slow sand filters. Pulverization experiments were performed using a fail mill pulverizer. The glass sand product from the pulverizer meets the size distribution requirements of ASTM-C-33 without size distribution adjustment. The size distribution must be adjusted to meet the grain size distribution requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media used in slow sand filters. Pulverized glass that meet slow sand filter media specifications is an effective alternative to silica sand as a filter media for slow sand filtration. Three pilot plant slow sand filters with glass sand filter media were compared to a fourth filter containing silica sand filter media. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good or better than the silica sands, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; 99.92% and 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.

Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Soldering Small Beads to Fine Wires  

SciTech Connect

One method suggested for soldering small beads to fine wires using a torch to heat the bead, flux, and magnesia brick did not prove entirely satisfactory in this case. It was found the brick would draw heat away from the bead and flux at too fast a rate resulting in a poor weld, a rough surface, and an excessive accumulation of flux on the bead. Secondly, removal of the depleted flux presented a problem when the welding was done on the surface of the brick.

Stanton, J. S.

1950-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Biomass Lignin Binder for Coal Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the production of a waste stream consisting of lignin from a dilute acid hydrolysis process for making ethanol fuel from cellulosic biomass. The lignin waste stream was then evaluated as a possible binder to hold coal fines in a useable form for fuel in a coal-fired power plant. The production and use of a lignin-rich waste stream is of interest because it would enable a biomass energy content in the fuel for the coal-fired power plant, while using waste coal and waste biomass. The ...

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

Rudisill, T. S.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

SAND97-8490 UC-404 Unlimited Release  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SAND97-8490 UC-404 SAND97-8490 UC-404 Unlimited Release Printed March 1997 J Mechanical Properties and Energy Absorption Characteristics of a Polyurethane Foam S. H. Goods, C. L. Neuschwanger, C. Henderson, D. M. Skala DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as a n account of work sponsored by a n agenq of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warrantyy express or impIied, or assumes any legal liabili- ty or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, appa- ratus, product, or process disdased, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necrsariiy constitute or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Shredded tires and rubber-sand as lightweight backfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing interest in utilizing waste materials in civil engineering applications has opened the possibility of constructing reinforced soil structures with unconventional backfills. Scrap tires are a high-profile waste material for which several uses have been studied, including the use of shredded tires as backfill. A triaxial testing program was conducted to investigate the stress-strain relationship and strength of tire chips and a mixture of sand and tire chips. The test results and additional information from the literature were used in the numerical modeling of wall backfills, both unreinforced and reinforced with geosynthetics. The numerical modeling results suggest tire shreds, particularly when mixed with sand, may be effectively used as a backfill.

Lee, J.H.; Salgado, R.; Lovell, C.W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering; Bernal, A. [GeoHidra, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

White Sands, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sands, New Mexico: Energy Resources Sands, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.38319°, -106.481499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.38319,"lon":-106.481499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Shallow horizontal drilling in unconsolidated sands offshore California  

SciTech Connect

Four shallow horizontal wells were drilled from Platform C in Dos Cuadras field offshore California to recover reserves inaccessible with conventional drilling techniques. The wells had true vertical depths (TVD's) ranging from 746 to 989 ft with total horizontal displacements from 1,613 to 3,788 ft. The wells had horizontal displacement TVD ratios up to 3.95. The targets were unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. This paper details well planning, drilling, and completion.

Payne, J.D.; Bunyak, M.J. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Huston, C.W. (Smith International Inc., Tyler, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method for diverting a gaseous sand-consolidating fluid  

SciTech Connect

An unconsolidated gas-producing sand in which the permeability is layered and the productivity can be impaired by liquid blocking can be consolidated by wetting the rock surfaces with a limited amount of water, injecting a smoke which selectively reduces the permeability of the most permeable layers by depositing on their faces unconsolidated masses of substantially inert solid particles and injecting a gaseous silicon polyhalide to convert a significant proportion of the rock surface-wettingwater to a grain bonding silica gel.

Davies, D. R.; Richardson, E. A.

1980-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Project Drum Inlet: explosive excavation in saturated sand  

SciTech Connect

Seasonal storms during February of 1971 completely closed the Drum Inlet navigation channel through the Outer Banks off the North Carolina coast. This channel is highly useful to commercial and sport fishing industries in the Carteret County vicinity of North Carolina, and is vital to maintenance of the ecological balance in the inland Core Sound waters. To reopen Drum Inlet, an alignment about 2.1 miles south of the original location was selected. A contract dredge excavated a channel from the inland Core Sound waterway to and part way through the Outer Banks. The final 385-ft-long section of sand separating the Core Sound from the Atlantic Ocean was excavated with large explosive charges, This report describes the explosive excavation of that portion of the channel. Twenty-two separate canisters, each containing 1 ton of aluminized ammonium-nitrate slurry blasting agent, were emplaced in two rows. All charges were detonated simultaneously at 1327 hours, 23 Decembcr 1971. The detonation successfully removed the sand barrier, forming a continuous channel over 80 ft in width. This channel subsequently washed out to a width of about 1000 ft and was used:is an access route to the Raleigh Bay fishing grounds. The Drum Inlet project demonstrated the practicality of explosive channel excavation in saturated sand under the special conditions encountered at this site. (auth)

Snell, C.M.; Gillespie, R.H.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Improved core recovery in laminated sand and shale sequences  

SciTech Connect

Coring and core analysis are essential to the exploration, development, and production phases of the oil and gas industry. Large-diameter (4-in. (10-cm)) core provides engineers and geologists with direct means to measure physical properties of reservoir rocks at both the microscopic and macroscopic levels. This information provides engineers with clues to improve their understanding of the reservoir and prediction of its performance. If stored properly, core may assist in development of the reservoir many years after the well is drilled. In microlaminated reservoirs, laboratory core analysis is very important because of inherent limitations in wireline log resolution. In these cases, petrophysical information, such as saturation, porosity, and net feet of pay, cannot be calculated from wireline data. Instead, these data must be measured directly from core plugs in the laboratory. Historically, core recovery in these types of reservoirs has not been good (Fig. 1A) using methods designed for firmly consolidated formations. These methods did not achieve satisfactory recovery in unconsolidated sand interbedded with hard shale stringers for two reasons: unconsolidated sand was eroded by mechanical or hydraulic means and shale ''jammed'' in the core barrel, thereby preventing more core from entering. Changes in coring strategies and equipment have nearly eliminated recovery problems in unconsolidated sand while reducing jams in shale (Fig. 1B). This paper discusses several of these changes and presents ideas for further improvements.

Bradburn, F.R.; Cheatham, C.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

File:OilSands.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OilSands.pdf OilSands.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:OilSands.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.69 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 85 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:24, 14 February 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:24, 14 February 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 85 pages (1.69 MB) Graham7781 (Talk | contribs)

128

Evaluation of superpave fine aggregate specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superpave[] was the final product of the Strategic Highway Research Program's (SHRP) asphalt pavement research effort during 1987-93. Some aspects of the Superpave aggregate specifications are not universally accepted. The validity of the fine aggregate angularity (FAA) requirement is questioned by both the owner agencies and the paving and aggregate industries. The FAA test is based on the assumption that more fractured faces will result in higher void content in the loosely compacted sample; however, this is not always true. The aggregate industry has found that cubical shaped particles, even with 100% fractured faces, may not meet the FAA requirement for high-volume traffic. State agencies are concerned that local materials previously considered acceptable and which have provided good field performance, now cannot meet the Superpave requirements. Twenty three-fine aggregates from different part of the USA were tested using major angularity tests: FAA test, direct shear test, compacted aggregate resistance (CAR) test, image analysis Hough transform, and visual inspection. The results from those tests were compared with the available performance history. The FAA test method does not consistently identify angular, cubical aggregates as high quality materials. There is a fair correlation between the CAR stability value and angle of internal friction (AIF) from direct shear test. No correlation was found between FAA and CAR stability or between FAA and AIF. A good correlation was found between FAA and K-index from Hough transform method. Some cubical crushed aggregates whose FAA values were less than 45 gave very high values of CAR stability, AIF and K-index. The statistical analysis of the SHRP LTPP database reveals that there is no evidence of any good linear relationship between FAA and rutting. Of the methods evaluated, image analysis using Hough transform appears most promising for measuring fine aggregate angularity. Until a replacement method for FAA can be identified, the author recommends that the FAA criteria be lowered from 45. The FAA vs. rutting data analysis should be continued with a larger amount of data as the LTPP SHRP database is expanded.

Chowdhury, Md. Tahjib-Ul-Arif

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Long-term nitrate leaching below the root zone in California tree fruit orchards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BD (g/cm3) loam loamy sand sand sandy loam Texture silt siltsquares (SS) for subgroup "sandy loam" in groups 2, 3, and 4Group 2, Population 1, subgroup sandy loam. Figure 4.5.3f-j.

Harter, Thomas; Horwath, William R; Hopmans, Jan W; Denton, Michelle; Onsoy, Yuksel S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High Temperature Hold Time Effects on Fine Grain Processed 718 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. Fine Grain Alloy 718 is a relatively cost effective turbine and compressor disk alloy with superior yield strength and low cycle fatigue properties.

131

Ultra Fine Grain/Ultra Low Carbon 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultra low carbon alloy 718 composition has been investigated in combination with ultra fine grain processing to improve the low cycle fatigue capabilities.

132

Tensile Properties of Fine Grain MA956 Oxide Dispersion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tensile Properties of Fine Grain MA956 Oxide Dispersion ... Weld Overlay Claddings by Gas-metal-arc Welding Process for Extending Plant ...

133

Application and evaluation of spiral separators for fine coal cleaning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Eight buckets of wet coal samples were collected from Shade Coal Preparation Plant,including the feed, clean coal, refuse, and middlings for fine spiral and coarse… (more)

Che, Zhuping.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 1, Sand reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile thermal foundry sand reclamation unit was designed and constructed. This unit consisted of thermal and mechanical sand reclamation equipment installed on the bed of a 50 foot low-boy trailer. It was transported to a number of Midwest foundries for on-site demonstration of the sand reclamation process. This allowed participating foundries to have their own refuse sand (10-100 tons) processed and then reused in production for evaluation. The purpose for building the unit was to demonstrate to foundries through ``hands on`` experience that refuse sands can be reclaimed and successfully reused particularly in regard to product quality. Most of the participating foundries indicated a high level of satisfaction with the reclaimed sand. Laboratory testing of samples of the used sand, before and after processing by the demonstration unit, verified the usability of the reclaimed sand. One of the foundries participating was a brass foundry, the sand from this foundry contained lead and is classified as a hazardous material. After reclamation the sand was no longer hazardous and could also be reused in the foundry.

Vondra, L.F.; Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Non-Darcy flow analysis through tight sand formations  

SciTech Connect

An experimental setup was designed and constructed to measure the flow parameters through tight sand porous media. The two kinds of coreholders being used are Hassler-type and one in which the core sample is encapsulated in layers of epoxy resin and metal alloy. A gas flow measuring system was also developed for accurately measuring very low gas flow rates. Using Darcy's Law as a tool for analysis of the experimental data, we obtained that the gas permeability of the SFE No. 3 (Staged Field Experiment No. 3) core samples is a linear function of reciprocal mean pressure, and decreases with overburden pressure. The water permeability is also decreased with overburden pressure and is about 6 times smaller than gas permeability for the samples that we have tested. No significant hysteresis effect was obtained for dry gas permeability after several two phase flow runs. We successfully tested our encapsulated coreholder and measured gas flow rate through a tight sand core sample at different pressure drops. The results showed that the experimental runs using Hassler-type coreholder at overburden pressures higher than 2000 psig will probably give us the reliable experimental data. The experimental data obtained from the two different types of tight sandstones were analyzed using the Non-Darcy flow equation. The results showed the importance and reliability of the Non-Darcy formulation for describing the flow behavior under different overburden and system pressures. Non-Darcy's velocity for both gas and liquid phase were incorporated into an existing FORTRAN code for simulation of the tight gas reservoirs. The modified program was tested to compare the initial production data of SFE No. 2 well. Our simulation showed in the case of local turbulence and non-uniformities in the tight sand formation, the value of [beta] increases and Non-Darcy effect becomes important.

Wang, Ching-Huei.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs are usually low due to poor permeability. As such, state-of-the-art technology must be used to economically develop the resource. TGS formations need to be hydraulically fractured in order to enhance the gas production rates. A majority of these reservoirs can be described as thick, multilayered gas systems. Many reservoirs are hundreds of feet thick and some are thousands of feet thick. The technology used to complete and stimulate thick, tight gas reservoirs is quite complex. It is often difficult to determine the optimum completion and stimulating techniques in thick reservoirs. The optimum methods are functions of many parameters, such as depth, pressure, temperature, in-situ stress and the number of layers. In multilayered reservoirs, it is important to include several sand layers in a single completion. The petroleum literature contains information on the various diversion techniques involved in the completion of these multilayered reservoirs. In this research, we have deduced and evaluated eight possible techniques that have been used in the oil and gas industry to divert multilayered fracture treatments in layered reservoirs. We have developed decision charts, economic analyses and computer programs that will assist completion engineers in determining which of the diversion methods are feasible for a given well stimulation. Our computer programs have been tested using case histories from the petroleum literature with results expressed in this thesis. A limited entry design program has also being developed from this research to calculate the fluid distribution into different layers when fracture treating multilayered tight gas reservoirs using the limited entry technique. The research is aimed at providing decision tools which will eventually be input into an expert advisor for well completions in tight gas reservoirs worldwide.

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CO{sub 2}/sand fracturing in Devonian shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of five carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2})/sand well stimulations were successfully executed with two Devonian shale operators in Perry and Pike Counties, Kentucky. This new stimulation method offers a minimum formation damage proppant stimulation approach for natural gas producers in the United States. Some operators have been concerned about the frac fluid formation damage associated with the water and chemicals used in conventional foam stimulations, whereas other operators have been concerned about the lack of proppant in straight nitrogen fracs used by service companies today. Two carefully screened geological areas of established Devonian shale production were selected based on active ongoing drilling and completion operations. One selected control area contained an existing set of wells with established production histories. More specifically, one operator furnished three offset wells which were stimulated with the carbon dioxide/sand frac method. The quantity of proppant and fluids pumped during each well stimulation ranged from 23,000 to 43,000 pounds of proppant and from 120 to 160 tons of liquid carbon dioxide. Another operator furnished two offset wells which were each stimulated with approximately 47,000 pounds of proppant and 120 tons of carbon dioxide. The logistics and field layout of a typical carbon dioxide/sand frac treatment has been described and highlighted. The importance and unique aspects of the closed system blender that is required for job execution is discussed. Five stimulation treatments have been reviewed, and stimulation and preliminary production data compared to offset wells stimulated with nitrogen, and explosives. Initial production results indicate more than a 50 percent increase in production rate compared to nitrogen fraced wells in the Pike County area.

Yost, A.B. II [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Mazza, R.L. [Petroleum Consulting Services, Canton, OH (United States); Gehr, J.B. [Natural Gas Resources Corporation (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Production process for glass sand from the quartz waste from the beneficiation of kingiseppsk phosphorites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a process developed for the production of molding sand from the quartz waste which makes it possible to simplify the system for obtaining glass sand. According to this system, the main operation in the removal of most of the residual phosphate shell and alkaline earth metal oxides from the quartz waste is foam separation, using the residual concentration of reagents in the pulp (tallow and kerosene). After the subsequent washing and hydraulic classification, the sands meet the requirements set for molding sands grade Ob2K. The characteristics of the original flotation tailings and molding sand are presented. The mineralogical analysis of the molding sand showed that the iron-containing impurities are grains of glauconite, films of iron oxide on the surface of the grains, grains of ferrous-dolomite cement, and iron from the apparatus.

Ershov, V.I.; Lezhnev, Y.P.; Novofastovskaya, E.M.; Rants, G.F.; Shalamova, V.G.; Sinyakova, E.I.; Sokolova, E.I.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Renewable Energy Opportunities at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewable Energy Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Warwick, William M.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

Perry, Nicolas; Bernard, Alain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

Nicolas Perry; Magali Mauchand; Alain Bernard

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Full Scale Gatorizing™ of Fine Grain Inconel 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and fine grain size achieved in the extruded billet as well as the high cost ... with alloys such as 718, 901, or A286 succeeded in producing fine-grained billet by using ... by oil quench and aging at 718"C/8 hrs. and furnace cool to 62l0CI8 hrs.

145

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems  

SciTech Connect

Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development of Optimal Energy Infrastructures for the Oil Sands Industry in a CO?-constrained World.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Western Canadian bitumen is becoming a predominant source of energy for North American markets. The bitumen extraction and upgrading processes in the oil sands industry… (more)

Ordorica Garcia, Jesus Guillermo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Adsorption of Single-ring Model Naphthenic Acid from Oil Sands ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Adsorption of Single-ring Model Naphthenic Acid from Oil Sands Tailings Pond Water Using Petroleum Coke-derived Activated Carbon.

149

An investigation of the combustion of oil sand derived bitumen-in-water emulsions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Dwindling conventional oil resources has caused exploration efforts to focus elsewhere. Bitumen from oil sands has emerged as one of the primary unconventional oil… (more)

Kennelly, Timothy Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

O-1: Using of Spent Moulding Sands for Production of Burned ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurements of exhaust gases emissions performed during burning the products containing spent moulding sands as well as during the normal ...

151

I-8: Research on the Influence of Moulding Sand with Furan Resin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, I-8: Research on the Influence of Moulding Sand with Furan Resin ... Study of Different metallurgical Waste for Preparation of Glass-Ceramics.

152

Meso-Scale Simulations to Examine the Role of Sand Paper Grit on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface between the platen and LX-10 sample includes a layer of sand particulates to .... Shock-Induced Phase Transformations in Ce-Al Metallic Glass.

153

Preparation of Activated Carbon from Oil Sands Coke by Chemical and Physical Activation Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil sands coke is a by-product resulting from the upgrading of heavy crude bitumen to light synthetic oil. This research investigates the preparation of activated… (more)

Morshed, Golam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Stored carbon partly fuels fine-root respiration but is not used for production of new fine roots  

SciTech Connect

The relative use of new photosynthate compared to stored C for the production and maintenance of fine roots, and the rate of C turnover in heterogeneous fine-root populations, are poorly understood. We followed the relaxation of a 13C tracer in fine roots in a Liquidambar styraciflua plantation at the conclusion of a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment. Goals included quantifying the relative fractions of new photosynthate versus stored C used in root growth and root respiration, as well as the turnover rate of fine-root C fixed during [CO2] fumigation. New fine-root growth was largely from recent photosynthate, while nearly one-quarter of respired C was from a storage pool. Changes in the isotopic composition of the fine-root population over two full growing seasons indicated heterogeneous C pools; less than 10% of root C had a residence time < 3 months, while a majority of root C had a residence time > 2 years. Compared to a 1-pool model, a 2-pool model for C turnover in fine roots (with 5 and 0.37 yr-1 turnover times) doubles the fine-root contribution to forest NPP (9-13%) and supports the 50% root-to-soil transfer rate often used in models.

Lynch, Douglas J [ORNL; Matamala-Paradeda, Roser [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miguel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Finely-Predicted Higgs Boson Mass from A Finely-Tuned Weak Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If supersymmetry is broken directly to the Standard Model at energies not very far from the unified scale, the Higgs boson mass lies in the range 128-141 GeV. The end points of this range are tightly determined. Theories with the Higgs boson dominantly in a single supermultiplet predict a mass at the upper edge, (141 \\pm 2) GeV, with the uncertainty dominated by the experimental errors on the top quark mass and the QCD coupling. This edge prediction is remarkably insensitive to the supersymmetry breaking scale and to supersymmetric threshold corrections so that, in a wide class of theories, the theoretical uncertainties are at the level of \\pm 0.4 GeV. A reduction in the uncertainties from the top quark mass and QCD coupling to the level of \\pm 0.3 GeV may be possible at future colliders, increasing the accuracy of the confrontation with theory from 1.4% to 0.4%. Verification of this prediction would provide strong evidence for supersymmetry, broken at a very high scale of ~ 10^{14 \\pm 2} GeV, and also for a Higgs boson that is elementary up to this high scale, implying fine-tuning of the Higgs mass parameter by ~ 20-28 orders of magnitude. Currently, the only known explanation for such fine-tuning is the multiverse.

Lawrence J. Hall; Yasunori Nomura

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

157

aquitard distribution in a northern reach of the miami ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

interest. Clay, Yellow Clay. Blue Clay, Sand with Clay. Gravel with Clay, Hardpan . Till, Silt. LOW 1. Fine Sand, Quicksand, Heaving. Sand, Black Sand, Red Sand.

158

Fluid Resistance Analysis of Sand Control Slotted Liner with Compound Cavity Based on Fluent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slotted liners have been used for many years to provide sand control in many oil industry applications. They are commonly applied in reservoirs that produce high-viscosity oil from horizontal wells with unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. However, ... Keywords: slotted liner, newly-designed slot, Fluid resistance

Hang Li; Yonghong Liu; Jianmin Ma; Xinfang Wei

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effect of temperature on wave velocities in sands and sandstones with heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of temperature on wave velocities in sandstones and unconsolidated sand saturated with heavy hydrocarbons. The large decreases of the compressional and shear velocities in such sandstones and sand with increasing temperature suggest that seismic methods may be very useful in detecting heat fronts in heavy hydrocarbon reservoirs undergoing steamflooding or in-situ combustion.

Wang, Z.; Nur, A.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products : quick reference guide.  

SciTech Connect

This 'Quick Reference Guide' supplements the more complete 'Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and Other Communication Products'. It provides limited guidance on how to prepare SAND Reports at Sandia National Laboratories. Users are directed to the in-depth guide for explanations of processes.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volumes of shale (gray), sand (yellow), gas hydrate-?lledgas hydrate-bearing zone is also bounded laterally with impermeable shaleshale section that overlies the Frio sand showing four-way closure that forms the trap for the AC818 gas

Boswell, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A modeling approach for iron concentration in sand filtration effluent using adaptive neuro-fuzzy model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effluent iron concentration is an important water quality criterion used for the assessment of the performance of rapid sand filters, in addition to other criteria. This study deals with the prediction of effluent iron concentrations by adaptive neuro-fuzzy ... Keywords: ANFIS, Effluent iron concentration, Modeling, Sand filtration

Mehmet Çakmakci; Cumali Kinaci; Mahmut Bayramo?lu; Y?lmaz Yildirim

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modelling damping ratio and shear modulus of sand-mica mixtures using genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents two Genetic Programming (GP) models for damping ratio and shear modulus of sand-mica mixtures based on experimental results. The experimental database used for GP modelling is based on a laboratory study of dynamic properties of saturated ... Keywords: Genetic programming, Leighton buzzard sand, Mica, Resonant column testing

Abdulkadir Cevik; Ali Firat Cabalar

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and other communication products : quick reference guide.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Quick Reference Guide supplements the more complete Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and Other Communication Products. It provides limited guidance on how to prepare SAND Reports at Sandia National Laboratories. Users are directed to the in-depth guide for explanations of processes.

Not Available

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearing sediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeability parameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by means of inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictions with observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and the hydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-ray CT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations are non-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydrate saturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at two locations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parameter sets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydrate saturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parameters require further refinement of the experimental design, and better description of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearingsediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas productionfrom gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeabilityparameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by meansof inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictionswith observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-raycomputed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and thehydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-rayCT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations arenon-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydratesaturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at twolocations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parametersets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydratesaturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parametersrequire further refinement of the experimental design, and betterdescription of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

167

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation of information is presented on geology and drilling activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project. The areas of interest are the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, the Uinta Basin, and the Northern Great Plains Province. Drilling activity is discussed for the months of October, November, and December, 1977, with the major emphasis on wells located in low permeability sandstone areas, having significant gas production and utilizing hydraulic fracturing treatments. The drilling information was obtained primarily from ''The Rocky Mountain Region Report'' published by Petroleum Information Corporation on a daily basis. Another source of information was the ''Montana Oil and Gas Journal'' which is released weekly.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Shape dependence of band-edge exciton fine structure in CdSe nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exciton fine structure in CdSe nanocrystals Qingzhong Zhao,fine structure of wurtzite CdSe nanocrystals is investigatedexciton fine structure of CdSe nanocrystals is determined by

Zhao, Qingzhong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

CO{sub 2}/sand fracturing in Devonian shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of five carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) /sand well stimulations were successfully executed with two Devonian shale operators in Perry and Pike Counties, Kentucky. This new stimulation method offers a minimum formation damage proppant stimulation approach for natural gas producers in the United States. Some operators have been concerned about the frac fluid formation damage associated with the water and chemicals used in conventional foam stimulations, whereas other operators have been concerned about the lack of proppant in straight nitrogen fracs used by service companies today. Two carefully screened geological areas of established Devonian shale production were selected based on active ongoing drilling and completion operations. One selected control area contained an existing set of wells with established production histories. The logistics and field layout of a typical carbon dioxide/sand frac treatment has been described and highlighted. The importance and unique aspects of the closed system blender that is required for job execution is discussed. Five stimulation treatments have been reviewed, and stimulation and preliminary production data compared to offset wells stimulated with nitrogen, and explosives. Initial production results indicate more than a 50 percent increase in production rate compared to nitrogen fraced wells in the Pike County area. In addition, production is also 4.8 times better than conventional shot wells in the same area. These results are encouraging enough to formally combine existing pumping equipment, a closed system blender, and liquid carbon dioxide supplies to develop a new fracturing service in the eastern US A total of 22 additional jobs are planned in the eastern US in low permeability gas formations over the next year.

