National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for load response program

  1. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01

    Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs V. Residential Discussion... Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off-peak period or from high-price periods...

  2. Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads in response to a utility signal, represent a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Issue Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads (Figure 1). The testing covered four Lighting the Way to Demand ResponseLighting the Way to Demand Response California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research Program Technical Brief PIER

  3. Demand Response and Peak Load Management; Programs, Products and Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, A.

    2015-01-01

    Management: Programs, Products, and Technology IETC 2015 ESL-IE-15-06-13 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 2Supply & Demand Power Demand Grid Stability Reliability Risk Price Availability... ESL-IE-15-06-13 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 What Should We Expect? 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 2 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 2 0 1 3 2 0 1 4 2 0 1 5 2 0 1 6 2 0 1 7 2 0 1 8 2 0 1 9 2 0...

  4. Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weller, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Commercial & Industrial (C&I) Load Management Programs A.on the Existing SCE Load Management System / Technology BaseSmall Commercial Load Management Programs A. Programs based

  5. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalsi, Manmohan S. (Houston, TX); Somogyi, Dezso (Sugar Land, TX); Dietle, Lannie L. (Stafford, TX)

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  6. Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director;Demand Response Results, 2004 Load Control ­ Cool Keeper ­ ID Irrigation Load Control Price Responsive

  7. Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weller, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    for emergency load management. e. Estimated Program Cost TheCommercial & Industrial (C&I) Load Management Programs A.on the Existing SCE Load Management System / Technology Base

  8. Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.J.

    2003-04-08

    Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial reward for supplying spinning reserve than for supplying the other reserve services as a result of the higher spinning reserve prices. The LIPAedge program (LIPA's demand reduction program using Carrier ComfortChoice thermostats) provides an opportunity to test the use of responsive load for spinning reserve. With potentially 75 MW of spinning reserve capability already installed, this test program can also make an important contribution to the capacity needs of Long Island during the summer of 2003. Testing could also be done at ConEd ({approx}30 MW), SCE ({approx}15 MW), and/or SDG&E ({approx}15 MW). This paper is divided into six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the contingency reserve ancillary services, their functions in supporting power system reliability, and their technical requirements. It also discusses the policy and tariff requirements and attempts to distinguish between ones that are genuinely necessary and ones that are artifacts of the technologies that were historically used to provide the services. Chapter 3 discusses how responsive load could provide contingency reserves (especially spinning reserve) for the power system. Chapter 4 specifically discusses the Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostat technology, the LIPAedge experience with that technology, and how the technology could be used to supply spinning reserve. Chapter 5 discusses a number of unresolved issues and suggests areas for further research. Chapter 6 offers conclusions and recommendations.

  9. Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson C.

    2002-09-01

    The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

  10. Spinning Reserve from Responsive Load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Laughner, T; Morris, K

    2009-01-01

    As power system costs rise and capacity is strained demand response can provide a significant system reliability benefit at a potentially attractive cost. The 162 room Music Road Hotel in Pigeon Forge Tennessee agreed to host a spinning reserve test. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) supplied real-time metering and monitoring expertise to record total hotel load during both normal operations and testing. Preliminary testing showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22% to 37% depending on the outdoor temperature and the time of day. The load drop was very rapid, essentially as fast as the 2 second metering could detect.

  11. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-15

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  12. Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson C.

    2002-01-01

    MARKETS – REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. ANDMARKETS – REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. ANDend-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called

  13. Bet and Energy -From Load Forecasting to Demand Response in a Web of Things

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    Bet and Energy - From Load Forecasting to Demand Response in a Web of Things Yong Ding TECO (DSM) [7, 19]. Within DSM, mainly two principal activities i.e. load shifting (demand response programs) and load reduction (energy efficiency and conser- vation programs) can be realized [4]. 1.1 Demand Response

  14. Residential Load Management Program and Pilot 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haverlah, D.; Riordon, K.

    1994-01-01

    In 1986 LCRA embarked on residential load management to control peak summer loads. At that time, LCRA was considered a summer peaking utility, and residential air conditioning and water heating systems were selected for control. The program...

  15. TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure describes the responsibilities of persons who are charged with implementing the DOE Technical Standards Program

  16. Demand Response Programs for Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

  17. Development and Validation of Aggregated Models for Thermostatic Controlled Loads with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Chassin, David P.

    2012-01-04

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated control models for a population of thermostatically controlled loads. The effects of demand response on the load population dynamics are investigated.

  18. Load Monitoring CEC/LMTF Load Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Lesieutre, B.; Yang, Steve; Ellis, A.; Meklin, A.; Wong, B.; Gaikwad, A.; Brooks, D.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Phillips, John; Kosterev, Dmitry; Hoffman, M.; Ciniglio, O.; Hartwell, R.; Pourbeik, P.; Maitra, A.; Lu, Ning

    2007-11-30

    This white paper addresses the needs, options, current practices of load monitoring. Recommendations on load monitoring applications and future directions are also presented.

  19. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GANTT, D.A.

    2000-01-12

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FETF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This revision reflects the 19 Oct 1999 baseline.

  20. Predicting the Response of Electricity Load to Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predicting the Response of Electricity Load to Climate Change Patrick Sullivan, Jesse Colman, and Eric Kalendra National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL...

  1. Generator Response to Load Variation The below table summarizes the way that load variation is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Generator Response to Load Variation The below table summarizes the way that load variation is allocated to generators in a power system. In these notes, we derive the proximity effect, the inertial, constant impedance loads, and the network reduced to generator internal nodes. This expression was: { }00

  2. Aggregated Modeling of Thermostatic Loads in Demand Response: A Systems and Control Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Chassin, Forrest S.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-12-12

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated models for a homogeneous population of thermostatically controlled loads. The different types of loads considered in this paper include, but are not limited to, water heaters and HVAC units. The effects of demand response and user over-ride on the load population dynamics are investigated. The controllability of the developed lumped models is validated which forms the basis for designing different control strategies.

  3. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part I: Load Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6417E Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part I: Load Availability Profiles Resources 4 #12;#12;#12;CHAPTER 3: Results: DR Profiles 3.1 Projected Demand Response Availability in 2020

  4. Ancillary-service details: regulation, load following, and generator response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine empirically these intrahour and interhour load changes and the responses of a utility`s generating resources to those load changes. We analyze data, primarily from one control area, to see how it maintains ACE close to zero in an effort to meet the A1 and A2 criteria. Overall, we estimate that load following costs US electric utilities over one billion dollars a year. We first test alternative ways to identify trends over multihour periods using both regression analysis and rolling averages. Then, we consider several metrics for intrahour load following. Next we examine characteristics of load following for different time-averaging periods and compare the dynamics of loads and load following generation across these time periods. Finally, we consider the contribution of each load to the total load following requirements of the control area.

  5. Analytical Methods for Implementing Industrial Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassig, N.; Chan, M.; Carlson, R.

    1982-01-01

    Many utilities have completed long-term planning studies and have shown that a load management program is cost effective. They are now actively implementing large-scale, system-wide programs such as demand subscription, interruptable rates, and time...

  6. Demand-Side Response from Industrial Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R; Alkadi, Nasr E; Letto, Daryl; Johnson, Brandon; Dowling, Kevin; George, Raoule; Khan, Saqib

    2013-01-01

    Through a research study funded by the Department of Energy, Smart Grid solutions company ENBALA Power Networks along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have geospatially quantified the potential flexibility within industrial loads to leverage their inherent process storage to help support the management of the electricity grid. The study found that there is an excess of 12 GW of demand-side load flexibility available in a select list of top industrial facilities in the United States. Future studies will expand on this quantity of flexibility as more in-depth analysis of different industries is conducted and demonstrations are completed.

  7. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6034E Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Dandan Zhu1 , Tianzhen Energy, the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency, of the U;Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads A joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley

  8. Response of Lithium Polymer Batteries to Mechanical Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Response of Lithium Polymer Batteries to Mechanical Loading Karl Suabedissen1, Christina Peabody2 #12;Outline · Motivation · Battery Structure · Testing and Results · Conclusions #12;Motivation · Lithium polymer batteries are everywhere. · Efforts to create flexible batteries. · Restrictive battery

  9. Characterizing tensile loading responses of 3D printed samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haid, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to characterize the loading response of samples manufactured through 3D printing. Tensile testing was performed on a number of 3D printed samples created through Fused Filament Fabrication ...

  10. Integrity Program Roles & Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    of the Inspector General's Compliance Program Guidance for Hospitals, the Office of the Inspector General .............................................................................................7 General Counsel ................................................................................17 Element 5. Monitoring, Auditing, and Reporting Systems

  11. Predicting the Response of Electricity Load to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Kalendra, Eric

    2015-07-28

    Our purpose is to develop a methodology to quantify the impact of climate change on electric loads in the United States. We perform simple linear regression, assisted by geospatial smoothing, on paired temperature and load time-series to estimate the heating- and coolinginduced sensitivity to temperature across 300 transmission zones and 16 seasonal and diurnal time periods. The estimated load sensitivities can be coupled with climate scenarios to quantify the potential impact of climate change on load, with a primary application being long-term electricity scenarios. The method allows regional and seasonal differences in climate and load response to be reflected in the electricity scenarios. While the immediate product of this analysis was designed to mesh with the spatial and temporal resolution of a specific electricity model to enable climate change scenarios and analysis with that model, we also propose that the process could be applied for other models and purposes.

  12. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie

    2013-11-01

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  13. Spinning Reserve From Hotel Load Response: Initial Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J

    2008-11-01

    This project was motivated by the fundamental match between hotel space conditioning load response capability and power system contingency response needs. As power system costs rise and capacity is strained demand response can provide a significant system reliability benefit at a potentially attractive cost. At ORNL s suggestion, Digital Solutions Inc. adapted its hotel air conditioning control technology to supply power system spinning reserve. This energy saving technology is primarily designed to provide the hotel operator with the ability to control individual room temperature set-points based upon occupancy (25% to 50% energy savings based on an earlier study [Kirby and Ally, 2002]). DSI added instantaneous local load shedding capability in response to power system frequency and centrally dispatched load shedding capability in response to power system operator command. The 162 room Music Road Hotel in Pigeon Forge Tennessee agreed to host the spinning reserve test. The Tennessee Valley Authority supplied real-time metering equipment in the form of an internet connected Dranetz-BMI power quality meter and monitoring expertise to record total hotel load during both normal operations and test results. The Sevier County Electric System installed the metering. Preliminary testing showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22% to 37% depending on the outdoor temperature and the time of day. These results are prior to implementing control over the common area air conditioning loads. Testing was also not at times of highest system or hotel loading. Full response occurred in 12 to 60 seconds from when the system operator s command to shed load was issued. The load drop was very rapid, essentially as fast as the 2 second metering could detect, with all units responding essentially simultaneously. Load restoration was ramped back in over several minutes. The restoration ramp can be adjusted to the power system needs. Frequency response testing was not completed. Initial testing showed that the units respond very quickly. Problems with local power quality generated false low frequency signals which required testing to be stopped. This should not be a problem in actual operation since the frequency trip points will be staggered to generate a droop curve which mimics generator governor response. The actual trip frequencies will also be low enough to avoid power quality problems. The actual trip frequencies are too low to generate test events with sufficient regularity to complete testing in a reasonable amount of time. Frequency response testing will resume once the local power quality problem is fully understood and reasonable test frequency settings can be determined. Overall the preliminary testing was extremely successful. The hotel response capability matches the power system reliability need, being faster than generation response and inherently available when the power system is under the most stress (times of high system and hotel load). Periodic testing is scheduled throughout the winter and spring to characterize hotel response capability under a full range of conditions. More extensive testing will resume when summer outdoor temperatures are again high enough to fully test hotel response.

  14. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Energy Efficiency, Demand Response, and Peak Load Managementdemand response, and load management programs in the Ebefore they undertake load management and demand response

  15. Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-11-06

    Direct load control (DLC) refers to the scenario where third party entities outside the home or facility are responsible for deciding how and when specific customer loads will be controlled in response to Demand Response (DR) events on the electric grid. Examples of third parties responsible for performing DLC may be Utilities, Independent System Operators (ISO), Aggregators, or third party control companies. DLC can be contrasted with facility centric load control (FCLC) where the decisions for how loads are controlled are made entirely within the facility or enterprise control systems. In FCLC the facility owner has more freedom of choice in how to respond to DR events on the grid. Both approaches are in use today in automation of DR and both will continue to be used in future market segments including industrial, commercial and residential facilities. This paper will present a framework which can be used to differentiate between DLC and FCLC based upon where decisions are made on how specific loads are controlled in response to DR events. This differentiation is then used to compare and contrast the differences between DLC and FCLC to identify the impact each has on:(1)Utility/ISO and third party systems for managing demand response, (2)Facility systems for implementing load control, (3)Communications networks for interacting with the facility and (4)Facility operators and managers. Finally a survey of some of the existing DR related specifications and communications standards is given and their applicability to DLC or FCLC. In general FCLC adds more cost and responsibilities to the facilities whereas DLC represents higher costs and complexity for the Utility/ISO. This difference is primarily due to where the DR Logic is implemented and the consequences that creates. DLC may be more certain than FCLC because it is more predictable - however as more loads have the capability to respond to DR signals, people may prefer to have their own control of end-use loads and FCLC systems. Research is needed to understand the predictability of FCLC which is related to the perceived value of the DR from the facility manager or home owner's perspective.

  16. Partnership with Industries- A Successful "Conservation and Load Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    WERE RECOMMENDED IN THREE ELEMENTS OF THE ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE, STAFFING LEVELS, AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. A CONSERVATION AND LOAD MANAGEMENT (CLM) DEPARTMENT WAS FORMED AT THE CORPORATE LEVEL IN 1982. THE NEW DEPARTMENT WAS GIVEN..., WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS, TOURS AND BRIEFINGS, VIDEO PROGRAMS, AND PERSONAL CONTACTS EACH AIMED AT SPECIFIC TARGET AUDIENCES. THE CONSERVATION AND LOAD MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT WAS GIVEN THE MISSION TO PLAN, DEVELOP, EVALUATE, MARKET AND MONITOR...

  17. Residential Air Conditioner Direct Load Control "Energy Partners Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    ) approach in which both demand- side and supply side resources are evaluated. HL&P also recognizes the contribution demand-side programs make to the company's long-term ability to provide reliable and reasonably priced electric service for its... effected, according to EPRI. Numerous large investor-owned electric utilities are presently offering residential load control programs with great success. Arkansas Power & Light, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, Florida Power t Light...

  18. EQUIVALENT STATIC WIND LOAD DISTRIBUTION OF COUPLED BUFFETING RESPONSE OF BRIDGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    EQUIVALENT STATIC WIND LOAD DISTRIBUTION OF COUPLED BUFFETING RESPONSE OF BRIDGES Xinzhong Chen in terms of the equivalent static wind loads. The gust response factor (GRF) approach that assumes the equivalent static loads having the same distribution of the mean static wind loads is widely used

  19. Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

    2008-11-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

  20. Aggregate Model for Heterogeneous Thermostatically Controlled Loads with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Chassin, David P.

    2012-07-22

    Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) – demand response, distributed generation, distributed storage - that are expected to be deployed, it is impractical to use detailed models of these resources when integrated with the transmission system. Being able to accurately estimate the fast transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies. On the other hand, a less complex model is more amenable to design feedback control strategies for the population of devices to provide ancillary services. The main contribution of this paper is to develop aggregated models for a heterogeneous population of Thermostatic Controlled Loads (TCLs) to accurately capture their collective behavior under demand response and other time varying effects of the system. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population and accounts for a second order effect necessary to accurately capture the collective dynamic behavior. The developed aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D (an open source distribution simulation software) under both steady state and severe dynamic conditions caused due to temperature set point changes.

  1. ORNL/TM-2008/227 Using Air Conditioning Load Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ORNL/TM-2008/227 Using Air Conditioning Load Response for Spinning Reserve 2008 Prepared by John D...........................................................................................................4 II. Air Conditioning Temperature Effect and High SEER Ratings .................................................................................................................10 IV. Use of Building Air Conditioning Models to Predict Load

  2. Response of a grooved plate subjected to out-of-plane contact loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastien, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    The response of a grooved plate subjected to out-of-plane contact loading is examined. The influence of selected geometric and loading parameters are investigated, as well as the effects of various boundary conditions. The ...

  3. Utilizing Load Response for Wind and Solar Integration and Power System Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2010-07-01

    Responsive load is still the most underutilized reliability resource in North America. This paper examines the characteristics of concern to the power system, the renewables, and to the loads.

  4. Response of grooved composites to transversely distributed and localized spherical contact loadings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, Holly K

    2011-01-01

    The response of a grooved composite specimen to two contact loading situations is studied; load applied via a transversely oriented cylindrical indenter and via a localized spherical ball-ended indenter. The philosophy of ...

  5. Seismic Safety Program: Ground motion and structural response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    In 1964, John A. Blume & Associates Research Division (Blume) began a broad-range structural response program to assist the Nevada Operations Office of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in ensuring the continued safe conduct of underground nuclear detonation testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Blume`s long experience in earthquake engineering provided a general basis for the program, but much more specialized knowledge was required for the AEC`s purposes. Over the next 24 years Blume conducted a major research program to provide essential understanding of the detailed nature of the response of structures to dynamic loads such as those imposed by seismic wave propagation. The program`s results have been embodied in a prediction technology which has served to provide reliable advanced knowledge of the probable effects of seismic ground motion on all kinds of structures, for use in earthquake engineering and in building codes as well as for the continuing needs of the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). This report is primarily an accounting of the Blume work, beginning with the setting in 1964 and the perception of the program needs as envisioned by Dr. John A. Blume. Subsequent chapters describe the structural response program in detail and the structural prediction procedures which resulted; the intensive data acquisition program which, as is discussed at some length, relied heavily on the contributions of other consultant-contractors in the DOE/NV Seismic Safety Support Program; laboratory and field studies to provide data on building elements and structures subjected to dynamic loads from sources ranging from testing machines to earthquakes; structural response activities undertaken for testing at the NTS and for off-NTS underground nuclear detonations; and concluding with an account of corollary studies including effects of natural forces and of related studies on building response.

  6. Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    1 Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response Wei Zhang, Member, IEEE Abstract--Demand response is playing an increasingly impor- tant role in the efficient loads is especially important to evaluate the effec- tiveness of various demand response strategies

  7. Energy-Agile Laptops: Demand Response of Mobile Plug Loads Using Sensor/Actuator Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Energy-Agile Laptops: Demand Response of Mobile Plug Loads Using Sensor/Actuator Networks Nathan@me.berkeley.edu Abstract--This paper explores demand response techniques for managing mobile, distributed loads with on observed. Our first simulation study explores a classic demand response scenario in which a large number

  8. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across U.S. Regions of the Western Interconnection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand response has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles for demand response that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study.

  9. Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

  10. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-07-15

    Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

  11. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    is estimated. Keywords: Demand response, ancillary services,of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availabilityof Energy (DOE) Demand Response and Energy Storage

  12. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Transition of a Utility Load Management Program to ProvideSCE’s Load Management Programs andRequirements for Load Management Resources to Provide

  13. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit; Sun, Yannan

    2012-12-12

    Demand Response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the behavior of populations of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of these demand response programs. In this paper, an aggregated model is proposed for a class of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs). The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. However, an accurate characterization of the collective dynamics however requires the aggregate model to have a high state space dimension. Most of the existing model reduction techniques require the stability of the underlying system which does not hold for the proposed aggregated model. In this work, a novel model reduction approach is developed for the proposed aggregated model, which can significantly reduce its complexity with small performance loss. The original and the reducedorder aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D, which is a realistic open source distribution simulation software. Index Terms – demand response, aggregated model, ancillary

  14. Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsøy Pilot Engineering No. 32 ISSN: 1603-9874 Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads University October, 2005 #12;#12;Preface This report presents the preparations done prior to model tests

  15. A Historical Perspective and Business Model for Load Response Aggregation Based on Priority Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    A Historical Perspective and Business Model for Load Response Aggregation Based on Priority Service technologies and experiments in the 1980's for implementing demand response. We argue that while new smart grid technologies are cheaper and provide more functionality the barrier to demand response implementation

  16. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response Wei Zhang, Jianming Lian, Chin-Yao Chang, Karanjit Kalsi and Yannan Sun Abstract-- Demand Response is playing population of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effec- tiveness

  17. Mentor Responsibilities | Robotics Internship Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELINGMeetingsMembranesMemorialProgramMentor

  18. Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2013-06-21

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in the efficient and reliable operation of the electric grid. Modeling the dynamic behavior of a large population of responsive loads is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of various demand response strategies. In this paper, a highly-accurate aggregated model is developed for a population of air conditioning loads. The model effectively includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with load heterogeneity, and accounts for second-order dynamics necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. Based on the model, a novel aggregated control strategy is designed for the load population under realistic conditions. The proposed controller is fully responsive and achieves the control objective without sacrificing end-use performance. The proposed aggregated modeling and control strategies are validated through realistic simulations using GridLAB-D. Extensive simulation results indicate that the proposed approach can effectively manage a large number of air conditioning systems to provide various demand response services, such as frequency regulation and peak load reduction.

  19. Real power regulation for the utility power grid via responsive loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J [Knoxville, TN; Kirby, Brendan J [Knoxville, TN; Kisner, Roger A

    2009-05-19

    A system for dynamically managing an electrical power system that determines measures of performance and control criteria for the electric power system, collects at least one automatic generation control (AGC) input parameter to at least one AGC module and at least one automatic load control (ALC) input parameter to at least one ALC module, calculates AGC control signals and loads as resources (LAR) control signals in response to said measures of performance and control criteria, propagates AGC control signals to power generating units in response to control logic in AGC modules, and propagates LAR control signals to at least one LAR in response to control logic in ALC modules.

