Sample records for llucmajor aquifer system

  1. On the solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Aiguo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is composed of five chapters and three major contributions are presented in Chapter II, III and IV. Chapter I provided a review of studies on solute transport in aquifer-aquitard system. If the aquitard is considered, two...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer guarani system Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times of years to tens of years. Conse- quently, these aquifers are fragile systems... of rainwater d18 O Fig. 5. Cross-section of limestone aquifers of northern Puerto Rico. The...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer system estimacion Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times of years to tens of years. Conse- quently, these aquifers are fragile systems... of rainwater d18 O Fig. 5. Cross-section of limestone aquifers of northern Puerto Rico. The...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer system brazil Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times of years to tens of years. Conse- quently, these aquifers are fragile systems... of rainwater d18 O Fig. 5. Cross-section of limestone aquifers of northern Puerto Rico. The...

  5. Hydraulics of horizontal wells in fractured shallow aquifer systems Eungyu Parka,*, Hongbin Zhanb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Hydraulics of horizontal wells in fractured shallow aquifer systems Eungyu Parka,*, Hongbin Zhanb Accepted 1 May 2003 Abstract An analysis of groundwater hydraulic head in the vicinity of a horizontal well in fractured or porous aquifers considering confined, leaky confined, and water-table aquifer boundary

  6. Upper Basalt-Confined Aquifer System in the Southern Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.

    1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 DOE Tiger Team Finding GW/CF-202 found that the hydrogeologic regime at the Hanford Site was inadequately characterized. This finding also identified the need for completing a study of the confined aquifer in the central and southern portions of the Hanford Site. The southern portion of the site is of particular interest because hydraulic-head patterns in the upper basalt-confined aquifer system indicate that groundwater from the Hanford central plateau area, where contaminants have been found in the aquifer, flows southeast toward the southern site boundary. This results in a potential for offsite migration of contaminants through the upper basalt-confined aquifer system. Based on the review presented in this report, available hydrogeologic characterization information for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system in this area is considered adequate to close the action item. Recently drilled offsite wells have provided additional information on the structure of the aquifer system in and near the southern part of the Hanford Site. Information on hydraulic properties, hydrochemistry, hydraulic heads and flow directions for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system has been re-examined and compiled in recent reports including Spane and Raymond (1993), Spane and Vermeul ( 1994), and Spane and Webber (1995).

  7. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  8. Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1994 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Vermeul, V.R.; Macdonald, Q.C.; Schubert, S.E.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work conducted during the fiscal year 1994 to development an improved three-dimensional conceptual model of ground-water flow in the unconfined aquifer system across the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, which is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The main objective of the ongoing effort to develop an improved conceptual model of ground-water flow is to provide the basis for improved numerical report models that will be capable of accurately predicting the movement of radioactive and chemical contaminant plumes in the aquifer beneath Hanford. More accurate ground-water flow models will also be useful in assessing the impacts of changes in facilities and operations. For example, decreasing volumes of operational waste-water discharge are resulting in a declining water table in parts of the unconfined aquifer. In addition to supporting numerical modeling, the conceptual model also provides a qualitative understanding of the movement of ground water and contaminants in the aquifer.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer system idaho Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between shallow and deeper aquifers Summary: aquifers in two villages of Araihazar, Bangladesh: Implications for deeper aquifers as drinking water... Department of Earth and...