Yost, A.B. II [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Mazza, R.L. [Petroleum Consulting Services, Canton, OH (United States); Gehr, J.B. [Natural Gas Resources Corporation (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Retention behavior of dilute polymers in oil sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adequate mobility control between fluid banks is a pertinent factor in the successful application of secondary and tertiary oil recovery processes. Favorable mobilities can be obtained by increasing the viscosity or reducing the permeability to the displacing fluid phase. Polyacrylamide and oio-polymers have proved to be useful for these purposes. These polymers increase the water viscosity substantially at low concentrations. The resulting reduced mobility of the displacing phase suppresses the fingering phenomenon and improves piston-like displacement. However, the structural complexity of these polymers coupled with the complexity of the flow channels in the porous medium cause part of these polymers to be retained in the reservoir as the displacing fluid from advances, thereby causing a reduction in the concentration of the polymer solution and consequently a loss of mobility control. In addition to the mechanical filtering, adsorption on the grain surfaces reduce the polymer concentration in the displacing fluid. Behavior of polyacrylamide polymers has been studied extensively. Susceptibility of these polymers to salinity, pH, shear, temperature, etc., is well documented. Mechanical entrapment, retention, degradation and adsorption behavior on porous media, including fired Berea sandstone, bead packs and Ottawa sand have been reported. The present study investigates the adsorption and trapping of polymers in flow experiments through unconsolidated oil field sands. Effects of particle size and mineral content have been studied. Effect of a surfactant slug on polymer-rock interaction is also reported. Corroborative studies have been conducted to study the pressure behavior and high tertiary oil recovery in surfactant dilute-polymer systems.

Kikani, J.; Somerton, W.H.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A performance model for fine-grain accesses in UPC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UPC's implicit communication and fine-grain programming style make application performance modeling a challenging task. The correspondence between remote references and communication events depends on the internals of the compiler and runtime system. ...

Zhang Zhang; Steven R. Seidel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #280: August 11, 2003 Fines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the fuel economy of new light vehicles sold in the United States. The CAFE program fines vehicle manufacturers whose corporate average is less than 27.5 miles per gallon (mpg) for...

173

A fine-grained component-level power measurement method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever growing energy consumption of computer systems have become a more and more serious problem in the past few years. Power profiling is a fundamental way for us to better understand where, when and how energy is consumed. This paper presents a ... Keywords: energy efficiency, fine-grained component-level power measurement method, computer system energy consumption, power profiling, direct measurement method, power dissipation synchronization, program phase, SPEC CPU2006 benchmarks, fine time granularity, memory management, architecture design

Zehan Cui; Yan Zhu; Yungang Bao; Mingyu Chen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Alberta bound : the interface between Alberta's environmental policies and the environmental management of three Albertan oil sands companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Athabasca Oil Sands, located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, were for many years anomalous. Two oil sands operators developed their extraction techniques for 30 years, refining their technology before production became ...

Lemphers, Nathan C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

176

Genome sequencing reveals fine scale diversification and reticulation history during speciation in Sus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as: Frantz et al. : Genome sequencing reveals fine scaleThornton K, Presgraves DC: Genome sequencing reveals complexRESEARCH Open Access Genome sequencing reveals fine scale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Gravity Wave – Fine Structure Interactions, Part 1: Influences of Fine-Structure Form and Orientation on Flow Evolution and Instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four idealized direct numerical simulations are performed to examine the dynamics arising from the superposition of a monochromatic gravity wave and sinusoidal linear and rotary fine structure in the velocity field. These simulations are motivated ...

David C. Fritts; Ling Wang; Joseph A. Werne

178

Experience with SAND-Tcl: A Scripting Tool for Spatial Databases 1 CLAUDIO ESPERANC A (Contact Author)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experience with SAND-Tcl: A Scripting Tool for Spatial Databases 1 CLAUDIO ESPERANC¸ A (Contact. This is illustrated by de- scribing our experience with SAND-Tcl, a scripting tool developed by us for building spatial database applications. SAND-Tcl is an extension of the Tcl embedded scripting language

Samet, Hanan

179

The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum engineering literature clearly shows that large proppant volumes and concentrations are required to effectively stimulate low-permeability gas sands. To pump large proppant concentrations, one must use a viscous fluid. However, many operators believe that low-viscosity, low-proppant concentration fracture stimulation treatments known as ??waterfracs?? produce comparable stimulation results in low-permeability gas sands and are preferred because they are less expensive than gelled fracture treatments. This study evaluates fracture stimulation technology in tight gas sands by using case histories found in the petroleum engineering literature and by using a comparison of the performance of wells stimulated with different treatment sizes in the Cotton Valley sands of the East Texas basin. This study shows that large proppant volumes and viscous fluids are necessary to optimally stimulate tight gas sand reservoirs. When large proppant volumes and viscous fluids are not successful in stimulating tight sands, it is typically because the fracture fluids have not been optimal for the reservoir conditions. This study shows that waterfracs do produce comparable results to conventional large treatments in the Cotton Valley sands of the East Texas basin, but we believe it is because the conventional treatments have not been optimized. This is most likely because the fluids used in conventional treatments are not appropriate or have not been used appropriately for Cotton Valley conditions.

Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt  

SciTech Connect

This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

Paul J. Tikalsky, Hussain U. Bahia, An Deng and Thomas Snyder

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

Pauul J. Tikalsky

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Collection of technical data for tight gas sands in support of the massive hydraulic fracturing system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed to study case histories of logging problems/requirements in tight gas sand areas, provide production histories/completion information on selected Uinta Basin tight gas sand wells, provide geologic guidance and additional technical input for computer simulation of tight gas sand well behavior, and develop information about production histories, completion techniques and reservoir rock characteristics from selected tight gas sand key wells in the Piceance and Green River Basins. A list of gas sand wells in the Uinta Basin is included along with gas production statistics, completion and reservoir data, and well production data. (JRD)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

CAVITY LIKE COMPLETIONS IN WEAK SANDS PREFERRED UPSTREAM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

SciTech Connect

The technology referred to as Cavity Like Completions (CLC) offers a new technique to complete wells in friable and unconsolidated sands. A successfully designed CLC provides significant increases in well PI (performance index) at lower costs than alternative completion techniques. CLC technology is being developed and documented by a partnership of major oil and gas companies through a GPRI (Global Petroleum Research Institute) joint venture. Through the DOE-funded PUMP program, the experiences of the members of the joint venture will be described for other oil and gas producing companies. To date six examples of CLC completions have been investigated by the JV. The project was performed to introduce a new type of completion (or recompletion) technique to the industry that, in many cases, offers a more cost effective method to produce oil and gas from friable reservoirs. The project's scope of work included: (1) Further develop theory, laboratory and field data into a unified model to predict performance of cavity completion; (2) Perform at least one well test for cavity completion (well provided by one of the sponsor companies); (3) Provide summary of geo-mechanical models for PI increase; and (4) Develop guidelines to evaluate success of potential cavity completion. The project tracks the experiences of a joint industry consortium (GPRI No. 17) over a three year period and compiles results of the activities of this group.

Ian Palmer; John McLennan

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products.  

SciTech Connect

This guide describes the R&A process, Common Look and Feel requirements, and preparation and publishing procedures for communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Samples of forms and examples of published communications products are provided. This guide takes advantage of the wealth of material now available on the Web as a resource. Therefore, it is best viewed as an electronic document. If some of the illustrations are too small to view comfortably, you can enlarge them on the screen as needed. The format of this document is considerably different than that usually expected of a SAND Report. It was selected to permit the large number of illustrations and examples to be placed closer to the text that references them. In the case of forms, covers, and other items that are included as examples, a link to the Web is provided so that you can access the items and download them for use. This guide details the processes for producing a variety of communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Figure I-1 shows the general publication development process. Because extensive supplemental material is available from Sandia on the internal web or from external sources (Table I-1), the guide has been shortened to make it easy to find information that you need.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Microsoft Word - Finely_NorthValley_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cecilia Brown Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Finely Creek and North Valley Creek property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-58888 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management Location: Finely Creek: Township 16 North, Range 20 West, Section 24; Missoula County, MT. North Valley Creek: Township 17 North, Range 20 West, Section 19; Lake County, MT. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for the purchase of 9 acres of property, referred to as the Finely Creek Property,

186

An Observational Analysis and Evaluation of Land Surface Model Accuracy in the Nebraska Sand Hills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the influence of subsurface water on the energy budget components of three locations with heterogeneous land surfaces in the Nebraska Sand Hills are examined through observations and use of the Noah land surface model (LSM). ...

David B. Radell; Clinton M. Rowe

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

Murray, A.M.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

Technologies, markets and challenges for development of the Canadian Oil Sands industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the current status of development of the Canadian oil sands industry, and considers possible paths of further development. We outline the key technology alternatives, critical resource ...

Lacombe, Romain H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Lowman site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive sands and residues at Lowman, Idaho. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of radioactive sands and residues and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, and investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 191,000 tons of radioactive sands, residues, and contaminated soils at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown radioactive sands and external gamma radiation also are factors.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Determination of soil liquefaction characteristics by large-scale laboratory tests. [Sand  

SciTech Connect

The testing program described in this report was carried out to study the liquefaction behavior of a clean, uniform, medium sand. Horizontal beds of this sand, 42 inches by 90 inches by 4 inches were prepared by pluviation with a special sand spreader, saturated, and tested in a shaking table system designed for this program, which applied a horizontal cyclic shear stress to the specimens. Specimen size was selected to reduce boundary effects as much as possible. Values of pore pressures and shear strains developed during the tests are presented for sand specimens at relative densities of 54, 68, 82, and 90 percent, and the results interpreted to determine the values of the stress ratio causing liquefaction at the various relative densities.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Temperature, Precipitation, and Lightning Modification in the Vicinity of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Athabasca oil sands development in northeast Alberta, Canada, has disturbed more than 500 km2 of boreal forest through surface mining and tailings ponds development. In this paper, the authors compare the time series of temperatures and ...

Daniel M. Brown; Gerhard W. Reuter; Thomas K. Flesch

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND952729 Unlimited Release U G A Q O D  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

r x 12-N -. CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND952729 Unlimited Release U G A Q O D Evaluation of Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a Binding Polymer for Absorbers Used to-Treat Liquid Radioactive...

193

Investigation of sand consolidation using steam for the Tar Zone, Wilmington field, California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An experimental study was carried out to better understand and optimize the process of sand consolidation using high-pH steam in wells of the Wilmington field,… (more)

Nilsen, Knut Arild

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Integration of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Technology with Oil Sands Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation of siting an HTGR plant in a remote area supplying steam, electricity and high temperature gas for recovery and upgrading of unconventional crude oil from oil sands. The area selected for this evaluation is the Alberta Canada oil sands. This is a very fertile and active area for bitumen recovery and upgrading with significant quantities piped to refineries in Canada and the U.S Additionally data on the energy consumption and other factors that are required to complete the evaluation of HTGR application is readily available in the public domain. There is also interest by the Alberta oil sands producers (OSP) in identifying alternative energy sources for their operations. It should be noted, however, that the results of this evaluation could be applied to any similar oil sands area.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss a few observational consequences of such a picture of dark energy.

Vishnu Jejjala; Michael Kavic; Djordje Minic

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated Sandstones and Clayey Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project include experimental data and a set of models for relating elastic moduli/porosity/texture and static-to-dynamic moduli to strength and failure relationships for unconsolidated sands and clayey sands. The results of the project should provide the industry with a basis for wider use of oil base drilling fluids in water sensitive formations by implementing drill cutting injection into existing wells at abandoned formations and controlling fracture geometry to prevent ground water contamination.

Mese, Ali; Dvorkin, Jack; Shillinglaw, John

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

Economics of tight sands gas extraction as affected by r and d. Occasional pub  

SciTech Connect

The paper examines the economics and resource potential of tight sand formations as a major near-term source of unconventional gas. The main vehicles for analyzing the issues to date are the 1980 study by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) on tight sand resources and two studies based on the NPC's work at different stages of completion for the GRI Center for Energy Systems Analysis (CESA).

Rosenberg, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-kaolin mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-kaolin mixtures containing 0, 5, 10, and 30% kaolin (by dry weight) is measured for matric suctions, {psi}{sub m} < {approximately} 6.0 m. The measured unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub m}) values are compared with predicted unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub p}) values using the Brooks-Corey-Burdine and van Genuchten-Mualem relative hydraulic conductivity functions. In general, the accuracy of k{sub p} decreases with an increase in kaolin content or an increase in {psi}{sub m}. In addition, k{sub m} tends to be underpredicted for kaolin contents of 10 and 30% at relatively high suctions (1.0 m {le} {psi}{sub m} {le} 6.0 m) and overpredicted for kaolin contents of 0 and 5% at relatively low suctions (0.1 m {le} {psi}{sub m} < 1.0 m). For a given kaolin content and {psi}{sub m}, k{sub p} based on the Brooks-Corey-Burdine function tends to be more accurate than k{sub m} based on the van Genuchten-Mualem function. Finally, for 1.0 m {le} {psi}{sub m} {le} 6.0 m, k{sub p} based on analysis using the maximum volumetric water content ({theta}{sub m}) attained under steady-state flow conditions typically is more accurate than k{sub p} based on analysis using the saturated volumetric water content, {theta}{sub s}, where {theta}{sub m} {approximately} 84--90% of {theta}{sub s} in this study.

Chiu, T.F. [Genesis Group, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

Raymond L. Mazza

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Dynamic Behavior of Sand: Annual Report FY 11  

SciTech Connect

Currently, design of earth-penetrating munitions relies heavily on empirical relationships to estimate behavior, making it difficult to design novel munitions or address novel target situations without expensive and time-consuming full-scale testing with relevant system and target characteristics. Enhancing design through numerical studies and modeling could help reduce the extent and duration of full-scale testing if the models have enough fidelity to capture all of the relevant parameters. This can be separated into three distinct problems: that of the penetrator structural and component response, that of the target response, and that of the coupling between the two. This project focuses on enhancing understanding of the target response, specifically granular geomaterials, where the temporal and spatial multi-scale nature of the material controls its response. As part of the overarching goal of developing computational capabilities to predict the performance of conventional earth-penetrating weapons, this project focuses specifically on developing new models and numerical capabilities for modeling sand response in ALE3D. There is general recognition that granular materials behave in a manner that defies conventional continuum approaches which rely on response locality and which degrade in the presence of strong response nonlinearities, localization, and phase gradients. There are many numerical tools available to address parts of the problem. However, to enhance modeling capability, this project is pursuing a bottom-up approach of building constitutive models from higher fidelity, smaller spatial scale simulations (rather than from macro-scale observations of physical behavior as is traditionally employed) that are being augmented to address the unique challenges of mesoscale modeling of dynamically loaded granular materials. Through understanding response and sensitivity at the grain-scale, it is expected that better reduced order representations of response can be formulated at the continuum scale as illustrated in Figure 1 and Figure 2. The final result of this project is to implement such reduced order models in the ALE3D material library for general use.

Antoun, T; Herbold, E; Johnson, S

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fine Prediction of Energy Power Production in Wind Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine Prediction of Energy Power Production in Wind Farms November 30, 2007 This report have been Technological Need: Wind Power Prediction Clean energy production systems and environmental policies have and Numerical Models The first important point to stress is that the energy power obtained from a single wind

203

ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE  

SciTech Connect

SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

Herman, D.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

204

Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to better understand the sand consolidation process under high-temperature alkaline solution. Wilmington Tar sand samples were successfully consolidated in the laboratory using high-temperature (250-260?C) solution of sodium carbonate (pH 11-12). The sample was placed in a vertical 18 in. long aluminum cylindrical cell with an ID of 1.5 in.. The top half of the cell was thermally insulated while the bottom half was cooled. Hot alkaline solution was injected at 20 ml/min for 3-4 hours at the top of the cell and liquid produced at the bottom of the cell. After each experiment, the cell contents were removed and analyzed to determine if sand consolidation occurred. Both aggregates of sand grains and sectioned and polished epoxy-mounted sand grains were examined and analyzed using an electron microprobe to determine any change in shape, size, or composition of the sand pack and precipitation and growth of secondary phases. To better understand the process, experiments were subsequently conducted using samples of pure quartz, pure feldspar, and a 50:50 (by weight) mixture of quartz and feldspar. In each case, both varied 20-40 mesh and 50-250 mesh grain size samples were used. For the 20-40 mesh cases, zeolites and a mixture of amorphous silica and sodium carbonate were deposited on grain surfaces but were insufficient to cause overall sand consolidation. However, when a finer, poorly sorted (50-250 mesh) 50:50 mixture of feldspar and quartz was used, sand consolidation was obtained in 2.5 hours. At the top, hotter part of the cell, equant and acicular zeolite crystals (sodium aluminum silicates) weakly bound the sand grains. At the bottom and cooler part of the cell, the sand grains were strongly bound by a mixture of amorphous silica and sodium carbonate. Results to-date indicate that both zeolite and silica may be cementing agents, the grain-bonding strength depending on the grain surface area. This investigation is part of an ongoing research. The temperature, injection rate, and pH of the alkaline solution, treating time and "soaking period" are considered important process parameters that need to be further investigated.

Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Sand deformation concept for in-situ recovery of bitumen by cyclic steam injection  

SciTech Connect

Historically, a vertical or horizontal fracture is believed to be a main recovery mechanism for a cyclic steam injection process from the unconsolidated oil sands. Most of the current computer models for the process are based on the fracture concept. With the new postulated ''Sand Deformation Concept'' on the other hand, the injected fluid is able to penetrate the unconsolidated oil sand by creating microchannels. When the pore pressure is reduced during production, these secondary flow channels will totally or partially collapse. Condensed steam tends to sweep fluids where the bitumen had been heated and imparts mobility due to the injected hot fluid. Flow geometry of the new concept was fully investigated in this study. The physical differences between the sand deformation zone and the no-deformation zone were also investigated. The major differences zone were also investigated. The major differences between these two zones are a porosity change, a pressure level and energy and flow characteristics resulting from the existence of microchannels. All of these modifications were successfully incorporated into a conventional numerical thermal simulator. The new model provided an excellent match for all the field observations (steam injection pressure, oil-and-water production rates, fluid production temperature, downhole production pressure and the salinity changes) of a steam stimulated well in an unconsolidated oil sand. Conclusion from the study indicates that the most important phenomenon for in-situ recovery of bitumen is the one way valve effect of the microchannels which are opened during injection and closed during production.

Ito, Y.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Annual report, July 1991--July 1992  

SciTech Connect

The University of Utah tar sand research and development program is concerned with research and development on Utah is extensive oil sands deposits. The program has been intended to develop a scientific and technological base required for eventual commercial recovery of the heavy oils from oil sands and processing these oils to produce synthetic crude oil and other products such as asphalt. The overall program is based on mining the oil sand, processing the mined sand to recover the heavy oils and upgrading them to products. Multiple deposits are being investigated since it is believed that a large scale (approximately 20,000 bbl/day) plant would require the use of resources from more than one deposit. The tasks or projects in the program are organized according to the following classification: Recovery technologies which includes thermal recovery methods, water extraction methods, and solvent extraction methods; upgrading and processing technologies which covers hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and hydropyrolysis; solvent extraction; production of specialty products; and environmental aspects of the production and processing technologies. These tasks are covered in this report.

Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Disjointed connections : the presidential permitting of tar sands oil pipelines at the U.S.-Canadian border.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The fuel for dynamic change in the United State’s energy relationship with Canada lies in immense deposits of tar sands beneath the boreal forests of… (more)

Tomasovic, Brian Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluation of metals release from oil sands coke : an ecotoxicological assessment of risk and hazard to aquatic invertebrates .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The oil sands operations in northeast Alberta, Canada, employ unconventional processes to produce synthetic crude oil (SCO). Because the extracted bitumen, ¡®the form of oil… (more)

PUTTASWAMY, NAVEEN V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fine, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fine, New York: Energy Resources Fine, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.2478396°, -75.1377015° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.2478396,"lon":-75.1377015,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

Three new approaches to the problem of dewatering fine coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased use of continuous miners and longwall shearers have made fine coal a growing proportion of preparation plant feed. Increased crushing within the plant itself to facilitate ash and sulfur removal further tips the size consist towards the fine end of the scale. Of itself there is nothing intrinsically wrong with fine coal, but the disproportionately large quantity of surface moisture entrained with it creates costly problems. Clark D. Harrison of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Homer City, PA, and James R. Cavalet of Science Applications International Corp., Homer City, have quantified the reasons for fine coal drying. According to their calculations an extra 1% moisture can add from $310,000 to $1 million per year to transport costs. The $310,000 (case 1) would be true for a power plant using 3.1 million tpy at a plant that is 250 miles from its source, and the $1 million (case 2) is a power plant that is 1,000 miles from its source and using 2.5 million tpy. Extra water also means extra heat used and wasted to vaporize this water, an additional avoidable expense of $700,000 for case 1 and $560,000 for case 2. There are also the uncalculated wet-coal-produced costs of plugged pulverizers, plugged chutes and frozen coal. Perhaps the figure that brings the deleterious effects of wet coal closest to home for a preparation plant manager is that a 1% increase in moisture can offset a 4.5% decrease in ash. In considering how to remove excess water, mechanical drying has advantages over thermal drying in that it produces no air pollution and is not as capital intensive, but unfortunately it is also not as effective.

Burger, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated to monitor surface fine sediment levels and overwinter intrusion of fine sediment in spring chinook salmon spawning habitat in the North Folk John Day and Grande Ronde Rivers, for five years.

Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Greene, M. Jonas; Purser, Michael D. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Regionalization in Fine-Grid GFS MOS 6-h Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent emergence of the National Digital Forecast Database as the flagship product of the National Weather Service has resulted in an increased demand for forecast guidance products on fine-mesh grids. Unfortunately, fine-grid forecasts with ...

Jerome P. Charba; Frederick G. Samplatsky

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A multiprocessor architecture combining fine-grained and coarse-grained parallelism strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: coarse-grained, fine-grained, instruction-level parallelism, loop-level parallelism, multiprocessor, performance comparisons, pipelining, superscalar

David J. Lilja

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Title Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Douglas R. Black, Megan McKay, Kenneth L. Revzan, Allen H. Goldstein, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page 373 Issue 5 Pagination 373-388 Date Published 02/2006 ISSN 0278-6826 (Print), 1521-7388 (Online) Abstract Atmospheric aerosols from natural and anthropogenic processes have both primary and secondary origins, and can influence human health, visibility, and climate. One key process affecting atmospheric concentrations of aerosols is the formation of new particles and their subsequent growth to larger particle sizes. A field study was conducted at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California from May through September of 2002 to examine the effect of biogenic volatile organic compounds on aerosol formation and processing. The study included in-situ measurements of concentration and biosphere-atmosphere flux of VOCs, ozone, aerosol size distribution, aerosol physical and optical properties, and meteorological variables. Fine particle growth events were observed on approximately 30 percent of the 107 days with complete size distribution data. Average particle growth rates measured during these events were 3.8 ± 1.9 nm hr-1. Correlations between aerosol properties, trace gas concentrations, and meteorological measurements were analyzed to determine conditions conducive to fine particle growth events. Growth events were typically observed on days with a lesser degree of anthropogenic influence, as indicated by lower concentrations of black carbon, carbon monoxide, and total aerosol volume. Days with growth events also had lower temperatures, increased wind speeds, and larger momentum flux. Measurements of ozone concentrations and ozone flux indicate that gas phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds occur in the canopy, strongly suggesting that a significant portion of the material responsible for the observed particle growth are oxidation products of naturally emitted very reactive organic compounds.

215

Hardware and software efficacy in assessment of fine root diameter distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine roots constitute the majority of root system surface area and thus most of the nutrient and water absorption surface. Fine roots are, however, the least understood of all plant roots. A sensitivity analysis of several software programs capable of ... Keywords: Diameter distribution, Digital image analysis, Fine roots, High resolution, Root length, Scanner

Richard W. Zobel

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Laboratory Analysis of a New Sand Consolidation Material for Oilfield Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production of sand can be a major issue in many young, unconsolidated sandstone formations where there is little to no cement holding the individual sand grains together. When such reservoirs are produced, quite often operators face problems with reduced well productivity and equipment failure. Because of these issues, the industry has developed numerous techniques in its effort to control formation sand production. Sand consolidation is one technology that has been studied and used since the 1940s. The theory behind sand consolidation technology is to place a liquid material which will create a grain to grain contact that will bind individual sand grains together. Most consolidation treatments contain a preflush to clean and wet the surface, the consolidating system to bind the sand grains and give residual strength, and, finally, an overflush to ensure the formation is still able to produce fluids. With the successful placement of this fluid, the sand grains will be locked in placed so that they will not be produced. The technology has gone through many phases of conception since the 1940s; however, most consolidation material that is pumped in the past has been based upon an epoxy or furan backbone. While there are many technologies available, for the purpose of my research, the epoxy technology was experimentally investigated. The testing of the fluid involved investigating numerous additives to obtain the correct residual strength of the sample, as well as the necessary retained permeability. For the epoxy fluid, the optimal preflush, epoxy system and overflush formulations were determined after 250 checkout tests. Based upon these tests, the fluid was optimized to its working time and UCS results. The optimal system included the addition of PA2 to the preflush, along with PA1 and an aromatic amine curing agent to the epoxy system. PA1 and PA2 are adhesion promoter additives which were deemed necessary as a result of the testing. This system was then tested further in a HP/HT cell. While there is still room for improvement with respect to retained permeability, the system still performs very well in terms of UCS.