  20. Decentralized Control of Aggregated Loads for Demand Response Di Guo, Wei Zhang, Gangfeng Yan, Zhiyun Lin, and Minyue Fu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    Decentralized Control of Aggregated Loads for Demand Response Di Guo, Wei Zhang, Gangfeng Yan of residential responsive loads for vari- ous demand response applications. We propose a general hybrid system and effectively reduce the peak power consumption. I. INTRODUCTION Demand response has the potential to shift

  1. Special Access Program Policies, Responsibilities, and Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-07-11

    Special Access Program Policies, Responsibilities, and Procedures This Manual is for OFFICIAL USE ONLY and will not be distributed on the Directives Portal. For distribution, please contact the Director, Office of Security, at 202-586-6775. Cancels: DOE M 471.2-3

  2. PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF STRUCTURE UNDER COLLAPSE LOADING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. PEPIN; E. RODRIGUEZ; ET AL

    2001-01-05

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing the capability to provide a reliability-based structural evaluation technique for performing weapon reliability assessments. To enhance the analyst's confidence with these new methods, an integrated experiment and analysis project has been developed. The uncertainty associated with the collapse response of commercially available spherical marine float is evaluated with the aid of the non-linear explicit dynamics code DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann 1988) coupled with the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) (Thacker et al. 1998). Variations in geometric shape parameters and uncertainties in material parameters are characterized and included in the probabilistic model.

  3. Blast Load Response of Steel Sandwich Panels with Liquid Encasement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Karr; Marc Perlin; Benjamin Langhorst; Henry Chu

    2009-10-01

    We describe an experimental investigation of the response of hybrid blast panels for protection from explosive and impact forces. The fundamental notion is to dissipate, absorb, and redirect energy through plastic collapse, viscous dissipation, and inter-particle forces of liquid placed in sub-structural compartments. The panels are designed to absorb energy from an impact or air blast by elastic-plastic collapse of the panel substructure that includes fluid-filled cavities. The fluid contributes to blast effects mitigation by providing increased initial mass and resistance, by dissipation of energy through viscosity and fluid flow, and by redirecting the momentum that is imparted to the system from the impact and blast impulse pressures. Failure and deformation mechanisms of the panels are described.

  4. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2009-01-01

    energy efficiency, load management, and demand response caseenergy efficiency and load management purposes can often bein place controls for load management programs as well as

  5. effective evaluation of viscoelastic responses of arbitrarily stratified Earth models to surface loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    The Aim effective evaluation of viscoelastic responses of arbitrarily stratified Earth models to surface loading Physical Model Maxwell viscoelastic pre-stressed self-gravitating sphere, compressible et al., 1996] ¯ taking into account the block diagonal structure of È and É desirable (see next panel

  6. Loading and Response of Offshore Wind Turbine Support Structures: Prediction with Comparison to Measured Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    Loading and Response of Offshore Wind Turbine Support Structures: Prediction with Comparison, offshore wind support platforms differ from oil platforms is several important ways: First, wind platforms turbines, combined with the relatively slender profit margins in the offshore wind business, makes cost

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Osmotic and metabolic responses to dehydration and urea-loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Osmotic and metabolic responses to dehydration and urea-loading in a dormant little work has addressed this problem in hibernating animals. We investigated osmotic and metabolic of or- ganic and inorganic osmolytes that raise internal osmotic pressure, thereby reducing

  8. Nutrient Loading and System Response in the Coastal Lagoons of the Delmarva Presented to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    Nutrient Loading and System Response in the Coastal Lagoons of the Delmarva Peninsula Approved by the Committee, April 2009 Committee Co-Chair/Co-Advisor Mark J. Brush, PhD. Committee Co-Chair/Co-Advisor a combination of watershed modeling and nitrogen source tracking

  9. The dynamic response of edge clamped plates loaded by spherically expanding sand shellsq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    The dynamic response of edge clamped plates loaded by spherically expanding sand shellsq Kumar P and water saturated sand has been investigated, both experimentally and via a particle based simulation methodology. The spherically expanding sand shell is generated by detonating a sphere of explosive surrounded

  10. Review of Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Approaches Used to Estimate the Load Impacts and Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-04-01

    Provides an overview of evaluation, measurement, and verification approaches used to estimate the load impacts and effectiveness of energy efficiency programs.

  11. Wood stove use in the end-use load and consumer assessment program residential base sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBaron, B.A.

    1988-11-01

    This report examines wood heating in the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) Residential Base Sample during the 1985/1986 heating season. The goals of this study were to assess the frequency of wood burning in homes having wood burning equipment and to estimate the quantity of electrical space heat displaced by it use. 15 refs., 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Managing Plug-Loads for Demand Response within Buildings Thomas Weng, Bharathan Balaji, Seemanta Dutta, Rajesh Gupta, Yuvraj Agarwal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    Managing Plug-Loads for Demand Response within Buildings Thomas Weng, Bharathan Balaji, Seemanta managers can per- form active energy management, especially during demand response situations that require, allowing them to deal with demand response situations through user- specified actuation policies. At its

  13. Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic reflection data in their flexural moat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic the seismic stratigraphy of the flexural moat that flanks the Canary Islands. The moat stratigraphy has been the volcanoes that make up the Canary Islands progressively load the underlying lithosphere from east to west

  14. Comverge contribution to load participation of ancillary services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyaji, Wendell

    2011-10-25

    Presents Comverge demand response program summary. Discusses advantages of residential aggregation and real-time load management. Compares residential and commercial.

  15. Impacts of Providing Inertial Response on Dynamic Loads of Wind Turbine Drivetrains: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girsang, I. P.; Dhupia, J.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Muljadi, E.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-09-01

    There has been growing demand from the power industry for wind power plants to support power system operations. One such requirement is for wind turbines to provide ancillary services in the form of inertial response. When the grid frequency drops, it is essential for wind turbine generators (WTGs) to inject kinetic energy stored in their inertia into the grid to help arrest the frequency decline. However, the impacts of inertial response on the structural loads of the wind turbine have not been given much attention. To bridge this gap, this paper utilizes a holistic model for both fixed-speed and variable-speed WTGs by integrating the aeroelastic wind turbine model in FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with the electromechanical drivetrain model in SimDriveline and SimPowerSystems.

  16. Economic and Emissions Implications of Load-Based, Source-based and First-seller Emissions Trading Programs under California AB32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yihsu; Liu, Andrew L.; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2008-01-01

    cates in a load-based emissions trading scheme. Technicaland First-seller Emissions Trading Programs under Californiaand First-seller Emissions Trading Programs under California

  17. Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

  18. Prediction of Air Conditioning Load Response for Providing Spinning Reserve - ORNL Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Ally, Moonis Raza; Rice, C Keith

    2009-02-01

    This report assesses the use of air conditioning load for providing spinning reserve and discusses the barriers and opportunities. Air conditioning load is well suited for this service because it often increases during heavy load periods and can be curtailed for short periods with little impact to the customer. The report also provides an appendix describing the ambient temperature effect on air conditioning load.

  19. Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Arman, B.; An, Q.; Luo, S. N.; Desai, T. G.; Tonks, D. L.; C?ag??n, T.; Goddard, III, W. A.

    2011-01-04

    We investigate with nonreactive molecular dynamics simulations the dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube (CNT) composites to shock wave compression. For phenolic resin, our simulations yield shock states in agreement with experiments on similar polymers except the “phase change” observed in experiments, indicating that such phase change is chemical in nature. The elastic–plastic transition is characterized by shear stress relaxation and atomic-level slip, and phenolic resin shows strong strain hardening. Shock loading of the CNT-resin composites is applied parallel or perpendicular to the CNT axis, and the composites demonstrate anisotropy in wave propagation, yield and CNT deformation. Themore »CNTs induce stress concentrations in the composites and may increase the yield strength. Our simulations indicate that the bulk shock response of the composites depends on the volume fraction, length ratio, impact cross-section, and geometry of the CNT components; the short CNTs in current simulations have insignificant effect on the bulk response of resin polymer.« less

  20. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  1. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  2. Special Access Program Policies, Responsibilities, and Procedure

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-10-29

    This Manual is for OFFICIAL USE ONLY and will not be distributed on the Directives Portal. For distribution, please contact the Executive Secretary of the Special Access Program Oversight Committee at 202-586-6775. Cancels DOE M 471.2-3A. Canceled by DOE O 471.5.

  3. Published in Proceedings of the XL2003 (Response of Structures to Extreme Loading) Conference, Toronto, August 2003. EFFICIENT MODELS FOR WIND TURBINE EXTREME LOADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    , Toronto, August 2003. EFFICIENT MODELS FOR WIND TURBINE EXTREME LOADS USING INVERSE RELIABILITY K, USA ABSTRACT The reliability of wind turbines against extreme loads is the focus of this study loads for a 600kW three-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine. Only operating loads ­ here, flapwise (out

  4. DOE enforcement program roles and responsibilities: DOE handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Price-Anderson Act provides indemnification to DOE contractors who manage and conduct nuclear activities in the DOE complex. The government acts as an insurer for these contractors against any findings of liability from the nuclear activities of the contractor within the scope of its contract. 10 CFR Part 820 establishes the legal framework for implementing DOE`s Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. Integration with other DOE organizations and programs would assure that the enforcement process properly considers the actual or potential safety significance of a violation when determining an appropriate enforcement sanction. Achieving a proactive contractor compliance assurance rather than a heavy enforcement hand, will require a foundation of cooperation and teamwork across DOE organizations. This handbook identifies the areas of interface for the DOE Enforcement Program and provides guidance on roles and responsibilities for the key DOE organizational areas. It complements DOE-HDBK-1087-95 and 1089-95.

  5. Computer Control for IGBT Based Heat Load System with Rapid Response and Large Heat Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yangmin

    system. So it can acquire the satisfactory performance, what is more, the heat load system combined heat flux within very short time, but it needs a very complicated welding power supply, and meantime, heating coils, etc. There are three power amplifiers: linear amplifier, on-off amplifier, and pulse width

  6. Dynamic System Response of Truss Panels under High Dynamic Loading through Experimental & Computation Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    to investigate the dynamic performance of truss panel systems. Two configurations were computer simulated to correlate experimental system failure limits under dynamic load. The computer code matched the experimental was the only trusted metric of dynamic performance of system. Computer codes were too inaccurate

  7. Energy Incentive Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and typically funded out of general tax revenues. It also provides information about demand-response and load management programs, which offer incentives to curtail demand...

  8. Regression Models for Demand Reduction based on Cluster Analysis of Load Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Han, Junqiao; Ghatikar, Girish; Piette, Mary Ann; Asano, Hiroshi; Kiliccote, Sila

    2009-06-28

    This paper provides new regression models for demand reduction of Demand Response programs for the purpose of ex ante evaluation of the programs and screening for recruiting customer enrollment into the programs. The proposed regression models employ load sensitivity to outside air temperature and representative load pattern derived from cluster analysis of customer baseline load as explanatory variables. The proposed models examined their performances from the viewpoint of validity of explanatory variables and fitness of regressions, using actual load profile data of Pacific Gas and Electric Company's commercial and industrial customers who participated in the 2008 Critical Peak Pricing program including Manual and Automated Demand Response.

  9. A Study of the Pre-Programmed Thermostat Timer as a Load Control Device 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, M. L.; Thedford, M.

    1985-01-01

    , August 26 and August 27, were chosen. The load leveling device was in the "on" mode on August 26, anl the "off" mode on August 27. Chart V identifies the data for August 26 and August 27. Humidity strip charts (not included) show 60% to 65% relative...

  10. Fracture response of externally flawed aluminum cylindrical shells under internal gaseous detonation loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Al

    Fracture response of externally flawed aluminum cylindrical shells under internal gaseous. Experiments were performed to observe the fracture behavior of thin- wall and initially-flawed aluminum tubes to different fracture events are analyzed. Keywords: tube fracture, detonation, crack branching, crack curving

  11. Demand Response in the ERCOT Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Mark

    2011-10-25

    ERCOT grid serves 85% of Texas load over 40K+ miles transmission line. Demand response: voluntary load response, load resources, controllable load resources, and emergency interruptible load service.

  12. Uncertainty quantification of a containment vessel dynamic response subjected to high-explosive detonation impulse loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, E. A.; Pepin, J. E.; Thacker, B. H.; Riha, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in cooperation with Southwest Research Institute, has been developing capabilities to provide reliability-based structural evaluation techniques for performing weapon component and system reliability assessments. The development and applications of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) is an important ingredient in the overall weapon reliability assessments. Focus, herein, is placed on the uncertainty quantification associated with the structural response of a containment vessel for high-explosive (HE) experiments. The probabilistic dynamic response of the vessel is evaluated through the coupling of the probabilistic code NESSUS with the non-linear structural dynamics code, DYNA-3D. The probabilistic model includes variations in geometry and mechanical properties, such as Young's Modulus, yield strength, and material flow characteristics. Finally, the probability of exceeding a specified strain limit, which is related to vessel failure, is determined.

  13. Ferrocyanide safety program: Heat load and thermal characteristics determination for selected tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.M.; Cash, R.J.

    1993-11-01

    An analysis was conducted to determine the heat loads, conductivities, and heat distributions of waste tanks 241-BY-105, -106, -108, -110, -111, and 241-C-109 at the Hanford Site. The heat distribution of tank 241-BY-111 was determined to be homogeneously distributed throughout the sludge contained in the tank. All of the other tanks, with the exception of 241-C-109, showed evidence of a heat-producing layer at the bottom of the tanks. No evidence of a heat-producing layer in a position above the bottom was found. The thermal conductivities were determined to be within the ranges found by previous laboratory and computer analysis. The heat loads of the tanks were found to be below 2.81 kW (9,600 Btu/hr).

  14. Review of Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Approaches Used to Estimate the Load Impacts and Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messenger, Mike; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Golemboski, Bill; Goldman, Charles A.; Schiller, Steven R.

    2010-04-14

    Public and private funding for end-use energy efficiency actions is expected to increase significantly in the United States over the next decade. For example, Barbose et al (2009) estimate that spending on ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in the U.S. could increase from $3.1 billion in 2008 to $7.5 and 12.4 billion by 2020 under their medium and high scenarios. This increase in spending could yield annual electric energy savings ranging from 0.58% - 0.93% of total U.S. retail sales in 2020, up from 0.34% of retail sales in 2008. Interest in and support for energy efficiency has broadened among national and state policymakers. Prominent examples include {approx}$18 billion in new funding for energy efficiency programs (e.g., State Energy Program, Weatherization, and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants) in the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Increased funding for energy efficiency should result in more benefits as well as more scrutiny of these results. As energy efficiency becomes a more prominent component of the U.S. national energy strategy and policies, assessing the effectiveness and energy saving impacts of energy efficiency programs is likely to become increasingly important for policymakers and private and public funders of efficiency actions. Thus, it is critical that evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) is carried out effectively and efficiently, which implies that: (1) Effective program evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) methodologies and tools are available to key stakeholders (e.g., regulatory agencies, program administrators, consumers, and evaluation consultants); and (2) Capacity (people and infrastructure resources) is available to conduct EM&V activities and report results in ways that support program improvement and provide data that reliably compares achieved results against goals and similar programs in other jurisdictions (benchmarking). The National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (2007) presented commonly used definitions for EM&V in the context of energy efficiency programs: (1) Evaluation (E) - The performance of studies and activities aimed at determining the effects and effectiveness of EE programs; (2) Measurement and Verification (M&V) - Data collection, monitoring, and analysis associated with the calculation of gross energy and demand savings from individual measures, sites or projects. M&V can be a subset of program evaluation; and (3) Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification (EM&V) - This term is frequently seen in evaluation literature. EM&V is a catchall acronym for determining both the effectiveness of program designs and estimates of load impacts at the portfolio, program and project level. This report is a scoping study that assesses current practices and methods in the evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs, with a focus on methods and practices currently used for determining whether projected (ex-ante) energy and demand savings have been achieved (ex-post). M&V practices for privately-funded energy efficiency projects (e.g., ESCO projects) or programs where the primary focus is greenhouse gas reductions were not part of the scope of this study. We identify and discuss key purposes and uses of current evaluations of end-use energy efficiency programs, methods used to evaluate these programs, processes used to determine those methods; and key issues that need to be addressed now and in the future, based on discussions with regulatory agencies, policymakers, program administrators, and evaluation practitioners in 14 states and national experts in the evaluation field. We also explore how EM&V may evolve in a future in which efficiency funding increases significantly, innovative mechanisms for rewarding program performance are adopted, the role of efficiency in greenhouse gas mitigation is more closely linked, and programs are increasingly funded from multiple sources often with multiple program administrators and in

  15. An Autonomous Demand Response Program in Smart Grid with Foresighted Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    An Autonomous Demand Response Program in Smart Grid with Foresighted Users Shahab Bahrami, Vancouver, Canada email: {bahramis, vincentw}@ece.ubc.ca Abstract--In smart grid, demand response also benefit by reducing its total cost. In most of the existing studies, the demand response program

  16. {Control of Residential Load Management Networks Using Real Time Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, William Jerome

    2010-01-01

    modeling and control of load management. Further, withoutA profit-based load management using linear programming”.with applica- tions to load management assessment and load

  17. Bridging the gap: A cooperative solution environmental load program for commercial banks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckles, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    A Cooperative Solution Environmental Loan Program is currently being designed for implementation, on an annual membership basis, to California Banks. Its purpose is to provide comprehensive guidance to lenders covering all facets of due diligence associated with existing and/or new lending relationships on properties that are environmentally impacted and/or sensitive. This program will provide an interdependent process to clean-up, finance, reach regulatory sign-off, scientifically validate and commercialize new alternative technologies, followed by property development and/or revitalization. The program structure is unique in its ability to provide a regionalized network, linking banks to the regulatory agencies that review the clean-up process as well as to the comprehensive resources that represent solutions to environmental loan problems.

  18. Do "enabling technologies" affect customer performance in price-responsive load programs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Heffner, Grayson

    2002-01-01

    utilities, retail energy suppliers, or curtailment serviceby competitive retail energy suppliers was not readily

  19. 2012 CERTS LAAR Program Peer Review - Frequency Responsive Load Evaluation and Benefits - Isabelle Snyder, ORNL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i s t aReliabilityDepartmentOfficeFrequency

  20. 2012 Load as a Resource Program Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks2 DOE Sustainability Awards 2012Department

  1. 2014 Load as a Resource Program Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks2 DOEEnergy Los

  2. Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Lee Hall, BPA Smart Grid Program Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Lee Hall, BPA Smart Grid Program Manager February 14 utilities to invest in DR Regional situational analysis ­ issues to address #12;Nationally ­ Demand ResponseSource: FERC Demand Response & Advanced Metering Report, February 2011 Peak DR 65,000 MW 1,062 MW Peak DR

  3. Load research manual. Volume 3. Load research for advanced technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms. In Volume 3, special load research procedures are presented for solar, wind, and cogeneration technologies.

  4. Optimal Power Flow Based Demand Response Offer Price Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    Optimal Power Flow Based Demand Response Offer Price Optimization Zhen Qiu 1 Introduction-time energy balance. Demand response programs are offered by the utility companies to reduce the load response cost in exchange for load reduction. A considerable amount of papers have discussed the demand

  5. Adaptive Demand Response: Online Learning of Restless and Controlled Bandits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mingyan

    Adaptive Demand Response: Online Learning of Restless and Controlled Bandits Qingsi Wang, Mingyan realized curtailment, not the curtailment of each load. We develop an adaptive demand response learning like UCB1. I. INTRODUCTION Electric loads participating in demand response programs provide a variety

  6. Pivotal Response Parent Training Program: Generalization Of Clear Language Opportunities To At-Risk Siblings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Sara Ann

    2010-12-15

    This study examined the effectiveness of training parents as primary interveners through an accelerated parent education program for Pivotal Response Treatments. Specifically this study examined if the parent's change in ...

  7. Improving Speedup and Response Times by Replicating Parallel Programs on a SNOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    Improving Speedup and Response Times by Replicating Parallel Programs on a SNOW Gaurav D. Ghare to as a shared network of workstations (SNOW). The speedup of parallel programs running on a SNOW can be greatly affected by workstation owner interference. In this paper we consider a SNOW where parallel jobs are run

  8. Comparison of the response of two and four-stroke diesel-generator sets to transient loading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willett, Kenneth Ray

    1979-01-01

    load1ng. The experimental apparatus necessary to conduct this research cons1sts of: ~ The diesel-generator sets. T hree diesel generator sets of comparable power outputs were chosen. . The instrumentat1on system. Instrumentat1on was developed...- ing the plates into the water by means ot a crank and pulley system. The deeper the plates were immersed the lower the resistance and the greater the load, as can be seen from examination of Kirchhoff's Law and the definition of 3-phase power...

  9. Technical Assistance to ISO's and Grid Operators For Loads Providing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study - Past Workshops Load Participation...

  10. A user`s guide to LUGSAN II. A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, W.N.

    1998-03-01

    LUG and Sway brace ANalysis (LUGSAN) II is an analysis and database computer program that is designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads for aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN II combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85, with a Macintosh Hypercard database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the LUGSAN II application program, which operates on the Macintosh System (Hypercard 2.2 or later) and includes function descriptions, layout examples, and sample sessions. Although this report is primarily a user`s manual, a brief overview of the LUGSAN II computer code is included with suggested resources for programmers.

  11. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    and Hebei. Regulation on load management To tackle China’sparticularly governing load management. The regulation,It further requires that load management take the following

  12. Dynamic Load Altering Attacks in Smart Grid Sajjad Amini, Hamed Mohsenian-Rad, and Fabio Pasqualetti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    response and demand side management programs. It attempts to control and change certain unsecured is on attacks against demand re- sponse (DR) and demand side management (DSM) programs. DR programs are used}@ece.ucr.edu and fabiopas@engr.ucr.edu Abstract--A load altering attack (LAA) is a cyber-physical attack against demand

  13. Load cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  14. Electrical Load Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Electricity consumer demand response and load control are playing an increasingly important role in the development of a smart grid. Smart grid load management technologies such as Grid FriendlyTM controls and real-time pricing are making their way into the conventional model of grid planning and operations. However, the behavior of load both affects, and is affected by load control strategies that are designed to support electric grid planning and operations. This chapter discussed the natural behavior of electric loads, how it interacts with various load control and demand response strategies, what the consequences are for new grid operation concepts and the computing issues these new technologies raise.