Filbrandt, Joseph Daniel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Three-dimensional geometry of fluvial reservoir sands: steam-drive case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional geometry of fluvial sands in South Belridge heavy oil field was investigated as part of an Enhanced Oil Recovery study. It was shown that only close-spaced well data are sufficient to define the sand-body geometries and heterogeneities of multichannelled fluvial systems. Reservoir flow-unit patterns cannot necessarily be correctly delineated by isolated vertical sequence analysis. Wireline logs from 19 wells and conventional cores from seven wells in a 10-ac (660 ft x 660 ft) pattern were correlated in detail, using additional input from sedimentology, steam-flow patterns, and reservoir flow-unit continuity.

McPherson, J.G.; Miller, D.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Auditory system comparisons between sand cats and other felid species : acoustic input admittance of ears and auditory brainstem responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sand cat, one species of the cat family, is found only in deserts and has unusually large ear canals and middle-ear air cavities. Recent work has shown that sand cat ears absorb acoustic power at low frequencies (<1 ...

Chan, Howard F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

Janney, M.A.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

Maria Cecilia Bravo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Effect of Temperature on the Absolute Permeability to Distilled Water of Unconsolidated Sand Cores  

SciTech Connect

The work presented herein is a study of the effect of temperature on the absolute permeability to distilled water of unconsolidated sandstones at one confining pressure. The absolute permeability to distilled water of Ottawa silica sand was not dependent on the temperature level.

Sageev, A.; Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Integration of nuclear power with oil sands extraction projects in Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the largest oil reserves in the world is not in the Middle East or in Alaska, but in Canada. This fuel exists in the form of bitumen in Alberta's oil sands. While it takes a tremendous amount of energy to recover ...

Finan, Ashley (Ashley E.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The performance of the small-angle diffractometer, SAND at IPNS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-of-flight small-angle diffractometer SAND has been serving the scientific user community since 1996. One notable feature of SAND is its capability to measure the scattered intensity in a wide Q (4{pi}sin{theta}/{lambda}, where 2{theta} is the scattering angle and {lambda} is the wavelength of the neutrons) range of 0.0035 to 0.5 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} in a single measurement. The optical alignment system makes it easy to set up the instrument and the sample. The cryogenically cooled MgO filter reduces the fast neutrons over two orders of magnitude, while still transmitting over 70% of the cold neutrons. A drum chopper running at 15 Hz suppresses the delayed neutron background. SAND has a variety of ancillary equipment to control the sample environment. In this paper we describe the features of the SAND instrument, compare its data on a few standard samples with those measured at well established centers in the world, and display two scientific examples which take advantage of measuring data in a wide Q-range in a single measurement. With a new set of tight collimators the Q{sub min} can be lowered to 0.002 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} and the presently installed high-angle bank of detectors will extend the Q{sub max} to 2 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1}.

Thiyagarajan, P.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Wilcox formation evaluation; Improved procedures for tight-gas-sand evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses risks in tight-gas-sand evaluation, reduced by defining relationships between pore geometry and critical water saturations. These results are integrated with log interpretation to derive an estimated kh that compares favorably with a true kh from production tests. These procedures are potentially applicable for evaluating other complex reservoirs.

Lewis, D.J.; Perrin, J.D. (BP Exploration Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ensemble-approaches for clustering health status of oil sand pumps F. Di Maio a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Ensemble-approaches for clustering health status of oil sand pumps F. Di Maio a , J. Hu b , P-of-the-practice entails oil pump failures being diagnosed by expert analysis of the parameter values measured during the monitoring time and their comparison with the nominal power curve of every oil pump: drawing the actual power

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

Simulation of a cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) separation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation of a heavy oil well site separation process was developed to test some of the requirements of operating on the North Slope of Alaska. This simulation used estimates of the dynamic proportions of oil, water and sand coming from the oil well ... Keywords: iThink™, CHOPS, North Slope, Alaska, continuous simulation, heavy oil

John Danielsen; David B. Hoffman

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Use of Brazilian sugarcane bagasse ash in concrete as sand replacement  

SciTech Connect

Sugarcane today plays a major role in the worldwide economy, and Brazil is the leading producer of sugar and alcohol, which are important international commodities. The production process generates bagasse as a waste, which is used as fuel to stoke boilers that produce steam for electricity cogeneration. The final product of this burning is residual sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA), which is normally used as fertilizer in sugarcane plantations. Ash stands out among agroindustrial wastes because it results from energy generating processes. Many types of ash do not have hydraulic or pozzolanic reactivity, but can be used in civil construction as inert materials. The present study used ash collected from four sugar mills in the region of Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil, which is one of the world's largest producers of sugarcane. The ash samples were subjected to chemical characterization, sieve analysis, determination of specific gravity, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubilization and leaching tests. Mortars and concretes with SBA as sand replacement were produced and tests were carried out: compressive strength, tensile strength and elastic modulus. The results indicated that the SBA samples presented physical properties similar to those of natural sand. Several heavy metals were found in the SBA samples, indicating the need to restrict its use as a fertilizer. The mortars produced with SBA in place of sand showed better mechanical results than the reference samples. SBA can be used as a partial substitute of sand in concretes made with cement slag-modified Portland cement.

Sales, Almir, E-mail: almir@ufscar.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lima, Sofia Araujo, E-mail: sofiaalima@yahoo.com.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Coupling of Gravity Waves and Turbulence at White Sands, New Mexico, from VHF Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler spectra taken with the VHF Doppler radar at White Sands Missile Range are used to describe the winds and turbulence for 10 days in March?April 1991. The large power aperture product of this radar provides excellent data coverage in 150-m ...

G. D. Nastrom; F. D. Eaton

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.  

SciTech Connect

BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

10th International Conference on Urban Drainage, Copenhagen/Denmark, 21-26 August 2005 Clark, et al. 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

media: peat-sand mix, compost, and zeolite were then selected for in-depth study. Upflow filters did media: peat-sand mix, compost, and zeolite were then selected for an in-depth study column study using-scale filters included sand, activated carbon, peat moss, compost, cotton textile waste, agrofiber, loamy

Pitt, Robert E.

232

Unraveling the Excess Air/Coal Fineness Enigma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the use of powered coal as a boiler fuel, the factors involved in heat loss from unburnt carbon in the ash are but partially understood. More finely pulverized coal particles will result in lower carbon-in-ash losses. On the other hand, the finer grind of coal requires a considerably higher energy input to the pulverizing mill. Thus, an optimum balance must be achieved between fuel savings and grinding costs to arrive at the maximum economic savings. If these were the only considerations, the solution would be simple. The problem, however, is compounded by a concurrent reduction in mill capacity as the fineness is increased. In addition, there are marked interactions between coal particle size and excess air as they effect carbon burning rate with its concomitant effect upon carbon-in-ash heat loss. Finally, variability in the excess air will alter the energy supplied to the induced-draft and forced-draft air fans. To generate a greater understanding of the impact of the aforesaid factors, upon potential fuel savings, a computer simulation was developed for the powdered coal boiler. The current paper presents results of exploratory studies using the simulator.

Laspe, C. G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Supercritical fluid molecular spray thin films and fine powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. The solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solution pressure is varied to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solution temperature is varied in relation to formation of a two-phase system during expansion to control porosity of the film or powder. A wide variety of film textures and powder shapes are produced of both organic and inorganic compounds. Films are produced with regular textural feature dimensions of 1.0-2.0 .mu.m down to a range of 0.01 to 0.1 .mu.m. Powders are formed in very narrow size distributions, with average sizes in the range of 0.02 to 5 .mu.m.

Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hydrogen Atom and Time Variation of Fine-Structure Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we have solved the de Sitter special relativistic ($\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-) Dirac equation of hydrogen in the earth-QSO(quasar) framework reference by means of the adiabatic approach. The aspects of geometry effects of de Sitter space-time described by Beltrami metric are explored and taken into account. It is found that the $\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-Dirac equation of hydrogen is a time dependent quantum Hamiltonian system. We provide an explicit calculation to justify the adiabatic approach in dealing with this time-dependent system. Since the radius of de Sitter sphere $R$ is cosmologically large, the evolution of the system is very slow so that the adiabatic approximation legitimately works with high accuracy. We conclude that the electromagnetic fine-structure constant, the electron mass and the Planck constant are time variations. This prediction of fine-structure constant is consistent with the presently available observation data. For confirming it further, experiments/observations are required.

Mu-Lin Yan

2009-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Modeling Electromagnetic Reflectivity of Agbabu Oil Sand from Hyperspectral Infrared Reflectance Spectra and Dielectric Properties at L-, C- and X-Band Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper remote identification of oil sand reservoirs from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is enhanced by accurate modeling of the electromagnetic (EM) reflectivity of Agbabu oil sands. This is demonstrated using a novel combination of hyperspectral ... Keywords: EM Reflectivity, Computer Simulation, Agbabu Oil Sand, Dielectric property, Petroleum Exploration

Maurice Ezeoke, Kenneth Tong

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Reduction of iron ore fines by coal fines in a packed bed and fluidized bed apparatus: A comparative study  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of iron ore fines by coal fines in packed and fluidized beds has been studied. The investigation includes study of the kinetic aspects of reduction, carbon and sulfur content of the direct reduced iron (DRI) produced, and metallography of the products. For both processes, the kinetic data fit the first-order reaction model. Reduction in a fluidized bed is much faster than in a packed bed system. In both cases, DRI contains a substantial amount of free carbon at the kinetic data fit the first-order reaction model. Reduction in a fluidized bed is much faster than in a packed bed system. In both cases, DRI contains a substantial amount of free carbon at the initial stages of reduction. At the later stages of reduction, the carbon present in the DRI is mainly in the combined state. For identical temperatures and particle sizes, reaction in fluidized bed is much faster compared to that in a packed bed. At any particular degree of reduction, sulfur content in DRI samples produced by fluidized bed reduction is always more than that of DRI samples produced by packed bed reduction. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs reveal that metallic whiskers formed during reduction in packed beds only. These whiskers become more prominent at higher temperatures and longer times.

Haque, R. (Bangladesh Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Metallurgical Engineering Department); Ray, H.S. (Regional Research Lab., Orissa (India)); Mukherjee, A. (Indian Inst. of Tech., (India).Metallurgical Engineering Department)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

DeRyckere, John F. (Eau Claire, WI); Jenkins, Philip Nord (Eau Claire, WI); Cornett, Frank Nolan (Chippewa Falls, WI)

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fine structure constant in the spacetime of a cosmic string  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the fine structure constant in the spacetime of a cosmic string. In the presence of a cosmic string the value of the fine structure constant reduces. We also discuss on numerical results. The gravitational properties of cosmic strings are strikingly different from those of non-relativistic linear distributions of matter. To explain the origin of the difference, we note that for a static matter distribution with energymomentum tensor, T µ ? = diag (?, ?p1, ?p2, ?p3) , (1) the Newtonian limit of the Einstein equations become ? 2 ? = 4?G (? + p1 + p2 + p3), (2) where ? is the gravitational potential. For non-relativistic matter, pi ? ? and ? 2 ? = 4?G?. Strings, on the other hand, have a large longitudinal tension. For a straight string parallel to the z-axis, p3 = ??, with p1 and p2 vanish when averaged over the string cross-section. Hence, the righthand side of Eq.(2) vanishes, suggesting that straight strings produce no gravitational forece on surrounding matter. This conclusion is confirmed by a full general-relativistic analysis. Another feature distinguishing cosmic strings from more familiar sources is their relativistic motion. As a result, oscillating loops of string can be strong emitters of gravitational radiation. A gravitating string is described by the combined system of Einstein, Higgs and guage field equations. The problem of solving these coupled equations is formidable and no exact solutions have been found to date. Fortunately, for most cosmological applications the problem can be made tractable by adopting two major simplifications. First, assuming that the string thickness is much smaller than all other relevant dimensions, the string can be 1

Forough Nasseri

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Waste Coal Fines Reburn for NOx and Mercury Emission Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Injection of coal-water slurries (CWS) made with both waste coal and bituminous coal was tested for enhanced reduction of NO{sub x} and Hg emissions at the AES Beaver Valley plant near Monaca, PA. Under this project, Breen Energy Solutions (BES) conducted field experiments on the these emission reduction technologies by mixing coal fines and/or pulverized coal, urea and water to form slurry, then injecting the slurry in the upper furnace region of a coal-fired boiler. The main focus of this project was use of waste coal fines as the carbon source; however, testing was also conducted using pulverized coal in conjunction with or instead of waste coal fines for conversion efficiency and economic comparisons. The host site for this research and development project was Unit No.2 at AES Beaver Valley cogeneration station. Unit No.2 is a 35 MW Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) front-wall fired boiler that burns eastern bituminous coal. It has low NO{sub x} burners, overfire air ports and a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system for NO{sub x} control. The back-end clean-up system includes a rotating mechanical ash particulate removal and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Coal slurry injection was expected to help reduce NOx emissions in two ways: (1) Via fuel-lean reburning when the slurry is injected above the combustion zone. (2) Via enhanced SNCR reduction when urea is incorporated into the slurry. The mercury control process under research uses carbon/water slurry injection to produce reactive carbon in-situ in the upper furnace, promoting the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers. By controlling the water content of the slurry below the stoichiometric requirement for complete gasification, water activated carbon (WAC) can be generated in-situ in the upper furnace. As little as 1-2% coal/water slurry (heat input basis) can be injected and generate sufficient WAC for mercury capture. During July, August, and September 2007, BES designed, procured, installed, and tested the slurry injection system at Beaver Valley. Slurry production was performed by Penn State University using equipment that was moved from campus to the Beaver Valley site. Waste coal fines were procured from Headwaters Inc. and transported to the site in Super Sacks. In addition, bituminous coal was pulverized at Penn State and trucked to the site in 55-gallon drums. This system was operated for three weeks during August and September 2007. NO{sub x} emission data were obtained using the plant CEM system. Hg measurements were taken using EPA Method 30B (Sorbent Trap method) both downstream of the electrostatic precipitator and in the stack. Ohio Lumex Company was on site to provide rapid Hg analysis on the sorbent traps during the tests. Key results from these tests are: (1) Coal Fines reburn alone reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 0-10% with up to 4% heat input from the CWS. However, the NO{sub x} reduction was accompanied by higher CO emissions. The higher CO limited our ability to try higher reburn rates for further NO{sub x} reduction. (2) Coal Fines reburn with Urea (Carbon enhanced SNCR) decreased NO{sub x} emissions by an additional 30% compared to Urea injection only. (3) Coal slurry injection did not change Hg capture across the ESP at full load with an inlet temperature of 400-430 F. The Hg capture in the ESP averaged 40%, with or without slurry injection; low mercury particulate capture is normally expected across a higher temperature ESP because any oxidized mercury is thought to desorb from the particulate at ESP temperatures above 250 F. (4) Coal slurry injection with halogen salts added to the mixing tank increased the Hg capture in the ESP to 60%. This significant incremental mercury reduction is important to improved mercury capture with hot-side ESP operation and wherever hindrance from sulfur oxides limit mercury reduction, because the higher temperature is above sulfur oxide dew point interference.

Stephen Johnson; Chetan Chothani; Bernard Breen

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

IA REP0 SAND85-2809 Unlimited Release UC-92A  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

IA REP0 SAND85-2809 Unlimited Release UC-92A IA REP0 SAND85-2809 Unlimited Release UC-92A Printed July 1986 High Energy Gas Fracture Experiments in Fluid-Filled Boreholes-Potential Geothermal Application J. F. Cuderman, T. Y. Chu, J. Jung, R. D. Jacobson Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87 185 and Livermore, California 94550 for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-76DP00789 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft Word - CX-Marion and Sand Springs Substation Towers Revised.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEC-4 KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dave Tripp Project Manager - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Marion and Sand Springs Substations Radio Tower Projects Budget Information: Work Orders 00243411 and 00243190; Task 3 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.19 Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities... Location: Marion and Deschutes counties, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install new radio towers at the Marion Substation and Sand Springs Substation communication sites in Oregon. BPA must vacate radio frequencies in the 1710-1755MHz band to comply with a Federal law mandating reallocation of

242

Polymer flotation and activated carbon adsorption treatment for in situ tar sand process water  

SciTech Connect

Tar sand deposits in the United States are estimated to exceed thirty billion barrels, and offer long term potential for satisfying future energy needs. At present there is no commercial scale tar sand extraction industry in the United States, although several bench and pilot scale research projects have been completed. Three of the larger field scale experiments were completed by the Department of Energy (DOE) at a site near Vernal, Utah. The first two of these efforts involved in situ combustion while the third used steam drive. This paper reviews some of the flotation configurations which were used to generate a large (350 L) volume of treated effluent as well as describing some toxicology and analytical chemistry protocols used to characterize these fluids. Additional emphasis is placed upon a series of activated carbon adsorption experiments undertaken to detoxify the flotation effluents.

Mc Ternan, W.F.; Kocornik, D.J.; Nolan, B.T.; Blanton, W.E.; Boardman, G.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

True in-situ bed preparation: oil shale and tar sand  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, a detailed study was conducted to evaluate the status of the bed preparation technology that had been developed for true in-situ processing of oil shale. It was concluded that the two techniques which had received the bulk of the attention in prior field experimentation, namely the wellbore springing and hydraulic/explosive fracturing concepts, both had inherent traits which would prevent them from being useful in practical applications. In the current paper, the previous results are reviewed to determine whether or not they are also applicable to tar sand. The conclusion reached is that neither technique would be practical for preparing a tar sands deposit for in-situ processing.

Boade, R. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Some Geotechnical Properties of Palm Biodiesel Contaminated Mining Sand and Weathered Granite Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil-pollution due to accidental during transportation or leakage from storage not only brings large damage to the environments, but it also affects the geotechnical properties of soil. Hence, an extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to investigate the geotechnical properties on palm biodiesel contaminated weathered granite soil and mining sand. A series of laboratory experiments has been carried out by using a direct simple shear device on clean and contaminated soil samples. The contaminated soil samples were mixed with palm biodiesel in the amount 5%, 10 % and 15 % by dry weight. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of palm biodiesel contamination on the mining sand and weathered granite soil samples. The overall results indicated decrease of shear strength with increasing palm biodiesel contents.

Yue Ling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Numerical simulation of transient gas flow during underbalanced drilling into a gas sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow gas drilling has long been recognized as a serious problem in offshore operations. Low fracture gradients and shallow casing do not permit shutting- in the well. Computer simulations of gas kicks during drilling require accurate description of the gas flow rate from the formation into the wellbore. The problem is complicated by the fact that during drilling into a gas sand the effective wellbore area exposed to flow is continually changing until the formation has been completely drilled. This paper describes a numerical model developed to calculate gas flow into the wellbore while drilling underbalanced into a gas sand. A two-dimensional finite difference model of transient flow from the reservoir has been coupled with a one-dimensional finite element model of two-phase flow in the wellbore.

Berg, K.A.; Skalle, P. (Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Trondheim (NO)); Podio, A.L. (Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

168 Phase Transformation from Ultra-Fine Grained Austenite in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Large number of grain boundaries in ultra-fine grained (UFG) metals ..... Oxides Nanocompounds for Electrodes in Electrochemical Capacitors.

248

Lignin as Both Fuel and Fusing Binder in Briquetted Anthracite Fines for Foundry Coke Substitute.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lignin that had been extracted from Kraft black liquor was investigated as a fusing binder in briquetted anthracite fines for a foundry coke substitute. Cupola… (more)

Lumadue, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Market model finds tight gas sands R and D offers most promise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional natural gas (UNG) - primarily tight gas sands - offers by far the largest opportunity for reducing gas costs between now and 2000, a team of researchers reported at the Sept. 1984 International Gas Research conference in Washington, DC. The promises of UNG R and D far outweigh those of synthetic natural gas (SNG), the researchers concluded, but stressed that SNG R and D should nonetheless continue - but with a different focus and changed performance goals.

Not Available

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Application of gas flotation and foam separation for the treatment of tar-sand wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of air flotation and foam separation for the treatment of tar sand, steam generation waste waters collected following an in-situ experiment in Vernal, Utah. It was found that the process waters were not amenable to treatment by means of polymer-aided air flotation or foam separation. Suspended solids were readily removed by the process, but dissolved organic substances were not affected significantly.

Boardman, G.D.; Nolan, B.T.; VanLeigh, L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

SANDS: A service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the ... Keywords: Clinical decision making, Computer communication networks/standards, Computer-assisted decision support techniques, Computerized decision support systems, Hospital information systems, Information systems/organization & administration/standards, Medical records systems, Systems integration

Adam Wright; Dean F. Sittig

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect

Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

Castle, J.W.; Molz, F.J.; Brame, S.E.; Falta, R.W.

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity is needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effect of temperature on wave velocities in sands and sandstones with heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of temperature on wave velocities in well cemented Massillon and Boise sandstones and unconsolidated Ottawa sand saturated with heavy hydrocarbons, as well as the dependence of compressional velocities in the hydrocarbons themselves as a function of temperature. The hydrocarbons selected as pore saturants were a commercial paraffin wax, 1-Eicosene, natural heavy crude, and natural tar. The experimental results show that the compressional wave velocities in the hydrocarbons decrease markedly with increasing temperature. In contrast wave velocities in the Massillon and Boise sandstones and unconsolidated Ottawa sand saturated with air or water decrease only little with increasing temperatures. The main reason for the large decreases in rocks with hydrocarbons is the melting of solid hydrocarbons, and high pore pressure. Thermal expansion of the saturants, and possibly thermal cracking of the heavy fractions and vaporization of the light fractions of the hydrocarbons may also contribute. The large decreases of the compressional and shear wave velocities in the hydrocarbon-saturated rocks and sands with temperature, suggest that seismic measurements such as used in seismology or borehole tomography may be very useful in detecting steam fronts in heavy hydrocarbon reservoirs undergoing steam flooding.

Wang, Z.; Nur, A.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Diamonds in the rough: identification of individual napthenic acids in oil sands process water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expansion of the oil sands industry of Canada has seen a concomitant increase in the amount of process water produced and stored in large lagoons known as tailings ponds. Concerns have been raised, particularly about the toxic complex mixtures of water-soluble naphthenic acids (NA) in the process water. To date, no individual NA have been identified, despite numerous attempts, and while the toxicity of broad classes of acids is of interest, toxicity is often structure-specific, so identification of individual acids may also be very important. The chromatographic resolution and mass spectral identification of some individual NA from oil sands process water is described. The authors concluded that the presence of tricyclic diamondoid acids, never before even considered as NA, suggests an unprecedented degree of biodegradation of some of the oil in the oil sands. The identifications reported should now be followed by quantitative studies, and these used to direct toxicity assays of relevant NA and the method used to identify further NA to establish which, or whether all NA, are toxic. The two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method described may also be important for helping to better focus reclamation/remediation strategies for NA as well as in facilitating the identification of the sources of NA in contaminated surface waters (auth)

Rowland, Steven J.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Jones, David; West, Charles E. (Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, Biogeochemistry Research Centre, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)); Frank, Richard A. (Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Division-Water Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Recovery of heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from underground formations  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of producing heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from an underground formation. The method consists of utilizing or establishing an aqueous fluid communication path within and through the formation between an injection well or conduit and a production well or conduit by introducing into the formation from the injection well or conduit hot water and/or low quality steam at a temperature in the range about 60{sup 0}-130{sup 0}C and at a substantially neutral or alkaline pH to establish or enlarge the aqueous fluid communication path within the formation from the injection well or conduit to the production well or conduit by movement of the introduced hot water or low quality steam through the formation, increasing the temperature of the injected hot water of low quality steam to a temperature in the range about 110{sup 0}-180{sup 0}C while increasing the pH of the injected hot water or low quality steam to a pH of about 10-13 so as to bring about the movement or migration or stripping of the heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation substantially into the hot aqueous fluid communication path with the formation and recovering the resulting produced heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation as an emulsion containing less than about 30% oil or bitumen from the production well or conduit.

McKay, A.S.

1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with hydrogeology and some hydromancy. We estimate its cost at 1 billion dollars - about 0.01 per sent of the USA 2007 Gross Domestic Product.

Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

2007-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Western Gas Sands Subprogram. Status report, October-November-December 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress during October, November and December 1982 of government-sponsored projects to increase gas production from low permeability gas sands of the Western United States, is summarized in this edition of the Western Gas Sands Subprogram (WGSS) Quarterly Status Report. During the quarter, major changes were made in the management of the subprogram. Personnel in the Division of Petroleum Projects Management at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) assumed the role of management for the Western Gas Sands Subprogram that had been performed by the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). BETC continued in-house research on the fluid and proppant problems of fracture conductivity, and management of the Multi-Well Experiment (MWX). Owing to economic constraints, all efforts at the Sandia National Laboratory that were not directly related to the performance of MWX were terminated. The projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory were reduced by approximately 50 percent. The efforts at the USGS were reduced by 70 percent. Significant progress was made in the MWX project. Both the Upper and Lower Cozzette zones were production tested. Interference tests run on the Upper Cozzette showed much higher in situ permeability than core and log analysis indicated. This higher permeability has been attributed to the natural fractures. The site was closed for the winter on December 22 and the test trailer moved to CER Corporation, Las Vegas, for maintenance and upgrading. 40 figures, 16 tables.

Crawley, A. (comp.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Pyrolysis of Sunnyside (Utah) tar sand: Characterization of volatile compound evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sunnyside (Utah) tar sand was subjected to programmed temperature pyrolysis and the volatile products were detected by tandem on-line mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in real time analyses. A heating rate of 4/degree/C/min from room temperature to 900/degree/C was employed. Evolution of hydrogen, light hydrocarbons, nitrogen-, sulfur- and oxygen-containing compounds was monitored by MS or MS/MS detection. Evolution of volatile organic compounds occurred in two regimes: 1) low temperature (maximum evolution at 150 to 175/degree C), corresponding to entrained organics, and 2) high temperature (maximum evolution at 440 to 460/degreeC), corresponding to cracking of large organic components. Pyrolysis yields were dominated by the evolution of light hydrocarbons. Alkanes and alkenes of two carbons and higher had temperatures of maximum evolution at approximately 440/degree/C, and methane at approximately 474/degree/C. Aromatic hydrocarbons had temperatures of maximum evolution slightly higher, at approximately 450/degree/C. In general, H/sub2/, CO, and CO/sub2/ exhibited evolution associated with hydrocarbon cracking reactions, and high temperature evolution associated with mineral decomposition, the water-gas shift reaction, and gasification reactions. Compared to other domestic tar sands, the gas evolution relected more mineral decomposition character for Sunnyside tar sand. 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Reynolds, J.G.; Crawford, R.W.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Composition of modern sand from the Sierra Nevada, California, USA: Implications for actualistic petrofacies of continental-margin magmatic arcs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modern and ancient source rocks: Geology, v. 18, p. 733–736.sand composition and source-rock type, and the secondaryrock types, including Paleozoic and Mesozoic metamorphic terranes, and Cenozoic volcanic cover, is a source

Ingersoll, Raymond V.; Eastmond, Daniel J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Improving both bond strength and corrosion resistance of steel rebar in concrete by water immersion or sand blasting of rebar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water immersion (2 days) and sand blasting were similarly effective for treating steel rebars for the purpose of improvement steel-concrete bond strength and corrosion resistance of steel in concrete. The increase in bond strength is due to surface roughening in the case of sand blasting and the presence of a surface layer in the case of water immersion. The increase in corrosion resistance is due to the surface uniformity rendered by either treatment.

Hou, J.; Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Towards Memory-Load Balanced Fast Fourier Transformations in Fine-Grain Execution Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The code let model is a fine-grain dataflow-inspired program execution model that balances the parallelism and overhead of the runtime system. It plays an important role in terms of performance, scalability, and energy efficiency in exascale studies ... Keywords: FFT, fine-grain, execution model, memory bandwidth

Chen Chen, Yao Wu, Stephane Zuckerman, Guang R. Gao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

HEP/123-qed Fine structure of alpha decay in odd nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an ? decay level scheme, the fine structure in odd nuclei is explained by taking into account the radial and rotational couplings between the unpaired valence nucleon and the core of the decaying system. It is shown that the experimental behavior of the ? decay fine structure phenomenon is governed by the dynamical characteristics of the system.

M. Mirea

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Can hidden correlations mimic a variable fine structure constant?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Murphy et al. (2003a, MNRAS, 345, 609) claim to find evidence of cosmological variations of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ in the spectra of intervening QSO absorption line systems. We find that this result is affected by systematic effects. The $\\alpha$ values estimated in individual line systems depend on the set of atomic transitions used and therefore the quoted dependence on the cosmic age may reflect the fact that different sets of transitions are used at different redshifts. A correlation between line shifts and relative optical depths of the atomic transitions is also present. This correlation is very tight for a high-redshift subsample and accounts for the anomalous dispersion of the $\\alpha$ values found by Murphy et al. (2003a) in this subsample. The above correlations are consistent with a scenario in which gravitational redshift, caused by the gravity of the dark halo, contributes to the shift in frequency of individual components. Gravitational redshift causes differential spectral shifts of the same order as magnitude of those measured. In the presence of line misidentification, these shifts can be interpreted in terms of a variable $\\alpha$. In order to verify the gravitational redshift hypothesis, a direct access to Murphy et al. (2003a) data, or to a large amount of new high resolution data, is necessary.

Rino Bandiera; Edvige Corbelli

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fine-tuning molecular energy levels by nonresonant laser pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the shifts imparted to vibrational and rotational levels of a linear molecule by a nonresonant laser field at intensities of up to 10^12 W/cm^2. Both types of shift are found to be either positive or negative, depending on the initial rotational state acted upon by the field. An adiabatic field-molecule interaction imparts a rotational energy shift which is negative and exceeds the concomitant positive vibrational shift by a few orders of magnitude. The rovibrational states are thus pushed downward in such a field. A nonresonant pulsed laser field that interacts nonadiabatically with the molecule is found to impart rotational and vibrational shifts of the same order of magnitude. The nonadiabatic energy transfer occurs most readily at a pulse duration which amounts to about a tenth of the molecule's rotational period, and vanishes when the sudden regime is attained for shorter pulses. We applied our treatment to the much studied 87Rb_2 molecule in the last bound vibrational levels of its lowest singlet and triplet electronic states. Our calculations indicate that 15 ns and 1.5 ns laser pulses of an intensity in excess of 5x10^9 W/cm^2 are capable of dissociating the molecule due to the vibrational shift. Lesser shifts can be used to fine tune the rovibrational levels and thereby to affect collisional resonances by the nonresonant light. The energy shifts may be discernible spectroscopically, at a 10 MHz resolution.

Mikhail Lemeshko; Bretislav Friedrich

2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future oil shale and tar sands resource development.

O'Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Seismic amplitude and coherency response of channel sand, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological drilling hazards are a major concern in the ics. drilling and development of offshore reservoirs. Some of these hazards may display high amplitudes on seismic profiles and some may be associated with stratigraphic features. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with channel sand deposits may indicate potential accumulations of hydrocarbons in reservoirs. However, shallow hydrocarbon accumulations are rarely of production size. More often, they are potential geological drilling hazards that could inhibit the development of petroleum resources from deeper hydrocarbon-bearing layers. Traditionally, existing and potential geologic hazards are identified by interpretation of high-resolution site survey data, acquired specifically for drilling hazard delineation. This paper describes a new technique for drilling hazard identification using a conventional 3D seismic amplitude dataset. An event coherence calculation program is applied to a 3D seismic dataset to derive seismic attributes sufficient to highlight structural and stratigraphic discontinuities in the area. A resultant 3D difference cube is used to establish fault framework and to detect spatial distribution of channel deposits in the area and their geometries. Superposition of the difference cube on seismic amplitude data allows simultaneous display of structural and stratigraphic discontinuities and reflectivity information. Therefore, it is used for the delineation of channels, which show anomalous amplitudes, identification of their dimensions and spatial locations, and implication of gas-charged sand distribution within the detected channel. The paper gives a detailed description of a workflow, which was found sufficient for delineation of likely gas-charged sand channels, and discusses the ways to adjust the proposed workbox to specific objectives.

Fischer, Elena Mikhaylovna

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Rock matrix and fracture analysis of flow in western tight gas sands: 1986 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents progress for the second year of a five-year project concerned with the pore structure and flow properties of low permeability gas sands. The main objective of work during the first year was to carry out advanced core analysis on cores recovered from the Multi-Well Field Experiment. In Phase 2, the properties of both fractured and non-fractured samples (hereafter referred to as matrix) have been studied. Special attention was given to the combined effect of overburden pressure and water saturation on gas flow. 11 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Morrow, N.R.; Buckley, J.S.; Cather, S.M.; Brower, K.R.; Dandge, V.; Graham, M.; Gonzales, B.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

In situ heat treatment from multiple layers of a tar sands formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. The method includes providing a drive fluid to a first hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the first layer. At least some of the mobilized hydrocarbons are allowed to flow into a second hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation. Heat is provided to the second layer from one or more heaters located in the second layer. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the second layer of the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect

The first twelve months of the project focused on collecting data for characterization and modeling. In addition, data from Coalinga Field was analyzed to define the fractal structure present in the data set. The following sections of the report parallel the first four subtasks of the investigation were: (1) Collect and Load Property Data from Temblor Outcrops in California, (2) Collect and Load Property Data from Temblor Reservoir Sands, West Coalinga Field, California, (3) Collect and Load Property Data from Continuous Upper Cretaceous Outcrops in Utah, and (4) Define Fractal Structure in the Data Sets and Apply to Generating Property Representations.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field, California. Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contained approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred W.; Bridges, Robert A.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Lorinovich, Caitlin J.; Lu, Silong

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biochars impact on soil moisture storage in an Ultisol and two Aridisols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biochar additions to soils can improve soil water storage capability, however, there is sparse information identifying feedstocks and pyrolysis conditions that maximize this improvement. Nine biochars were pyrolyzed from five feedstocks at two temperatures and their physical and chemical properties were characterized. Biochars were mixed at 2% wt w{sup -1} into a Norfolk loamy sand (Fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kandiudult), a Declo silt loam (Coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, mesic xeric Haplocalcid), or a Warden silt loam (Coarse-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic xeric Haplocambid). Untreated soils served as controls. Soils were laboratory incubated in pots for 127 days and were leached about every 30 days with deionized water. Soil bulk densities were measured before each leaching event. For six days thereafter, pot holding capacities (PHC) for water were determined gravimetrically and were used as a surrogate for soil moisture contents. Water tension curves were also measured on the biochar treated and untreated Norfolk soil. Biochar surface area, surface tension, ash, C, and Si contents, in general, increased when produced under higher pyrolytic temperatures ({ge}500 C). Both switchgrass biochars caused the most significant water PHC improvements in the Norfolk, Declo and Warden soils compared to the controls. Norfolk soil water tension results at 5 and 60 kPa corroborated that biochar from switchgrass caused the most significant moisture storage improvements. Significant correlation occurred between the PHC for water with soil bulk densities. In general, biochar amendments enhanced the moisture storage capacity of Ultisols and Aridisols, but the effect varied with feedstock selection and pyrolysis temperature.

Novak, Jeffrey M.; Busscher, Warren J.; Watts, Don W.; Amonette, James E.; Ippolito, James I.; Lima, Isabel M.; Gaskin, Julia; Das, K. C.; Steiner, Christoph; Ahmedna, Mohamed; Rehrah, Djaafar; Schomberg, Harry

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

The introduction of the microchanneling phenomenon to cyclic steam stimulation and its application to the numerical simulator (sand deformation concept)  

SciTech Connect

Historically, a vertical or horizontal fracture is believed to be a main recovery mechanism for a cyclic steam-injection process in unconsolidated oil sands. Most current computer models for the process are based on the fracture concept. With the postulated sand deformation concept, on the other hand, the injected fluid is able to penetrate the unconsolidated oil sand by creating microchannels. When the pore pressure is reduced during production, these secondary flow channels will collapse totally or partially. Condensed steam tends to sweep fluids where the bitumen had been heated and imparts mobility as a result of the injected hot fluid. Flow geometry of the new concept is described in this paper. The physical differences between the sand deformation zone and the no-deformation zone are also investigated. The three major differences between these two zones are porosity change, pressure level, and energy and flow characteristics resulting from the existence of microchannels. All these modifications were incorporated successfully into a conventional numerical thermal simulator. The new model provided an excellent match for all the field observations (steam-injection pressure, oil-and-water production rates, fluid production temperature, downhole production pressure, and salinity changes) of a steam-stimulated well in an unconsolidated oil sand. The study indicates that the most important phenomenon for in-situ recovery of bitumen is the one-way-valve effect of the microchannels, which are opened during injection and closed during production.

Ito, Y.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic concerns associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits: state-of-knowledge  

SciTech Connect

Tar-sand petroleum-extraction procedures undergoing field testing for possible commercial application in the US include both surface (above-ground) and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface tar-sand systems currently being field tested in the US are thermal decomposition processes (retorting), and suspension methods (solvent extraction). Underground bitumen extraction procedures that are also being field tested domestically are in situ combustion and steam-injection. Environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic concerns associated with construction and operation of 20,000-bbl/d commercial tar-sand surface and in situ facilities have been estimated and are summarized in this report. The principal regulations that commercial tar-sand facilities will need to address are also discussed, and environmental control technologies are summarized and wherever possible, projected costs of emission controls are stated. Finally, the likelihood-of-occurrence of potential environmental, health, and safety problems that have been determined are reviewed, and from this information inference is made as to the environmental acceptability of technologically feasible 20,000-bbl/d commercial tar-sand oil-extraction procedures.

Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

1982-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

279

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor's logic, which mimics human expert's decision-making process. TGS Advisor's recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor’s logic, which mimics human expert’s decision-making process. TGS Advisor’s recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

DOE Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power Initiative Project DOE Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power Initiative Project July 6, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The success of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project has led to a repayment of $580,000 to U.S. taxpayers, with much more - potentially exceeding $13 million - possible in the future. Great River Energy (GRE) of Maple Grove, Minn., made the payment to the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) recently as part of an agreement associated with the DryFining™ CCPI project. Implemented by NETL, CCPI is a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal government and private industry aimed at stimulating investment

284

Fine and Microstructure Observations on a Hydrographic Section from the Azores to the Flemish Cap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous conductivity-temperature-depth-dissolved-oxygen (CTD) data are used to investigate the spatial distribution of fine and microstructure between the Azores and Flemish Cap. The CTD data are used to calculate a conductivity-microstructure ...

Daniel T. Georgi; Raymond W. Schmitt

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Gravity Wave – Fine Structure Interactions, Part 2: Energy Dissipation Evolutions, Statistics, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fritts et al. (2013) employ four direct numerical simulations (DNS) to examine the dynamics and energetics of idealized gravity wave – fine structure (GW-FS) interactions. That study, and this companion paper, were motivated by the ubiquity of ...

David C. Fritts; Ling Wang

286

Fine-Resolved, Near-Coastal Spatiotemporal Variation of Temperature in Response to Insolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses GIS-based modeling of incoming solar radiation to quantify fine-resolved spatiotemporal responses of monthly average temperature, and diurnal temperature variation, at different times and locations within a field study area located ...

Nikki Vercauteren; Georgia Destouni; Carl Johan Dahlberg; Kristoffer Hylander

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Effect of Prongs in the Measurement of Atmospheric Turbulence with Fine-Wire Resistance Transducers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the fine-wire resistance temperature transducer was analyzed including the effects of (i) conducive heat transfer between wire and the supporting prong and (ii) a thermal boundary layer, which can form around the prongs especially ...

V. P. Singh; F. Eaton; R. Rubio

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Optimizing fine-grained communication in a biomolecular simulation application on Cray XK6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achieving good scaling for fine-grained communication intensive applications on modern supercomputers remains challenging. In our previous work, we have shown that such an application --- NAMD --- scales well on the full Jaguar XT5 without long-range ...

Yanhua Sun; Gengbin Zheng; Chao Mei; Eric J. Bohm; James C. Phillips; Laximant V. Kalé; Terry R. Jones

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Influence of Mesoscale Dynamics and Turbulence on Fine Dust Transport in Owens Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine dust particles emitted from Owens (dry) Lake in California documented during the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) of 2006 have been examined using surface observations and a mesoscale aerosol model. Air quality stations around Owens (...

Qingfang Jiang; Ming Liu; James D. Doyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Isopycnal Momentum Budget of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The momentum budget of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is analyzed using data from the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model (FRAM), using density as a vertical coordinate, since density is approximately conserved on streamlines. This steady ...

Peter D. Killworth; M. Majed Nanneh

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining reserves of the Leona Este Field, which is located in the southern portion of the Eastern Venezuela Basin. Two or more of these reservoir sands, which are interbedded with shales, have been simultaneously produced pursuing an increase in the oil production rate, but an unexpected production performance was obtained: the accelerated and early increase of the water volume associated to the produced oil has caused the shut down of some wells in the Leona Este Field. In order to understand this productive performance and to re-evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the study interval, it is important to describe these reservoirs in terms of their depositional origin and trap formation. An integrated reservoir model was constructed using all the available geological, geophysical and production data. The hydrocarbon trapping mechanism of each studied stratigraphic interval, traditionally known as the "S5", "TU", "TL", "U1U", "U1L", "U2U", "U2MA", "U2MB" and "U2L" sands, includes two components: ? Stratigraphic component: each stratigraphic interval presents one or more reservoir zones composed by sandy deposits that fill belts of stacked tidal-fluvial channels in a SSE-NNW trending tide-dominated estuarine system. In most intervals, these contemporaneous-in-deposition reservoir zones are not connected due to the lateral variation of facies present in the tide-dominated estuary. ? Structural component: northward dipping strata have been offset by a W-E trending major normal fault and secondary normal faults striking parallel to the major one. The major fault is the southern seal of the hydrocarbon traps. The most important prospects of the study interval are the reservoir zones 1 and 2 of the "U1L" sand, the reservoir zone 3 of the "U2MB" sand, and the "U1U" sand, which show more than 15 feet of average net sand thickness, and contain the largest volume of recoverable oil per reservoir zone in the Leona Este Field.

Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Bayesian considerations on the multiverse explanation of cosmic fine-tuning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental laws and constants of our universe seem to be finely tuned for life. The various multiverse hypotheses are popular explanations for the fine tuning. This paper reviews the four main suggestions on inference in the presence of possible multiple universes and observer selection effects. Basic identities from probability theory and previously unnoticed conditional dependencies of the propositions involved are used to decide among the alternatives. In the case of cosmic fine-tuning, information about the observation is not independent of the hypothesis. It follows that the observation should be used as data when comparing hypotheses. Hence, approaches that use the observation only as background information are incorrect. It is also shown that in some cases the self-sampling assumption by Bostrom leads to probabilities greater than one, leaving the approach inconsistent. The "some universe" (SU) approach is found wanting. Several reasons are given on why the "this universe" (TU) approach seems to be correct. Lastly, the converse selection effect by White is clarified by showing formally that the converse condition leads to SU and its absence to TU. The overall result is that, because multiverse hypotheses do not predict the fine-tuning for this universe any better than a single universe hypothesis, the multiverse hypotheses fail as explanations for cosmic fine-tuning. Conversely, the fine-tuning data does not support the multiverse hypotheses.

V. Palonen

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

How can New Zealand producers increase the level of fine wool production? Research using linear programming as a modelling tool with case studies in Marlborough and Canterbury.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fine wool is suitable for clothing, both designer suits and outdoor active wear. Around 6,817 tonnes of clean, fine wool was exported between July 2009… (more)

Kidd, Robert James Trevelyan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

NUREG/CR-6547 SAND97-2776 DOSFAC2 User's Guide  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

547 547 SAND97-2776 DOSFAC2 User's Guide Prepared by M. L.Young/SNL D. Chanin/TE Sandia National Laboratories Technadyne Engineering Prepared for U . S . Nuclear Regulatory Commission AVAllABlLlTY NOTICE Availabiliiy o f Reference Materials Cied in NFlC Publications Most documents cited In NRC publications will be available from one of the following sources: 1. The NRC Public DoclJment Room. 2120 L Street, NW., Lower Level. Washington, DC 20555-0001 2. The Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, P. 0. Box 37082, Washington, DC 20402-9328 3. Although the listing that follows represents the majority of documents cited in NRC publications, it is not in- tended to be exhaustive. The National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22 161 -0002

296

Temperature effects on oil-water relative permeabilities for unconsolidated sands  

SciTech Connect

This study presents an experimental investigation of temperature effects on relative permeabilities of oil- water systems in unconsolidated sands. The fluids used in this study were refined mineral oil and distilled water. A rate sensitivity study was done on residual oil saturation and oil and water relative permeabilities. The temperature sensitivity study of relative permeabilities was conducted in 2 parts. The first was to investigate changes in residual oil saturation with temperature where the cores were 100% saturated with oil at the start of the waterflood. The second part continued the floods for a longer time until the water-cut was virtually 100%. Under these conditions, little change in residual oil saturation was observed with temperature. A study on viscous instabilities also was performed. This verified the existence of viscous fingers during waterflooding. It also was observed that tubing volume after the core could cause fingering, resulting in lower apparent breakthrough oil recoveries.

Sufi, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In thermally enhanced recovery processes like cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) or steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), continuous steam injection entails changes in pore fluid, pore pressure and temperature in the rock reservoir, that are most often unconsolidated or weakly consolidated sandstones. This in turn increases or decreases the effective stresses and changes the elastic properties of the rocks. Thermally enhanced recovery processes give rise to complex couplings. Numerical simulations have been carried out on a case study so as to provide an estimation of the evolution of pressure, temperature, pore fluid saturation, stress and strain in any zone located around the injector and producer wells. The approach of Ciz and Shapiro (2007) - an extension of the poroelastic theory of Biot-Gassmann applied to rock filled elastic material - has been used to model the velocity dispersion in the oil sand mass under different conditions of temperature and stress. A good agreement has been found between these pre...

Nauroy, Jean-François; Guy, N; Baroni, Axelle; Delage, Pierre; Mainguy, Marc; 10.2516/ogst/2012027

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Groundwater flow near the Shoal Site, Sand Springs Range, Nevada: Impact of density-driven flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of flow from a highland recharge area in a mountain range in north-central Nevada to discharge areas on either side of the range is evaluated to refine a conceptual model of contaminant transport from an underground nuclear test conducted beneath the range. The test, known as the Shoal event, was conducted in 1963 in granitic rocks of the Sand Springs Range. Sparse hydraulic head measurements from the early 1960s suggest flow from the shot location to the east to Fairview Valley, while hydrochemistry supports flow to salt pans in Fourmile Flat to the west. Chemical and isotopic data collected from water samples and during well-logging arc best explained by a reflux brine system on the west side of the Sand Springs Range, rather than a typical local flow system where all flow occurs from recharge areas in the highlands to a central discharge area in a playa. Instead, dense saline water from the playa is apparently being driven toward the range by density contrasts. The data collected between the range and Fourmile Flat suggest the groundwater is a mixture of younger, fresher recharge water with older brine. Chemical contrasts between groundwater in the east and west valleys reflect the absence of re-flux water in Fairview Valley because the regional discharge area is distant and thus there is no accumulation of salts. The refluxing hydraulic system probably developed after the end of the last pluvial period and differences between the location of the groundwater divide based on hydraulic and chemical indicators could reflect movement of the divide as the groundwater system adjusts to the new reflux condition.

Chapman, J.; Mihevc, T.; McKay, A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

After the fire is out: A post in-situ combustion audit, Upper Miocene deepwater sands, San Joaquin Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

An audit of small-scale, air in-situ combustion projects developed in the upper Miocene Monarch and Webster unconsolidated, arkosic sand reservoirs, Midway Sunset field, Kern County, California, demonstrates minor rock diagenesis. Burn distribution and progression is controlled by reservoir continuity, layering, and original permeability variations. Air in-situ combustion projects were operated between 1962 and 1976. Injected air drives a burning oil (coke) front through a reservoir reaching maximum temperatures of 650C. Dense new well control including 3,000 ft of core is part of a large steamdrive development. Fireflood-induced diagenesis was clearly visible in core. Altered zones include sands with reduced oil saturations, burn zones with remaining coke, and reddish (oxidized) zones with no hydrocarbons. Wireline log response in these zones have been highly modified. Detailed mapping by subzone using pre- and post-burn logs permits the determination of three-dimensional burn and reduced saturation geometries. Little rock alteration occurred in these sands. The only diagenesis of the sand fraction was to calcite grains, where oil/calcite reactions produced calcium sulfate rims and CO{sub 2} gas. X-ray diffraction of finer 'matrix' reveals no recrystallization of opal-CT, no irreversible collapse of smectite, and only minor removal of kaolinite. Partial dissolution of opal and zeolites was visible in SEM. This nonequilibrium mineral suite probably reflects kinetic control by grain size, protective grain coatings, and alteration time.

Eagan, J.M.; Barrett, M.L. (Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Soustek, P.G. (Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Variations of Winds and Turbulence Seen by the 50-MHz Radar at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean vertical profiles of the winds from about 5 to 20 km at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, are described. The variability of wind speed, spectral width, volume reflectivity calibrated as CN2, and vertical wind shear are documented as ...