  15. Load research manual. Volume 1. Load research procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. In Volumes 1 and 2, procedures are suggested for determining data requirements for load research, establishing the size and customer composition of a load survey sample, selecting and using equipment to record customer electricity usage, processing data tapes from the recording equipment, and analyzing the data. Statistical techniques used in customer sampling are discussed in detail. The costs of load research also are estimated, and ongoing load research programs at three utilities are described. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms.

  16. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand response (DR) has the potential to improve electric grid reliability and reduce system operation costs. However, including DR in grid modeling can be difficult due to its variable and non-traditional response characteristics, compared to traditional generation. Therefore, efforts to value the participation of DR in procurement of grid services have been limited. In this report, we present methods and tools for predicting demand response availability profiles, representing their capability to participate in capacity, energy, and ancillary services. With the addition of response characteristics mimicking those of generation, the resulting profiles will help in the valuation of the participation of demand response through production cost modeling, which informs infrastructure and investment planning.

  17. Electrical transient stability and underfrequency load shedding analysis for a large pump station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilling, S.R. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-12-31

    Electrical transients from faults, loss of generation, and load swings can disrupt pump station operations. Isolated stations with no utility tie and those with weak utility ties are especially at risk. Relative to this problem, the following four main issues are addressed: (1) Analyze the methods that use high-speed underfrequency load shedding to maintain system stability and preserve station operations. (2) Analyze combustion gas turbine generator and diesel generator transient responses, as they pertain to the Electrical Engineer. (3) Discuss system component modeling and the use of low voltage circuit switching devices to shed loads. (4) Compare two computer analysis program outputs for underfrequency load shedding responses.

  18. Electrical transient stability and underfrequency load shedding analysis for a large pump station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilling, S.R. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)] [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1997-01-01

    Electrical transients from faults, loss of generation, and load swings can disrupt pump station operations. Isolated stations with no utility tie, and those with weak utility ties, are especially at risk. Relative to this problem, the following four main issues are addressed: (1) analyze the methods that use high-speed underfrequency load shedding to maintain system stability and preserve station operations; (2) analyze combustion gas turbine generator and diesel generator transient responses, as they pertain to the electrical engineer; (3) discuss system component modeling and the use of low voltage circuit switching devices to shed loads; (4) compare two computer analysis program outputs for underfrequency load shedding responses.

  19. Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-01-01

    efficiency, daily peak load management and demand response.Loads Efficiency, Daily Load Management and Demand ResponseOperations Peak Load Management (Daily) - TOU Savings - Peak

  20. Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – For the first time, a program led by EM’s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE for response to potential radiological incidents joined an exercise to test national readiness for such an event.

  1. Review of the Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Event Response Program of the National Marine Fisheries Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review of the Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Event Response Program of the National Marine and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-OPR-33 September National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Protected Resources 1315 East-West Highway Silver Spring

  2. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric LoadReduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak PricingTariff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-11-14

    The goal of this investigation was to characterize themanual and automated response of residential customers to high-price"critical" events dispatched under critical peak pricing tariffs testedin the 2003-2004 California Statewide Pricing Pilot. The 15-monthexperimental tariff gave customers a discounted two-price time-of-userate on 430 days in exchange for 27 critical days, during which the peakperiod price (2 p.m. to 7 p.m.) was increased to about three times thenormal time-of-use peak price. We calculated response by five-degreetemperature bins as the difference between peak usage on normal andcritical weekdays. Results indicatedthat manual response to criticalperiods reached -0.23 kW per home (-13 percent) in hot weather(95-104.9oF), -0.03 kW per home (-4 percent) in mild weather (60-94.9oF),and -0.07 kW per home (-9 percent) during cold weather (50-59.9oF).Separately, we analyzed response enhanced by programmable communicatingthermostats in high-use homes with air-conditioning. Between 90oF and94.9oF, the response of this group reached -0.56 kW per home (-25percent) for five-hour critical periods and -0.89 kW/home (-41 percent)for two-hour critical periods.

  3. An Approach to Locality-Conscious Load Balancing and Transparent Memory Hierarchy Management with a Global-Address-Space Parallel Programming Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Catalyurek, Umit; Nieplocha, Jarek; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2006-04-25

    This paper describes a global-addressspace framework for the convenient specification and effi- cient execution of parallel out-of-core applications operating on block-sparse data. The programming model provides a global view of block-sparse matrices and a mechanism for the expression of parallel tasks that operate on blocksparse data. The tasks are automatically partitioned into phases that operate on memory-resident data, and mapped onto processors to optimize load balance and data locality. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the utility of the approach.

  4. Preliminary Evaluation of Load Management for Electricity End Users 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The planning, design and implementation of load management is complex and expensive. The results of a load management program are subject to numerous uncertainties related to load characteristics, power cost savings, load management costs...

  5. Abstract --Demand Response (DR) programs are not a new concept; moreover, the key technologies for their implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    1 Abstract -- Demand Response (DR) programs are not a new concept; moreover, the key technologies migrate to active and dynamic demand response, under reliability criteria based on the smart grid paradigm. This article formulates a new perspective of demand response in emerging countries, based on the US

  6. Distributed Algorithms for Control of Demand Response and Distributed Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro

    Distributed Algorithms for Control of Demand Response and Distributed Energy Resources Alejandro D networks. These algorithms are relevant for load curtailment control in demand response programs, and also is currently achieved through demand response programs in which participants, i.e., demand re- sponse resources

  7. The Impact of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs on the U.S. Electricity Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Young Sun; Hadley, Stanton W

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of the energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) programs on the grid and the consequent level of production. Changes in demand caused by EE and DR programs affect not only the dispatch of existing plants and new generation technologies, the retirements of old plants, and the finances of the market. To find the new equilibrium in the market, we use the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch Model (ORCED) developed to simulate the operations and costs of regional power markets depending on various factors including fuel prices, initial mix of generation capacity, and customer response to electricity prices. In ORCED, over 19,000 plant units in the nation are aggregated into up to 200 plant groups per region. Then, ORCED dispatches the power plant groups in each region to meet the electricity demands for a given year up to 2035. In our analysis, we show various demand, supply, and dispatch patterns affected by EE and DR programs across regions.

  8. Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6108E Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A Scoping Study was sponsored in part by the Demand Response Research Center which is funded by the California .................................. 2 Best Opportunities for Demand Response and Permanent Load Shifting Programs.............. 3

  9. Developing Embedded/Real-Time and Cyber-Physical Systems: Functional Reactive Programming, RTL-based Formal Verification, Response Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Albert M. K.

    , specification, modeling, scheduling, and formal verification of real- time, embedded, and cyber-physical systems-based Formal Verification, Response Time Analysis, and Power-Aware Scheduling Albert M. K. Cheng Real reactive programming, RTL (real-time logic)-based formal verification, response time analysis, and power

  10. The accurate response prediction of hypersonic aircraft panels to the extreme loading environments of hypersonic flight is of immense importance to the U.S. Air Force.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a representative hypersonic panel subjected to thermal, aerodynamic, and acoustic loads. The structural pressure and heating are accounted for with piston theory and Eckert's reference enthalpy method of a Panel Under Thermal, Aerodynamic, and Acoustic Loads Andrew Matney Advisor: Marc Mignolet April 21, 2014

  11. Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

    1988-01-01

    custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. For example, the Load Profile Viewer is a PC-based software program for reviewing and validating the end-use load data....

  12. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Shengnian; Arman, Bedri; Germann, Timothy C; Cagin, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  13. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. , 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for DataProcessing Industry Demand Response Participation: A Scoping

  14. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikler, Greg

    2008-01-01

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. May

  15. Peak-Coincident Demand Savings from Behavior-Based Programs: Evidence from PPL Electric's Behavior and Education Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, James

    2013-01-01

    kW from residential load management programs (EIA, 2012).States are employing load-management strategies to reducefrom residential load management programs. Thus, from a

  16. UTILITY-SCALE SOLAR LOAD CONTROL Richard Perez, ASRC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    was initially devised to function with user-sited PV installations to maximize demand reduction. An efficient load reduction (middle). By shedding load in response to PV output and load requirements the SLC load control (DLC) enhancement. The aggregate of direct load controlled customers constitute a reliable

  17. NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO TRANSIENT THERMAL LOADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vecchio, Frank J.

    Abstract ii NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES SUBJECTED nonlinear finite element transient thermal analysis is implemented into program VecTor2©, a nonlinear's response to thermal loads, this research develops and implements a 2D nonlinear finite element transient

  18. Impact of enabling technologies on customer load curtailment performance: Summer 2001 results from NYSERDA's PON 585 and 577 programs and NYISO's emergency demand response program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2002-01-01

    utilities or retail energy suppliers, or curtailment serviceby competitive retail energy suppliers was not readily

  19. Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-01-01

    Conservation and Load Management Programs for Commercial andusing CAPP for all but load management technologies. Busbar

  20. Summary of FIRE Actions in Response to Next Step Options Program Advisory Committee Report #4, January 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary of FIRE Actions in Response to Next Step Options Program Advisory Committee Report #4, January 2002 Previous Findings and Recommendations The FIRE Project has made good progress on responding where we deem they are of very high priority. 1. NBI for FIRE Finding 1: At our previous meeting we

  1. Dietetic Internship Program Students participating in the UNLV DI will be responsible for the following costs (these costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Dietetic Internship Program Costs Students participating in the UNLV DI will be responsible for the following costs (these costs are those for the 2013-2014 academic year and are subject to change for 1200 practice hours. Uniforms: lab coats cost approximately $30-40. Books and Nutrition Care Manual

  2. Ratio of Shear to Load Ground-Reaction Force May Underlie the Directional Tuning of the Automatic Postural Response to Rotation and Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the perturbation and leads to the directional tuning of the early electromyographic burst in the postural response. Directional tuning of the initial electromyographic (EMG) burst of the automatic postural response has been

  3. Load research manual. Volume 2. Fundamentals of implementing load research procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. In Volumes 1 and 2, procedures are suggested for determining data requirements for load research, establishing the size and customer composition of a load survey sample, selecting and using equipment to record customer electricity usage, processing data tapes from the recording equipment, and analyzing the data. Statistical techniques used in customer sampling are discussed in detail. The costs of load research also are estimated, and ongoing load research programs at three utilities are described. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms.

  4. Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Response SEAB Recommendations Related to the Evaluation of New Funding Constructs for Energy R&D in the Department of Energy Introduction Over the past seven years, the Department...

  5. Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    signal · Reinforces conservation program efforts in areas such as insulation and heat pumps Voluntary DR Commercial & Industrial DR Pilot ­ Internet communication/control of imbedded load control devices on up storage Commercial & Industrial DR Pilot (8 customers)* · Open Automated Demand Response Communication

  6. Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    chain such as daily load management and demand response.more effective load management or a permanent reduction inother actions such as load management and demand response (

  7. Economic and Emissions Implications of Load-Based, Source-based and First-seller Emissions Trading Programs under California AB32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yihsu; Liu, Andrew L.; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2008-01-01

    emissions trading programs for the electric power sector:power markets, transmission limitations, and emissions trading,

  8. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    the ongoing pilot demand-side management (DSM) programs ina comprehensive demand-side management (DSM) pilot program,a directive on demand-side management (DSM) in late 2010.

  9. Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goli, Sasank

    2012-01-01

    CPower (n.d. ). Peak Load Management. Retrieved on July 14,systems required for load management programs, as well asalso known as peak load management) utilities often employ

  10. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into3]. Utilities implemented load management (e.g. direct loadinitial interest in load management was driven in part by

  11. Using Utility Load Data to Estimate Demand for Space Cooling and Potential for Shiftable Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ong, S.; Booten, C.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes a simple method to estimate hourly cooling demand from historical utility load data. It compares total hourly demand to demand on cool days and compares these estimates of total cooling demand to previous regional and national estimates. Load profiles generated from this method may be used to estimate the potential for aggregated demand response or load shifting via cold storage.

  12. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01

    Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

  13. Load As A Reliability Resource in the Restructured Electricity Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, J.D.

    2002-06-10

    Recent electricity price spikes are painful reminders of the value that meaningful demand-side responses could bring to the restructuring US electricity system. Review of the aggregate offers made by suppliers confirms that even a modest increase in demand elasticity could dramatically reduce these extremes in price volatility. There is a strong need for dramatically increased customer participation in these markets to enhance system reliability and reduce price volatility. Indeed, allowing customers to manage their loads in response to system conditions might be thought of as the ultimate reliability resource. Most would agree that meaningful demand-side responses to price are the hallmark of a well-functioning competitive market [1]. Yet, in today's markets for electricity, little or no such response is evident. The reason is simple: customers currently do not experience directly the time-varying costs of their consumption decisions. Consequently, they have no incentive to modify these decisions in ways that might enhance system reliability or improve the efficiency of the markets in which electricity is traded. Increased customer participation is a necessary step in the evolution toward more efficient markets for electricity and ancillary services. This scoping report provides a three-part assessment of the current status of efforts to enhance the ability of customer's load to participate in competitive markets with a specific focus on the role of customer loads in enhancing electricity system reliability. First, this report considers the definitions of electricity-reliability-enhancing ancillary services (Section 2) and a preliminary assessment of the ability of customer's loads to provide these services. Second, is a review a variety of programs in which load has been called on as a system reliability resource (Section 3). These experiences, drawn from both past and current utility and ISO programs, focus on programs triggered by system condition (e.g., forecast reserves fall below a threshold), rather than those triggered by price (e.g., real-time prices). Third, the report examines the status of the underlying metering, communication, and control technologies required to enable customer loads to participate in competitive electricity markets (Section 4). Following the three-part assessment, we offer preliminary thoughts on directions for future research (Section 5).

  14. Response

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNatural GasBreakoutResponse SEAB Recommendations

  15. Responsibility

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNaturalEnergy Response

  16. Variable loading roller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Daniel M. (Oliver Springs, TN)

    1989-01-01

    An automatic loading roller for transmitting torque in traction drive devices in manipulator arm joints includes a two-part camming device having a first cam portion rotatable in place on a shaft by an input torque and a second cam portion coaxially rotatable and translatable having a rotating drive surface thereon for engaging the driven surface of an output roller with a resultant force proportional to the torque transmitted. Complementary helical grooves on the respective cam portions interconnected through ball bearings interacting with those grooves effect the rotation and translation of the second cam portion in response to rotation of the first.

  17. Variable loading roller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, D.M.

    1988-01-21

    An automatic loading roller for transmitting torque in traction drive devices in manipulator arm joints includes a two-part camming device having a first cam portion rotatable in place on a shaft by an input torque and a second cam portion coaxially rotatable and translatable having a rotating drive surface thereon for engaging the driven surface of an output roller with a resultant force proportional to the torque transmitted. Complementary helical grooves in the respective cam portions interconnected through ball bearings interacting with those grooves effect the rotation and translation of the second cam portion in response to rotation of the first. 14 figs.

  18. Distributional Analysis for Model Predictive Deferrable Load Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    for demand response. There are two major categories of demand response, direct load control (DLC) and price-based demand response. See [1] for a discussion of the contrasts between these approaches. In this paper we focus on direct load control with the goal of using demand response to reduce variations

  19. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    2012. Addressing Electricity Demand through Demand Response:has been driving up the electricity demand while widespreadexperiences in addressing electricity demand This section is

  20. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    of preferred resources, placing energy efficiency and demandPromoting Energy Efficiency as a Cost-Effective Resource infor energy efficiency and demand response resources. Peak

  1. Statistical Analysis of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2012-01-01

    M. Potter, The Demand Response Baseline, v.1.75, EnerNOC OPSand Techniques for Demand Response, Lawrence BerkeleyS. Kilicotte, Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

  2. UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN PROGRAM Science, Technology, and the Responsible Citizen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patt, Yale

    1 M 6/25 · Introductions and presentation of the program. · "Global warming is not a crisis" from Public Radio. T 6/26 · Genesis 1.1-3.24 · The Epic of Gilgamesh · Science, truth and facts (Chalmers

  3. Program Strategies and Results for California’s Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrhard, R.; Hamilton, G.

    2008-01-01

    Global Energy Partners provides a review of California’s strategic approach to energy efficiency and demand response implementation, with a focus on the industrial sector. The official role of the state, through the California Energy Commission (CEC...

  4. Comprehensive report to Congress: Proposals received in response to the Clean Coal Technology V Program Opportunity Notice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report is a comprehensive overview of all proposals received and the projects that were selected in response to the Program Opportunity Notice (PON) for the Clean Coal Technology V (CCT-V) Demonstration Projects (solicitation number DE-PS01-92FE62647). The Department of Energy (DOE) issued the solicitation on July 6, 1992. Through this PON, DOE solicited proposals to conduct cost-shared Clean Coal Technology (CCT) projects that advance significantly the efficiency and environmental performance of coal-using technologies and that are applicable to either new or existing facilities.

  5. Analytical Modeling of Wood Frame Shear Walls Subjected to Vertical Load 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyendinh, Hai

    2011-08-08

    A nonlinear automated parameter fitted analytical model that numerically predicts the load-displacement response of wood frame shear walls subjected to static monotonic loading with and without vertical load is presented. This analytical model...

  6. US Department of Energy participation in the development of emergency response planning guidelines: The program and process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, L.H.; Holder, B.W.

    1991-10-01

    Emergency response levels and protective action guides for incidents that could expose the public to an accidental release of radiation have been developed and used for many years. Similar attention, has not been focused on hazards from potential chemical releases. The tragic incident in Bhopal, India, in which over 2000 people died and many suffered irreversible health damage, has heightened concern worldwide about real and potential releases of chemicals. This concern, and the resultant re-evaluation by many companies, has demonstrated a need for similar guidelines for dealing with chemical hazards; such guidance would aid significantly in plant design and community planning. To address the need for reliable, consistent, and well-documented emergency planning guidelines, a program of Emergency Response Planning Guidelines (ERPGs) was established by Organization Resources Counselors, Inc. (ORC). ORC, working through established task forces and the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), oversees ERPG development. This paper describes the program established for developing and issuing ERPGs and the process within DOE for providing support.

  7. Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air...

  8. 770 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 3, NO. 2, JUNE 2012 Residential Load Control: Distributed Scheduling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    been termed demand response or load response, among others; see, e.g., [2], [3]. Residential loads have770 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 3, NO. 2, JUNE 2012 Residential Load Control: Distributed residential end-user has a base load, two types of adjustable loads, and pos- sibly a storage device

  9. Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program for Community Energy Planning and Projects - Round 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher iSlide 1 Moresteelmaking industry has significantlytext versionPrograms

  10. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Comprehensive Environmentally Response, Compensation, and Liability Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  11. Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-10-10

    Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

  12. The Summer of 2006: A Milestone in the Ongoing Maturation of Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Engel, Dan

    2007-01-01

    presentation to Peak Load Management Alliance Fall Meeting,Midwest ISO 2006 Load Management Response Survey Summary,

  13. Design Loads for Wind Turbines using the Environmental Contour Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    Design Loads for Wind Turbines using the Environmental Contour Method Korn Saranyasoontorn, TX 78712 When interest is in establishing ultimate design loads for wind turbines such that a service). The parametric conditional load distri- butions require extensive turbine response simulations over the entire

  14. The Summer of 2006: A Milestone in the Ongoing Maturation of Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Engel, Dan

    2007-01-01

    presentation to Peak Load Management Alliance Fall Meeting,Midwest ISO 2006 Load Management Response Survey Summary,appeals, demand-side management, utility load conservation,

  15. Global Climate Change Response Program: Potential regional impacts of global warming on precipitation in the western United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leverson, V.

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to build upon a previous Global Climate Change Response Program investigation in which an initial `first guess` climate change scenario was derived for the Western United States. Using the scenario`s hypothesized northward shift in the mean wintertime storm track, historical upper-air patterns in the atmosphere were searched to identify winter months (December, January, or February) that would serve as appropriate global warming analogues (GWA). Contour charts were generated of four geopotential height parameters. Specific pattern configurations of the four parameters were identified that reflected the altered storm track pattern, and guidelines for selecting suitable analogues based on the configurations were developed. Monthly mean precipitation values for the GWA months at three climatological divisions in Western Montana, northern Utah, and east central Arizona were compared with median values for the 1946-89 period to determine if any significant differences existed.

  16. Load Management for Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konsevick, W. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    categories: Thermal Energy Storage, Communication and Load Control, Interconnection and Operation of Power Systems, and Selective Load Promotions. The endeavors of the utility industry and Ohio Edison Company in three of the four categories are described...

  17. Load sensing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Nodine, Robert N. (Knoxville, TN); Wallace, Steven Allen (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A load sensing system inexpensively monitors the weight and temperature of stored nuclear material for long periods of time in widely variable environments. The system can include an electrostatic load cell that encodes weight and temperature into a digital signal which is sent to a remote monitor via a coaxial cable. The same cable is used to supply the load cell with power. When multiple load cells are used, vast

  18. Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson C.

    2002-01-01

    FOR COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY MARKETS – REVIEW OF DEMANDFOR COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY MARKETS – REVIEW OF DEMANDof regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and

  19. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matricesstudents working inProgramming Programming

  20. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matricesstudents working inProgrammingProgramming

  1. The Seismic Category 1 Structures Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, J.G.; Farrar, C.R.; Dunwoody, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Seismic Category I Structures Program entered a new phase at the end of FY 1984. During the prior fiscal years, tests on microconcrete scale model shear deformation dominated structures were completed. The results indicated that these structures responded to seismic excitations with frequencies that were reduced by factors of two or more over those calculated based on an uncracked cross section strength-of-materials approach. This reduction implies that stiffness associated with seismic working loads (loads resulting from an operating basis earthquake up to and including a safe shutdown earthquake) are down by a factor of four or more. These reductions were also consistent with those measured during quasistatic tests to an equivalent level of loading. Furthermore, though the structures themselves were shown to have sufficient reserve margin, the equipment and piping are designed to response spectra that are based on uncracked cross sectional member properties, and these spectra may not be appropriate for actual building responses.