G. D. Nastrom; F. D. Eaton

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Comprehensive Study of the Reservoir Sand and Depositional Setting of Garden Banks Field 236, North-Central Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Central Gulf of Mexico Sean O'Brien, M. Royhan Gani, and Abu K. M. Sarwar Department of Earth and Environmental in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hydrocarbon explo- ration and production of these deposits has yielded one of the largest gas producing trends in the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf-slope break. Reservoir sands were

Gani, M. Royhan

303

Sulfate Fining Chemistry in Oxidized and Reduced Soda-Lime-Silica Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Various reducing agents were used and their additions were varied to (1) increase glass quality through eliminating defects from silica scum, (2) decrease SOx emissions through changing the kind and quantity of reducing agents, and (3) improve production efficiency through increased flexibility of glass redox control during continuous processing. The work included measuring silica sand dissolution and sulfate decomposition in melts from glass batches. Glass batches were heated at a temperature-increase rate deemed similar to that experienced in the melting furnace. The sulfate decomposition kinetics was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis and evolved gas analysis. Sulfur concentrations in glasses quenched at different temperatures were determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The distribution of residual sand (that which was not dissolved during the initial batch reactions) in the glass was obtained as a function of temperature with optical microscopy in thin-sections of melts. The fraction of undissolved sand was measured with X-ray diffraction. The results of the present study helped Visteon Inc. reduce the energy consumption and establish the batch containing 0.118 mass% of graphite as the best candidate for Visteon glass production. The improved glass batch has a lower potential for silica scum formation and for brown fault occurrence in the final glass product. It was established that bubbles trapped in the melt even at 1450 C have a high probability to be refined when reaching the hot zone in the glass furnace. Furthermore, silica sand does not accumulate at the glass surface and dissolves faster in the batch with graphite than in the batch with carbocite.

Matyas, Josef; Hrma, Pavel R.

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

304

Technology assessment: environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits  

SciTech Connect

The tar-sand resources of the US have the potential to yield as much as 36 billion barrels (bbls) of oil. The tar-sand petroleum-extraction technologies now being considered for commercialization in the United States include both surface (above ground) systems and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface systems currently receiving the most attention include: (1) thermal decomposition processes (retorting); (2) suspension methods (solvent extraction); and (3) washing techniques (water separation). Underground bitumen extraction techniques now being field tested are: (1) in situ combustion; and (2) in situ steam-injection procedures. At this time, any commercial tar-sand facility in the US will have to comply with at least 7 major federal regulations in addition to state regulations; building, electrical, and fire codes; and petroleum-industry construction standards. Pollution-control methods needed by tar-sand technologies to comply with regulatory standards and to protect air, land, and water quality will probably be similar to those already proposed for commercial oil-shale systems. The costs of these systems could range from about $1.20 to $2.45 per barrel of oil produced. Estimates of potential pollution-emisson levels affecting land, air, and water were calculated from available data related to current surface and in situ tar-sand field experiments in the US. These data were then extrapolated to determine pollutant levels expected from conceptual commercial surface and in situ facilities producing 20,000 bbl/d. The likelihood-of-occurrence of these impacts was then assessed. Experience from other industries, including information concerning health and ecosystem damage from air pollutants, measurements of ground-water transport of organic pollutants, and the effectiveness of environmental-control technologies was used to make this assessment.

Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

305

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. These samples' combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. This report covers the first quarter's progress. Major activities during this period were focused on finding the plants where a demo MTU column will be installed to prepare the samples needed to characterize the combustion behavior of slurry effluents. Also, a meeting was held at Penn State University to discuss the availability of the laboratory furnace for testing the plant coal/recovered coal fines blends.

Singh, Shyam.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser Printers Speaker(s): Tunga Salthammer Date: October 9, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Several publications have recently appeared which describe the release of ultra-fine particles (UFPs) from hardcopy devices not only in chamber tests but also under real room conditions. Due to assumed health impacts attributed to UFPs this subject currently receives substantial public attention. For the characterization of emitted UFPs from laser printers, different test methods (box chamber tests, flow chamber tests, furnace tests) and analytical techniques (SMPS, FMPS, VHTDMA, GC/MS, Headspace/MS, thermography, etc...) were applied. It could be shown that the release of

307

Exciton fine-structure splitting of telecom wavelength single quantum dots: statistics and external strain tuning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a charge tunable device, we investigate the fine structure splitting of neutral excitons in single long-wavelength (1.1\\mu m response of the splitting to the external strain, including positive and negative tuning slopes, different tuning ranges, and linear and parabolic dependencies, indicating that these physical parameters depend strongly on the unique microscopic structure of the individual quantum dot. To better understand the experimental results, we apply a phenomenological model describing the exciton polarization and fine-structure splitting under uniaxial strain. The model predicts that, with an increased experimental strain tuning range, the fine-structure can be effectively canceled for select telecom wavelength dots using uniaxial strain. These results are promising for the generation of on-demand entangled photon pairs at telecom wavelengths.

Luca Sapienza; Ralph N. E. Malein; Christopher E. Kuklewicz; Peter E. Kremer; Kartik Srinivasan; Andrew Griffiths; Edmund Clarke; Ming Gong; Richard J. Warburton; Brian D. Gerardot

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

308

Localized electrical fine tuning of passive microwave and radio frequency devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the localized electrical fine tuning of passive multiple element microwave or RF devices in which a nonlinear dielectric material is deposited onto predetermined areas of a substrate containing the device. An appropriate electrically conductive material is deposited over predetermined areas of the nonlinear dielectric and the signal line of the device for providing electrical contact with the nonlinear dielectric. Individual, adjustable bias voltages are applied to the electrically conductive material allowing localized electrical fine tuning of the devices. The method of the present invention can be applied to manufactured devices, or can be incorporated into the design of the devices so that it is applied at the time the devices are manufactured. The invention can be configured to provide localized fine tuning for devices including but not limited to coplanar waveguides, slotline devices, stripline devices, and microstrip devices.

Findikoglu, Alp T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Facies and architecture of deep-water Sandstone lobes: Comparison of a shale-rich and a sand-rich system  

SciTech Connect

Two different foreland-basin deep-water sandstone systems have been studied for reservoir characterization purposes: the Broto lobes of the Eocene Hecho group, spain, and two sand bodies of the Oligocene-Miocene Arakintos Sandstone, Greece. The shale-rich Broto lobes are characterized by distinct vertical developments in terms of facies and expression of heterogeneity. Bed-thickness trends, lateral extent of sand beds, and facies variability are related to overall sand/shale ratio. A feature common to most of the sandstone packages is the occurrence of a basal slump and/or pebbly mudstone. The dominant sediment source is considered fluvial. Variation in sand quality within and between lobes is high. Deposition is considered to be strongly controlled by tectonics. The sand-rich Arakintos Sandstone consists of massive and pebbly sandstones, forming thick, sandy sheets alternating with relatively coarse-grained, thin-bedded turbidites. Facies, geometries, vertical organization, and the relation between grain size and bed thickness indicate a constrained development of the lobes, partly influenced by preexisting topography. A coastal sediment source is inferred. Little variation exists in sand quality within and between the lobes. The overall regularity in terms of facies, and the absence of slumps, suggest that fluctuations in relative sea level may have formed a major control on deposition. The two lobe systems illustrate the effect of tectonics, sediment type, topographic confinement, and possible sea level on facies and sand body architecture of deep-water sandstone lobes.

Schuppers, J.D. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ecological Consequences of Landscape Fragmentation on the Lizard Community in the Mescalero-Monahans Shinnery Sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape fragmentation poses a major threat to biodiversity world-wide. The goal of my dissertation research was to determine the effects of landscape fragmentation on a lizard community in the Mescalero-Monahans shinnery sands, New Mexico and the extent to which conservation efforts might protect biodiversity in this ecosystem. My research relied heavily on data collected from a large-scale spatially-replicated comparative study. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impacts of landscape fragmentation as a result of oil and gas development on the dunes sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus arenicolus). Results from analysis of lizard community structure indicate that fragmented sites are less diverse than non-fragmented sites. In particular, two species are found in lower density and occupancy in the fragmented locations (Holbrookia maculata and Sceloporus arenicolus). Analysis of landscape configuration at the scale of a trapping grid indicated that sand dune blowout shape and size differed between fragmented and non-fragmented locations. Differences in landscape pattern were associated with reduced lizard diversity. Because of this association between lower diversity and altered landscape pattern, extensive alterations to landscape pattern may cause disassembly at the ecosystem level. The maintenance of existing landscape pattern may be important to the maintenance of diversity in this ecosystem. Evaluations of habitat use patterns of the lizards in this community demonstrate that a few species have narrow preferences for certain habitats. In particular, H. maculata, Phrynosoma cornutum, and S. arenicolus all demonstrated narrow habitat use patterns. Effect size of fragmentation for each species indicated that the same three species showed a large effect when comparing their average abundances between fragmented and non-fragmented locations. Thus species that are most likely to benefit or be harmed by landscape fragmentation are those with the most specific habitat requirements. Umbrella species represent one of many approaches to conservation using surrogate species. I used data on ants, beetles, small mammals, lizards, and endemic species to test the use of the dunes sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus arenicolus) as an umbrella for endemism and biodiversity of the Mescalero-Monahans shinnery sands ecosystem. I applied a comparative approach at three spatial scales to examine how conservation practices at different scales may affect biodiversity and endemism in this ecosystem. At the largest scale, the frequency of occurrence for endemic species increased though no other patterns emerged because S. arenicolus was present at all sites and there were no relationships between relative abundances of S. arenicolus and the other taxonomic groups. At the smallest scale, both beetle species richness, diversity, and endemic species richness were higher in the presence of S. arenicolus. To protect biodiversity in this ecosystem, conservation efforts should focus on protection at the scale of the species distribution rather than on the small-scale placement of individual well pads.

Leavitt, Daniel 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND IMPROVED RECOVERY: APPLICATION TO HEAVY OIL SANDS  

SciTech Connect

Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity has the potential to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involves application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation, particularly in heavy oil sands. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field. Observations of lateral variability and vertical sequences observed in Temblor Formation outcrops has led to a better understanding of reservoir geology in West Coalinga Field. Based on the characteristics of stratigraphic bounding surfaces in the outcrops, these surfaces were identified in the subsurface using cores and logs. The bounding surfaces were mapped and then used as reference horizons in the reservoir modeling. Facies groups and facies tracts were recognized from outcrops and cores of the Temblor Formation and were applied to defining the stratigraphic framework and facies architecture for building 3D geological models. The following facies tracts were recognized: incised valley, estuarine, tide- to wave-dominated shoreline, diatomite, and subtidal. A new minipermeameter probe, which has important advantages over previous methods of measuring outcrop permeability, was developed during this project. The device, which measures permeability at the distal end of a small drillhole, avoids surface weathering effects and provides a superior seal compared with previous methods for measuring outcrop permeability. The new probe was used successfully for obtaining a high-quality permeability data set from an outcrop in southern Utah. Results obtained from analyzing the fractal structure of permeability data collected from the southern Utah outcrop and from core permeability data provided by Chevron from West Coalinga Field were used in distributing permeability values in 3D reservoir models. Spectral analyses and the Double Trace Moment method (Lavallee et al., 1991) were used to analyze the scaling and multifractality of permeability data from cores from West Coalinga Field. T2VOC, which is a numerical flow simulator capable of modeling multiphase, multi-component, nonisothermal flow, was used to model steam injection and oil production for a portion of section 36D in West Coalinga Field. The layer structure and permeability distributions of different models, including facies group, facies tract, and fractal permeability models, were incorporated into the numerical flow simulator. The injection and production histories of wells in the study area were modeled, including shutdowns and the occasional conversion of production wells to steam injection wells. The framework provided by facies groups provides a more realistic representation of the reservoir conditions than facies tracts, which is revealed by a comparison of the history-matching for the oil production. Permeability distributions obtained using the fractal results predict the high degree of heterogeneity within the reservoir sands of West Coalinga Field. The modeling results indicate that predictions of oil production are strongly influenced by the geologic framework and by the boundary conditions. The permeability data collected from the southern Utah outcrop, support a new concept for representing natural heterogeneity, which is called the fractal/facies concept. This hypothesis is one of the few potentially simplifying concepts to emerge from recent studies of geological heterogeneity. Further investigation of this concept should be done to more fully apply fractal analysis to reservoir modeling and simulation. Additional outcrop permeability data sets and further analysis of the data from distinct facies will be needed in order to fully develop

James W. Castle; Fred J. Molz; Ronald W. Falta; Cynthia L. Dinwiddie; Scott E. Brame; Robert A. Bridges

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Effect of temperature on oil/water relative permeabilities of unconsolidated and consolidated sands  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 20 years, a number of studies have reported temperature effects on two-phase relative permeabilities in porous media. However, some of the reported results have been contradictory. Also, observed effects have not been explained in terms of fundamental properties known to govern two-phase flow. The purpose of this study was to attempt to isolate the fundamental properties affecting two-phase relative permeabilities at elevated temperature. Laboratory dynamic displacement relative permeability measurements were made on unconsolidated and consolidated sand cores, using water and a refined white mineral oil. Experiments were run on 2 in. (51 mm) diameter, 20 in. (510 mm) long cores from room temperature to 300/sup 0/F (149/sup 0/C). Unlike the results of previous researchers, essentially no changes with temperatures were observed in either residual saturations or relative permeability relationships. It was concluded that previous results may have been affected by viscous instabilities, capillary end-effects, and/or difficulties in maintaining material balances.

Miller, M.A.; Ramey, H.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products : version 4.  

SciTech Connect

This guide describes the R&A process, Common Look and Feel requirements, and preparation and publishing procedures for communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Samples of forms and examples of published communications products are provided. This guide takes advantage of the wealth of material now available on the Web as a resource. Therefore, it is best viewed as an electronic document. If some of the illustrations are too small to view comfortably, you can enlarge them on the screen as needed. The most significant changes since Version 1 involve the introduction of the electronic Review and Approval application at the Sandia/California (CA) and Sandia/New Mexico (NM) sites. Authors are advised to check the most current material on the application Web site before initiating the R&A process. The format of this document is considerably different than that expected of a SAND Report. It was selected to permit the large number of illustrations and examples to be placed closer to the text that references them. In the case of forms, covers, and other items that are included as examples, a link to the Web is provided so that you can access the items and download them for use.

Brittenham, Phillip W.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products : version 3.  

SciTech Connect

This guide describes the R&A process, Common Look and Feel requirements, and preparation and publishing procedures for communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Samples of forms and examples of published communications products are provided. This guide takes advantage of the wealth of material now available on the Web as a resource. Therefore, it is best viewed as an electronic document. If some of the illustrations are too small to view comfortably, you can enlarge them on the screen as needed. The most significant changes since Version 1 involve the introduction of the electronic Review and Approval application at the Sandia/California (CA) and Sandia/New Mexico (NM) sites. Authors are advised to check the most current material on the application Web site before initiating the R&A process. The format of this document is considerably different than that expected of a SAND Report. It was selected to permit the large number of illustrations and examples to be placed closer to the text that references them. In the case of forms, covers, and other items that are included as examples, a link to the Web is provided so that you can access the items and download them for use.

Brittenham, Phillip W.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO 2 S. D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. Doughty (CADoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453 ) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 P. R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313), Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 510-495-2461) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 K. Pruess(K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116,

318

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO 2 Christine Doughty (cadoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453) Karsten Pruess (k_pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; 510-486-5875) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Susan D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Paul R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313) Bureau of Economic Geology P.O. Box X, The University of Texas Austin, TX 78713 Christopher T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 530-752-1372) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences 1 Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616 Abstract The capacity of fluvial brine-bearing formations to sequester CO 2 is investigated using numerical simulations of CO

319

Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrographic study of Fe in bitumens derived from tar sands  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on bitumens extracted from tar sands from various locations (Utah, California, Kentucky, and Alberta) that were examined by size exclusion chromatography with on-line element-specific detection to study the Fe concentration as a function of size. In most cases, the resulting profiles exhibit unimodal distributions at relatively large molecular size with very similar times for maximum elution. specifically, Sunnyside (Utah) and McKittrick (California) tar-sand bitumens exhibited very intense maxima consistent with extremely high bulk Fe contents. Arroyo Grande (California) exhibited an additional maximum at very large molecular size. This size behavior of the Fe appears to correlate with the large molecular size Ni and V components eluted under the same conditions.

Reynolds, J.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)); Biggs, W.R. (Chevron Research Co., Richmond, CA (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University's prestigious  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University's prestigious graduate training program in conservation, is accepting applications for The Leon Levy Visiting Fellowship specializing in the conservation of archaeological materials of the ancient world, from the western

Mohri, Mehryar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Induction of fine-grained part-of-speech taggers via classifier combination and crosslingual projection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an original approach to part-of-speech tagging of fine-grained features (such as case, aspect, and adjective person/number) in languages such as English where these properties are generally not morphologically marked. The goals of ...

Elliott Franco Drábek; David Yarowsky

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Kinetic Energy Budget and Internal Instabilities in the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy analysis of the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model (FRAM) reveals the instability processes in the model. The main source of time-mean kinetic energy is the wind stress and the main sink is transfer to mean potential energy. The wind ...

V. O. Ivchenko; A. M. Treguier; S. E. Best

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Daily Simulation of Ozone and Fine Particulates over New York State: Findings and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the potential utility of the application of a photochemical modeling system in providing simultaneous forecasts of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) over New York State. To this end, daily simulations from the ...

C. Hogrefe; W. Hao; K. Civerolo; J.-Y. Ku; G. Sistla; R. S. Gaza; L. Sedefian; K. Schere; A. Gilliland; R. Mathur

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

We are not equally negative: fine-grained labeling for multimedia event detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia event detection (MED) is an effective technique for video indexing and retrieval. Current classifier training for MED treats the negative videos equally. However, many negative videos may resemble the positive videos in different degrees. ... Keywords: attribute representation, attribute selection, fine-grained labeling, multi-source attributes, multimedia event detection (MED)

Zhigang Ma; Yi Yang; Zhongwen Xu; Nicu Sebe; Alexander G. Hauptmann

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants  

SciTech Connect

Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Seasonal influence of insolation on fine-resolved air temperature variation and snowmelt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses GIS-based modeling of incoming solar radiation to quantify fine-resolved spatiotemporal responses of year-round monthly average temperature within a field study area located on the eastern coast of Sweden. A network of temperature ...

Nikki Vercauteren; Steve W. Lyon; Georgia Destouni

327

Research article: Fine grained sampling of residue characteristics using molecular dynamics simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a fine-grained computational analysis of protein structure, we investigated the relationships between a residue's backbone conformations and its side-chain packing as well as conformations. To produce continuous distributions in high resolution, we ... Keywords: Backbone conformation, Dynameome, Molecular dynamics simulation, Ramachandran plot, Residue volume, Rotamer, Side-chain packing

Hyun Joo; Xiaotao Qu; Rosemarie Swanson; C. Michael McCallum; Jerry Tsai

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Transport and Resuspension of Fine Particles in a Tidal Boundary Layer near a Small Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a theory on the transport and resuspension of fine particles in a tidal boundary layer when the ambient tidal flow is nonuniform due to a peninsula along the coastline. As a first step toward better physical understanding the ...

Chiang C. Mei; Chimin Chian; Feng Ye

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

SunCast: fine-grained prediction of natural sunlight levels for improved daylight harvesting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daylight harvesting is the use of natural sunlight to reduce the need for artificial lighting in buildings. The key challenge of daylight harvesting is to provide stable indoor lighting levels even though natural sunlight is not a stable light source. ... Keywords: daylight harvesting, fine-grained prediction, sunlight, wireless sensor networks

Jiakang Lu; Kamin Whitehouse

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Coarse to Fine Facial Key Landmark Points Locating Algorithm Based on Active Shape Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we proposed an improved coarse to fine improved algorithm to enhance the accuracy of facial key landmark points locating. Based on the analysis of PCA, the proposed algorithm redesigns the parameter update rule through adding a monotonically ... Keywords: ASM, facial key landmarks point locating

Bo Fan; Xiaokang Yang; Xi Zhou; Weiyao Lin; Changjian Chen

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The parXXL Environment: Scalable Fine Grained Development for Large Coarse Grained Platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and datastructure update, that are mandatory to send cell output into con- nected cell input buffers on remote with a paradoxical situation: their modeling and thinking is fine-grained, speaking e.g. of atoms, cells, items collaborations with researchers in optic components and hot plasma (from LMOPS and LPMIA lab- oratories) guide

Vialle, Stéphane

332

Sand-rich submarine fans, Mio-Pliocene of Santa Monica Basin, offshore California: Untapped exploration targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Santa Monica Basin lies directly west of Los Angeles Basin, one of the world's most prolific oil provinces. Published literature suggests that Santa Monica Basin was starved of coarse clastics during the late Miocene through Pliocene. However, seismic sequence stratigraphy indicates that deposition of sand-rich fans alternated with mixed-load systems throughout the Delmontian and Repettian stages. Seismic sequences and facies are calibrated to seismic and well data from Beta Oil Field, in San Pedro Basin to the south. Eustasy evidently played a dominant role in controlling sedimentation. Variations in tan lithology, thickness, and basinward extent correspond to worldwide changes in sea level. Regional erosion surfaces apparently signify drops in sea level. Overlying thick seismic packages display hummocky to chaotic seismic facies separated by high- to low-amplitude continuous reflections. These configurations are interpreted as inner- to mid-fan channels separated by overbank deposits in sand-rich lowstand fans. High-amplitude basinwide reflections bound the tops of the sand-rich intervals, and likely represent condensed sections formed during sea-level rises. Thin seismic intervals above the condensed sections display downlap, and are interpreted as interbedded sandstones and shales of prograding highstand fans. Sediment input to Santa Monica Basin, based on seismic-facies and isochron patterns, was predominantly from the (present-day) north, with subordinate input from the east. High-amplitude eustatic variations dominated deposition and sequence development even in this tectonically active basin Previously unidentified sand-rich fans are present, and have not been drilled.

May, J.A.; McMillen, K.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

Severinghaus, J.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Report on variation of electrical conductivity during steam injection in unconsolidated sand saturated with a salt solution  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical electrical methods are useful in evaluating the performance of certain classes of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations and also remediation operations for contaminant spills. Electrical resistivity is sensitive to the concentration of ionic species in solution in fluids present in the subsurface zone. Such fluids are displaced during oil recovery operations and contaminant remediation. If the resistivity of the displacing fluid differs from the in situ fluid, then a geophysical method for detecting resistivity variations may be capable of tracking the advance of the displacing fluid. This report presents the results of experiments designed to determine the variations in resistivity that occur when steam is injected into a homogeneous, fully-saturated sand. These experiments were simple, one-dimensional laboratory steam injection experiments. They were performed using a glass tube filled with a tightly-packed sand and fitted with an injection port at one end and an exit port at the other In each experiment, the sand pack was initially saturated with a brine and then steam was introduced at one end of the tube. Analytic solutions for the steam front velocity, steam temperature, steam distribution, salt concentration profile, and liquid saturation are presented and are used with appropriate correlations of electrical conductivity to describe the observed behavior. The results of these experiments should provide experimental justification for the electrical conductivity variations that are calculated from the analytic solutions. In addition, the experiments may yield new information regarding features of the data that may not result from the analytical modelling.

Vaughan, P. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Udell, K.S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Wilt, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Feasibility of calculating petrophysical properties in tight-sand reservoirs using neural networks. Final report, October 1989-July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to determine the feasibility of using neural networks to estimate petrophysical properties in tight sand reservoirs. A second objective was to gain some experience concerning how to approach the development of a future prototype, including what should be done and what should be avoided. Gas Research Institute (GRI) focused the project on tight sands because they contain enormous gas reserves and their complicated lithology represents a challenge to log analysts. The data were supplied by GRI from two of its geographically proximate experimental wells in tight sand formations. The nets were tested in sections of those wells that were not used for training, and in two other wells, one in a geographically close but geologically unrelated formation and one in Wyoming. The feasibility testing demonstrated that the relatively simple neural networks developed have comparable accuracy with standard logging analysis estimates in wells that contributed data to the training set. Transportability of the network was tested by using core measurements in two wells in which the nets were not trained, with inconclusive results. Recommendations were made to increase the accuracy of the neural networks.

Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Javitz, H.S.; Park, W.; Lee, J.D.; Bergman, A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Continuity and permeability development in the tight gas sands of the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The relationships between reservoir characteristics and flow regimes exhibited by twenty-one Uinta Basin gas wells represent fluvial, lake margin, and lacustrine deposits. Production data were analyzed to determine the type of flow for each well. This analysis indicated that one well exhibits radial flow, thirteen wells linear flow, and seven wells indeterminate flow regimes. Values of SSP, ..delta..t, R/sub w/ and SP curve patterns were determined from well logs. These data were compared for the three types of flow observed. It appears that SSP, R/sub w/ and SP pattern may be useful in qualitatively distinguishing between sands of low continuity and those with moderate continuity. The permeabilities are considerably higher than those normally attributed to ''tight sands.'' Also permeability correlates inversely with the number of sands completed in each well. Consideration of the orientations of linear features in the area and those of reservoir lenses in outcrops indicates that the relationship between frac orientation and lens geometry cannot be effectively predicted without a good technique to predict lens orientation. Completion strategies to optimize frac efficiency are suggested, based upon the findings of this study.

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Characterization of Black Trona Waters and use of the waters for recovery of bitumen from US tar sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There were two principal research objectives for this project. The first objective was to characterize organic material in Black Trona Water with an emphasis on colloids and organic acids. The second objective was to determine the utility of Black Trona Water as a solvent for extracting fossil fuels from US Tar Sands. Spectroscopic studies, molecular weights and shapes of polymeric acids and behavior as a polysoap were determined. Experiments indicate that trona water is preferable to Black Trona Water as an extraction agent for tar sands. The trona water is fairly efficient at stripping bitumen from the sand with gentle heating. In trona water, the displaced bitumen is readily collected on a Teflon surface (i.e., a non-water-wetted surface) with little material dissolving in the water. In contrast, the polysoap in Black Trona Water appears to take up displaced bitumen in a detergent-like process. Separating bitumen from the polysoap would undoubtedly be very difficult. 38 references, 16 figures, 2 tables.