  2. ENERNOC Load Participation in Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breidenbaugh, Aaron

    2011-10-25

    Report on EnerNOC. Description of their demand response for ancillary services in wholesale markets, bilateral programs, and lessons learned. NYISO experience.

  3. PASSIVE DETECTION OF VEHICLE LOADING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A.

    2012-01-03

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.

  4. Procedures for Correcting Cost Overruns on OSP Funds It is the responsibility of the PI to ensure that their sponsored program fund/index is not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Procedures for Correcting Cost Overruns on OSP Funds It is the responsibility of the PI to ensure that their sponsored program fund/index is not overspent. On occasion expenditures for a particular project may exceed the overdraft condition immediately. The procedure to be followed once a cost overrun or deficit is identified

  5. Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    energy efficiency, peak load management and demand response.minimization); peak load management (for daily operations);Energy Efficiency, Daily Load Management and DR Demand-Side

  6. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  7. HLW Glass Waste Loadings

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview Vitrification - general background Joule...

  8. Load sensing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sohns, C.W.; Nodine, R.N.; Wallace, S.A.

    1999-05-04

    A load sensing system inexpensively monitors the weight and temperature of stored nuclear material for long periods of time in widely variable environments. The system can include an electrostatic load cell that encodes weight and temperature into a digital signal which is sent to a remote monitor via a coaxial cable. The same cable is used to supply the load cell with power. When multiple load cells are used, vast inventories of stored nuclear material can be continuously monitored and inventoried of minimal cost. 4 figs.

  9. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, Lawrence M. (San Jose, CA); Strum, Michael J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  10. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matricesstudents working inProgramming

  11. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    demand response: ? Distribution utility ? ISO ? Aggregator (demand response less obstructive and inconvenient for the customer (particularly if DR resources are aggregated by a load aggregator).

  12. Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goli, Sasank

    2012-01-01

    and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

  13. Utilization of Heat Pump Water Heaters for Load Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Jackson, Roderick K; Munk, Jeffrey D; Gehl, Anthony C; Lyne, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    The Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters require residential electric storage water heaters with volumes larger than 55 gallons to have an energy factor greater than 2.0 after April 2015. While this standard will significantly increase the energy efficiency of water heaters, large electric storage water heaters that do not use heat pump technologies may no longer be available. Since utilities utilize conventional large-volume electric storage water heaters for thermal storage in demand response programs, there is a concern that the amended standard will significantly limit demand response capacity. To this end, Oak Ridge National Laboratory partnered with the Tennessee Valley Authority to investigate the load management capability of heat pump water heaters that meet or exceed the forthcoming water heater standard. Energy consumption reduction during peak periods was successfully demonstrated, while still meeting other performance criteria. However, to minimize energy consumption, it is important to design load management strategies that consider the home s hourly hot water demand so that the homeowner has sufficient hot water.

  14. Swing Dynamics as Primal-Dual Algorithm for Optimal Load Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    al. studied the aggregate response character- istics when individual loads are turned on networks, loads can pro- vide flexible, fast responsive, and decentralized sources for frequency regulation and generation-demand balancing, com- plementary to generation control. We consider an optimal load control (OLC

  15. Equivalent Static Wind Loads on Buildings: New Model Xinzhong Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xinzhong

    Equivalent Static Wind Loads on Buildings: New Model Xinzhong Chen1 and Ahsan Kareem2 Abstract: In current design practice, spatiotemporally varying wind loads on buildings are modeled as equivalent static static wind load for any given peak response of buildings with uncoupled responses in the three primary

  16. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-04

    To establish the policies, procedures, and specific responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Counterintelligence (CI) Program. This directive does not cancel any other directive.

  17. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-12-10

    The Order establishes Counterintelligence Program requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Supersedes DOE 5670.3.

  18. A loaded thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, J.R.; Swift, G.W.

    1995-11-01

    Measurements and analysis of the performance of a thermoacoustic engine driving a dissipative load are presented. The effect of the load can be explained qualitatively using a simple low-amplitude approximation and quantitatively by invoking a more accurate low-amplitude numerical solution. The heater power {ital @};DQ and hot-end temperature {ital T}{sub {ital H}} are found to be simple functions of the load impedance and the unloaded values of {ital @};DQ and {ital T}{sub {ital H}}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Acoustical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  19. Load Participation in Ancillary Services Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Load Participation in Ancillary Services Workshop was held October 25-26, 2011, in Washington, DC. This U.S. Department of Energy workshop was attended by members of the electric power industry, researchers, and policy makers. The results of the workshop informed the Demand Response and Energy Storage Study.

  20. Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, Gary; Wilcox, Edmund; Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank

    2013-01-02

    California agricultural irrigation consumes more than ten billion kilowatt hours of electricity annually and has significant potential for contributing to a reduction of stress on the grid through demand response, permanent load shifting, and energy efficiency measures. To understand this potential, a scoping study was initiated for the purpose of determining the associated opportunities, potential, and adoption challenges in California agricultural irrigation. The primary research for this study was conducted in two ways. First, data was gathered and parsed from published sources that shed light on where the best opportunities for load shifting and demand response lie within the agricultural irrigation sector. Secondly, a small limited survey was conducted as informal face-to-face interviews with several different California growers to get an idea of their ability and willingness to participate in permanent load shifting and/or demand response programs. Analysis of the data obtained from published sources and the survey reveal demand response and permanent load shifting opportunities by growing region, irrigation source, irrigation method, grower size, and utility coverage. The study examines some solutions for demand response and permanent load shifting in agricultural irrigation, which include adequate irrigation system capacity, automatic controls, variable frequency drives, and the contribution from energy efficiency measures. The study further examines the potential and challenges for grower acceptance of demand response and permanent load shifting in California agricultural irrigation. As part of the examination, the study considers to what extent permanent load shifting, which is already somewhat accepted within the agricultural sector, mitigates the need or benefit of demand response for agricultural irrigation. Recommendations for further study include studies on how to gain grower acceptance of demand response as well as other related studies such as conducting a more comprehensive survey of California growers.

  1. A practical approach to dynamic load-sharing in a LAN environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudur, Jaganmohan

    1993-01-01

    run queue length over I min. 41 Response time variation with load; Load factor: Average CPU run queue length over 5 min. 42 14 Response time variation with load; Load factor: Average CPU run queue length over 15 min. . 43 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION... compilations spawned at a particular node would be transferred to a given node, or probabilistic, wherein all the compilations at a particular node would be transferred to a subset of (other) nodes, with predecided probabilities [4, 5]. In comparison...

  2. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 4. Evaluation of other loads and load combinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Six topical areas were covered by the Task Group on Other Dynamic Loads and Load Combinations as described below: Event Combinations - dealing with the potential simultaneous occurrence of earthquakes, pipe ruptures, and water hammer events in the piping design basis; Response Combinations - dealing with multiply supported piping with independent inputs, the sequence of combinations between spacial and modal components of response, and the treatment of high frequency modes in combination with low frequency modal responses; Stress Limits/Dynamic Allowables - dealing with inelastic allowables for piping and strain rate effects; Water Hammer Loadings - dealing with code and design specifications for these loadings and procedures for identifying potential water hammer that could affect safety; Relief Valve Opening and Closing Loads - dealing with the adequacy of analytical tools for predicting the effects of these events and, in addition, with estimating effective cycles for fatigue evaluations; and Piping Vibration Loads - dealing with evaluation procedures for estimating other than seismic vibratory loads, the need to consider reciprocating and rotary equipment vibratory loads, and high frequency vibratory loads. NRC staff recommendations or regulatory changes and additional study appear in this report.

  3. Load frequency control of interconnected power systems with system constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhury, Md Ershadul H

    1993-01-01

    So far, researches in load frequency controls ( LFC) are involved in analysis of dynamic responses under normal conditions of the - interconnected power systems. In This research considers some system constraints (for example, one area fails...

  4. Intelligent electrical outlet for collective load control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Ford, Justin R.; Spires, Shannon V.; Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-10-27

    Various technologies described herein pertain to an electrical outlet that autonomously manages loads in a microgrid. The electrical outlet can provide autonomous load control in response to variations in electrical power generation supply in the microgrid. The electrical outlet includes a receptacle, a sensor operably coupled to the receptacle, and an actuator configured to selectively actuate the receptacle. The sensor measures electrical parameters at the receptacle. Further, a processor autonomously controls the actuator based at least in part on the electrical parameters measured at the receptacle, electrical parameters from one or more disparate electrical outlets in the microgrid, and a supply of generated electric power in the microgrid at a given time.

  5. Intelligent electrical outlet for collective load control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lentine, Anthony L; Ford, Justin R; Spires, Shannon V; Goldsmith, Steven Y

    2015-11-05

    Various technologies described herein pertain to an electrical outlet that autonomously manages loads in a microgrid. The electrical outlet can provide autonomous load control in response to variations in electrical power generation supply in the microgrid. The electrical outlet includes a receptacle, a sensor operably coupled to the receptacle, and an actuator configured to selectively actuate the receptacle. The sensor measures electrical parameters at the receptacle. Further, a processor autonomously controls the actuator based at least in part on the electrical parameters measured at the receptacle, electrical parameters from one or more disparate electrical outlets in the microgrid, and a supply of generated electric power in the microgrid at a given time.

  6. Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-10-08

    The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

  7. DC switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, George R. (Norris, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A power supply for driving an inductive load current from a dc power supply hrough a regulator circuit including a bridge arrangement of diodes and switching transistors controlled by a servo controller which regulates switching in response to the load current to maintain a selected load current. First and second opposite legs of the bridge are formed by first and second parallel-connected transistor arrays, respectively, while the third and fourth legs of the bridge are formed by appropriately connected first and second parallel connected diode arrays, respectively. The regulator may be operated in three "stages" or modes: (1) For current runup in the load, both first and second transistor switch arrays are turned "on" and current is supplied to the load through both transistor arrays. (2) When load current reaches the desired level, the first switch is turned "off", and load current "flywheels" through the second switch array and the fourth leg diode array connecting the second switch array in series with the load. Current is maintained by alternating between modes 1 and 2 at a suitable duty cycle and switching rate set by the controller. (3) Rapid current rundown is accomplished by turning both switch arrays "off", allowing load current to be dumped back into the source through the third and fourth diode arrays connecting the source in series opposition with the load to recover energy from the inductive load. The three operating states are controlled automatically by the controller.

  8. PinBus Interface for Interoperable, Grid-Responsive Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2009-12-02

    A very simple appliance interface was suggested by this author and his co-authors during Grid-Interop 2007. The approach was based on a successful collaboration between utilities, a major appliance manufacture, and the manufacturer of a load control module during the U.S. Department of Energy’s Grid Friendly Appliance project. The suggested approach was based on the assumption that demand-response objectives could be effectively communicated to and from many small electrical loads like appliances by simply agreeing on the meaning of the binary states of several shared connector pins. It was argued that this approach could pave the way for a wave of demand-response-ready appliances and greatly reduced expenses for utilities’ future demand-response programs. The approach could be supported by any of the many competing serial communication protocols and would be generally applicable to most end-use devices.

  9. Measuring alignment of loading fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scavone, Donald W. (Saratoga Springs, NY)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the alignment of a clevis and pin type loading fixture for compact tension specimens include a pair of substantially identical flat loading ligaments. Each loading ligament has two apertures for the reception of a respective pin of the loading fixture and a thickness less than one-half of a width of the clevis opening. The pair of loading ligaments are mounted in the clevis openings at respective sides thereof. The loading ligaments are then loaded by the pins of the loading fixture and the strain in each loading ligament is measured. By comparing the relative strain of each loading ligament, the alignment of the loading fixture is determined. Preferably, a suitable strain gage device is located at each longitudinal edge of a respective loading ligament equidistant from the two apertures in order to determine the strain thereat and hence the strain of each ligament. The loading ligaments are made substantially identical by jig grinding the loading ligaments as a matched set. Each loading ligament can also be individually calibrated prior to the measurement.

  10. Tackling Optimization Challenges in Industrial Load Control and Full-Duplex Radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gholian, Armen

    2015-01-01

    pricing electricity demand response program for sustainableand communications for demand response and energy efficiencyChen, “Data center demand response: Avoiding the coincident

  11. Load Management Made Simple 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, K.

    1985-01-01

    Company have moved to a demand side or load management mode which seeks to influence customers to change electric usage patterns to more efficiently use available generating capacity. Since 1970, the TUEC system peak demand has more than doubled from about...

  12. Pricing Structure and Tools for Profitable Load-Shifting by Aggregator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    via incentive pricing. Also, a complementary visualization technique for assessing demand response plans and peak load shifts. Description As power grids struggle to keep up...

  13. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee T.

    2009-01-01

    and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

  14. Incorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection Transmission Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Aggregator Programs. Demand Response Measurement andIncorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection13 Demand Response Dispatch

  15. Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenze, David; Greenberg, Steve; Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

    2005-11-29

    Laboratory equipment such as autoclaves, glass washers, refrigerators, and computers account for a significant portion of the energy use in laboratories. However, because of the general lack of measured equipment load data for laboratories, designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' rated data, or design assumptions from prior projects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequently overestimated. This results in oversized HVAC systems, increased initial construction costs, and increased energy use due to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. This best-practice guide first presents the problem of over-sizing in typical practice, and then describes how best-practice strategies obtain better estimates of equipment loads and right-size HVAC systems, saving initial construction costs as well as life-cycle energy costs. This guide is one in a series created by the Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs21') program, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and facilities managers, these guides provide information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  16. A Dynamic Water-filling Method for Real-Time HVAC Load Control Based on Model Predictive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Lin

    load potential. Existing work, such as [3], usually needs accurate long-term load and renewable energy between the fluctuation of non-renewable power generation and the limited demand response potential at users' side. By changing the elastic load w.r.t. both renewable energy generation and inelastic load

  17. GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-245 Fuel Load Modeling From Mensuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this study was to model a dead fuel load based on forest mensuration attributes from forest management from management programs are an efficient and low-cost alternative for estimating forest fuel loadsGENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-245 274 Fuel Load Modeling From Mensuration Attributes

  18. FERC sees huge potential for demand response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-15

    The FERC study concludes that U.S. peak demand can be reduced by as much as 188 GW -- roughly 20 percent -- under the most aggressive scenario. More moderate -- and realistic -- scenarios produce smaller but still significant reductions in peak demand. The FERC report is quick to point out that these are estimates of the potential, not projections of what could actually be achieved. The main varieties of demand response programs include interruptible tariffs, direct load control (DLC), and a number of pricing schemes.

  19. When it comes to Demand Response, is FERC its Own Worst Enemy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, James; Hobbs, Benjamin; Wolak, Frank A.

    2009-01-01

    made between traditional demand response (DR) programs andpricing. Traditional demand response programs typically payFor overviews of demand response technologies and program

  20. Buildings Stock Load Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joutey, H. A.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Clemoncon, B.; Rosenstein, F.

    2006-01-01

    , Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol.VI-9-4 Buildings Stock Load Control Ms H. Amrani Joutey Mr H. Vaezi-Nejad Mr B. Clemonçon Mr F.Rosenstein PHD student Research engineer Research... electricity consumption and curtail peak demand but in local form: building by building. Few developments are carried out for multi sites management. Multi sites management is essential in crisis and/or peak periods (large energy demand in particular during...

  1. Shot loading trainer analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.K.

    1995-02-15

    This document presents the results from the analysis of the shot loading trainer (SLT). This device will be used to test the procedure for installing shot into the annulus of the Project W-320 shipping container. To ensure that the shot is installed uniformly around the container, vibrators will be used to settle the shot. The SLT was analyzed to ensure that it would not jeopardize worker safety during operation. The results from the static analysis of the SLT under deadweight and vibrator operating loads show that the stresses in the SLT are below code allowables. The results from the modal analysis show that the natural frequencies of the SLT are far below the operating frequencies of the vibrators, provided the SLT is mounted on pneumatic tires. The SLT was also analyzed for wind, seismic, deadweight, and moving/transporting loads. Analysis of the SLT is in accordance with SDC-4.1 for safety class 3 structures (DOE-RL 1993) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction (AISC 1989).

  2. Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-01-01

    S.  Kiliccote.   Estimating Demand Response Load  Impacts: in California.   Demand Response Research Center, Lawrence and Techniques for Demand Response.  LBNL Report 59975.  

  3. Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Grower Acceptance of Demand Response and Permanent LoadCommission. (n.d. ). Demand Response. Retrieved fromLead Product Manager, Demand Response Department, Pacific

  4. Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Junqiao

    2008-01-01

    and Techniques for Demand Response, LBNL-59975, May 2007 [Protocol Development for Demand Response Calculation – Findsand S. Kiliccote, Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

  5. Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    2008. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation ofK. C. Mares, and D. Shroyer. 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data

  6. Load Management: Opportunity or Calamity? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Males, R.; Hassig, N.

    1981-01-01

    larger now than prior to 1973. Utilities are examining two options which can be termed load management. One option is to control discretionary loads during peak periods. Cycling of residential water heaters or shutting off industrial electric furnaces...

  7. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  8. Renewable Energy Growth Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2014, Act H 7727 created the Renewable Energy Growth (REG) program with the goal to promote installation of grid connected renewable energy within the load zones of electric distribution...

  9. Assessment of LWR piping design loading based on plant operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svensson, P. O.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to: (1) identify current Light Water Reactor (LWR) piping design load parameters, (2) identify significant actual LWR piping loads from plant operating experience, (3) perform a comparison of these two sets of data and determine the significance of any differences, and (4) make an evaluation of the load representation in current LWR piping design practice, in view of plant operating experience with respect to piping behavior and response to loading.

  10. 2006 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of both the Federal system and the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This surplus energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These energy deficits will be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. This study incorporates information on Pacific Northwest (PNW) regional retail loads, contract obligations, and contract resources. This loads and resources analysis simulates the operation of the power system in the PNW. The simulated hydro operation incorporates plant characteristics, streamflows, and non-power requirements from the current Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). Additional resource capability estimates were provided by BPA, PNW Federal agency, public agency, cooperative, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers furnished through annual PNUCC data submittals for 2005 and/or direct submittals to BPA. The 2006 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary document of Federal system and PNW region loads and resources, and (2) a technical appendix which presents regional loads, grouped by major PNW utility categories, and detailed contract and resource information. The technical appendix is available only in electronic form. Individual customer information for marketer contracts is not detailed due to confidentiality agreements. The 2006 White Book analysis updates the 2004 White Book. This analysis shows projections of the Federal system and region's yearly average annual energy consumption and resource availability for the study period, OY 2007-2016. The study also presents projections of Federal system and region expected 1-hour monthly peak demand, monthly energy demand, monthly 1-hour peak generating capability, and monthly energy generation for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. BPA is investigating a new approach in capacity planning depicting the monthly Federal system 120-hour peak generating capability and 120-hour peak surplus/deficit for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. This document analyzes the PNW's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency;

  11. A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

    2011-03-01

    Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

  12. As a chaperone/participant in a New Hampshire 4-H Event, you have the responsibility of representing the New Hampshire 4-H Program to the public. You have the responsibility to be a positive role model for youth and partner with other adults to ensure you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    As a chaperone/participant in a New Hampshire 4-H Event, you have the responsibility of representing the New Hampshire 4-H Program to the public. You have the responsibility to be a positive role the University of New Hampshire, its trustees, officers, agents, employees, and volunteers from and against all

  13. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  14. Program Analyst (Senior Program Analyst)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as Senior Program Analyst in the NNSA Information Assurance Response Center Cyber Intelligence Unit (IARC CIU), as the IARC CIU Supervisory...

  15. Multi-State Load Models for Distribution System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-11-01

    Recent work in the field of distribution system analysis has shown that the traditional method of peak load analysis is not adequate for the analysis of emerging distribution system technologies. Voltage optimization, demand response, electric vehicle charging, and energy storage are examples of technologies with characteristics having daily, seasonal, and/or annual variations. In addition to the seasonal variations, emerging technologies such as demand response and plug in electric vehicle charging have the potential to send control signals to the end use loads which will affect how they consume energy. In order to support time-series analysis over different time frames and to incorporate potential control signal inputs it is necessary to develop detailed end use load models which accurately represent the load under various conditions, and not just during the peak load period. This paper will build on previous work on detail end use load modeling in order to outline the method of general multi-state load models for distribution system analysis.

  16. Seismic Loading for FAST: May 2011 - August 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asareh, M. A.; Prowell, I.

    2012-08-01

    As more wind farms are constructed in seismically active regions, earthquake loading increases in prominence for design and analysis of wind turbines. Early investigation of seismic load tended to simplify the rotor and nacelle as a lumped mass on top of the turbine tower. This simplification allowed the use of techniques developed for conventional civil structures, such as buildings, to be easily applied to wind turbines. However, interest is shifting to more detailed models that consider loads for turbine components other than the tower. These improved models offer three key capabilities in consideration of base shaking for turbines: 1) The inclusion of aerodynamics and turbine control; 2) The ability to consider component loads other than just tower loads; and 3) An improved representation of turbine response in higher modes by reducing modeling simplifications. Both experimental and numerical investigations have shown that, especially for large modern turbines, it is important to consider interaction between earthquake input, aerodynamics, and operational loads. These investigations further show that consideration of higher mode activity may be necessary in the analysis of the seismic response of turbines. Since the FAST code is already capable of considering these factors, modifications were developed that allow simulation of base shaking. This approach allows consideration of this additional load source within a framework, the FAST code that is already familiar to many researchers and practitioners.

  17. Draft 1992 Resource Program : Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Resource Program will propose actions to meet future loads placed on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). It will also discuss and attempt to resolve resource-related policy issues. The Resource Program assesses resource availability and costs, and analyzes resource requirements and alternative ways of meeting those requirements through both conservation and generation resources. These general resource conclusions are then translated to actions for both conservation and generation. The Resource Program recommends budgets for the Office of Energy Resources for Fiscal Years (FY) 1994 and 1995. BPA's Resource Program bears directly on an important BPA responsibility: the obligation under the Northwest Power Act{sup 3} to meet the power requirements of public and private utility and direct service industrial (DSI) customers according to their contractual agreements. BPA's Draft 1992 Resource Program is contained in four documents: (1) 1992 Resource Program Summary; (2) Technical Report; (3) Technical Assumptions Appendix; and, (4) Conservation Implementation Plan. This volume is the Draft 1992 Resource Program Technical Report, a comprehensive document that provides supporting data and analyses for Resource Program recommendations.

  18. Draft 1992 Resource Program : Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Resource Program will propose actions to meet future loads placed on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). It will also discuss and attempt to resolve resource-related policy issues. The Resource Program assesses resource availability and costs, and analyzes resource requirements and alternative ways of meeting those requirements through both conservation and generation resources. These general resource conclusions are then translated to actions for both conservation and generation. The Resource Program recommends budgets for the Office of Energy Resources for Fiscal Years (FY) 1994 and 1995. BPA`s Resource Program bears directly on an important BPA responsibility: the obligation under the Northwest Power Act{sup 3} to meet the power requirements of public and private utility and direct service industrial (DSI) customers according to their contractual agreements. BPA`s Draft 1992 Resource Program is contained in four documents: (1) 1992 Resource Program Summary; (2) Technical Report; (3) Technical Assumptions Appendix; and, (4) Conservation Implementation Plan. This volume is the Draft 1992 Resource Program Technical Report, a comprehensive document that provides supporting data and analyses for Resource Program recommendations.

  19. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheat, S.R.

    1997-05-13

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers is disclosed. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated. 13 figs.

  20. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheat, Stephen R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated.

  1. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors for each shift... The purpose of this paper is to analyze operating hours of small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in the United States and develop ranges of load factors for use as diagnostic tools for effective energy management. Load factor is defined...

  2. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billingsley, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    including one for demand response programs, which are nottheir input. For the demand-response program categories, weFERC 2012), although demand-response program data are not

  3. High-Power Rf Load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Vlieks, Arnold E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-09-01

    A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

  4. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

    2009-06-01

    Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

  5. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and over 1,900 MW can be dispatched on less than thirty minutes notice. These legacy DR programs are increasingly used by utilities for economic in addition to reliability purposes, with over two-thirds (68percent) of these programs callable based on market conditions. - Approximately 60percent of DLC programs and 30percent of interruptible rate programs called ten or more DR events in 2006. Despite the high frequency of DR events, customer complaints remained low. The use of economic criteria to trigger DR events and the flexibility to trigger a large number of events suggests that DR resources can help improve the efficiency of MISO wholesale markets. - Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels averaged about $5/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $6/kW-month for DLC programs. Few programs offered incentive payments that were explicitly linked to actual load reductions during events and at least 27 DR programs do not have penalties for non-performance. - Measurement and verification (M&V) protocols to estimate load impacts vary significantly across MISO states. Almost half of the DR programs have not been evaluated in recent times and thus performance data for DR events is not available. For many DLC programs, M&V protocols may need to be enhancedin order to allow participation in MISO's proposed EDR schedule. System operators and planners will need to develop more accurate estimates of the load reduced capability and actual performance.

  6. Simulating Autonomous Mobile Programs on Natalia Chechina, Peter King, Rob Pooley and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinder, Phil

    been proposed for load management in dynamic networks. An AMP is aware of its resource needs. RELATED WORK A. Load Management Autonomous Mobile Programs (AMPs) were developed to manage computing load

  7. Prediction of stochastic blade loads for three-bladed, rigid-hub rotors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.D.; Weber, T.L.; Thresher, R.W.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1989-11-01

    Accurately predicting wind turbine blade loads and response is important for the design of future wind turbines. The need to include turbulent wind inputs in structural dynamics models is widely recognized. In this paper, the Force and Loads Analysis Program (FLAP) code will be used to predict turbulence-induced bending moments for the SERI Combined Experiment rotor blade and the Howden 330-kW blade. FLAP code predictions will be compared to the power spectra of measured blade-bending moments. Two methods will be used to generate turbulent wind inputs to FLAP: a theoretical simulation: the Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) simulation theory; and measured wind-speed data taken from an array of anemometers upwind of the turbine. Turbulent wind-speed time series are input to FLAP for both methods outlined above. Power spectra of predicted flap-bending moments are compared to measured results for different wind conditions. Conclusions are also drawn as to the ability of the turbulence simulation models to provide accurate wind input to FLAP and to FLAP's ability to accurately simulate blade response to turbulence. Finally, suggestions are made as to needed improvements in the theoretical model. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  8. A free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator controls and load interaction test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauch, J.S.; Kankam, M.D.; Santiago, W.; Madi, F.J.

    1992-08-01

    A test facility at LeRC was assembled for evaluating free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator control options, and interaction with various electrical loads. This facility is based on a 'SPIKE' engine/alternator. The engine/alternator, a multi-purpose load system, a digital computer based load and facility control, and a data acquisition system with both steady-periodic and transient capability are described. Preliminary steady-periodic results are included for several operating modes of a digital AC parasitic load control. Preliminary results on the transient response to switching a resistive AC user load are discussed.

  9. LOAD FORECASTING Eugene A. Feinberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinberg, Eugene A.

    , regression, artificial intelligence. 1. Introduction Accurate models for electric power load forecasting to make important decisions including decisions on pur- chasing and generating electric power, load for different operations within a utility company. The natures 269 #12;270 APPLIED MATHEMATICS FOR POWER SYSTEMS

  10. Load Management - A Better Way 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easley, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    of load management techniques which has enabled the company to shift well over 100,000 kilowatts of customer load from the on-peak period to the off-peak period in the last four to five years. This is helping delay the need for new plants and allows...

  11. Handbook of five methodologies for the assessment of load management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This report provides a summary description and evaluation of five methodologies that have been developed for the assessment of utility costs and benefits of load-management programs, including marginal-costing methodologies and an integrated set of utility-system planning and production costing models. Of the two basic methods, the first uses marginal-cost data to compute the cumulative reduction in utility-system costs realized in moving units of load from periods of high marginal cost to periods of low marginal cost. The present value of these cost savings may be compared directly with the costs of implementing the load-management program. The second method relies on an evaluation of future total-system costs. System planning and production-costing models are used to calculate the total fixed and variable costs of meeting baseline and alternative-load configurations. The difference between baseline system costs and the costs with load management may then be compared to the costs of implementing the program. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are summarized briefly.

  12. Review of Residential Low-Load HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott A.; Thornton, Brian; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building America Program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an investigation to inventory commercially available HVAC technologies that are being installed in low-load homes. The first step in this investigation was to conduct a review of published literature to identify low-load HVAC technologies available in the United States and abroad, and document the findings of existing case studies that have evaluated the performance of the identified technologies. This report presents the findings of the literature review, identifies gaps in the literature or technical understanding that must be addressed before low-load HVAC technologies can be fully evaluated, and introduces PNNL’s planned research and analysis for this project to address identified gaps and potential future work on residential low-load HVAC systems.

  13. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Annika

    2014-01-01

    EE) and/or demand response (DR) program implementers toincentive-based demand response (DR) programs and time-based

  14. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  15. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  16. To: University administrators responsible for code of conduct and licensing issues From: The Members of the Designated Suppliers Program (DSP) Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    : The Members of the Designated Suppliers Program (DSP) Working Group Date: September 29, 2006 Re: Revisions to the DSP The Designated Suppliers Program (DSP) Working Group has been meeting since March of this year Group, have expressed about the program. The following document "Designated Suppliers Program

  17. Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wholesale Electricity Demand Response Program Comparison,J. (2009) Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services.

  18. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration -- Phase 2 Findings from the Summer of 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Parker, Eric; Bernier, Clark; Young, Paul; Sheehan, Dave; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan

    2009-04-30

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneering demonstration showing that existing utility load-management assets can provide an important electricity system reliability resource known as spinning reserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinning reserve as demonstrated in this project will give grid operators at the California Independent System Operator (CA ISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful new tool to improve reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lower grid operating costs.In the first phase of this demonstration project, we target marketed SCE?s air-conditioning (AC) load-cycling program, called the Summer Discount Plan (SDP), to customers on a single SCE distribution feederand developed an external website with real-time telemetry for the aggregated loads on this feeder and conducted a large number of short-duration curtailments of participating customers? air-conditioning units to simulate provision of spinning reserve. In this second phase of the demonstration project, we explored four major elements that would be critical for this demonstration to make the transition to a commercial activity:1. We conducted load curtailments within four geographically distinct feeders to determine the transferability of target marketing approaches and better understand the performance of SCE?s load management dispatch system as well as variations in the AC use of SCE?s participating customers;2. We deployed specialized, near-real-time AC monitoring devices to improve our understanding of the aggregated load curtailments we observe on the feeders;3. We integrated information provided by the AC monitoring devices with information from SCE?s load management dispatch system to measure the time required for each step in the curtailment process; and4. We established connectivity with the CA ISO to explore the steps involved in responding to CA ISO-initiated requests for dispatch of spinning reserve.The major findings from the second phase of this demonstration are:1. Demand-response resources can provide full response significantly faster than required by NERC and WECC reliability rules.2. The aggregate impact of demand response from many small, individual sources can be estimated with varying degrees of reliability through analysis of distribution feeder loads.3. Monitoring individual AC units helps to evaluate the efficacy of the SCE load management dispatch system and better understand AC energy use by participating customers.4. Monitoring individual AC units provides an independent data source to corroborate the estimates of the magnitude of aggregate load curtailments and gives insight into results from estimation methods that rely solely on distribution feeder data.

  19. GRAIL : Graphical Representation of Activity, Interconnection and Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    GRAIL : Graphical Representation of Activity, Interconnection and Loading Susan Stepney GEC One of the tools being developed as part of ParSiFal is GRAIL. It represents an occam program flow of control, not communication channels): Susan Stepney. "GRAIL: Graphical Representation

  20. SAPHIRE 8 Volume 7 - Data Loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood; C. L. Smith; S. R. Prescott

    2011-03-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE Version 8 is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 8. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  1. Stochastic Programming of Vehicle to Building Interactions with Uncertainty in PEVs Driving for a Medium Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Goncalo

    2014-01-01

    load shifting and demand response measures that add to thetechnologies, and demand response measures. Since the focusof carbon taxation, demand response measures and electricity

  2. Recovery Act. Advanced Load Identification and Management for Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yi; Casey, Patrick; Du, Liang; He, Dawei

    2014-02-12

    In response to the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE)’s goal of achieving market ready, net-zero energy residential and commercial buildings by 2020 and 2025, Eaton partnered with the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Georgia Institute of Technology to develop an intelligent load identification and management technology enabled by a novel “smart power strip” to provide critical intelligence and information to improve the capability and functionality of building load analysis and building power management systems. Buildings account for 41% of the energy consumption in the United States, significantly more than either transportation or industrial. Within the building sector, plug loads account for a significant portion of energy consumption. Plug load consumes 15-20% of building energy on average. As building managers implement aggressive energy conservation measures, the proportion of plug load energy can increase to as much as 50% of building energy leaving plug loads as the largest remaining single source of energy consumption. This project focused on addressing plug-in load control and management to further improve building energy efficiency accomplished through effective load identification. The execution of the project falls into the following three major aspects; An intelligent load modeling, identification and prediction technology was developed to automatically determine the type, energy consumption, power quality, operation status and performance status of plug-in loads, using electric waveforms at a power outlet level. This project demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed technology through a large set of plug-in loads measurements and testing; A novel “Smart Power Strip (SPS) / Receptacle” prototype was developed to act as a vehicle to demonstrate the feasibility of load identification technology as a low-cost, embedded solution; and Market environment for plug-in load control and management solutions, in particular, advanced power strips (APSs) was studied. The project evaluated the market potential for Smart Power Strips (SPSs) with load identification and the likely impact of a load identification feature on APS adoption and effectiveness. The project also identified other success factors required for widespread APS adoption and market acceptance. Even though the developed technology is applicable for both residential and commercial buildings, this project is focused on effective plug-in load control and management for commercial buildings, accomplished through effective load identification. The project has completed Smart Receptacle (SR) prototype development with integration of Load ID, Control/Management, WiFi communication, and Web Service. Twenty SR units were built, tested, and demonstrated in the Eaton lab; eight SR units were tested in the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) for one-month of field testing. Load ID algorithm testing for extended load sets was conducted within the Eaton facility and at local university campuses. This report is to summarize the major achievements, activities, and outcomes under the execution of the project.

  3. Commercial Building Loads Providing Ancillary Services in PJM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Jason; Kiliccote, Sila; Boch, Jim; Chen, Jonathan; Nawy, Robert

    2014-06-27

    The adoption of low carbon energy technologies such as variable renewable energy and electric vehicles, coupled with the efficacy of energy efficiency to reduce traditional base load has increased the uncertainty inherent in the net load shape. Handling this variability with slower, traditional resources leads to inefficient system dispatch, and in some cases may compromise reliability. Grid operators are looking to future energy technologies, such as automated demand response (DR), to provide capacity-based reliability services as the need for these services increase. While DR resources are expected to have the flexibility characteristics operators are looking for, demonstrations are necessary to build confidence in their capabilities. Additionally, building owners are uncertain of the monetary value and operational burden of providing these services. To address this, the present study demonstrates the ability of demand response resources providing two ancillary services in the PJM territory, synchronous reserve and regulation, using an OpenADR 2.0b signaling architecture. The loads under control include HVAC and lighting at a big box retail store and variable frequency fan loads. The study examines performance characteristics of the resource: the speed of response, communications latencies in the architecture, and accuracy of response. It also examines the frequency and duration of events and the value in the marketplace which can be used to examine if the opportunity is sufficient to entice building owners to participate.

  4. Supplying Renewable Energy to Deferrable Loads: Algorithms and Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Supplying Renewable Energy to Deferrable Loads: Algorithms and Economic Analysis Anthony compares to price responsive demand in terms capacity gains and energy market revenues for renewable to renewable generation. I. INTRODUCTION Renewable power is emerging as a mainstream source of energy supply

  5. Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2014-01-01

    C. McParland, "Open Automated Demand Response Communications2011. Utility & Demand Response Programs Energy ProviderAnnual Consumption (kWh) Demand Response Program Curtailment

  6. CenterPoint Energy Sustainable Schools Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sustainable Schools Program focuses on energy savings through behavioral and operational improvements, and may be used along with CenterPoint Energy’s SCORES and Load Management programs. It...

  7. Demand Response in the West: Lessons for States and Provinces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Larson; Matt Lowry; Sharon Irwin

    2004-06-29

    OAK-B135 This paper is submitted in fulfillment of DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-015F22369 on the experience of western states/provinces with demand response (DR) in the electricity sector. Demand-side resources are often overlooked as a viable option for meeting load growth and addressing the challenges posed by the region's aging transmission system. Western states should work together with utilities and grid operators to facilitate the further deployment of DR programs which can provide benefits in the form of decreased grid congestion, improved system reliability, market efficiency, price stabilization, hedging against volatile fuel prices and reduced environmental impacts of energy production. This report describes the various types of DR programs; provides a survey of DR programs currently in place in the West; considers the benefits, drawbacks and barriers to DR; and presents lessons learned and recommendations for states/provinces.

  8. Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    #12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

  9. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tapajyoti

    2010-07-14

    Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector...

  10. Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: “Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations”, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

  11. Building load control and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Hai-Yun Helen, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners have proposed a variety of solutions to reduce electricity consumption and curtail peak demand. This research focuses on load control by improving the operations in existing building HVAC ...

  12. Loading and conjugating cavity biostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1997-11-25

    Methods for the preparation and use of a biological delivery system are disclosed. The method of preparation includes the loading of a non-biological material into a biostructure having a load-bearing structure. The method also includes the removal of some of the biostructure`s contents and the loading of a non-biological material into the biostructure. The biostructure is biologically compatible with the host, and preferably is derived from the host, the host`s species or a related species. The loaded biostructure is used directly, or it can be targeted to specific cells, tissues and/or organs within a host. The targeted biostructure can be used to deliver the non-biological material to a specified tissue, organ or cell within a host for diagnostic, therapeutic or other purposes. 11 figs.

  13. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

  14. Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and Consumer Response February 2004 · NREL-35618 Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and Consumer Response Lori Bird, Blair Swezey legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information

  15. Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

    2006-12-01

    Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

  16. Structural assessment of accident loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-28

    Structural assessments were made for specific accident loads for specific catch, receiver, and storage tanks. The evaluation herein represents level-of-effort order-of-magnitude estimates of limiting loads that would lead to collapse or rupture of the tank and unmitigated loss of confinement for the waste. Structural capacities were established using failure criteria. Compliance with codes such as ACI, ASCE, ASME, RCRA, UBC, WAC, and DOE Orders was `NOT` maintained. Normal code practice is to prevent failure with margins consistent with expected variations in loads and strengths and confidence in analysis techniques. The evaluation herein represent estimates of code limits without code load factors or code strength reduction factors, and loading beyond such a limit is considered as an onset of some failure mode. The exact nature of the failure mode and its relation to a safe condition is a judgment of the analyst. Consequently, these `RESULTS SHALL NOT BE USED TO ESTABLISH OPERATING OR SAFETY LOAD LIMITS FOR THESE TANKS`.

  17. An MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    their operations prone to high demand charges. In fact, demand control has been used in residential power systemsAn MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar* , Joseph Sottile linear programming formulation for load-side control of electrical energy demand. The formulation

  18. Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Handheld Data Files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Handheld Data Files Understanding the Process Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands No. 10 - 1998 The purpose of this document Data File Requirements Three criteria are checked by the loading program before the import process

  19. Independent Oversight Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-30

    The order prescribes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Independent Oversight Program. Cancels DOE O 470.2B. Superseded by DOE O 227.1A.

  20. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-05-14

    The order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program. Supersedes DOE O 361.1B.

  1. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-03

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for implementing and maintaining a cost-effective records management program throughout the Department of Energy.

  2. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-26

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a program for the efficient and economical management of records and information assets.

  3. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-01-24

    The order defines requirements and responsibilities for training, certification, and career development programs for the DOE acquisition workforce. Cancels DOE O 361.1A.

  4. Management Control Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-04-18

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Management Control Program. Cancels DOE O 413.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.1B.

  5. Radiological Assistance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-10

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  6. Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

  7. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Mission Support Alliance, Llc, Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (Hammer), Federal Training Center- September 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Recertification of MSA/HAMMER as a Star Participant in the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program.

  8. Cooling load design tool for UFAD systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2010-01-01

    De- velopment of a Simplified Cooling Load Design Tool forand C. Benedek. 2007. “Cooling airflow design calculationscalculation method for design cooling loads in underfloor

  9. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Advanced diagnostics of experiments covering many orders of magnitude in strain...

  10. Load Participation in Ancillary Services Workshop Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    controls on the load-side is growing. Driven by improved and widely available communications systems, load participation is becoming easier and more reliable; and there...

  11. Self-aligning biaxial load frame

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.; Lloyd, W.R.

    1994-01-18

    An self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus for use in testing the strength of specimens while maintaining a constant specimen centroid during the loading operation. The self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus consists of a load frame and two load assemblies for imparting two independent perpendicular forces upon a test specimen. The constant test specimen centroid is maintained by providing elements for linear motion of the load frame relative to a fixed cross head, and by alignment and linear motion elements of one load assembly relative to the load frame. 3 figures.

  12. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Energy efficiency programson energy efficiency program types, see National Action PlanNational Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Most demand response programs

  13. Market-Based Coordination of Thermostatically Controlled Loads Part I: A Mechanism Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    through realistic simulations. Index Terms--Mechanism design, demand response, market- based coordination, thermostatically controlled loads I. INTRODUCTION Demand response has attracted considerable research at- tention and reliability of the future smart grid. A natural way to achieve demand response is through various pricing

  14. Design Considerations For Blast Loads In Pressure Vessels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, E. A. (Edward A.); Nickell, Robert E.; Pepin, J. E. (Jason E.)

    2007-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conducts confined detonation experiments utilizing large, spherical, steel pressure vessels to contain the reaction products and hazardous materials from high-explosive (HE) events. Structural design and analysis considerations include: (a) Blast loading phase (i.e., impulsive loading); (b) Dynamic structural response; (c) Fragment (i.e., shrapnel) generation and penetration; (d) Ductile and non-ductile fracture; and (e) Design Criteria to ASME Code Sec. VIII, Div. 3, Impulsively Loaded Vessels. These vessels are designed for one-time-use only, efficiently utilizing the significant plastic energy absorption capability of ductile vessel materials. Alternatively, vessels may be designed for multiple-detonation events, in which case the material response is restricted to elastic or near-elastic range. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 50 provides requirements for commercial nuclear reactor licensing; specifically dealing with accidental combustible gases in containment structures that might cause extreme loadings. The design philosophy contained herein may be applied to extreme loading events postulated to occur in nuclear reactor and non-nuclear systems or containments.

  15. Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval GARY L. THORNE Abstract Inhibition of the startle eyeblink response at long lead intervals has been hypothesized to occur the lead and startle stimuli are in different modalities under conditions of high perceptual load

  16. Understanding subsidence in the Mississippi Delta region due to sediment, ice, and ocean loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    Understanding subsidence in the Mississippi Delta region due to sediment, ice, and ocean loading The processes responsible for land surface subsidence in the Mississippi Delta (MD) have been vigorously debated. Numerous studies have postulated a dominant role for isostatic subsidence associated with sediment loading

  17. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21

    Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

  18. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01

    LBNL Commercial and Residential Demand Response Overview ofmarket [5]. Residential demand reduction programs have beenin the domain of residential demand response. There are a

  19. Staying FIT: Efficient Load Shedding Techniques for Distributed Stream Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bottlenecks slow down processing and network transmission, and cause delayed outputs. Load management has been. Common load management techniques include adaptive load distribution, admis- sion control, and load

  20. Non-linear load-deflection models for seafloor interaction with steel catenary risers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Yaguang

    2009-05-15

    The simulation of seafloor-steel catenary interaction and prediction of riser fatigue life required an accurate characterization of seafloor stiffness as well as realistic description of riser load-deflection (P-y) response. ...