Barden, R.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Permeability of laboratory-formed methane-hydrate-bearing sand: Measurements and observations using x-ray computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

Methane hydrate was formed in two moist sands and a sand/silt mixture under a confining stress in an X-ray-transparent pressure vessel. Three initial water saturations were used to form three different methane-hydrate saturations in each medium. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe location-specific density changes caused by hydrate formation and flowing water. Gas-permeability measurements in each test for the dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing states are presented. As expected, the effective permeabilities (intrinsic permeability of the medium multiplied by the relative permeability) of the moist sands decreased with increasing moisture content. In a series of tests on a single sample, the effective permeability typically decreased as the pore space became more filled, in the order of dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing. In each test, water was flowed through the hydrate-bearing medium and we observed the location-specific changes in water saturation using CT scanning. We compared our data to a number of models, and our relative permeability data compare most favorably with models in which hydrate occupies the pore bodies rather than the pore throats. Inverse modeling (using the data collected from the tests) will be performed to extend the relative permeability measurements.

Kneafsey, T. J.; Seol, Y.; Gupta, A.; Tomutsa, L.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hydrophobic Dewatering of Fine Coal. Topical report, March 1, 1995-March 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many advanced fine coal cleaning technologies have been developed in recent years under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy. However, they are not as widely deployed in industry as originally anticipated. An important reason for this problem is that the cleaned coal product is difficult to dewater because of the large surface area associated with fine particles. Typically, mechanical dewatering, such as vacuum filtration and centrifugation, can reduce the moisture to 20-35% level, while thermal drying is costly. To address this important industrial problem, Virginia Tech has developed a novel dewatering process, in which water is displaced from the surface of fine particulate materials by liquid butane. Since the process is driven by the hydrophobic interaction between coal and liquid butane, it was referred to as hydrophobic dewatering (HD). A fine coal sample with 21.4 pm median size was subjected to a series of bench-scale HD tests. It was a mid-vol bituminous coal obtained from the Microcel flotation columns operating at the Middle Fork coal preparation plant, Virginia. All of the test results showed that the HD process can reduce the moisture to substantially less than 10%. The process is sensitive to the amount of liquid butane used in the process relative to the solids concentration in the feed stream. Neither the intensity nor the time of agitation is critical for the process. Also, the process does not require long time for phase separation. Under optimal operating conditions, the moisture of the fine coal can be reduced to 1% by weight of coal.

Yoon, R.; Sohn, S.; Luttrell, J.; Phillips, D.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Impacts of human trampling and periodic sand inundation on Southern California intertidal algal turf communities : implications for conservation and management of rocky shores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with rocky shore algae. Pgs. 36- 56 in: P.G.associated with rocky shore algae. In: P. G. Moore & R.h. Boulder Boulder / Turf Other Algae Sand > 50 mm, < 200 mm

Huff, Tonya Michelle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Volatile compound evolution from the programmed temperature pyrolysis of Big Clifty and McKittrick tar sands at a 10 degrees C/min heating rate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Clifty (Kentucky) and McKittrick (California) tar sands were pyrolyzed at a 10{degrees}C/min heating rate from room temperature to 900{degrees}C. The volatile compounds were detected on-line and in real time by tandem mass spectrometry using MS and MS/MS detection. This paper reports the programmed temperature pyrolysis behaviors of Big Clifty and McKittrick tar sands and compares their results. 48 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Reynolds, J.G.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Appendix 2: coal fines disposal. Final report, December 1982-September 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of several studies conducted by KRSI under the Advanced Coal Gasification Technical Analyses contract with GRI. It addresses the issue of disposal and/or utilization of the coal fines that cannot be used as feedstock for fixed-bed (i.e. Lurgi) gasifiers. Specific items addressed are: (1) Technical, legal and economic aspects of fines burial, (2) Estimation of the premium for fines-free coal delivered to an SNG plant and resulting reduction in SNG production costs, (3) Comparison of the relative advantages and limitations of Winkler and GKT gasifiers to consuming fines, (4) Review of coal-size consist curves in the GRI Guidelines to assess the fines content of ROM coals, (5) a first-pass design and cost estimate using GKT gasifiers in tandem with Lurgi gasifiers in an North Dakota lignite-to-SNG plant to consume full range of coal-size consist, (6) Evaluation of the General Electric technology for extrusion of coal fines and testing of the extrudates in a fixed-bed gasifier, and (7) Investigation of equipment and variables involved in briquetting of coal fines, such that fines could be fed to the gasifiers along with the lump coal.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing is essential for producing gas and oil at an economic rate from low permeability sands. Most fracturing treatments use water and polymers with a gelling agent as a fracturing fluid. The water is held in the small pore spaces by capillary pressure and is not recovered when drawdown pressures are low. The un-recovered water leaves a water saturated zone around the fracture face that stops the flow of gas into the fracture. This is a particularly acute problem in low permeability formations where capillary pressures are high. Depletion (lower reservoir pressures) causes a limitation on the drawdown pressure that can be applied. A hydraulic fracturing process can be energized by the addition of a compressible, sometimes soluble, gas phase into the treatment fluid. When the well is produced, the energized fluid expands and gas comes out of solution. Energizing the fluid creates high gas saturation in the invaded zone, thereby facilitating gas flowback. A new compositional hydraulic fracturing model has been created (EFRAC). This is the first model to include changes in composition, temperature, and phase behavior of the fluid inside the fracture. An equation of state is used to evaluate the phase behavior of the fluid. These compositional effects are coupled with the fluid rheology, proppant transport, and mechanics of fracture growth to create a general model for fracture creation when energized fluids are used. In addition to the fracture propagation model, we have also introduced another new model for hydraulically fractured well productivity. This is the first and only model that takes into account both finite fracture conductivity and damage in the invaded zone in a simple analytical way. EFRAC was successfully used to simulate several fracture treatments in a gas field in South Texas. Based on production estimates, energized fluids may be required when drawdown pressures are smaller than the capillary forces in the formation. For this field, the minimum CO{sub 2} gas quality (volume % of gas) recommended is 30% for moderate differences between fracture and reservoir pressures (2900 psi reservoir, 5300 psi fracture). The minimum quality is reduced to 20% when the difference between pressures is larger, resulting in additional gas expansion in the invaded zone. Inlet fluid temperature, flow rate, and base viscosity did not have a large impact on fracture production. Finally, every stage of the fracturing treatment should be energized with a gas component to ensure high gas saturation in the invaded zone. A second, more general, sensitivity study was conducted. Simulations show that CO{sub 2} outperforms N{sub 2} as a fluid component because it has higher solubility in water at fracturing temperatures and pressures. In fact, all gas components with higher solubility in water will increase the fluid's ability to reduce damage in the invaded zone. Adding methanol to the fracturing solution can increase the solubility of CO{sub 2}. N{sub 2} should only be used if the gas leaks-off either during the creation of the fracture or during closure, resulting in gas going into the invaded zone. Experimental data is needed to determine if the gas phase leaks-off during the creation of the fracture. Simulations show that the bubbles in a fluid traveling across the face of a porous medium are not likely to attach to the surface of the rock, the filter cake, or penetrate far into the porous medium. In summary, this research has created the first compositional fracturing simulator, a useful tool to aid in energized fracture design. We have made several important and original conclusions about the best practices when using energized fluids in tight gas sands. The models and tools presented here may be used in the future to predict behavior of any multi-phase or multi-component fracturing fluid system.

Mukul Sharma; Kyle Friehauf

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Channel complex architecture of fine-grained submarine fans at the base-of-slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fan-valley or upper fan channel connects the submarine canyon on the outer shelf-upper slope to the basin proper. It is an erosionally-formed channel that is a conduit for sediment transported to the basin. The valley may widen where it enters the base-of-slope area. Most of the density flows are much smaller than the initial flow and therefore will not occupy the entire width of the upper fan channel. Smaller individual channels will be constructed resulting in a massive fill comprised of amalgamated sandstones. Sand-rich levees and overbank deposits flank each channel. Channel switching may take place toward locations with a slightly steeper gradient. These switches most likely result from irregular flow successions and different flow sizes. Erosion between successive channels is common, removing part of the channel fill and levee-overbank deposits. This results in a disorderly distribution of low-permeability barriers creating local obstruction to connectivity. A study of the sedimentological architecture of the updip mid-fan channel complex was conducted on cliff sections of the Permian Tanqua Karoo subbasin in South Africa, and in Big Rock Quarry in North Little Rock, Arkansas. Seismic records of the base-of-slope of the Mississippi Fan show a widening pattern, and of the Bryant Canyon Fan Complex south of the Sigsbee Escarpment the channel complexity. Integration of seismic data in outcrop observations improves our understanding of the complexity of many good reservoir sands, typically overlain by slope shales.

Bouma, A.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Gwang, H. [Kunsan National Univ. (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of); Van Antwerepen, O. [Univ. of Port Elizabeth (South Africa)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

New microtextural criterion for differentiation of compaction and early cementation in fine-grained limestones  

SciTech Connect

Mechanisms of porosity reduction in fine-grained limestones (micrites), the most abundant type of limestone, have been difficult to evaluate because of the fine crystal sizes. Scanning electron microscopy reveals common minute voids termed microfenestrae ({approximately} 1.5-40{mu}m diameter) in Holocene lime muds from all marine carbonate environments studied. Experimental compaction of lime muds greatly reduces abundance of microfenestrae at pressures less than 10 bar. Thus, the abundance of cement-filled microfenestrae in micrites appears to be a widely applicable criterion for recognition of the extent of cementation prior to significant compaction in any given micrite. Microfenestrae in most Phanerozoic micrites studied are about as common as in Holocene lime muds, suggesting that early cementation is a more important mechanism in micrite porosity reduction than recent views have suggested.

Lasemi, Z.; Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford OH (USA)); Sandberg, P.A. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fine-grained authorization for job and resource management usingakenti and the globus toolkit(R)  

SciTech Connect

As the Grid paradigm is adopted as a standard way of sharing remote resources across organizational domains, the need for fine-grained access control to these resources increases. This paper presents an authorization solution for job submission and control, developed as part of the National Fusion Collaboratory, that uses the Globus Toolkit 2 and the Akenti authorization service in order to perform fine-grained authorization of job and resource management requests in a Gridenvironment. At job startup, it allows the system to evaluate a user's Resource Specification Language request against authorization policies on resource usage determining how many CPUs or memory a user can use on a given resource or which executables the user can run based on authorization policies, it allows other virtual organization members to manage the user's job.

Thompson, Mary R.; Essiari, Abdelilah; Keahey, Kate; Welch, Von; Lang, S.; Liu, Bo

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Constraints on Field Theoretical Models for Variation of the Fine Structure Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent theoretical ideas and observational claims suggest that the fine structure constant alpha may be variable. We examine a spectrum of models in which alpha is a function of a scalar field. Specifically, we consider three scenarios: oscillating alpha, monotonic time variation of alpha, and time-independent alpha that is spatially varying. We examine the constraints imposed upon these theories by cosmological observations, particle detector experiments, and ``fifth force'' experiments. These constraints are very strong on models involving oscillation, but cannot compete with bounds from the Oklo sub-nuclear reactor on models with monotonic time-like variation of alpha. One particular model with spatial variation is consistent with all current experimental and observational measurements, including those from two seemingly conflicting measurements of the fine structure constant using the many multiplet method on absorption lines.

Charles L. Steinhardt

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

5-Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory Five Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere FY2001-FY2005 NETL PM Research Program Ambient Sampling & Analysis Control Technology R&D Source Characterization Predictive Modeling -iii- TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B. Outlook for PM and the Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A. Program Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 B. Current Program Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1. The Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

350

Is there Correlation between Fine Structure and Dark Energy Cosmic Dipoles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis (including redshift tomography) of the cosmic dipoles in the Keck+VLT quasar absorber and in the Union2 SnIa samples. We show that the fine structure constant cosmic dipole obtained through the Keck+VLT quasar absorber sample at $4.1\\sigma$ level is anomalously aligned with the corresponding dark energy dipole obtained through the Union2 sample at $2\\sigma$ level. The angular separation between the two dipole directions is $11.3^\\circ \\pm 11.8^\\circ$. We use Monte Carlo simulations to find the probability of obtaining the observed dipole magnitudes with the observed alignment, in the context of an isotropic cosmological model with no correlation between dark energy and fine structure constant $\\alpha$. We find that this probability is less than one part in $10^6$. We propose a simple physical model (extended topological quintessence) which naturally predicts a spherical inhomogeneous distribution for both dark energy density and fine structure constant values. The model is based on the existence of a recently formed giant global monopole with Hubble scale core which also couples non-minimally to electromagnetism. Aligned dipole anisotropies would naturally emerge for an off-centre observer for both the fine structure constant and for dark energy density. This model smoothly reduces to \\lcdm for proper limits of its parameters. Two predictions of this model are (a) a correlation between the existence of strong cosmic electromagnetic fields and the value of $\\alpha$ and (b) the existence of a dark flow on Hubble scales due to the repulsive gravity of the global defect core (`Great Repulser') aligned with the dark energy and $\\alpha$ dipoles. The direction of the dark flow is predicted to be towards the spatial region of lower accelerating expansion. Existing data about the dark flow are consistent with this prediction.

Antonio Mariano; Leandros Perivolaropoulos

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

Engineering and Biological Assessment of Fine Mesh Fish Protection-Modified Traveling Water Screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study that examined: (1) the protection afforded to early life stages (eggs, larvae, and juveniles) of fish and shellfish by different traveling water screen (TWS) mesh sizes and (2) the engineering challenges, operational and maintenance (O&M) issues, and installation costs that power plants may experience if fine-mesh modified TWSs are identified as a site-specific best technology available (BTA) for minimizing entrainment mortality in accordance with a ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

352

Measurement of the magnetic fine structure of the 10G and 10H states of helium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetic fine-structure intervals separating the four members of the 10G and 10H manifolds of helium have been measured with a precision of 0.1% using a fast-beam microwave-optical resonance technique. The results are found to be in good agreement with theory, illustrating that the two-electron wave function is very nearly hydrogenic. The measurements are also used to determine the small exchange energies of the 10G and 10H states.

Hessels, E.A.; Sturrus, W.G.; Lundeen, S.R.; Cok, D.R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fine grain pipeline systems for real-time motion and stereo-vision computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image processing systems require high computational load that motivates the design of specific hardware architectures in order to arrive at real-time platforms. We adopt innovative design techniques based on the intensive utilisation of the inherent ... Keywords: FPGAs, algorithm parallelisation, cognitive vision models, customised architectures, data flow architectures, field programmable gate arrays, fine-grain pipelining, high performance architectures, image processing, on-chip integration, optical flow, pipelined techniques, real-time motion, reconfigurable hardware, stereo vision, superscalar units

Javier Diaz; Eduardo Ros; Alberto Prieto; Francisco J. Pelayo

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The HIGGS Boson Mass at 2 Loops in the Finely Tuned Split Supersymmetric Standard Model  

SciTech Connect

The mass of the Higgs boson in the finely tuned Split Supersymmetric Standard Model is calculated. All 1 loop threshold effects are included, in addition to the full RG running of the Higgs quartic coupling through 2 loops. The 2 loop corrections are very small, typically less than 1GeV. The 1 loop threshold corrections to the top yukawa coupling and the Higgs mass generally push the Higgs mass down a few GeV.

Binger, M

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Very Fine Aerosols from the World Trade Center Collapse Piles: Anaerobic Incineration  

SciTech Connect

By September 14, three days after the initial World Trade Center collapse, efforts at fire suppression and heavy rainfall had extinguished the immediate surface fires. From then until roughly mid-December, the collapse piles continuously emitted an acrid smoke and fume in the smoldering phase of the event. Knowledge of the sources, nature, and concentration of these aerosols is important for evaluation and alleviation of the health effects on workers and nearby residents. In this paper, we build on our earlier work to ascribe these aerosols to similar processes that occur in urban incinerators. The simultaneous presence of finely powdered (circa 5 {micro}m) and highly basic (pH 11 to 12) cement dust and high levels of very fine (< 0.25 {micro}m) sulfuric acid fumes helps explain observed health impacts. The unprecedented levels of several metals in the very fine mode can be tied to liberation of those metals that are both present in elevated concentrations in the debris and have depressed volatility temperatures caused by the presence of organic materials and chlorine.

Cahill, T A; Cliff, S S; Shackelford, J; Meier, M; Dunlap, M; Perry, K D; Bench, G; Leifer, R

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: internal wave fine structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic wave fields propagating long ranges through the ocean are refracted by the inhomogeneities in the ocean's sound speed profile. Intuitively, for a given acoustic source frequency, the inhomogeneities become ineffective at refracting the field beyond a certain fine scale determined by the acoustic wavelength. On the other hand, ray methods are sensitive to infinitely fine features. Thus, it is possible to complicate arbitrarily the ray dynamics, and yet have the wave field propagate unchanged. This feature raises doubts about the ray/wave correspondence. Given the importance of various analyses relying on ray methods, a proper model should, at a minimum, exclude all of the fine structure that does not significantly alter the propagated wave field when the correspondence to the ray dynamics is integral. We develop a simple, efficient, smoothing technique to be applied to the inhomogeneities - a low pass filtering performed in the spatial domain - and give a characterization of its necessary extent as a function of acoustic source frequency. We indicate how the smoothing improves the ray/wave correspondence, and show that the so-called ``ray chaos'' problem remains above a very low frequency (about 15-25 Hz).

Katherine C. Hegewisch; Nicholas R. Cerruti; Steven Tomsovic

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Decoherent Histories Quantum Mechanics with One 'Real' Fine-Grained History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decoherent histories quantum theory is reformulated with the assumption that there is one "real" fine-grained history, specified in a preferred complete set of sum-over-histories variables. This real history is described by embedding it in an ensemble of comparable imagined fine-grained histories, not unlike the familiar ensemble of statistical mechanics. These histories are assigned extended probabilities, which can sometimes be negative or greater than one. As we will show, this construction implies that the real history is not completely accessible to experimental or other observational discovery. However, sufficiently and appropriately coarse-grained sets of alternative histories have standard probabilities providing information about the real fine-grained history that can be compared with observation. We recover the probabilities of decoherent histories quantum mechanics for sets of histories that are recorded and therefore decohere. Quantum mechanics can be viewed as a classical stochastic theory of histories with extended probabilities and a well-defined notion of reality common to all decoherent sets of alternative coarse-grained histories.

Murray Gell-Mann; James B. Hartle

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Fine-Tuning Price of Neutralino Dark Matter in Models with Non-Universal Higgs Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the amounts of fine-tuning of the parameters of the MSSM with non-universal soft supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the Higgs masses (the NUHM) that would be required for the relic neutralino density to lie within the range favoured by WMAP and other astrophysical and cosmological observations. Such dark matter fine-tuning is analogous to the commonly studied electroweak fine-tuning associated with satisfying the electroweak symmetry breaking conditions, which we also study for completeness. We identify several distinct regions of the NUHM parameter space: a bulk region, a $\\stau-\

John Ellis; S. F. King; J. P. Roberts

2007-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

Dependence of waterflood remaining oil saturation on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters in mixed-wet turbidite sands  

SciTech Connect

The dependence of waterflood oil recovery on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters was investigated by numerical simulation. The relative permeability and capillary pressure curves were based on laboratory measurements on unconsolidated sands. The water-wet case is based on the assumption that the system is water-wet and measurements were made with refined oil. The mixed-wet case assumed that the system is mixed-wet and restored-state measurements were made with crude oil. The reservoir model was a prototype turbidite sand with a range of thickness and permeability values. The economic oil recovery was based on an economic limit water cut of 50%. The remaining oil saturation (ROS) in the swept region for the water-wet cases was close to the residual oil saturation. The ROS of the mixed-wet cases ranged from low values near the residual oil saturation to far above the residual oil saturation. It is dependent on the reservoir parameters that govern (1) the vertical film surface drainage of oil by gravity, (2) accumulation of a high oil saturation and thus a high relative permeability under the caprock, and (3) up-dip migration of the oil that accumulated under the caprock. The dependence on the reservoir parameters can be summarized by dimensionless groups. There is a dimensionless time for the vertical displacement of oil by gravity. The accumulation of a high oil saturation under the caprock is dependent on the ratio of the capillary transition zone and the sand thickness. The updip migration is dependent on a combination of the gravity number and the endpoint mobility ratio.

Hirasaki, G.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Laboratory study on the use of tire shreds and rubber-sand in backfills and reinforced soil applications. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Millions of scrap tires are discarded annually in the United States, the bulk of which are currently landfilled or stockpiled. This consumes valuable landfill space, or, if improperly disposed, creates a fire hazard and provides a prolific breeding ground for rates and mosquitoes. The use of tire shreds as lightweight fill material can sharply reduce the tire disposal problem. The present study, based on laboratory testing and numerical modeling, examines the feasibility of incorporating tire shreds and rubber-sand mixtures as lightweight geomaterial in embankments and backfills.

Bernal, A.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

1996-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Numerical modeling of gas migration into and through faulted sand reservoirs in Pabst Field (Main Pass East Block 259), northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The further exploration and development of Pabst Gas Field with faulted sand reservoirs require an understanding of the properties and roles of faults, particularly Low Throw near Vertical Faults (LTNVFs), in gas migration and accumulation at a reservoir scale. This study presents numerical modeling of gas migration and accumulation processes in Pabst Field. Based on studies of the reservoirs, structure, faults, and fluid properties of the field, reservoir scale modeling was performed to determine the gas supply style and the fault properties by means of hundreds of iterations in which the fault properties and gas supply pattern were modified to match the gas distribution obtained from modeling with the gas distribution inferred from seismic data constrained by well data and production data. This study finds that in the main three sand reservoirs of Pabst Field the overlying younger sands cut down into the underlying older sands, so that partial connections between the three sands allow gas communication among the sands. Meanwhile, three fault families break up the three sands into numerous compartments. A primary fault and large synthetic and antithetic faults act as gas migration pathways: the synthetic and antithetic faults are inlets for gas flow and the primary fault is an outlet, and LTNVFs act as barriers to gas flow. Modeling requires fault properties in the field to change while the field is formed. The porosity and permeability of the faults in Pabst Field are 10% and 0.1 md, respectively, during gas charging of the sand reservoirs. But when there is no gas charging and large gas columns are maintained, the porosity and permeability of the faults decrease to 6% and 0.001 md, respectively. Pabst Field probably has an impulse gas charge history. Fault opening and closing, gas charge and recharge, and replacement of gas by formation water may occur. A combination of stratigraphy, structure, overpressure and gas charge rate control gas migration style, gas charge history, and gas distribution in the field. The significance of the study is that this improved numerical approach for modeling gas migration into and through specifically faulted sand reservoirs fills the gap between basin modeling and production modeling.

Li, Yuqian

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

An assessment of density-based fine-scale methods for estimating diapycnal diffusivity in the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine-scale estimates of diapycnal diffusivity ? are computed from CTD and XCTD data sampled in Drake Passage and in the eastern Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean and are compared against microstructure measurements from the same times and ...

Marina Frants; Gillian M. Damerell; Sarah T. Gille; Karen J. Heywood; Jennifer MacKinnon; Janet Sprintall

363

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Humidity Fluctuations over a Vegetated Surface Measured with a Lyman-Alpha Hygrometer and a Fine-Wire Thermocouple Psychrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of humidity fluctuations over a crop made with a specially modified Lyman-alpha hygrometer and a fine-wire thermocouple psychrometer are compared. Standard deviations of the two sets of data are comparable except ...

T. Grayson Redford Jr.; Shashi B. Verma; Norman J. Rosenberg

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Documentation and Preservation of Art-in-Architecture of Michigan: The Section of Fine Arts Projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Section of Fine Arts’ Art-in-Architecture program created public and permanent cultural artifacts that expressed and recorded American beliefs, values, and stories for future generations.… (more)

Chidester, Cheryl Ann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fine-grained sedimentation on the Chenier Plain Coast and inner continental shelf, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the evolution of a mud-dominated coastal sedimentary system on multiple time scales. Fine-grained systems exhibit different properties and behavior from sandy coasts, and have received relatively little ...

Draut, Amy Elizabeth

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Comment on the paper "Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?" at arXiv:1003.3703v1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A constructive and straightforward proof of the existence of the Zeeman topology is provided, contradicting a fallacious claim contained in the paper "Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?" available at arXiv:1003.3703v1.

Giacomo Dossena

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

368

Comment on the paper "Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?" at arXiv:1003.3703v1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A constructive and straightforward proof of the existence of the Zeeman topology is provided, contradicting a fallacious claim contained in the paper "Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?" available at arXiv:1003.3703v1.