  1. The effect of local scheduling in load balancing designs Ho-Lin Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    that proba- bilistically routes arrivals to queues so that the mean response time (a.k.a. sojourn time, flow with rate i and the load at queue i is i := i/µi a.k.a

  2. Direct participation of electrical loads in the California independent system operator markets during the Summer of 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Khavkin, Mark; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-04-01

    California's restructured electricity markets opened on 1 April 1998. The former investor-owned utilities were functionally divided into generation, transmission, and distribution activities, all of their gas-fired generating capacity was divested, and the retail market was opened to competition. To ensure that small customers shared in the expected benefit of lower prices, the enabling legislation mandated a 10% rate cut for all customers, which was implemented in a simplistic way that fossilized 1996 tariff structures. Rising fuel and environmental compliance costs, together with a reduced ability to import electricity, numerous plant outages, and exercise of market power by generators drove up wholesale electricity prices steeply in 2000, while retail tariffs remained unchanged. One of the distribution/supply companies entered bankruptcy in April 2001, and another was insolvent. During this period, two sets of interruptible load programs were in place, longstanding ones organized as special tariffs by the distribution/supply companies and hastily established ones run directly by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). The distribution/supply company programs were effective at reducing load during the summer of 2000, but because of the high frequency of outages required by a system on the brink of failure, customer response declined and many left the tariff. The CAISO programs failed to attract enough participation to make a significant difference to the California supply demand imbalance. The poor performance of direct load participation in California's markets reinforces the argument for accurate pricing of electricity as a stimulus to energy efficiency investment and as a constraint on market volatility.

  3. Noise Load Management at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Noise Load Management at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol T.R. Meerburg , R.J. Boucherie , M.J.A.L. van objective is to guarantee safety, efficiency, and protection of the environment, that includes noise load contributes to the noise load at these points. If the cumulative load in an aviation year at an enforce- ment

  4. Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE This module will discuss...

  5. Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    is being developed by the Zigbee/Homeplug alliance. It hasautomation including BACnet, Zigbee (including Smart EnergyOASIS, UCAIug, NAESB, and the Zigbee/Homeplug alliance, just

  6. Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    http://www.multispeak.org) Smart Energy Profile Marketingstandard fashion (i.e. Smart Energy Profile - SEP). Inaspects of FCLC and DLC. Smart Energy Profile (SEP) versions

  7. Rigid pile response to ice plate and current loads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolte, John George

    1986-01-01

    Using Light Ice-Breaking Recording Vessel, " Proceedinxls, Qffsbore Technolo Confer~ace, OTC Paper No. 2225, lloOl~J~ PP. McLeod, W. R. , Adamo, L. C. , and Hamilton, R. C. , "A Unique Strategy for Obtaining Wave and Wind Data in the Gulf of Alaska... stream_source_info 1986 Thesis N798.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 88765 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name 1986 Thesis N798.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 RIGID PILE...

  8. Dynamic Response Of Complex Materials Under Shock Loading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arman, Bedri

    2012-10-19

    resin and its carbon-nanotube (CNT) composites to shock wave compression. For phenolic resin, our simulations yielded shock states in agreement with experiments on similar polymers, except the "phase change" observed in experiments, indicating...

  9. RLTec formerly ResponsiveLoad Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFU Elektronik GmbH JumpChina

  10. Peak-Coincident Demand Savings from Behavior-Based Programs: Evidence from PPL Electric's Behavior and Education Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, James

    2013-01-01

    hours caused by residential demand for air conditioning. Airto those of other residential demand-response programs?11 Most residential demand response programs fall into one

  11. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes existing research and discusses current practices, opportunities, and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response programs.

  12. Model for Aggregated Water Heater Load Using Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlachopoulou, Maria; Chin, George; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-19

    The transition to the new generation power grid, or “smart grid”, requires novel ways of using and analyzing data collected from the grid infrastructure. Fundamental functionalities like demand response (DR), that the smart grid needs, rely heavily on the ability of the energy providers and distributors to forecast the load behavior of appliances under different DR strategies. This paper presents a new model of aggregated water heater load, based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs). The model has been validated against simulated data from an open source distribution simulation software (GridLAB-D). The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the DBN model accurately tracks the load profile curves of aggregated water heaters under different testing scenarios.

  13. 1.0 Introduction The primary controller response to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    represents the effect of synchronous generator windage and friction); DLi is the load damping coefficient1 AGC 3 1.0 Introduction The primary controller response to a load/generation imbalance results in generation adjustment so as to maintain load/generation balance. However, due to droop, it also results

  14. Load Forecasting of Supermarket Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @compute.dtu.dk www.compute.dtu.dk M.Sc.-2013-87 #12;Summary (English) The Danish power production coming from energy system. Observed refrigeration load and local ambient temperature from a Danish su- permarket renewable energy, is increasing, therefore a flexible energy system is needed. In the present Thesis

  15. Scaling the Web Load Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Load Testing of Web Sites D evelopers typically measure a Web appli- cation on a Web site's IT infrastructure are a function of the site's expect- ed traffic. Ideally, you want, you shouldn't upgrade your Web servers if customers experience most delays in the database server

  16. Integration of MHD load models with circuit representations the Z generator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Jones, Brent Manley; McBride, Ryan D.; Bailey, James E.; Jones, Michael C.; Gomez, Matthew Robert.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Nakhleh, Charles; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; Wagoner, Timothy C.; Moore, James K.

    2013-03-01

    MHD models of imploding loads fielded on the Z accelerator are typically driven by reduced or simplified circuit representations of the generator. The performance of many of the imploding loads is critically dependent on the current and power delivered to them, so may be strongly influenced by the generators response to their implosion. Current losses diagnosed in the transmission lines approaching the load are further known to limit the energy delivery, while exhibiting some load dependence. Through comparing the convolute performance of a wide variety of short pulse Z loads we parameterize a convolute loss resistance applicable between different experiments. We incorporate this, and other current loss terms into a transmission line representation of the Z vacuum section. We then apply this model to study the current delivery to a wide variety of wire array and MagLif style liner loads.

  17. Turbulence loads on the Howden 26-m-diameter wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, P.H.; Hock, S.M.; Hausfeld, T.E.

    1987-11-01

    Conducted in Palm Springs, California, a joint effort between SERI and James Howden and Company involved a comprehensive test program on the 330-kW Howden wind turbine with a three-bladed, fixed-hub rotor 26 m in diameter. Part of the measurement analysis is to quantify the turbulence loads during the steady-state production modes of operation. Assuming wind turbulence to be the cause of the random loads, the turbulence loads in terms of blade root-bending moments have been determined empirically by isolating the random or nonperiodic part of the load signals using azimuthal averaging. Standard deviations as functions of wind speed, as well as power spectra of the loads, are presented. The measured turbulence loads are compared to a recently developed model for turbulence loading of wind turbines. The model works in the frequency domain and uses the standard engineering representation of turbulence in terms of a coherence function and a wind-power spectrum at a fixed point in space. The turbulence load model accounts for the dominant mode of vibration for the load in question and is intended to be simple enough to be used for a preliminary load estimate for practical design purposes.

  18. THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

  19. THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

  20. Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-07-01

    We describe a method to generate statistical models of electricity demand from Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities including their response to dynamic pricing signals. Models are built with historical electricity demand data. A facility model is the sum of a baseline demand model and a residual demand model; the latter quantifies deviations from the baseline model due to dynamic pricing signals from the utility. Three regression-based baseline computation methods were developed and analyzed. All methods performed similarly. To understand the diversity of facility responses to dynamic pricing signals, we have characterized the response of 44 C&I facilities participating in a Demand Response (DR) program using dynamic pricing in California (Pacific Gas and Electric's Critical Peak Pricing Program). In most cases, facilities shed load during DR events but there is significant heterogeneity in facility responses. Modeling facility response to dynamic price signals is beneficial to the Independent System Operator for scheduling supply to meet demand, to the utility for improving dynamic pricing programs, and to the customer for minimizing energy costs.

  1. Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-03-30

    This report describes the results of a research project to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and ensure that customers receive signals that encourage load reduction during times when the electric grid is near its capacity. The two main drivers for widespread demand responsiveness are the prevention of future electricity crises and the reduction of electricity prices. Additional goals for price responsiveness include equity through cost of service pricing, and customer control of electricity usage and bills. The technology developed and evaluated in this report could be used to support numerous forms of DR programs and tariffs. For the purpose of this report, we have defined three levels of Demand Response automation. Manual Demand Response involves manually turning off lights or equipment; this can be a labor-intensive approach. Semi-Automated Response involves the use of building energy management control systems for load shedding, where a preprogrammed load shedding strategy is initiated by facilities staff. Fully-Automated Demand Response is initiated at a building or facility through receipt of an external communications signal--facility staff set up a pre-programmed load shedding strategy which is automatically initiated by the system without the need for human intervention. We have defined this approach to be Auto-DR. An important concept in Auto-DR is that a facility manager is able to ''opt out'' or ''override'' an individual DR event if it occurs at a time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. This project sought to improve the feasibility and nature of Auto-DR strategies in large facilities. The research focused on technology development, testing, characterization, and evaluation relating to Auto-DR. This evaluation also included the related decisionmaking perspectives of the facility owners and managers. Another goal of this project was to develop and test a real-time signal for automated demand response that provided a common communication infrastructure for diverse facilities. The six facilities recruited for this project were selected from the facilities that received CEC funds for new DR technology during California's 2000-2001 electricity crises (AB970 and SB-5X).

  2. Utility -Owned Central Plant Load Management at the Domain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilley, D.

    2013-01-01

    • Renewable “Green Energy” Programs > Solar > Wind • Residential, multi-family, and Commercial Rebate Programs • Weatherization Programs • Demand Response 3 Austin Energy ESL-KT-13-12-12 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio...) localized plants – Chilled Water Storage • An estimated 112,000 ton-hours of storage capacity 4 Austin Energy – Thermal Utility ESL-KT-13-12-12 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 • Provides value...

  3. Priorities and Allocations Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-12

    The Order establishes responsibilities for administration of the DOE and NNSA priorities and allocations program for industrial products, materials, and services and requirements for maintaining a system for procurement of industrial products, materials, and services programs that promote the national defense and programs that are determined by DOE to maximize domestic energy supplies. Supersedes DOE O 5560.1A.

  4. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21

    To establish responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program, and to establish program planning and management requirements for the S&S Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4A, DOE M 470.4-1, Chg. 2, and DOE O 142.1.

  5. Practica at a Glance Program Year Program Practica Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The student teacher will assume a 60 % teaching load during this practicum. Fourth year students in EDU 428Practica at a Glance Program Year Program Practica Content First year students in EDU 115 and EDU to classrooms to observe Second year students in EDU 215 and EDU 216 ­ Reflective Practicum Elementary

  6. Slow motion responses of compliant offshore structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Peimin

    1996-01-01

    An efficient method is developed to predict slow motion responses of slender compliant offshore structures in the unidirectional irregular waves and currents. The environmental loads are computed using the modified Morison equation based on slender...

  7. Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

    2011-07-01

    Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

  8. Optimization Online - Integer Programming Submissions - 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integer Programming Submissions - 2012. January 2012. 0-1 Programming Optimal Response to Epidemics and Cyber Attacks in Networks Noam Goldberg  ...

  9. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-15

    Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

  10. Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Environmental Restoration (ERP) Environmental Services (ESG)Action Program (CAP). The ERP is responsible for carryingResponsibilities of the ERP include the following: ERP

  11. New TCIPG Research Program Builds on Past Successes with Nearly...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and smart grid applications including wide-area control and monitoring, controllable load demand response, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The TCIPG team consists of...

  12. Load Forecast For use in Resource Adequacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecast of 4) Calculate Hourly Load Allocation Factor s for each day for 2019 For use in RA analysis as a function ofthe load for electricity in the region as a function of cyclical, weather and economic variables

  13. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  14. Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

    2008-10-03

    Automated Demand Response (DR) programs require that Utility/ISO's deliver DR signals to participants via a machine to machine communications channel. Typically these DR signals constitute business logic information (e.g. prices and reliability/shed levels) as opposed to commands to control specific loads in the facility. At some point in the chain from the Utility/ISO to the loads in a facility, the business level information sent by the Utility/ISO must be processed and used to execute a DR strategy for the facility. This paper explores the various scenarios and types of participants that may utilize DR signals from the Utility/ISO. Specifically it explores scenarios ranging from single end user facility, to third party facility managers and DR Aggregators. In each of these scenarios it is pointed out where the DR signal sent from the Utility/ISO is processed and turned into the specific load control commands that are part of a DR strategy for a facility. The information in these signals is discussed. In some cases the DR strategy will be completely embedded in the facility while in others it may be centralized at a third party (e.g. Aggregator) and part of an aggregated set of facilities. This paper also discusses the pros and cons of the various scenarios and discusses how the Utility/ISO can use an open standardized method (e.g. Open Automated Demand Response Communication Standards) for delivering DR signals that will promote interoperability and insure that the widest range of end user facilities can participate in DR programs regardless of which scenario they belong to.

  15. System and method employing a minimum distance and a load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A

    2014-12-23

    A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types, each of the different electric load types including a first load feature vector having at least four different load features; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the different electric loads; determining a second load feature vector comprising at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the different electric loads; and identifying by a processor one of the different electric load types by determining a minimum distance of the second load feature vector to the first load feature vector of the different electric load types of the load feature database.

  16. Wind induced torsional loads on structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    -level crosswind loading on a square cross-section building. Reinhold et al.4 instrumented a building model

  17. Plug Load Behavioral Change Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Kandt, A.; VanGeet, O.

    2011-08-01

    This report documents the methods and results of a plug load study of the Environmental Protection Agency's Region 8 Headquarters in Denver, Colorado, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The study quantified the effect of mechanical and behavioral change approaches on plug load energy reduction and identified effective ways to reduce plug load energy. Load reduction approaches included automated energy management systems and behavioral change strategies.

  18. Java Programming Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Java Programming Certificate Program COMPUTER PROGRAMMING The Java programming language lies that fuel the Internet economy. In addition, the portability inherent in Java is useful for programming languages are likely to encounter projects in the near future that require knowledge of Java. Who Should

  19. Java Programming Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Java Programming Certificate Program COMPUTER PROGRAMMING The Java programming language lies that fuel the Internet economy. In addition, the portability inherent in Java is useful for programming are likely to encounter projects in the near future that require knowledge of Java. Who Should Enroll

  20. Impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on power systems with demand response and wind power.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Liu, C.; Ton, D.; Zhou, Y.; Kim, J.; Vyas, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES); (ED); (Kyungwon Univ.)

    2011-07-01

    This paper uses a new unit commitment model which can simulate the interactions among plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wind power, and demand response (DR). Four PHEV charging scenarios are simulated for the Illinois power system: (1) unconstrained charging, (2) 3-hour delayed constrained charging, (3) smart charging, and (4) smart charging with DR. The PHEV charging is assumed to be optimally controlled by the system operator in the latter two scenarios, along with load shifting and shaving enabled by DR programs. The simulation results show that optimally dispatching the PHEV charging load can significantly reduce the total operating cost of the system. With DR programs in place, the operating cost can be further reduced.

  1. Energy Efficiency Program Typology and Data Metrics: Enabling Multi-State Analyses Through the Use of Common Terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    including one for demand response programs), then byare shown) Including demand response as a seventh “sector”,and utilized. For the demand-response program categories, we

  2. Modeling and Forecasting Electric Daily Peak Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

    for the same data. Two methods are described for forecasting daily peak loads up to one week ahead through, including generator unit commitment, hydro-thermal coordination, short-term maintenance, fuel allocation forecasting accuracies. STLF forecasting covers the daily peak load, total daily energy, and daily load curve

  3. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Preliminary Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriikku, E.

    1998-11-25

    This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading preliminary equipment specifications and includes a process block diagram, process description, equipment list, preliminary equipment specifications, plan and elevation sketches, and some commercial catalogs. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.

  4. Instantaneous Offloading of Transient Web Server Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instantaneous Offloading of Transient Web Server Load Vsevolod V. Panteleenko and Vincent W. Freeh A modern web-hosting site is designed to handle load that is sometimes an order of magnitude greater than and performance study of the web booster architecture, which reduces web server load during peak periods. A web

  5. Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R; Kirby, Brendan J; Kueck, John D; Todd, Duane; Caulfield, Michael; Helms, Brian

    2009-02-01

    Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

  6. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  7. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Energy Management System ), External Interface, FMI ( Functional Mockup Interface ) Interoperability

  8. SPOTL: Some Programs for Ocean-Tide Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of deep ocean tidal energy dissipation based onJ. H. (1973), Tidal patterns and energy balance in the Gulf

  9. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Shruti Kaserekar (2010). Solar gain and cooling loadcoefficient assumptions, the solar position calculation, andthe sky diffuse solar models. 2. DeST and EnergyPlus both

  10. Introduction of static load balancing in incremental parallel programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, J.

    Goodman,J. O'Donnell,J.T. Proceedings of Euro-Par 2001 Parallel Processing, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp. 535-539, vol. 2150 pp 535-539 Springer

  11. Improved Load Plan Design Through Integer Programming Based ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-12-21

    feasible solution, and the search for an improving solution is performed by solving ..... We model freight which enters the linehaul network at terminal u1 on day d1 as entering the ..... Set TERMS = array of top 25% of terminals with respect to Fd.

  12. A Cooperative Demand Response Scheme Using Punishment Mechanism and Application to Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

    2014-01-01

    aggregated loads for demand response,” in Proceedings of TheS. H. Low, “Optimal demand response: Problem formulation andZ. Yang, and Y. Zhang, “Demand response man- agement with

  13. Customer Impact Evaluation for the 2009 Southern California Edison Participating Load Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, William; Bodmann, Shawn; Young, Paul; Eto, Joseph H.; Laundergan, Jeremy

    2010-05-28

    The 2009 Participating Load Pilot Customer Impact Evaluation provides evidence that short duration demand response events which cycle off air conditioners for less than thirty minutes in a hot, dry environment do not lead to a significant degradation in the comfort level of residents participating in the program. This was investigated using: (1) Analysis of interval temperature data collected from inside residences of select program participants; and (2) Direct and indirect customer feedback from surveys designed and implemented by Southern California Edison at the conclusion of the program season. There were 100 indoor temperature monitors that were acquired by LBNL for this study that transmitted temperature readings at least once per hour with corresponding timestamps during the program season, June-October, 2009. Recorded temperatures were transferred from the onsite telemetry devices to a mesh network, stored, and then delivered to KEMA for analysis. Following an extensive data quality review, temperature increases during each of the thirty demand response test events were calculated for each device. The results are as follows: (1) Even for tests taking place during outside temperatures in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, over 85 percent of the devices measured less than a 0.5 degree Fahrenheit temperature increase indoors during the duration of the event. (2) For the increases that were observed, none was more than 5 degrees and it was extremely rare for increases to be more than 2 degrees. At the end of the testing season SCE and KEMA designed and conducted a survey of the a facilities and public works managers and approximately 100 customers feedback survey to assess the extent the PLP events were noticed or disrupted the comfort level of participants. While only a small sampling of 3 managers and 16 customer surveys were completed, their responses indicate: (1) No customer reported even a moderate level of discomfort from the cycling-off of their air conditioners during test events; and (2) Very few customers noticed any of the thirty events at all. The results of this study suggest that the impacts on comfort from short-duration interruptions of air-conditioners, even in very hot climates, are for the most part very modest, if they are even noticed at all. Still, we should expect that these impacts will increase with longer interruptions of air-conditioning. By the same token, we should also expect that they will be less significant in cooler climates.

  14. 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01

    The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; (2) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads, and (3) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a range of forecasted electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands -- firm loads -- are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and {open_quotes}contracted for{close_quotes} resources to determine whether Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the region will be surplus or deficit. If resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA can sell to increase revenues. Conversely, if firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity, and additional conservation, contract purchases, or generating resources will be needed to meet load growth. The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study analyzes the Pacific Northwest`s projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional power system, which includes loads and resource in addition to the Federal system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. This study presents the Federal system and regional analyses for five load forecasts: high, medium-high, medium, medium-low, and low. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 1994--95 through 2003--04.

  15. Engineering Physics (For students entering the College 2010-11) It is the student's responsibility to ensure that their program and necessary prerequisites are correct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    to ensure that their program and necessary prerequisites are correct 1st YEAR 2nd YEAR 3rd YEAR 4th YEAR be taken in either term. Treat MATH 238 as MATH 224 EN Two Year Common Core EN Three Year Common Core 45 CU

  16. Engineering Physics (For students entering the College 2009-10) It is the student's responsibility to ensure that their program and necessary prerequisites are correct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    to ensure that their program and necessary prerequisites are correct 1st YEAR 2nd YEAR 3rd YEAR 4th YEAR can be taken in either term. Treat MATH 238 as MATH 224 EN Two Year Common Core EN Three Year Common

  17. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry R. (Palos Heights, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  18. Automated fuel pin loading system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, William F. (West Richland, WA); Steffen, Jim M. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    An automated loading system for nuclear reactor fuel elements utilizes a gravity feed conveyor which permits individual fuel pins to roll along a constrained path perpendicular to their respective lengths. The individual lengths of fuel cladding are directed onto movable transports, where they are aligned coaxially with the axes of associated handling equipment at appropriate production stations. Each fuel pin can be reciprocated axially and/or rotated about its axis as required during handling steps. The fuel pins are inserted as a batch prior to welding of end caps by one of two disclosed welding systems.