Dossena, Giacomo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Development of an Ultra-fine Coal Dewatering Technology and an Integrated Flotation-Dewatering System for Coal Preparation Plants  

SciTech Connect

The project proposal was approved for only the phase I period. The goal for this Phase I project was to develop an industrial model that can perform continuous and efficient dewatering of fine coal slurries of the previous flotation process to fine coal cake of {approx}15% water content from 50-70%. The feasibility of this model should be demonstrated experimentally using a lab scale setup. The Phase I project was originally for one year, from May 2005 to May 2006. With DOE approval, the project was extended to Dec. 2006 without additional cost from DOE to accomplish the work. Water has been used in mining for a number of purposes such as a carrier, washing liquid, dust-catching media, fire-retardation media, temperature-control media, and solvent. When coal is cleaned in wet-processing circuits, waste streams containing water, fine coal, and noncombustible particles (ash-forming minerals) are produced. In many coal preparation plants, the fine waste stream is fed into a series of selection processes where fine coal particles are recovered from the mixture to form diluted coal fine slurries. A dewatering process is then needed to reduce the water content to about 15%-20% so that the product is marketable. However, in the dewatering process currently used in coal preparation plants, coal fines smaller than 45 micrometers are lost, and in many other plants, coal fines up to 100 micrometers are also wasted. These not-recovered coal fines are mixed with water and mineral particles of the similar particle size range and discharged to impoundment. The wasted water from coal preparation plants containing unrecoverable coal fine and mineral particles are called tailings. With time the amount of wastewater accumulates occupying vast land space while it appears as threat to the environment. This project developed a special extruder and demonstrated its application in solid-liquid separation of coal slurry, tailings containing coal fines mostly less than 50 micron. The extruder is special because all of its auger surface and the internal barrier surface are covered with the membranes allowing water to drain and solid particles retained. It is believed that there are four mechanisms working together in the dewatering process. They are hydrophilic diffusion flow, pressure flow, agitation and air purging. Hydrophilic diffusion flow is effective with hydrophilic membrane. Pressure flow is due to the difference of hydraulic pressure between the two sides of the membrane. Agitation is provided by the rotation of the auger. Purging is achieved with the air blow from the near bottom of the extruder, which is in vertical direction.

Wu Zhang; David Yang; Amar Amarnath; Iftikhar Huq; Scott O'Brien; Jim Williams

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

370

Effect of coarse or fine grinding on utilization of dry or ensiled corn by lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the effect of coarse or fine grinding of three forms of corn on the performance of lactating cows. Six diets, fed as total mixed rations, were identical except for the corn portion of the diet. Corn treatments were dry shelled corn, high moisture ensiled ear corn, and high moisture ensiled shelled corn, either coarsely or finely ground. The experimental design was a6 × 6 Latin square with 36 cows. Eighteen cows were assigned to the six different treatments and were fed once daily. Within this group of 18 cows, six had a ruminal cannula and were used to evaluate nutrient digestibilities and ruminal fermentation. The remaining 18 cows, six of which were ruminally cannulated, were similarly assigned, except they were fed twice daily. In the group fed once daily, milk production and composition were not affected by treatment. Starch digestibility was greater with the high moisture and with the finely ground corn treatments. In addition, the high moisture ensiled corn treatments had reduced ruminal ammonia concentrations. In the group that was fed twice daily, milk production and protein yield were greatest for the finely ground high moisture ensiled shelled corn treatment. Starch utilization was improved by fine grinding. Lower ruminal ammonia concentrations were obtained with the high moisture ensiled corn treatments, and there was a tendency for reduced ammonia concentration with fine grinding. Results indicate that high moisture ensiled corn as well as fine grinding improved nitrogen and starch utilization. (Key words: corn, milk, particle size, starch) Abbreviation key: CG = coarsely ground, DSC = dry shelled corn, FG = finely ground, HMEC = high mois-

F. San Emeterio; R. B. Reis; W. E. Campos; L. D. Satter

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal fines. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. For this effort, we will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach. Previously it has been decided that corn starch would be used as binder and a roller-and-die mill would be used for pellet manufacture. A quality starch binder has been identified and tested. To potentially lower binder costs, a starch that costs about 50% of the high quality starch was tested. Results indicate that the lower cost starch will not lower binder cost because more is required to produce a comparable quality pellet. Also, a petroleum in water emulsion was evaluated as a potential binder. The compound seemed to have adhesive properties but was found to be a poor binder. Arrangements have been made to collect a waste slurry from the mine previously described.

Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Changes in the fine structure of stochastic distributions as a consequence of space-time fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earlier we showed that the fine structure of the spectrum of amplitude variations in the results of measurements of the processes of different nature (in other words, the fine structure of the dispersion of results or the pattern of the corresponding histograms) is subject to macroscopic fluctuations, changing regularly with time. These changes indicate that the dispersion of results that remains after all artifacts are excluded inevitably accompanies any measurements and reflects very basic features of our world. In our research, we have come to the conclusion that this dispersion of results is the effect of space-time fluctuations, which, in their turn, are caused by the movement of the measured object in an anisotropic gravitational field. Among other things, this conclusion means that the examination of the detailed pattern of distributions obtained from the results of measurement of the dynamics of processes of different nature discovers laws, which cannot be revealed with traditional methods for the analysis of time series. These assertions are based on the results of long-term experimental investigations conducted for many decades. The major part of these results, starting with 1958, is published in Russian. The goal of this paper is to give a brief review of those results and provide corresponding references. The most general conclusion of our research is the evidence that the fine structure of stochastic distributions is not accidental. In other words, noncasual is the pattern of histograms plotted from a rather small number of the results of measurement of the dynamics of processes of different nature, from the biochemical reactions and noise in the gravitational antenna to the alpha-decay.

Simon E. Shnoll

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes  

SciTech Connect

The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

Nabi, Jameel-Un, E-mail: jameel@giki.edu.pk [Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Sciences (Pakistan)] [Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Sciences (Pakistan); Tawfik, Abdel Nasser, E-mail: a.tawfik@eng.mti.edu.eg [MTI University, Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP) (Egypt)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Gas-Mediated Impact Dynamics in Fine-Grained Granular Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-cohesive granular media exhibit complex responses to sudden impact that often differ from those of ordinary solids and liquids. We investigate how this response is mediated by the presence of interstitial gas between the grains. Using high-speed x-ray radiography we track the motion of a steel sphere through the interior of a bed of fine, loose granular material. We find a crossover from nearly incompressible, fluid-like behavior at atmospheric pressure to a highly compressible, dissipative response once most of the gas is evacuated. We discuss these results in light of recent proposals for the drag force in granular media.

John R. Royer; Eric I. Corwin; Peter J. Eng; Heinrich M. Jaeger

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

DY/DZ from fine structure in the Main Sequence based on Hipparcos parallaxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The slope Delta Y/Delta Z is a quantity of interest in relation to stellar evolution, the initial mass function and the determination of the primordial helium abundance. In this paper we estimate Delta Y/Delta Z from fine structure in the Main Sequence of nearby stars from Hipparcos data for stars with Z \\leq Zsun and find a value of about 3, which is consistent with what has been found in extragalactic H II regions and with stellar models for suitable upper limits to the initial masses of supernovae according to the IMF slope adopted.

B. E. J. Pagel; L. Portinari

1997-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies  

SciTech Connect

This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies. The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level.

1992-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale oil agglomeration technology capable of increasing the recovery and improving the quality of fine coal strearrts. Two distinct agglomeration devices will be tested, namely, a conventional high shear mixer and a jet processor. To meet the overall objective an eleven task work plan has been designed. The work ranges from batch and continuous bench-scale testing through the design, commissioning and field testing of POC-scale agglomeration equipment.

None

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

Solar abundances and helioseismology: fine structure spacings and separation ratios of low-degree p modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used 4752 days of data collected by the Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) to determine very precise oscillation frequencies of acoustic low-degree modes that probe the solar core. We compare the fine (small frequency) spacings and frequency separation ratios formed from these data with those of different solar models. We find that models constructed with low metallicity are incompatible with the observations. The results provide strong support for lowering the theoretical uncertainties on the neutrino fluxes. These uncertainties had recently been raised due to the controversy over the solar abundances.

Sarbani Basu; William J. Chaplin; Yvonne Elsworth; Roger New; Aldo M. Serenelli; Graham A. Verner

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

SENSOR FOR INDIVIDUAL BURNER CONTROL OF FIRING RATE, FUEL-AIR RATIO, AND COAL FINENESS CORRELATION  

SciTech Connect

To minimize program cost, additional testing is planned to be performed in concert with EPRI-funded testing at the Coal Flow Test Facility in late July. This will be followed by field testing to be performed by EPRI in August. The minimal effort put into the analysis during this reporting period revealed surprising variation in the trends of the dynamic signatures over time. It is unclear whether these temporal trends are related to noise or to the actual dynamics. Further data analysis and fine-tuning of the algorithm will be done upon arrival of the data to be collected in the near future.

Wayne Hill; Roger Demler

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-Situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and of unconventional deposits such as heavy oils, tar sands and oil shales.” As conventional oil becomes scarcer, the transport sector will remain dependent on petroleum resources, if no oil substitute is available. Fuels from non-conventional oil resources... www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery EPRG Working Paper 1005...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

382

Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluation of fine-particle size catalysts using bituminous and subbituminous coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of Sandia`s fine-particle size catalyst testing project are to evaluate and compare the activities of fine-particle size catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s Advanced Research Coal Liquefaction Program by using Sandia`s standard coal liquefaction test procedures. The first test procedure uses bituminous coal (DECS-17 Blind Canyon coal), phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that is used to evaluate catalysts over ranges of temperature, time, and catalyst loading. The best catalyst evaluated to date is West Virginia University`s iron catalyst that was impregnated onto the coal. Current work is aimed at developing a standard test procedure using subbituminous Wyodak coal. Ibis test is being developed using Pacific Northwest Laboratories` 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst and coal samples impregnated with either molybdenum or iron at Argonne National Laboratories. Results of testing catalysts with bituminous coal will be summarized and the development of the subbituminous coal test procedure will be presented.

Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Optimizing Fine-grained Communication in a Biomolecular Simulation Application on Cray XK6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achieving good scaling for fine-grained communication intensive applications on modern supercomputers remains challenging. In our previous work, we have shown that such an application NAMD scales well on the full Jaguar XT5 without long-range interactions; Yet, with them, the speedup falters beyond 64K cores. Although the new Gemini interconnect on Cray XK6 has improved network performance, the challenges remain, and are likely to remain for other such networks as well. We analyze communication bottlenecks in NAMD and its CHARM++ runtime, using the Projections performance analysis tool. Based on the analysis, we optimize the runtime, built on the uGNI library for Gemini. We present several techniques to improve the fine-grained communication. Consequently, the performance of running 92224-atom Apoa1 with GPUs on TitanDev is improved by 36%. For 100-million-atom STMV, we improve upon the prior Jaguar XT5 result of 26 ms/step to 13 ms/step using 298,992 cores on Jaguar XK6.

Sun, Yanhua [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Zheng, Gengbin [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Mei, Chao [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Phillips, James C. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Kale, Laxmikant V [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Jones, Terry R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Composition and decomposition of soybean and sorghum tissues grown under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that changes in both quantity and quality of plant residue inputs to soils as atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration increases may alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) turnover rates and pool sizes. We determined the effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plant tissue quality, and how modifications in tissue quality affect C and N mineralization. Soybean and sorghum were grown under elevated (704.96 {plus_minus} 0.33 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}) and ambient (357.44 {plus_minus} 0.12 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} in open-top chambers. Leaf and stem tissues were separated form harvested plants and analyzed for C,N, lignin, and cellulose. Tissues were applied to Norfolk loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Kandiudult) and aerobically incubated for 70-d to determine C and N mineralization, C turnover, relative N mineralization, and C/N mineralized. Elevated CO{sub 2} had no effect on plant residue C concentration, but N concentration of soybean leaves and stems and sorghum stems was reduced; however, CO{sub 2} enrichment increased C/N ratio and lignin concentration for only sorghum stems and soybean leaves, respectively. Source of plant residue (i.e., produced under either elevated or ambient CO{sub 2}) had no impact on soil C turnover, relative N mineralization, cumulative C and N mineralization, and C/N mineralized. These data suggest that increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} will have little effect on composition or decomposition of field crop residues. Thus, since CO{sub 2} enrichment results in increased photosynthetic C fixation, the possibility exists for increased soil C storage under field crops in an elevated CO{sub 2} world. 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Henning, F.P. [Cooperative Ext. Serv., Dunwoody, GA (United States); Wood, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Rogers, H.H.; Runion, G.B.; Prior, S.A. [National Soil Dynamics Lab., Auburn, AL (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA What does airborne particulate matter look like? How do we develop quantitative descriptors for particles of complex morphology? These challenges were highlighted in the NIST workshop report "Aerosol Metrology Needs for Climate Science" (Dec, 2011). Sure, we can capture aerosol particles on surfaces - removing them from their airborne state - and probe them with high resolution optical and chemical imaging tools, but what information do we lose about the airborne particles? How can we follow dynamics? In this talk we will explore these very basic questions and their importance to combustion

387

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

SciTech Connect

To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report number 8, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. On the other hand, Mulled Coal does not cause the fugitive and airborne dust problems normally associated with thermally dried coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: the Mulled Coal process, which has been proved to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality, and at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant; the wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation; and a wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems.

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. This report covers the first quarter`s progress. Major activities during this period were focused on finding the plants where a demo MTU column will be installed to prepare the samples needed to characterize the combustion behavior of slurry effluents. Also, a meeting was held at Penn State University to discuss the availability of the laboratory furnace for testing the plant coal/recovered coal fines blends.

Singh, Shyam

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculants and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude. 8 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radium-226 and calcium uptake by crops grown in mixtures of sand and cay tailings from phosphate mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium-226 is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in reclaimed clay and sand tailing from phosphate mining. Field studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sand/clay ratio (SCR), Ca supplement and organic amendments on the {sup 226}Ra concentration in turnip, banana pepper, cabbage, yellow squash, mustard, and alfalfa. For vegetables, treatment effects included SCR (2:1, 4:1, 6:1, and 8:1), phosphogypsum (PG) 0,22, and 134 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}, and peat 0,100, and 200 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}. For alfalfa grown in a 1:1 SCR mixture, treatments included organic amendments (control, peat, sewage slude, sawdust, composted sewage sludge, composted garbage and humate) applied at 44.8 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} (2.2 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} for humate). Plant {sup 226}Ra concentration tended to be higher in the 4:1 than in the 2:1 SCR mix but this depended on the crop an d the season. Organic amendments and PG had no effect (p<0.05) on the {sup 226}Ra concentration in vegetables and alfalfa. Mean {sup 226}Ra concentration in plant tissues ranged from 3.4 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} in banana pepper fruit to 31.1 Bq kg{sup {minus}1}. A quadratic relationship based on 631 observations was observed between {sup 226}Ra and Ca concentration in plant tissues. The {sup 226}Ra/Ca ratio in plant tissues ranged from 0.85 to 2.13 kBq {sup 226}Ra kg{sup {minus}1} Ca and decreased with increasing plant {sup 226}Ra. Results indicated that wide differences in plant {sup 226}Ca concentration were related more to differences in plant Ca levels than to soil factors. 21 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Million, J.B. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Sartain, J.B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Gonzalez, R.X.; Carrier, W.D. III [Bromwell & Carrier, Lakeland, FL (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Use of Computed X-ray Tomographic Data for Analyzing the Thermodynamics of a Dissociating Porous Sand/Hydrate Mixture  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a method that has been used extensively in laboratory experiments for measuring rock properties and fluid transport behavior. More recently, CT scanning has been applied successfully to detect the presence and study the behavior of naturally occurring hydrates. In this study, we used a modified medical CT scanner to image and analyze the progression of a dissociation front in a synthetic methane hydrate/sand mixture. The sample was initially scanned under conditions at which the hydrate is stable (atmospheric pressure and liquid nitrogen temperature, 77 K). The end of the sample holder was then exposed to the ambient air, and the core was continuously scanned as dissociation occurred in response to the rising temperature. CT imaging captured the advancing dissociation front clearly and accurately. The evolved gas volume was monitored as a function of time. Measured by CT, the advancing hydrate dissociation front was modeled as a thermal conduction problem explicitly incorporating the enthalpy of dissociation, using the Stefan moving-boundary-value approach. The assumptions needed to perform the analysis consisted of temperatures at the model boundaries. The estimated value for thermal conductivity of 2.6 W/m K for the remaining water ice/sand mixture is higher than expected based on conduction alone; this high value may represent a lumped parameter that incorporates the processes of heat conduction, methane gas convection, and any kinetic effects that occur during dissociation. The technique presented here has broad implications for future laboratory and field testing that incorporates geophysical techniques to monitor gas hydrate dissociation.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

Guidebook for the Use of Synfuels in Electric Utility Combustion Systems, Volume 3: Liquid Fuels Derived From Shale and Tar Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of liquid fuels derived from oil shales or tar sands differ substantially and in varying degrees from those of conventional petroleum fuels. Utilities will find data and procedures in this guidebook to help them evaluate the modifications those fuels would require in their systems.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fine Tuning for Best-Value Super ESPC Deals Using the Responsibility Matrix  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings and Performance Guarantees Savings and Performance Guarantees That Work for You QUICK STUDY Fine Tuning for Best-Value Super ESPC Deals Using the Responsibility Matrix Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) are a practical and flexible tool for obtaining energy improvements for federal facilities. While the overarching Super ESPC establishes general terms and conditions of the agree- ment between the agency and the energy service company (ESCO), the contract leaves broad latitude to custom-tailor a deal to suit the agency's own particular needs, priorities, and circumstances. The agency can precisely define the nature of the savings guarantee and how optimum performance of the energy conservation measures (ECMs) will be ensured through- out the life of the contract. A full aware-

396

Human error and general aviation accidents: A comprehensive, fine-grained analysis using HFACS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) is a theoretically based tool for investigating and analyzing human error associated with accidents and incidents. Previous research performed at both at the University of Illinois and the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) have been highly successful and have shown that HFACS can be reliably used to analyze the underlying human causes of both commercial and general aviation (GA) accidents. these analyses have helped identify general trends in the types of human factors issues and aircrew errors that have contributed to civil aviation accidents. The next step is to identify the exact nature of the human errors identified. The purpose of this research effort, therefore, was to address these questions by performing a fine-grained HFACS analysis of the individual human causal factors associated with GA accidents and to assist in the generation of intervention programs. This report details those findings and offers an approach for developing interventions to address them.

Douglas A. Wiegmann; Albert Boquet; Cristy Detwiler; Kali Holcomb; Troy Faaborg; Douglas A. Wiegmann, Ph.D., Ph.D.; Albert Boquet, Ph.D.; Cristy Detwiler; Kali Holcomb; Troy Faaborg

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

POC-scale testing of oil agglomeration techniques and equipment for fine coal processing  

SciTech Connect

The information presented in this manual is solely for the purpose of operating the POC-scale equipment for fine coal processing as described herein. This manual provides a general description of the process technology and guidelines for plant operating procedures. It is intended for use by the operators and maintenance personnel who will be responsible for the operations of the plant. No attempt should be made to operate the plant until the principles of the process and operating instructions contained in this manual are fully understood. Operating personnel should thoroughly familiarize themselves with all processing equipment prior to commencing plant operation. All equipment is skid mounted to provide a self-contained unit. The dimensions of the unit are comply with standard guidelines. A minimum distance of 2 feet is provided between equipment for walkway and maintenance.

W. Pawlak; K. Szymocha

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J{approx}5x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2}, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E=10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately D{sub x}=0.5 {mu}m.

Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ohara, T. [Topcon Corporation, 75-1 Hasunuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Synthesis of LiFePO{sub 4} with fine particle by co-precipitation method  

SciTech Connect

LiFePO{sub 4} is a potential candidate for the cathode material of the lithium secondary batteries. A co-precipitation method was adopted to prepare LiFePO{sub 4} because it is simple and cheap. Nitrogen gas was needed to prevent oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} in the aqueous solution. The co-precipitated precursor shows the high reactivity with the reductive gas, and the single phase of LiFePO{sub 4} is successfully synthesized with the aid of carbon under less reductive conditions. LiFePO{sub 4} fine powder prepared by co-precipitation method shows high rate capability, impressive specific capacity and cycle property.

Park, K.S. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: gappa37@dreamwiz.com; Kang, K.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Y.J. [Battery Technology Team, ETRI, Daejon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fine and hyperfine structure of P-levels in muonic hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrections of orders $\\alpha^5$ and $\\alpha^6$ are calculated in the fine structure interval $\\Delta E^{fs}=E(2P_{3/2})-E(2P_{1/2})$ and in the hyperfine structure of the energy levels $2P_{1/2}$ and $2P_{3/2}$ in muonic hydrogen. The obtained numerical values $\\Delta E^{fs}= 8352.08 \\mu eV$, $\\Delta \\tilde E^{hfs}(2P_{1/2})=7964.36 \\mu eV$, $\\Delta \\tilde E^{hfs}(2P_{3/2})=3392.59 \\mu eV$ can be considered as a reliable estimate for the comparison with corresponding experimental data and for the extraction of the experimental value of the Lamb shift $(2P-2S)$ in muonic hydrogen.

A. P. Martynenko

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fine Tuning for Best-Value Super ESPC Deals Using the Responsibility Matrix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings and Performance Guarantees Savings and Performance Guarantees That Work for You QUICK STUDY Fine Tuning for Best-Value Super ESPC Deals Using the Responsibility Matrix Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) are a practical and flexible tool for obtaining energy improvements for federal facilities. While the overarching Super ESPC establishes general terms and conditions of the agree- ment between the agency and the energy service company (ESCO), the contract leaves broad latitude to custom-tailor a deal to suit the agency's own particular needs, priorities, and circumstances. The agency can precisely define the nature of the savings guarantee and how optimum performance of the energy conservation measures (ECMs) will be ensured through- out the life of the contract. A full aware-

402

Chiral Symmetry Restoration, Naturalness and the Absence of Fine-Tuning I: Global Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Standard Model (SM), and the scalar sector of its zero-gauge-coupling limit -- the chiral-symmetric limit of the Gell Mann-Levy Model (GML) -- have been shown not to suffer from a Higgs Fine-Tuning (FT) problem. All ultraviolet quadratic divergences (UVQD) are absorbed into the mass-squared of pseudo Nambu-Goldstone (pNGB) bosons, in GML. Since chiral SU(2)_{L-R} symmetry is restored as the pNGB mass-squared or as the Higgs vacuum expectation value (VEV) are taken to 0, small values of these quantities and of the Higgs mass are natural, and therefore not Fine-Tuned. In this letter, we extend our results on the absence of FT to a wide class of high-mass-scale (M_{Heavy}>>m_{Higgs}) extensions to a simplified SO(2) version of GML. We explicitly demonstrate naturalness and no-FT for two examples of heavy physics, both SO(2) singlets: a heavy (M_S >> m_{Higgs}) real scalar field (with or without a VEV); and a right-handed Type 1 See-Saw Majorana neutrino with M_R >> m_{Higgs}. We prove that for |q^2| energy effective theory with certain high-mass-scale extensions. We conjecture that, since gravity couples democratically to particles, quantum gravitational theories that respect chiral symmetry will also retain naturalness, and avoid FT problems for GML and the SM. Phenomenological consequences include the renewed possibility of thermal lepto-genesis in the neutrino-MSM. Absent a FT problem, there should be no expectation that LHC will discover physics beyond the SM unrelated to neutrino mixing.

Bryan W. Lynn; Glenn D. Starkman

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy  

SciTech Connect

An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Zinn, Yuri [Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Gisladottir, Gudrun [University of Iceland; Ann, Russell [Iowa State University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Resistance spot welding of ultra-fine grained steel sheets produced by constrained groove pressing: Optimization and characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constrained groove pressing as a severe plastic deformation method is utilized to produce ultra-fine grained low carbon steel sheets. The ultra-fine grained sheets are joined via resistance spot welding process and the characteristics of spot welds are investigated. Resistance spot welding process is optimized for welding of the sheets with different severe deformations and their results are compared with those of as-received samples. The effects of failure mode and expulsion on the performance of ultra-fine grained sheet spot welds have been investigated in the present paper and the welding current and time of resistance spot welding process according to these subjects are optimized. Failure mode and failure load obtained in tensile-shear test, microhardness, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope images have been used to describe the performance of spot welds. The region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. The results show that optimum welding parameters (welding current and welding time) for ultra-fine grained sheets are shifted to lower values with respect to those for as-received specimens. In ultra-fine grained sheets, one new region is formed named recrystallized zone in addition to fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal. It is shown that microstructures of different zones in ultra-fine grained sheets are finer than those of as-received sheets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resistance spot welding process is optimized for joining of UFG steel sheets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum welding current and time are decreased with increasing the CGP pass number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness at BM, HAZ, FZ and recrystallized zone is enhanced due to CGP.

Khodabakhshi, F.; Kazeminezhad, M., E-mail: mkazemi@sharif.edu; Kokabi, A.H.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

SAND REPORT SAND2004-1777  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA UNCLASSIFIED #12;Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA of Energy's NNSA The Next 20 years ENERGY HEALTH ENVIRONMENT RESOURCES #12;Operated by Los

Walker, Homer F.