  19. INCREMENTAL COOLING LOAD DETERMINATION FOR PASSIVE DIRECT GAIN HEATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    May 27-30, 1981 INCREMENTAL COOLING LOAD DETERMINATION FOR12048 May 1981 INCREMENTAL COOLING LOAD DETERMINATION FORfor increases in the building cooling load resulting from

  20. Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

    2002-01-01

    of Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMSof Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMSof Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMS

  1. Optimal Load Management System for Aircraft Electric Power Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maasoumy, Mehdi; Nuzzo, Pierluigi; Iandola, Forrest; Kamgarpour, Maryam; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto; Tomlin, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Optimal Load Management System for Aircraft Electric Poweris to develop an optimal load management system based on thescheme where a high-level load management system receives as

  2. ELECTRICAL LOAD MANAGEMENT FOR THE CALIFORNIA WATER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krieg, B.

    2010-01-01

    Development Commission. Load Management in California. Staffon the Challenge of Load Management, Conservation Paper No.for Electric Utility Load Management. New York, New York:

  3. DOE-FLEX: DOE's Telework Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-02-11

    The order establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the Departments telework program. Supersedes DOE N 314.1.

  4. Dynamic Load Balancing on Single- and Multi-GPU Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Long; Villa, Oreste; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Gao, Guang R.

    2010-04-19

    The computational power provided by many-core graphics processing units (GPUs) has been exploited in many applications. The programming techniques supported and employed on these GPUs are not sufficient to address problems exhibiting irregular, and unbalanced workload. The problem is exacerbated when trying to effectively exploit multiple GPUs, which are commonly available in many modern systems. In this paper, we propose a task-based dynamic load-balancing solution for single- and multi-GPU systems. The solution allows load balancing at a finer granularity than what is supported in existing APIs such as NVIDIA’s CUDA. We evaluate our approach using both micro-benchmarks and a molecular dynamics application that exhibits significant load imbalance. Experimental results with a single-GPU configuration show that our fine-grained task solution can utilize the hardware more efficiently than the CUDA scheduler for unbalanced workload. On multi-GPU systems, our solution achieves near-linear speedup, load balance, and significant performance improvement over techniques based on standard CUDA APIs.

  5. Study of the Heating Load of a Manufactured Space with a Gas-fired Radiant Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, X.; Dong, Z.

    2006-01-01

    A thermal balance mathematics model of a manufactured space with a gas-fired radiant heating system is established to calculate the heating load. Computer programs are used to solve the model. Envelope internal surface temperatures under different...

  6. Semantic Responsibility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toribio, Josefa

    2002-01-01

    In this paper I attempt to develop a notion of responsibility (semantic responsibility) that is to the notion of belief what epistemic responsibility is to the notion of justification. 'Being semantically responsible' ...

  7. Model Fidelity Study of Dynamic Transient Loads in a Wind Turbine Gearbox: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Moan, T.; Xing, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Transient events cause high loads in the drivetrain components so measuring and calculating these loads can improve confidence in drivetrain design. This paper studies the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative 750kW wind turbine gearbox response during transient events using a combined experimental and modeling approach. The transient events include emergency shut-downs and start-ups measured during a field testing period in 2009. The drivetrain model is established in the multibody simulation tool Simpack. A detailed study of modeling fidelity required for accurate load prediction is performed and results are compared against measured loads. A high fidelity model that includes shaft and housing flexibility and accurate bearing stiffnesses is important for the higher-speed stage bearing loads. Each of the transient events has different modeling requirements.

  8. PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette Program Development and Outreach Response Research Plan #12;2 Demand Response Research Center Objective Scope Stakeholders Develop, prioritize, conduct and disseminate multi- institutional research to facilitate Demand Response. Technologies

  9. Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs funded under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    renewable energy/energy efficiency programs in the future.renewable energy/energy efficiency programs in the future.future. Resource-efficient loading order – On-site renewable energy

  10. Low reflectance radio frequency load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M

    2014-04-01

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  11. _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _________ __________________ Training Program EHS 370 Lockout/Tagout for Authorized Persons Course Syllabus Subject Category: Electrical participants with training on Lockout/Tagout responsibilities, acceptable practices, and procedures, and line management and supervision responsibilities. Course Objectives: After completing this training

  12. Employee Performance and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-05-20

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the administration of performance management program for all non Senior Executive Service and Senior Professional or Technical employees.

  13. Chemical Engineering (For students entering the College 2008-09) It is the student's responsibility to ensure that their program and necessary prerequisites are correct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    to ensure that their program and necessary prerequisites are correct 1st YEAR 2nd YEAR 3rd YEAR 4th YEAR term ^ offered in alternate years, taken in either 3rd or 4th year @ must be at the 200 level or higher MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 121 Hum/SocSci Jr ! CHEM 115 must be taken in T1 if not taken in first year

  14. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

    2009-11-06

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

  15. The Seismic Category I Structures Program results for FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C.R.; Bennett, J.G.; Dunwoody, W.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Baker, W.E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The accomplishments of the Seismic Category I Structures Program for FY 1987 are summarized. These accomplishments include the quasi-static load cycle testing of large shear wall elements, an extensive analysis of previous data to determine if equivalent linear analytical models can predict the response of damaged shear wall structures, and code committee activities. In addition, previous testing and results that led to the FY 1987 program plan are discussed and all previous data relating to shear wall stiffness are summarized. Because separate reports have already summarized the experimental and analytical work in FY 1987, this report will briefly highlight this work and the appropriate reports will be references for a more detailed discussion. 12 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP contract requirements. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization oftank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste-loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

  17. Supervisory Program Analysis Officer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will be responsible for the program analysis and evaluation of all activities which fall within the purview of the Office. The incumbent directs a moderate...

  18. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  19. Protective Force Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-02-13

    To prescribe Department of Energy policy, responsibilities, and requirements for the management and operation of the Protective Force Program. Chg 1 dated 2-13-95. Cancels DOE O 5632.7 and DOE O 5632.8.

  20. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-25

    The Order establishes roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4. Canceled by DOE O 470.4B

  1. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-01-22

    To establish the policy and responsibilities for the Department of Energy safeguards and security program. Does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 5630.11A dated 12-7-92.

  2. Operations Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-30

    To establish policies, responsibilities and authorities for implementing and sustaining the Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Security (OPSEC) Program. Cancels DOE O 5632.3B. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

  3. Targeted Efficiency: Using Customer Meter Data to Improve Efficiency Program Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgeson, Samuel Dalton

    2013-01-01

    e?ciency (EE) and demand response (DR) programs are designedenergy e?ciency and demand response programs. Chapter 3 usesin e?ciency and demand response program targeting. Drawing

  4. High voltage load resistor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Monty Ray (Smithfield, VA)

    2005-01-18

    A high voltage resistor comprising an array of a plurality of parallel electrically connected resistor elements each containing a resistive solution, attached at each end thereof to an end plate, and about the circumference of each of the end plates, a corona reduction ring. Each of the resistor elements comprises an insulating tube having an electrode inserted into each end thereof and held in position by one or more hose clamps about the outer periphery of the insulating tube. According to a preferred embodiment, the electrode is fabricated from stainless steel and has a mushroom shape at one end, that inserted into the tube, and a flat end for engagement with the end plates that provides connection of the resistor array and with a load.

  5. Engineering to Control Noise, Loading, and Optimal Operating Points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell R. Swartz

    2000-11-12

    Successful engineering of low-energy nuclear systems requires control of noise, loading, and optimum operating point (OOP) manifolds. The latter result from the biphasic system response of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR)/cold fusion systems, and their ash production rate, to input electrical power. Knowledge of the optimal operating point manifold can improve the reproducibility and efficacy of these systems in several ways. Improved control of noise, loading, and peak production rates is available through the study, and use, of OOP manifolds. Engineering of systems toward the OOP-manifold drive-point peak may, with inclusion of geometric factors, permit more accurate uniform determinations of the calibrated activity of these materials/systems.

  6. INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract the case that distributed PV generation deserves a substantial portion of the credit allotted to demand response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing

  7. Estimated radiactive and shock loading of fusion reactor armor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, D C

    2008-11-25

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is of interest as a source of neutrons for proliferation-resistant and high burn-up fission reactor designs. ICF is a transient process, each implosion leading to energy release over a short period, with a continuous series of ICF operations needed to drive the fission reactor. ICF yields energy in the form of MeV-range neutrons and ions, and thermal x-rays. These radiations, particularly the thermal x-rays, can deposit a pulse of energy in the wall of the ICF chamber, inducing loading by isochoric heating (i.e. at constant volume before the material can expand) or by ablation of material from the surface. The explosion of the hot ICF system, and the compression of any fill material in the chamber, may also result in direct mechanical loading by a blast wave (decaying shock) reaching the chamber wall. The chamber wall must be able to survive the repetitive loading events for long enough for the reactor to operate economically. It is thus necessary to understand the loading induced by ICF systems in possible chamber wall designs, and to predict the response and life time of the wall. Estimates are given for the loading induced in the wall armor of the fusion chamber caused by ablative thermal radiation from the fusion plasma and by the hydrodynamic shock. Taking a version of the LIFE design as an example, the ablation pressure was estimated to be {approx}0.6 GPa with an approximately exponential decay with time constant {approx}0.6 ns. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations suggested that ablation of the W armor should be negligible.

  8. Solubility, Light Output and Energy Resolution Studies of Molybdenum-Loaded Liquid Scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Gehman; P. J. Doe; R. G. H. Robertson; D. I. Will; H. Ejiri; R. Hazama

    2010-09-03

    The search for neutrinoless double-beta decay is an important part of the global neutrino physics program. One double-beta decay isotope currently under investigation is 100Mo. In this article, we discuss the results of a feasibility study investigating the use of molybdenum-loaded liquid scintillator. A large, molybdenum-loaded liquid scintillator detector is one potential design for a low-background, internal-source neutrinoless double-beta decay search with 100Mo. The program outlined in this article included the selection of a solute containing molybdenum, a scintillating solvent and the evaluation of the mixture's performance as a radiation detector.

  9. NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    GA­A23223 NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS by C.P.C. WONG OCTOBER 1999 #12;DISCLAIMER Government or any agency thereof. #12;GA­A23223 NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS by C.P.C. WONG by General Atomics IR&D Funds GA PROJECT 4437 OCTOBER 1999 #12;C.P.C. WONG NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK

  10. Measured Peak Equipment Loads in Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2007-09-12

    This technical bulletin documents measured peak equipment load data from 39 laboratory spaces in nine buildings across five institutions. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain data on the actual peak loads in laboratories, which can be used to rightsize the design of HVAC systems in new laboratories. While any given laboratory may have unique loads and other design considerations, these results may be used as a 'sanity check' for design assumptions.

  11. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    DECC aggregator managed portfolio automated demand responseaggregator designs their own programs, and offers demand responseaggregator is responsible for designing and implementing their own demand response

  12. DOE Responses to DOE Challenge Home (formerly Builders Challenge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Responses to Draft Specification Comments 1 Updated 492012 DOE Responses to DOE Challenge Home (formerly Builders Challenge) National Program Requirements Public Comments DOE...

  13. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbett, K; Mendler, O J; Gardner, G C; Garnsey, R; Young, M Y

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated.

  14. History of Load Participation in ERCOT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Mark

    2011-10-25

    Presentation on demand integration by ERCOT for a DOE Workshop. Covers history of load participation in ERCOT from 2002 to present.

  15. Decentralized customerlevel under frequency load shedding in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Decentralized customerlevel under frequency load shedding in Switzerland (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Decentralized customerlevel under frequency...

  16. Load Participation in Ancillary Services Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan; O'Malley, Mark; Ma, Ookie; Cappers, Peter; Corbus, Dave; Kiliccote, Sila; Onar, Omer; Starke, Michael; Steinberg, Dan

    2011-10-25

    Developing load participation in ancillary services to the electric grid. Challenges: coordination among multiple entities, targeted R&D for market conditions and regulatory and policy environments.

  17. Building Technologies Office Load Control Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BTO researches and implements load control strategies, which support the Sustainable and Holistic IntegratioN of Energy storage and Solar PV (SHINES) FOA.

  18. FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesieutre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    of individual appliances. For off-grid applications, solarinappropriate load for an off-grid solar system. Increasedsolar systems in general, and off-grid solar systems in

  19. NGNP Program 2013 Status and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-03-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology can play an important role in the energy future of the United States by extending the use of nuclear energy for non-electricity energy production missions, as well as continuing to provide a considerable base load electric power generation capability. Extending nuclear energy into the industrial and transportation sectors through the coproduction of process heat and electricity provides safe, reliable energy for these sectors in an environmentally responsible manner. The modular HTGR provides a substantial improvement in nuclear plant safety for the protection of the public and the environment, and supports collocation of the HTGRhigh temperature gas-cooled reactor with major industrial facilities. Under U.S. Department of Energy direction since 2006, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project at Idaho National Laboratory has been working toward commercializing the HTGR technology. However, a recent decision by the Secretary of Energy to reduce the scope of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to a research and development program, considerable realignment has taken place. This report: (1) summarizes the accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program from FY2011 through FY2013; (2) lays out the path forward necessary to achieve the ultimate objective of commercializing HTGR technology; and (3) discusses ongoing technical, licensing, and evaluation activities under the realigned Next Generation Nuclear Plant program considered important to preserve the significant investment made by the government to-date and to maintain some progress in meeting the objectives of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct2005).

  20. NO{sub 2} gas sensing of flame-made Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} thick films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samerjai, Thanittha [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Program, Faculty of Graduate School, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Tamaekong, Nittaya [Program in Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Liewhiran, Chaikarn [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wisitsoraat, Anurat [Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Phanichphant, Sukon, E-mail: sphanichphant@yahoo.com [Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-06-01

    Unloaded WO{sub 3} and 0.25–1.0 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles for NO{sub 2} gas detection were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) and characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The BET surface area (SSA{sub BET}) of the nanoparticles was measured by nitrogen adsorption. The NO{sub 2} sensing properties of the sensors based on unloaded and Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated. The results showed that the gas sensing properties of the Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensors were excellent to those of the unloaded one. Especially, 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensor showed highest response to NO{sub 2} than the others at low operating temperature of 150 °C. - Graphical abstract: The response of 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO3 sensor was 637 towards NO{sub 2} concentration of 10 ppm at 150 °C. - Highlights: • Unloaded and Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles for NO{sub 2} gas detection were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). • Gas sensing properties of the Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensors were excellent to those of the unloaded one. • 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensor showed highest response to NO{sub 2} at low operating temperature of 150 °C.

  1. Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Mathieu, Johanna; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14

    California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15percent with an average of 13percent. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

  2. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  3. Beyond the Price Effect in Time-of-Use Programs: Results from a Municipal Utility Pilot, 2007-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutzenhiser, Susan; Peters, Jane; Moezzi, Mithra; Woods, James

    2009-08-12

    This paper discusses results of a two-year collaborative research project between the authors and the Demand Response Research Center focused on behavioral response to a voluntary time-of-use pilot rate offered by the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District (SMUD) under the PowerChoice label. The project had two purposes: one was to assess the potential for increasing demand response through the introduction of enhanced information and real-time consumption feedback; the second was to better understand behavioral response to a TOU rate. Three successive waves of telephone surveys collected details about reasons for participation, actions taken, capacities and constraints to altering behavior, and a range of salient conditions, such as demographics and dwelling characteristics. Pre- and post-program interval meter data for participants and a comparison sample of households were also collected and analyzed to consider initial and season-change price effects of the rate and the effect of supplemental information treatments on response. Over half of surveyed participating households reported that they had made a great deal of effort to adjust their electricity consumption to the rate. Despite this, load data analysis revealed only minimal price effects; and, though households subjected to information treatments seemed to have learned from these treatments, load data analysis again detected only minimal effects on load. Given the currently high hopes for behavioral intervention and residential TOU rates, these unexpected results require explanation. We suggest a number of possibilities and discuss some implications for TOU programs, and for understanding demand response behavior and approaches to experiments with TOU rates.

  4. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-20

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, PROTECTIVE FORCE PROGRAM, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Change 1 revised pages in Chapters IV and VI on 12/20/2001.

  5. Information Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-10-19

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Security Program and set forth policies, procedures and responsibilities for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. The Information Security Program is a system of elements which serve to deter collection activities, This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

  6. Personnel Security Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-16

    provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 472.1B, PERSONNEL SECURITY ACTIVITIES, which establishes the overall objectives, requirements, and responsibilities for implementation and operation of the Personnel Security Program and the Personnel Security Assurance Program in the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Cancels DOE M 472.1-1

  7. California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese E.

    2009-01-01

    majority of existing residential demand response programs inas evidence that residential demand response can “empowerthat facilitates residential demand response in order to

  8. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    to  Automated  Demand   Response  and  the  OpenADR  ®  Automated  Demand  Response  Program.   https://Data  for  Automated  Demand  Response  in  Commercial  

  9. Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger; Herter, Karen; Wilson, John

    2004-01-01

    Advanced Metering, Demand Response, and Dynamic Pricing. ”for Efficiency and Demand Response through Advanced Meteringenergy efficiency and demand response programs. Without

  10. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01

    of Program Participation Rates on Demand Response MarketTable 3-1. Methods of Estimating Demand Response PenetrationDemand Response

  11. Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

    2006-01-01

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”NYSERDA) and the Demand Response Research Center (LLC “Working Group 2 Demand Response Program Evaluation –

  12. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2009-01-01

    your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedS. (2008). Automated Demand Response Results from Multi-Yearusing Open Automated Demand Response, California Energy

  13. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    to  Automated  Demand   Response  and  the  OpenADR  ®  Automated  Demand  Response  Program.   https://2009a.   Open  Automated  Demand  Response  Communications  

  14. Electric Drive Vehicle Climate Control Load Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  15. High Efficiency Linguistics Program for Spanish (HELPS): A Cyclic Curriculum for Improving Intrinsic Spanish Language Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burt, D.; Jones, T.; Silber, J.; Woods, W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstracts Issue 2015 High Efficiency Linguistics Program forIn response, the High Efficiency Linguistics Program for

  16. Strategies for Controlling Plug Loads. A Tool for Reducing Plug Loads in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torcellini, Paul; Bonnema, Eric; Sheppy, Michael; Pless, Shanti

    2015-09-01

    Plug loads are often not considered as part of the energy savings measures in Commercial Buildings; however, they can account for up to 50% of the energy used in the building. These loads are numerous and often scattered throughout a building. Some of these loads are purchased by the owner and some designed into the building or the tenant finishes for a space. This document provides a strategy and a tool for minimizing these loads.

  17. 2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Assessing Demand Response (DR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Assessing Demand Response (DR) Program Potential for the Seventh;Assessing Demand Response (DR) Program Potential for the Seventh Power Plan Page i Updated Final Report

  18. Apparatus for loading a band saw blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reeves, S.R.

    1990-03-20

    A band saw blade is loaded between pairs of guide wheels upon tensioning the blade by guiding the blade between pairs of spaced guide plates which define converging slots that converge toward the guide wheels. The approach is particularly useful in loading blades on underwater band saw machines used to cut radioactive materials. 2 figs.

  19. Nonparametric models for electricity load forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genève, Université de

    Electricity consumption is constantly evolving due to changes in people habits, technological innovations1 Nonparametric models for electricity load forecasting JANUARY 23, 2015 Yannig Goude, Vincent at University Paris-Sud 11 Orsay. His research interests are electricity load forecasting, more generally time

  20. Apparatus for loading a band saw blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reeves, Steven R. (49 Williams Ave., West Valley, NY 14171)

    1990-01-01

    A band saw blade is loaded between pairs of guide wheels upon tensioning the blade by guiding the blade between pairs of spaced guide plates which define converging slots that converge toward the guide wheels. The approach is particularly useful in loading blades on underwater band saw machines used to cut radioactive materials.

  1. Harmonic Load Pull of High-Power Microwave Devices using Fundamental-Only Load Pull Tuners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    Harmonic Load Pull of High-Power Microwave Devices using Fundamental-Only Load Pull Tuners John-frequency load pull tuners. Harmonic impedance control at the virtual drain is accomplished through the use the dramatic impact of varying 2nd harmonic termination. A 3rd harmonic termination is added to satisfy

  2. Equipment qualification research program: program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, R.G.; Smith, P.D.

    1982-06-08

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed this program plan for research in equipment qualification (EQA). In this report the research program which will be executed in accordance with this plan will be referred to as the Equipment Qualification Research Program (EQRP). Covered are electrical and mechanical equipment under the conditions described in the OBJECTIVE section of this report. The EQRP has two phases; Phase I is primarily to produce early results and to develop information for Phase II. Phase I will last 18 months and consists of six projects. The first project is program management. The second project is responsible for in-depth evaluation and review of EQ issues and EQ processes. The third project is responsible for detailed planning to initiate Phase II. The remaining three projects address specific equipment; i.e., valves, electrical equipment, and a pump.

  3. Equilibrium Configurations of Cantilever under Terminal Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milan Batista

    2013-03-27

    The paper provides an exact analytical solution for equilibrium configurations of cantilever rod subject to inclined force and torque acting on its free end. The solution is given in terms of Jacobi elliptical functions and illustrated by several numerical examples and several graphical presentations of shapes of deformed cantilever. Possible forms of cantilever underlying elastica are discussed in details and various simple formulas are given for calculation of characteristic dimensions of elastica. For the case when cantilever is subject only to applied force four load conditions are discussed: follower load problem, load determination problem, conservative load problem and rotational load problem. For all the cases the formulas or effective procedure for solution is given.

  4. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

  5. Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-19

    Jun 19, 2013 ... efficient linear programming formulation for the demand response of such a consumer who could be a price taker, industrial or commercial user ...

  6. Laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation for shock wave loading: Validation and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Luo Shengnian; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.

    2008-02-15

    We present validation and some applications of two laser-driven shock wave loading techniques: laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and the dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. With transient imaging displacement interferometry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading induced by a spatially shaped laser pulse is within 2-7 mrad (with an average of 4{+-}1 mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible, in particular, when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation allows for flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These techniques can be utilized to investigate such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples.

  7. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

    2010-03-17

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

  8. Loss-of-feedwater, steam generator tube rupture, and steam line break experiments: Steam generator transient response test program: Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendler, O.J.; Takeuchi, K.; Young, M.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam generator test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, was reinstrumented and modified for performing a series of tests simulating steam generator accident transients. The transients simulated were: loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture, and steam line break events. This document presents a description of (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility, (2) the tests performed, and (3) the analyses of the test results. Two LOF tests were analyzed in detail. Both tests were initiated from 100% power condition by shutting off the main feedwater flow. In LOF Test No. 1, the remaining boundary conditions were kept constant while in LOF Test No. 2, the power was rapidly reduced to 3%. The results show that the primary to secondary heat transfer becomes degraded when the collapsed water liquid level in the bundle region falls below approximately 50 inches. The SGTR test analyzed in detail - SGTR Test No. 2 - simulated the post-reactor-trip portion of the SGTR transient (T/sub prim/ = 560/sup 0/F). The transient was initiated by starting the SGTR flow injection and simultaneously shutting off the auxiliary feedwater. The water level rose and flooded the dryer to its mid-elevation by the end of the test. The primary carry-over was shown to be less than 0.4% of the tracer mass injected into the secondary side by the SGTR flow. SGTR Test No. 3 investigated the response of the intact steam generator. Reverse heat transfer and low heat flow conditions were simulated. The results have demonstrated the occurrence of temperature stratification in the secondary water which lasted for about 800 seconds.

  9. Ensure Program Correctness Programming Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Ensure Program Correctness Programming Languages and Formal Methods Research Group Lab Coordinator Bow-Yaw Wang The Programming Languages and Formal Methods Research Group develops techniques to help ensure program correctness. Our research in programming languages focuses on syntactic, semantic

  10. Coupled Analysis of the Motion and Mooring Loads of a Spar "CONSTITUTION" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chengxi

    2012-10-19

    Loading Platform (ALP). In recent years, Kim et al. (2005) used the coupled dynamic analysis program for the global motion simulation of a turret-moored, tanker based FPSO designed for 6000-ft water depth. Chen et al. (2006) compared the numerical...

  11. Load Scheduling and Power Trading in Systems with High Penetration of Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    Load Scheduling and Power Trading in Systems with High Penetration of Renewable Energy Resources with high penetration of renewable energy resources (RERs). We adopt approximate dynamic programming friendly renewable energy resources (RERs). Regulations have been passed to increase the pro- duction

  12. Squeeze flow of potato starch gel: effect of loading history on visco-elastic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moutushi Dutta Choudhury; Shantanu Das; Sujata Tarafdar

    2015-03-25

    In this work gelatinized potato starch is shown to retain the memory of past loading history. It exhibits a visco-elastic response which does not depend solely on instantaneous conditions. A simple squeeze flow experiment is performed, where loading is done in two steps with a time lag $\\tau \\sim$ seconds between the steps. The effect on the strain, of varying $\\tau$ is reproduced by a three element visco-elastic solid model. Non-linearity is introduced through a generalized calculus approach by incorporating a non-integer order time derivative in the viscosity equation. A strain hardening proportional to the time lag between the two loading steps is also incorporated. This model reproduces the three salient features observed in the experiment, namely - the memory effect, slight initial oscillations in the strain as well as the long-time solid-like response. Dynamic visco-elasticity of the sample is also reported.

  13. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  14. The Role of Demand Response Policy Forum Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Role of Demand Response Policy Forum Series Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Future and Demand Response #12;Historic focus on Seasonal Grid Stress PG&E Demand Bid Test Day 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 Communication Latency #12;Bottom Up Review of End-Use Loads for Demand Response 5 Commercial Residential

  15. Opportunities and Challenges for Data Center Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Opportunities and Challenges for Data Center Demand Response Adam Wierman Zhenhua Liu Iris Liu of renewable energy into the grid as well as electric power peak-load shaving: data center demand response. Data center demand response sits at the intersection of two growing fields: energy efficient data

  16. Optimal demand response: problem formulation and deterministic case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Optimal demand response: problem formulation and deterministic case Lijun Chen, Na Li, Libin Jiang load through real-time demand response and purchases balancing power on the spot market to meet, optimal demand response reduces to joint scheduling of the procurement and consumption decisions

  17. A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    1 A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources Contribution of intelligent line switching, demand response resources (DRRs), FACTS devices and PMUs is key in the smart grid events as a result of voluntary load curtailments. Index Terms--Electricity Markets, Demand Response re

  18. The Unfolded Protein Response Triggers Selective mRNA Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicchitta, Chris

    of translo- cation, this mechanism may serve as a potent means to transiently reduce ER protein folding load- tion as a selective and rapid regulatory feature of the cellular response to protein folding stress folding load of the ER and increase the organelle's protein folding capacity, the UPR pro- vides

  19. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  20. The Summer of 2006: A Milestone in the Ongoing Maturation of Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Engel, Dan

    2007-01-01

    2007) Figure 7. U.S. Demand Response Resources in 2005Proposals to Augment 2007 Demand Response Programs, Aug. 22,Efforts to Improve Demand Response Programs for State to

  1. Water Power Program: 2010 Peer Review Report | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Program: 2010 Peer Review Report Water Power Program: 2010 Peer Review Report This document contains the peer review panel's observations and findings, responses from the...

  2. Extended-Time Demand Bids: A New Bidding Framework to Accommodate Time-Shiftable Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    , price bids, energy bids, day-ahead market, demand response, price competativeness, load synchronization bids e Energy component of a bid p Price component of a bid Start-time component of a bid End-time component of a bid i Bidder index t Hourly time index q Cleared energy in the market Cleared price

  3. Modeling and Control of Aggregated Air Conditioning Loads Under Realistic Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    strategy is designed to track a desired demand curve and to ensure a stable and smooth response. IModeling and Control of Aggregated Air Conditioning Loads Under Realistic Conditions Chin-Yao Chang, Wei Zhang, Jianming Lian, and Karanjit Kalsi Abstract-- Demand-side control is playing an increasingly

  4. Optimal Power Allocation and Load Distribution for Multiple Heterogeneous Multicore Server

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    clouds and data centers, the aggregated performance of the cloud of clouds can be optimized by load processor, power allocation, queuing model, response time Ç 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Motivation CLOUD computing, software, databases, information, and all re- sources are provided to users on-demand. In a data center

  5. Impact of Industrial Electric Rate Structure on Load Management - A Utility Viewpoint 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A few years ago our response to an inquiry regarding availability of electric service for a large industrial load was something like: 'Let us put this into our production model to determine whether we will have adequate generating capacity to commit...

  6. Inverse Load Calculation of Wind Turbine Support Structures - A Numerical Verification Using the Comprehensive Simulation Code FAST: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahn, T.; Jonkman, J.; Rolges, R.; Robertson, A.

    2012-11-01

    Physically measuring the dynamic responses of wind turbine support structures enables the calculation of the applied loads using an inverse procedure. In this process, inverse means deriving the inputs/forces from the outputs/responses. This paper presents results of a numerical verification of such an inverse load calculation. For this verification, the comprehensive simulation code FAST is used. FAST accounts for the coupled dynamics of wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity and turbine controls. Simulations are run using a 5-MW onshore wind turbine model with a tubular tower. Both the applied loads due to the instantaneous wind field and the resulting system responses are known from the simulations. Using the system responses as inputs to the inverse calculation, the applied loads are calculated, which in this case are the rotor thrust forces. These forces are compared to the rotor thrust forces known from the FAST simulations. The results of these comparisons are presented to assess the accuracy of the inverse calculation. To study the influences of turbine controls, load cases in normal operation between cut-in and rated wind speed, near rated wind speed and between rated and cut-out wind speed are chosen. The presented study shows that the inverse load calculation is capable of computing very good estimates of the rotor thrust. The accuracy of the inverse calculation does not depend on the control activity of the wind turbine.

  7. Reliability-based calibration of design seismic response spectra and structural acceptance criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    Reliability-based calibration of design seismic response spectra and structural acceptance criteria: Earthquake engineering design requires an evaluation of the structure's reliability over future seismic loads alternate "explicit" check, which commonly specifies a design spectrum and associated structural response

  8. Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buescher, B.J. Jr.; Lloyd, W.R.; Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.

    1997-02-04

    A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: (a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; (b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; (c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and (d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen. 6 figs.

  9. Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Addy, Nathan; Kiliccote, Sila; Mathieu, Johanna; Callaway, Duncan S.

    2012-06-13

    Accurate evaluation of the performance of buildings participating in Demand Response (DR) programs is critical to the adoption and improvement of these programs. Typically, we calculate load sheds during DR events by comparing observed electric demand against counterfactual predictions made using statistical baseline models. Many baseline models exist and these models can produce different shed calculations. Moreover, modelers implementing the same baseline model can make different modeling implementation choices, which may affect shed estimates. In this work, using real data, we analyze the effect of different modeling implementation choices on shed predictions. We focused on five issues: weather data source, resolution of data, methods for determining when buildings are occupied, methods for aligning building data with temperature data, and methods for power outage filtering. Results indicate sensitivity to the weather data source and data filtration methods as well as an immediate potential for automation of methods to choose building occupied modes.

  10. Optimal demand response: problem formulation and deterministic case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wierman, Adam

    load through real-time demand response and purchases balancing power on the spot market to meet generation [17]. Indeed, [12, 18, 19] advocates the creation of a distribution/retail market to encourage

  11. Final Project Report Load Modeling Transmission Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesieutre, Bernard; Bravo, Richard; Yinger, Robert; Chassin, Dave; Huang, Henry; Lu, Ning; Hiskens, Ian; Venkataramanan, Giri

    2012-03-31

    The research presented in this report primarily focuses on improving power system load models to better represent their impact on system behavior. The previous standard load model fails to capture the delayed voltage recovery events that are observed in the Southwest and elsewhere. These events are attributed to stalled air conditioner units after a fault. To gain a better understanding of their role in these events and to guide modeling efforts, typical air conditioner units were testing in laboratories. Using data obtained from these extensive tests, new load models were developed to match air conditioner behavior. An air conditioner model is incorporated in the new WECC composite load model. These models are used in dynamic studies of the West and can impact power transfer limits for California. Unit-level and systemlevel solutions are proposed as potential solutions to the delayed voltage recovery problem.

  12. FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesieutre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    model.   3.0 PV System Modeling Issues When modeling the PV systems in the electric  power electric grid.   4.0 Load Composition Data Tool 4.1. Introduction A power system model 

  13. Impact of load type on microgrid stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnin, Jared P

    2012-01-01

    Microgrids show great promise as a means of integrating distributed generation sources into the public grid distribution system. In order to provide uninterrupted,high quality power to local loads, microgrids must have the ...

  14. Determining Electric Motor Load and Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DETERMINING ELECTRIC MOTOR LOAD AND EFFICIENCY Most likely your operation's motors account for a large part of your monthly electric bill. Far too often motors are mismatched-or...

  15. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; /SLAC; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  16. Largest Ice-Bank Promotes Load Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brarmann, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    conservation measures were incorporated in the design of the new research facility, the ice-bank system has been the most cost-effective of the load management projects at Union Oil....

  17. FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesieutre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    to voltage and frequency  disturbances by offering a much to voltage and frequency  disturbances by offering a much disturbances is that modeling the voltage sensitivity of the load is far more important than the  frequency 

  18. Radiation load to the SNAP CCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov

    2003-08-14

    Results of an express Monte Carlo analysis with the MARS14 code of radiation load to the CCD optical detectors in the Supernova Acceleration Project (SNAP) mission presented for realistic radiation environment over the satellite orbit.

  19. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operation for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic pricing electricity tariffs, now the default for large customers in California (peak demand of 200 kW and higher for PG&E and SCE, and 20 kW and higher for SDG&E), are providing Federal facilities new opportunities to cut their electricity bills and help them meet their energy savings mandates. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has created this fact sheet to help California federal facilities take advantage of these opportunities through “rate-responsive building operation.” Rate-responsive building operation involves designing your load management strategies around your facility’s variable electric rate, using measures that require little or no financial investment.

  20. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  1. Harmonic approaches to non-intrusive load diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Ashley E. (Ashley Eliot)

    2008-01-01

    The Non-Intrusive Load Monitor (NILM) is a system that monitors, records and processes voltage and current measurements to establish the operating characteristics of individual loads on a load center from a single aggregate ...

  2. A three phase load flow algorithm for Shipboard Power Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina-Calder?on, M?onica M

    2003-01-01

    -Seidel and/or Newton Raphson techniques, were primarily developed for transmission system analysis. Distribution load flow analysis must incorporate its unique characteristics such as unbalanced loads, distributed loads, radial network structure, and one...

  3. Steady state load models for power system analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cresswell, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The last full review of load models used for power system studies occurred in the 1980s. Since then, new types of loads have been introduced and system load mix has changed considerably. The examples of newly introduced ...

  4. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) Description and Loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oyague, F.

    2011-11-01

    This document describes simulated turbine load cases in accordance to the IEC 61400-1 Ed.3 standard, which is representative of the typical wind turbine design process. The information presented herein is intended to provide a broad understanding of the gearbox reliability collaborative 750kW drivetrain and turbine configuration. In addition, fatigue and ultimate strength drivetrain loads resulting from simulations are presented. This information provides the bases for the analytical work of the gearbox reliability collaborative effort.

  5. Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; Piette, MaryAnn

    2009-08-01

    In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This ?electricity value chain? defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to"demo" potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives.1 In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

  6. Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

    2008-08-01

    In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

  7. Load cell having strain gauges of arbitrary location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, Barry (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-03-13

    A load cell utilizes a plurality of strain gauges mounted upon the load cell body such that there are six independent load-strain relations. Load is determined by applying the inverse of a load-strain sensitivity matrix to a measured strain vector. The sensitivity matrix is determined by performing a multivariate regression technique on a set of known loads correlated to the resulting strains. Temperature compensation is achieved by configuring the strain gauges as co-located orthogonal pairs.

  8. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  9. Using Negotiation to Reduce Redundant Autonomous Mobile Program Movements Natalia Chechina, Peter King, and Phil Trinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinder, Phil

    , UK {nc75, P.J.B.King, P.W.Trinder}@hw.ac.uk Abstract--Distributed load managers exhibit thrashing external load management system, each AMP periodically recalculates network and program parameters and may independently move to a better execution environment. Load management emerges from the behaviour of collections

  10. Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management for larger...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management for larger waste packages. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management...

  11. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting and Other Electric Loads Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light...

  12. Beam Loading by Distributed Injection of Electrons in a Plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Beam Loading by Distributed Injection of Electrons in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Beam Loading by Distributed...

  13. Minimized Space Conditioning Distribution Strategy for Low-load...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimized Space Conditioning Distribution Strategy for Low-load Homes Minimized Space Conditioning Distribution Strategy for Low-load Homes This presentation was given at the...

  14. Nanosegregated Cathode Catalysts with Ultra-Low Platinum Loading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanosegregated Cathode Catalysts with Ultra-Low Platinum Loading Nanosegregated Cathode Catalysts with Ultra-Low Platinum Loading Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell...

  15. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    have been relaxed as third party load aggregators have developed and installed lower-cost communications equipment. These load aggregators targeted customers with small...

  16. Local Soot Loading Distribution in Cordierite Diesel Particulate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Local Soot Loading Distribution in Cordierite Diesel Particulate Filters by Dynamic Neutron Radiography Local Soot Loading Distribution in Cordierite Diesel Particulate Filters by...

  17. Locality Aware Dynamic Load Management for Massively Multiplayer Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amza, Cristiana

    Locality Aware Dynamic Load Management for Massively Multiplayer Games Jin Chen Department with a dynamic load management algorithm enables us to better handle transient crowding by adaptively dispersing

  18. The Development of a Small Engine Based Accelerated Ash Loading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated Ash Loading Protocol The Development of a Small Engine Based Accelerated Ash Loading Protocol Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan....

  19. Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Poster presentation at the 2007...

  20. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading...

  1. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard

    2005-05-03

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply.

  2. Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

    1986-01-01

    -LOAD-SHAPI1IG: TIlE PRACTICE OF AND PROSPECTS FOR UTILITY/INDUSTRY COOPERATION TO MAUGE PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Donald J. BuIes and David E. Rubin Consultants, Pacific Gas and Electric Company San Francisco, California Michael F. Maniates Energy... and Resources Group, University of California Berkeley, California ABSTRACT Load-management programs designed to reduce demand for electricity during peak periods are becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. For a gf'owing number...

  3. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01

    your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedUsing Open Automated Demand Response, Lawrence Berkeley2008). "What is Demand Response?" Retrieved 10/10/2008, from

  4. Plug Load Energy Analysis: The Role of Plug Loads in LEED Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuertes, Gwen; Schiavon, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Energy performance of LEED® for new construction buildings,The Role of Plug Loads in LEED Certification Gwen FuertesGreen Building Council for LEED certification. The study

  5. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-01-01

    the Market Report for PJM: Ancillary Service Markets. 2010Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services", Grid—Kintner—Meyer, Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of

  6. Displacement, Tension & Kinematic Properties of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament during Flexion- Extension with Applied Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branch, Jamie

    2013-04-01

    fixings to track their motion in 3D space. The tibia of the knee was manually moved through maximum extension to 110 degrees of flexion while either Varus-Valgus (VV), Anterior-Posterior (AP), or Interior- Exterior (IE) loads were applied (Fig. 4... program to generate representative plots for analysis. resuLts The PCL undergoes the least amount of load in a VV test. Because varus-valgus affects the PCL the least, the VV test was used to model the displacement of the PCL as it travels through...

  7. A comparison of measured wind park load histories with the WISPER and WISPERX load spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    The blade-loading histories from two adjacent Micon 65/13 wind turbines are compared with the variable-amplitude test-loading histories known as the WISPER and WISPERX spectra. These standardized loading sequences were developed from blade flapwise load histories taken from nine different horizontal-axis wind turbines operating under a wide range of conditions in Europe. The subject turbines covered a broad spectrum of rotor diameters, materials, and operating environments. The final loading sequences were developed as a joint effort of thirteen different European organizations. The goal was to develop a meaningful loading standard for horizontal-axis wind turbine blades that represents common interaction effects seen in service. In 1990, NREL made extensive load measurements on two adjacent Micon 65/13 wind turbines in simultaneous operation in the very turbulent environment of a large wind park. Further, before and during the collection of the loads data, comprehensive measurements of the statistics of the turbulent environment were obtained at both the turbines under test and at two other locations within the park. The trend to larger but lighter wind turbine structures has made an understanding of the expected lifetime loading history of paramount importance. Experience in the US has shown that the turbulence-induced loads associated with multi-row wind parks in general are much more severe than for turbines operating individually or within widely spaced environments. Multi-row wind parks are much more common in the US than in Europe. In this paper we report on our results in applying the methodology utilized to develop the WISPER and WISPERX standardized loading sequences using the available data from the Micon turbines. While the intended purpose of the WISPER sequences were not to represent a specific operating environment, we believe the exercise is useful, especially when a turbine design is likely to be installed in a multi-row wind park.

  8. Technical Surveillance Countermeasures Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-06-18

    To prescribe policies, responsibilities and authorities to establish Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Surveillance Countermeasures (TSCM) Program. This order implements the DOE TSCM Procedural Guide, DOE TSCM Operations Manual, DOE TSCM Report Writing Guide and Threat Assessment Scheduling System (TASS) which contain classified policies and procedures concerning the DOE TSCM Program. Cancels DOE 5636.3A. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 dated 9-28-95.

  9. Personnel Security Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-07-12

    This Manual provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 472.1B, Personnel Security Activities, which establishes the overall objectives, requirements, and responsibilities for implementation and operation of the Personnel Security Program and the Personnel Security Assurance Program in the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels: DOE M 472.1-1A.

  10. Low-Load Space Conditioning Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth

    2015-05-01

    With limited low-load options in the HVAC market, many new-construction housing units are being fitted with oversized equipment - thus facing penalties in system efficiency, comfort, and cost. To bridge the gap between currently available HVAC equipment and the rising demand for low-load HVAC equipment in the marketplace, HVAC equipment manufacturers need to be fully aware of multifamily buildings and single-family homes market needs. Over the past decade, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. (SWA) has provided certification and consulting services on hundreds of housing projects and has accrued a large pool of data. CARB compiled and analyzed these data to see what the thermal load ranges are in various multifamily apartments and attached single-family home types (duplex and townhouse). In total, design loads from 941 dwellings from SWA's recent multifamily and attached single-family work across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic were analyzed. Information on the dwelling characteristics, design loads, and the specifications of installed mechanical equipment were analyzed to determine any trends that exist within the dataset.

  11. Departmental Directives Program - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE O 251.1C, Departmental Directives Program and Conforming Changes to DOE O 252.1, Technical Standards Program Redline of DOE O 251.1D - First Draft Comment Response Report...

  12. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-04-29

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

  13. Modality Effects on Cognitive Load and Performance in High-Load Information Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    INTRODUCTION Intelligent human-computer interfaces are often multimodal, i.e. the human-computer communications into the modality planning procedure for systems that support high-load human-computer interaction. Author Keywords-load information presenta- tion scenario. Mainly based on modality-related psychology theories, we selected five

  14. Reconstruction of a wind turbine's endured load spectrum using a short-time load measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    Reconstruction of a wind turbine's endured load spectrum using a short-time load measurement Abstract Wind turbines (WT) are normally designed for a service life (SL) of 20 years. In Germany, over safety. 1 Introduction A wind turbine (WT) is normally designed, tested and certified for a design life

  15. Dimeric Drug Polymeric Nanoparticles with Exceptionally High Drug Loading and Quantitative Loading Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Dimeric Drug Polymeric Nanoparticles with Exceptionally High Drug Loading and Quantitative LoadingChampaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education-molecule drugs in hydrophobic polymers or amphiphilic copolymers has been extensively used for preparing

  16. Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School;Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School/ College 1

  17. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    using existing utility load-management assets can provide anhow existing utility load-management assets can provide anutility load-management asset can be repositioned as a

  18. Quality Control Inspector: Different Programs, Different Responsibilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document explains the role of the Quality Control Inspector (QCI) in regards to the Home Energy Professional Certification Exam.

  19. Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    27 Certification Program on Prohibited Personnel Practices and Whistleblower Protections Congress enacted 5 U.S.C. 2302(c) in response to reports of limited understanding in...

  20. DOE-FLEX: DOE's Telework Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-05

    The directive establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the Department’s telework program. Canceled by DOE O 314.1.