407

SAND REPORT SAND2003-0112  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Kauai Test Facility in Hawaii and the Tonopah Test Range in Nevada. The majority of employees work......................................................................................................27 4.2 Support of Nuclear Testing....................................................................................29 4.3 Environmental Testing

Fuerschbach, Phillip

408

SAND REPORT SAND2003-0799  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investment Fund Regional Revolving Loan Fund RTD Grants (Washington Technology Center) Rural Business

Ho, Cliff

409

SAND REPORT SAND2002-4135  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the vicinity of the sensor (see Figure 9). A resistance temperature detector (RTD) on-board the chemiresistor of the Phase II and III tests. The average temperature recorded by the chemiresistor RTD while located

Ho, Cliff

410

SAND REPORT SAND2003-3410  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 11. Apparatus inside an oven for RTD calibration (two chemiresistor chips and a thermocouple).............................................................................................................26 Figure 12. Calibration of the RTD on the chemiresistor die. Chemiresistor E18 RTD response with and without a constant-voltage heating

Ho, Cliff

411

Receptive field self-organization in a model of the fine structure in v1 cortical columns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study a dynamical model of processing and learning in the visual cortex, which reflects the anatomy of V1 cortical columns and properties of their neuronal receptive fields. Based on recent results on the fine-scale structure of columns in V1, we ...

Jörg Lücke

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Synchrotron radiation x-ray absorption fine-structure and Raman studies on CdZnTe ternary alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technology has been employed to obtained Zn K-edge absorption spectra for Cd1[subscript 1-x]Zn[subscript x]Te alloy with x = 0.03, 0.10, ...

Becla, Piotr

413

Geyser-1: a MIPS R3000 CPU core with fine-grained run-time power gating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geyser-1 is a MIPS CPU which provides a fine-grained run-time power gating (PG) controlled by instructions. Unlike traditional PGs, it uses special standard cells in which the virtual ground (VGND) is separated from the real ground, and a certain number ...

D. Ikebuchi; N. Seki; Y. Kojima; M. Kamata; L. Zhao; H. Amano; T. Shirai; S. Koyama; T. Hashida; Y. Umahashi; H. Masuda; K. Usami; S. Takeda; H. Nakamura; M. Namiki; M. Kondo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED PHYSICAL FINE COAL CLEANING FOR PREMIUM FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, together with Amax Research and Development Center (Amax R&D), has prepared this study which provides conceptual cost estimates for the production of premium quality coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) in a commercial plant. Two scenarios are presented, one using column flotation technology and the other the selective agglomeration to clean the coal to the required quality specifications. This study forms part of US Department of Energy program ?Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications,? (Contract No. DE-AC22- 92PC92208), under Task 11, Project Final Report. The primary objective of the Department of Energy program is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to stable and highly loaded CWF. The fuels should contain less than 2 lb ash/MBtu (860 grams ash/GJ) of HHV and preferably less than 1 lb ash/MBtu (430 grams ash/GJ). The advanced fine coal cleaning technologies to be employed are advanced column froth flotation and selective agglomeration. It is further stipulated that operating conditions during the advanced cleaning process should recover not less than 80 percent of the carbon content (heating value) in the run-of-mine source coal. These goals for ultra-clean coal quality are to be met under the constraint that annualized coal production costs does not exceed $2.5 /MBtu ($ 2.37/GJ), including the mine mouth cost of the raw coal. A further objective of the program is to determine the distribution of a selected suite of eleven toxic trace elements between product CWF and the refuse stream of the cleaning processes. Laboratory, bench-scale and Process Development Unit (PDU) tests to evaluate advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration were completed earlier under this program with selected coal samples. A PDU with a capacity of 2 st/h was designed by Bechtel and installed at Amax R&D, Golden, Colorado by Entech Global for process evaluation tests. The tests successfully demonstrated the capability of advanced column flotation as well as selective agglomeration to produce ultra-clean coal at specified levels of purity and recovery efficiency. Test results and the experience gained during the operation of the PDU have provided valuable insights into the processes studied. Based on the design data obtained from the test work and a set of project design criteria, two sets of conceptual designs for commercial CWF production plants have been developed, one using column flotation and the other using selective agglomeration process. Using these designs, Capital as well as Operating and Maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for the plants have been compiled. These estimates have then been used to derive the annualized cost of production of premium CWF on a commercial scale. Further, a series of sensitivity analysis have been completed to evaluate the effects of variations in selected cost components and process parameters on the overall economics of premium fuel production

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A LOW COST AND HIGH QUALITY SOLID FUEL FROM BIOMASS AND COAL FINES  

SciTech Connect

Use of biomass wastes as fuels in existing boilers would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, SO2 and NOx emissions, while beneficially utilizing wastes. However, the use of biomass has been limited by its low energy content and density, high moisture content, inconsistent configuration and decay characteristics. If biomass is upgraded by conventional methods, the cost of the fuel becomes prohibitive. Altex has identified a process, called the Altex Fuel Pellet (AFP) process, that utilizes a mixture of biomass wastes, including municipal biosolids, and some coal fines, to produce a strong, high energy content, good burning and weather resistant fuel pellet, that is lower in cost than coal. This cost benefit is primarily derived from fees that are collected for accepting municipal biosolids. Besides low cost, the process is also flexible and can incorporate several biomass materials of interest The work reported on herein showed the technical and economic feasibility of the AFP process. Low-cost sawdust wood waste and light fractions of municipal wastes were selected as key biomass wastes to be combined with biosolids and coal fines to produce AFP pellets. The process combines steps of dewatering, pellet extrusion, drying and weatherizing. Prior to pilot-scale tests, bench-scale test equipment was used to produce limited quantities of pellets for characterization. These tests showed which pellet formulations had a high potential. Pilot-scale tests then showed that extremely robust pellets could be produced that have high energy content, good density and adequate weatherability. It was concluded that these pellets could be handled, stored and transported using equipment similar to that used for coal. Tests showed that AFP pellets have a high combustion rate when burned in a stoker type systems. While NOx emissions under stoker type firing conditions was high, a simple air staging approach reduced emissions to below that for coal. In pulverized-fuel-fired tests it was found that the ground pellets could be used as an effective NOx control agent for pulverized-coal-fired systems. NOx emissions reductions up to 63% were recorded, when using AFP as a NOx control agent. In addition to performance benefits, economic analyses showed the good economic benefits of AFP fuel. Using equipment manufacturer inputs, and reasonable values for biomass, biosolids and coal fines costs, it was determined that an AFP plant would have good profitability. For cases where biosolids contents were in the range of 50%, the after tax Internal Rates of Return were in the range of 40% to 50%. These are very attractive returns. Besides the baseline analysis for the various AFP formulations tested at pilot scale, sensitivity analysis showed the impact of important parameters on return. From results, it was clear that returns are excellent for a range of parameters that could be expected in practice. Importantly, these good returns are achieved even without incentives related to the emissions control benefits of biomass.

John T. Kelly; George Miller; Mehdi Namazian

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING  

SciTech Connect

Numerous advanced coal cleaning processes have been developed in recent years that are capable of substantially reducing both ash- and sulfur-forming minerals from coal. However, most of the processes involve fine grinding and use water as the cleaning medium; therefore, the clean coal products must be dewatered before they can be transported and burned. Unfortunately, dewatering fine coal is costly, which makes it difficult to deploy advanced coal cleaning processes for commercial applications. As a means of avoiding problems associated with the fine coal dewatering, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed a dry coal cleaning process in which mineral matter is separated from coal without using water. In this process, pulverized coal is subjected to triboelectrification before being placed in an electric field for electrostatic separation. The triboelectrification is accomplished by passing a pulverized coal through an in-line mixer made of copper. Copper has a work function that lies between that of carbonaceous material (coal) and mineral matter. Thus, coal particles impinging on the copper wall lose electrons to the metal thereby acquiring positive charges, while mineral matter impinging on the wall gain electrons to acquire negative charges. The charged particles then pass through an electric field where they are separated according to their charges into two or more products depending on the configuration of the separator. The results obtained at NETL showed that it is capable of removing more than 90% of the pyritic sulfur and 70% of the ash-forming minerals from a number of eastern U.S. coals. However, the BTU recoveries were less than desirable. The laboratory-scale batch triboelectrostatic separator (TES) used by NETL relied on adhering charged particles on parallel electrode surfaces and scraping them off. Therefore, its throughput will be proportional to the electrode surface area. If this laboratory device is scaled-up as is, it would suffer from low throughput capacities and high maintenance requirements. In general, surface area-based separators (e.g., shaking tables, magnetic drum separator, electrodynamic separator, etc.) have lower throughput capacities than volume-based separators (e.g., flotation cell, dense-medium bath, cyclones, etc.) by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the electrodes of the laboratory unit need to be cleaned frequently, creating a high maintenance requirement if it is scaled-up to a commercial unit. The bench-scale continuous TES unit developed at NETL, on the other hand, separates positively and negatively charged particles by splitting the gaseous stream containing these particles in an electric field by means of a flow splitter, so that the oppositely charged particles can be directed into different compartments. This device is fundamentally different from the laboratory unit in that the former is a surface area-based separator, while the latter is a volume-based separator. The bench-scale unit is referred to as an entrained flow separator by the in-house researchers at NETL. Thus, the entrained flow TES unit is a significant improvement over the laboratory unit with regard to throughput capacity. In the present work, the entrained flow separator concept will be utilized for developing a proof-of concept (POC) separator that can be scaled-up to commercial size units. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop a bench-scale separator that can achieve high Btu recoveries while maintaining the high degree of separation efficiencies. It is the objective of the present investigation to develop an efficient separator by studying the mechanisms of triboelectrification and investigating better ways of separating the charged particles. An important criterion for developing efficient separators is that they not only provide high separation efficiencies but also have high throughput capacities, which are essential ingredients for successful commercialization.

R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; E.S. Yan; A.D. Walters

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluation of ceramic filters for high-temperature/high-pressure fine particulate control. Final report Dec 75-Jun 76  

SciTech Connect

High temperature gas turbines used to generate electric power require gas streams virtually free of particulate matter. Gas streams from high temperature, high pressure coal processes, such as low Btu gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion, require considerable particulate removal. In order to maintain high thermal efficiency the particulate clean-up must be done at the high temperatures of the process. Many new concepts for fine particulate control at elevated temperatures are presently being proposed. One such concept utilizes ceramic membrane filters. The report gives results of a study to analyze and evaluate ceramic membrane filters as a new, fine particulate (<3 um) control concept for high-temperature (approx. 900/sup 0/C), high-pressure processes. Several ceramic filters were identified as potential candidates for fine particulate removal. There does not seem to be any inherent material limitation to high-temperature operation; however, no evidence of high-temperature filter application was found. The filters typically are 2-6 mm thick, cylindrical, and available with various pore sizes, increasing upward from 0.5 um. These elements may be suitable for fine particulate control in hot gas streams. The most promising, although undeveloped, idea for a ceramic filter is to use ceramic honeycomb monoliths similar to those available for catalyst supports and heat exchangers. The walls of the monoliths are about 0.2-0.4 mm thick and of varying pore size and porosity. Geometric configurations are available which would force the gas to flow through the membrane walls. Pressure losses would be very small relative to those of standard ceramic filter elements. The application of ceramic monoliths to high-temperature fine particulate control appears very promising. It is strongly recommended that this concept be investigated further.

Poe, G.G.; Evans, R.M.; Bonnett, W.S.; Waterland, L.R.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Characterization and utilization of hydrotreated products produced from the Whiterocks (Utah) tar sand bitumen-derived liquid  

SciTech Connect

The bitumen-derived liquid produced in a 4-inch diameter fluidized-bed reactor from the mined and crushed ore from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit has been hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor. The purpose was to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variable. A sulfided nickel-molybendum on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in all experiments. Moderately severe operating conditions were employed; that is, high reaction temperature (617--680 K) high reactor pressure (11.0--17.1 MPa) and low liquid feed rate (0.18--0.77 HSV); to achieve the desired reduction in heteroatom content. Detailed chemical structures of the bitumen-derived liquid feedstock and the hydrotreated total liquid products were determined by high resolution gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analyses. The compounds identified in the native bitumen included isoprenoids; bicyclic, tricycle, and tetracyclic terpenoids; steranes; hopanes; and perhydro-{beta}-carotenes. In addition, normal and branched alkanes and alkenes and partially dehydrogenated hydroaromatics were identified in the bitumen-derived liquid. The dominant pyrolysis reactions were: (1) the dealkylation of long alkyl side chains to form {alpha} - and isoolefins; and (2) the cleavage of alkyl chains linking aromatic and hydroaromatic clusters. Olefinic bonds were not observed in the hydrotreated product and monoaromatic hydrocarbons were the predominant aromatic species. The properties of the jet fuel fractions from the hydrotreated products met most of the jet fuel specifications. The cetane indices indicated these fractions would be suitable for use as diesel fuels.

Tsai, C.H.; Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Oblad, A.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Characterization of nickel and vanadium compounds in tar sand bitumen by UV-VIS spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography coupled with element specific detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously, the authors examined the Ni and V in heavy crude oils, residua, and processed products by several metal speciation techniques to ascertain molecular structure and processing behavior. Two classes of metal compounds were found - metallopetroporphyrins and metallo-nonprophyrins - each having unique reactivity during processing. In efforts to better understand the binding of metals in the oil medium, they now examine NI and V in tar sand bitumens. The bitumen was solvent extracted from the sand matrix and was separated by column chromatography and the petroporphyrin content was quantitated by UV-vis spectroscopy. The petroporphyrin contents ranged from virtually none to over 36% of the total metals. Asphalt Ridge (Utah) has primarily Ni petroporphyrins; Big Clifty (Kentucky) and Athabasca (Canada) have primarily V petroporphyrins; Arroyo Grande and McKittrick (California) have roughly equal amounts of both types; and Sunnyside (Utah) has virtually none of either.

Reynolds, J.G.; Jones, E.L.; Bennett, J.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Biggs, W.R. (Chevron Research Co., Richmond, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "loamy fine sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MROrchestrator: A Fine-Grained Resource Orchestration Framework for MapReduce Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient resource management in data centers and clouds running large distributed data processing frameworks like MapReduce is crucial for enhancing the performance of hosted applications and boosting resource utilization. However, existing resource scheduling schemes in Hadoop MapReduce allocate resources at the granularity of fixed-size, static portions of nodes, called slots. In this work, we show that MapReduce jobs have widely varying demands for multiple resources, making the static and fixed-size slot-level resource allocation a poor choice both from the performance and resource utilization standpoints. Furthermore, lack of co-ordination in the management of mul- tiple resources across nodes prevents dynamic slot reconfigura- tion, and leads to resource contention. Motivated by this, we propose MROrchestrator, a MapReduce resource Orchestrator framework, which can dynamically identify resource bottlenecks, and resolve them through fine-grained, co-ordinated, and on- demand resource allocations. We have implemented MROrches- trator on two 24-node native and virtualized Hadoop clusters. Experimental results with a suite of representative MapReduce benchmarks demonstrate up to 38% reduction in job completion times, and up to 25% increase in resource utilization. We further show how popular resource managers like NGM and Mesos when augmented with MROrchestrator can hike up their performance.

Sharma, Bikash [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Prabhakar, Ramya [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Kandemir, Mahmut [Pennsylvania State University; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Image-Directed Fine-needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid with Safety-engineered Devices  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to integrate safety-engineered devices into outpatient fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the thyroid in an interventional radiology practice. Materials and Methods: The practice center is a tertiary referral center for image-directed FNA thyroid biopsies in difficult patients referred by the primary care physician, endocrinologist, or otolaryngologist. As a departmental quality of care and safety improvement program, we instituted integration of safety devices into our thyroid biopsy procedures and determined the effect on outcome (procedural pain, diagnostic biopsies, inadequate samples, complications, needlesticks to operator, and physician satisfaction) before institution of safety devices (54 patients) and after institution of safety device implementation (56 patients). Safety devices included a patient safety technology-the mechanical aspirating syringe (reciprocating procedure device), and a health care worker safety technology (antineedlestick safety needle). Results: FNA of thyroid could be readily performed with the safety devices. Safety-engineered devices resulted in a 49% reduction in procedural pain scores (P < 0.0001), a 56% reduction in significant pain (P < 0.002), a 21% increase in operator satisfaction (P < 0.0001), and a 5% increase in diagnostic specimens (P = 0.5). No needlesticks to health care workers or patient injuries occurred during the study. Conclusions: Safety-engineered devices to improve both patient and health care worker safety can be successfully integrated into diagnostic FNA of the thyroid while maintaining outcomes and improving safety.

Sibbitt, Randy R., E-mail: THESIBB2@aol.com; Palmer, Dennis J., E-mail: lyonscreek@aol.com [Montana Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology (United States); Sibbitt, Wilmer L., E-mail: wsibbitt@salud.unm.edu; Bankhurst, Arthur D., E-mail: abankhurst@salud.unm.edu [University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Department of Internal Medicine (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

High-Throughput Asynchronous Pipelines for Fine-Grain Dynamic Datapaths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces several new asynchronous pipeline designs which offer high throughput as well as low latency. The designs target dynamic datapaths, both dualrail as well as single-rail. The new pipelines are latchfree and therefore are particularly well-suited for fine-grain pipelining, i.e., where each pipeline stage is only a single gate deep. The pipelines employ new control structures and protocols aimed at reducing the handshaking delay, the principal impediment to achieving high throughput in asynchronous pipelines. As a test vehicle, a 4-bit FIFO was designed using 0.6 micron technology. The results of careful HSPICE simulations of the FIFO designs are very encouraging. The dualrail designs deliver a throughput of up to 860 million data items per second. This performance represents an improvement by a factor of 2 over a widely-used comparable approach by Williams [16]. The new single-rail designs deliver a throughput of up to 1208 million data items per second.

Montek Singh; Steven M. Nowick

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fine structure collision strengths and line ratios for [Ne V] in infrared and optical sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved collisions strengths for the mid-infrared and optical transitions in Ne V are presented. Breit-Pauli R-Matrix calculations for electron impact excitation are carried out with fully resolved near-threshold resonances at very low energies. In particular, the fine structure lines at 14 micron and 24 micron due to transitions among the ground state levels 1s^22s^22p^3 (^3P_{0,1,2}), and the optical/near-UV lines at 2973, 3346 and 3426 Angstrom transitions among the ^3P_{0,1,2}, ^1D_2, ^1S_0 levels are described. Maxwellian averaged collision strengths are tabulated for all forbidden transistion within the ground configuration. Significant differences are found in the low temperature range Te < 10000 K for both the FIR and the opitcal transitions compared to previous results. An analysis of the 14/24 line ratio in low-energy-density (LED) plasma conditions reveals considerable variation; the effective rate coefficient may be dominated by the very low-energy behaviour rather than the maxwellian averaged...

Dance, Michael; Nahar, Sultana N; Pradhan, Anil K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fine topological structure of coherent complex light created by carbon nanocomposites in LC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine complex light structure, optical singularities and electroconductivty of nematic 5CB doped by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were investigated. MWCNTs gather spontaneously to system of micro scale clusters with random fractal borders at small enough concentration. They are surrounded by the striped micro scale cladding which creates optical singularities in propagating laser beam. Applied transverse electric field above the Freedericksz initiates homeotropic arrangement of 5CB and the striped inversion walls between nanotubes clusters what diminishes free energy of a composite. Theory of their appearance and properties was built. Simultaneously the striped cladding disappears what can be treated as new mechanism of structure orientation nonlinearity in nonlinear photonics. Polarization singularities (circular C points) were measured firstly. Percolation of clusters enhances strongly electrical conductivity of the system and creates inversion walls even without applied field. Carbon nanotubes composites in LC form bridge between nano dopants and micro/macro system and are promising for applications. Elaborated protocol of singular optics inspection and characterization of LC nanocomposites is promising tool for applications in modern nanosience and technique.

Vlad. V. Ponevchinsky; Andrey I. Goncharuk; Serguey S. Minenko; Longin N. Lisetskii; Nikolai I. Lebovka; Marat S. Soskin

2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

Evaluation of fine-particle size catalysts using standard test procedures  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine-particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Liquefaction Program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Since bituminous and subbituminous coals have significantly different properties, it is feasible that catalysts may perform differently with these coal types. Because all previous testing has been done with the DECS-17 Blind Canyon bituminous coal, it is important to develop the capability of evaluating catalysts using a subbituminous coal. Initial efforts towards developing a subbituminous coal test are aimed at comparing the reactivities of the Wyodak subbituminous coal and the Blind Canyon bituminous coal. Therefore, the same factorial experimental design was used with the Wyodak coal as was used previously with the Blind Canyon coal. In addition, PNL`s 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst precursor was used in the development of the Wyodak coal test procedure because this catalyst is the best powder catalyst found to date in Sandia`s tests with Blind Canyon coal. Results show that Blind Canyon coal yields higher DHP amounts in the reaction products and higher tetrahydrofuran conversions at the higher severity conditions. Wyodak coal gives higher heptane conversions and higher gas yields for all conditions tested.

Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic study of uranium nitrides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium mononitride (UN), sesquinitride (U2N3) and dinitride (UN2) were characterized by extended X-Ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Analysis on UN indicate the presence of three uranium shells at distances of 3.46(3), 4.89(5) and 6.01(6) A and a nitrogen shell at a distance of 2.46(2) A . For U2N3, two absorbing uranium atoms at different crystallographic positions are present in the structure. One of the uranium atoms is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.28(2) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4) and 3.95(4) A . The second type of uranium atom is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.33(2) and 2.64(3) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4), 3.95(4) and 5.31(5) A . Results on UN2 indicate two uranium shells at 3.71(4) and 5.32(5) A and two nitrogen shells at 2.28(2).

Poineau, Frederic [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Cerefice, Gary S. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Use of a vegetative filter zone to control fine-grained sediments from surface mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a vegetative filter zone in trapping fine-grained sediments from surface mining operations. The area selected for study was located in Whitley County, Kentucky, directly below an active surface mining operation. The outslope above the filter was the primary drainage area monitored during the study. This project was initiated with the specific purpose of conducting a field test on vegetation as a viable sediment trapping medium. From the onset, the project was wholly designed for a field evaluation under typical mining conditions. The filter area was constructed directly below an abandoned surface mine bench, on typical soil types found in mined areas of Eastern Kentucky. The outslope located above the filter was the primary source area for sediment flow. Sediment-laden water samples were collected at the inlet flume for comparison with samples collected at the outlet flume to permit evaluation of the sediment removal capability of the vegetative filter. Results of the monitoring efforts revealed that a dramatic reduction in sediment load was achieved by vegetative filtration with trapping efficiencies ranging from 70 to 99% for the storms monitored. Based on results of this study, it is concluded that vegetative filters are an effective method for reducing the quantity of sediment transported into surface streams and rivers from disturbed mined lands.

Barfield, B.J.; Albrecht, S.C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Microstructure, Morphology, and Nanomechanical Properties Near Fine Holes Produced by Electro-Discharge Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine holes in metal alloys are employed for many important technological purposes, including cooling and the precise atomization of liquids. For example, they play an important role in the metering and delivery of fuel to the combustion chambers in energy-efficient, low-emissions diesel engines. Electro-discharge machining (EDM) is one process employed to produce such holes. Since the hole shape and bore morphology can affect fluid flow, and holes also represent structural discontinuities in the tips of the spray nozzles, it is important to understand the microstructures adjacent to these holes, the features of the hole walls, and the nanomechanical properties of the material that was in some manner altered by the EDM hole-making process. Several techniques were used to characterize the structure and properties of spray-holes in a commercial injector nozzle. These include scanning electron microscopy, cross-sectioning and metallographic etching, bore surface roughness measurements by optical interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy of recast EDM layers extracted with the help of a focused ion beam.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Yang, Nan [Caterpillar Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fabrication and thermoelectric properties of fine-grained TiNiSn compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nearly single-phased TiNiSn half-Heusler compound thermoelectric materials were synthesized by combining mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) in order to reduce its thermal conductivity by refining the grain sizes. Although TiNiSn compound powders were not synthesized directly via MA, dense bulk samples of TiNiSn compound were obtained by the subsequent SPS treatment. It was found that an excessive Ti addition relative to the TiNiSn stoichiometry is effective in increasing the phase purity of TiNiSn half-Heusler phase in the bulk samples, by compensating for the Ti loss caused by the oxidation of Ti powders and MA processing. The maximum power factor value obtained in the Ti-compensated sample is 1720 muW m{sup -1} K{sup -2} at 685 K. A relatively high ZT value of 0.32 is achieved at 785 K for the present undoped TiNiSn compound polycrystals. - Graphical abstract: Nearly single-phased TiNiSn-based half-Heusler compound polycrystalline materials with fine grains were fabricated by combining mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A high ZT value for undoped TiNiSn was obtained because of the reduced thermal conductivity.

Zou Minmin [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Jingfeng, E-mail: jingfeng@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Du Bing; Liu Dawei [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kita, Takuji [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Vehicle Engineering Group, Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200, Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

Scheffer, K.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

432

Colloid Transport and Deposition in Water-Saturated and Unsaturated Sand and Yucca Mountain Tuff: Effect of Ionic Strength and Moisture Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colloid-aided radionuclide transport has been considered a potentially important mechanism for the candidate spent fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain. This mechanism, however, has not been treated in Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) until recently. Even then there has been little discussion of possible colloid retention in the unsaturated zone. This report summarizes investigations of potential colloid retention in sand and Yucca Mountain tuff as a fun...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

433

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

434

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are briefly described for the following areas of research: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale and tar sand researches cover processing studies. Coal research includes: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology covers: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of an effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.