  11. Two well storage systems for combined heating and airconditioning by groundwater heatpumps in shallow aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelka, W.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of soil and ground water as an energy source and heat storage systems for heat pumps in order to conserve energy in heating and air conditioning buildings is discussed. Information is included on heat pump operation and performance, aquifer characteristics, soil and ground water temperatures, and cooling and heating demands. Mathematical models are used to calculate flow and temperature fields in the aquifer. It is concluded that two well storage systems with ground water heat pumps are desirable, particularly in northern climates. (LCL)

  12. Permanent scatterer InSAR reveals seasonal and long-term aquifer-system response to groundwater pumping and artificial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    pumping and artificial recharge John W. Bell,1 Falk Amelung,2 Alessandro Ferretti,3 Marco Bianchi,3 and precisely measuring long-term and seasonal aquifer-system response to pumping and recharge. In contrast this methodology can be utilized in heavily pumped groundwater basins to analyze aquifer-system response to long

  13. Air and water flows in a large sand box with a two-layer aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Air and water flows in a large sand box with a two-layer aquifer system Xingxing Kuang & Jiu Jimmy negative air pressure can be generated in the vadose zone during pumping. The negative air pressure. The initial water-table depth has a significant effect on the generated negative air pressure. The shallower

  14. Source and mobility of Rare Earth Elements in a sedimentary aquifer system: Aquitaine basin (Southern France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Source and mobility of Rare Earth Elements in a sedimentary aquifer system: Aquitaine basin Geological Survey Service, Bordeaux, France, e.malcuit@brgm.fr The study of rare earth elements (REEs such as rivers and lakes and groundwaters. Rare earth elements) are of great interest because of their unique

  15. Geostatistical Simulation of Hydrofacies Heterogeneity of the West Thessaly Aquifer Systems in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modis, K., E-mail: kmodis@mail.ntua.gr; Sideri, D. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering (Greece)] [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering (Greece)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating geological properties, such as relative positions and proportions of different hydrofacies, is of highest importance in order to render realistic geological patterns. Sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and Plurigaussian simulation (PS) are alternative methods for conceptual and deterministic modeling for the characterization of hydrofacies distribution. In this work, we studied the spatial differentiation of hydrofacies in the alluvial aquifer system of West Thessaly basin in Greece. For this, we applied both SIS and PS techniques to an extensive set of borehole data from that basin. Histograms of model versus experimental hydrofacies proportions and indicative cross sections were plotted in order to validate the results. The PS technique was shown to be more effective in reproducing the spatial characteristics of the different hydrofacies and their distribution across the study area. In addition, the permeability differentiations reflected in the PS model are in accordance to known heterogeneities of the aquifer capacity.

  16. aquifer system california: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    City Environmental Health Services Delivery System The purpose service delivery in California with the aim of providing a foundation for informed decision making about...

  17. Summary and evaluation of hydraulic property data available for the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system. For the past 40 years, hydrologic testing of the upper basalt confined aquifer has been conducted by a number of Hanford Site programs. Hydraulic property estimates are important for evaluating aquifer flow characteristics (i.e., ground-water flow patterns, flow velocity, transport travel time). Presented are the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydraulic properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). Available hydrologic test data were reevaluated using recently developed diagnostic test analysis methods. A comparison of calculated transmissivity estimates indicates that, for most test results, a general correspondence within a factor of two between reanalysis and previously reported test values was obtained. For a majority of the tests, previously reported values are greater than reanalysis estimates. This overestimation is attributed to a number of factors, including, in many cases, a misapplication of nonleaky confined aquifer analysis methods in previous analysis reports to tests that exhibit leaky confined aquifer response behavior. Results of the test analyses indicate a similar range for transmissivity values for the various hydro-geologic units making up the upper basalt confined aquifer. Approximately 90% of the calculated transmissivity values for upper basalt confined aquifer hydrogeologic units occur within the range of 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}/d, with 65% of the calculated estimate values occurring between 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}d. These summary findings are consistent with the general range of values previously reported for basalt interflow contact zones and sedimentary interbeds within the Saddle Mountains Basalt.

  18. Problems of trace element ratios and geothermometry in a gravel geothermal-aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, J.L.; Donovan, J.J.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Tertiary-age, block-faulted basin in which a Pleistocene gravel bed acts as a confined aquifer and permits the lateral dispersion of the geothermal fluids is studied. Basic data on geology and trace element holes presented previously are reproduced along with fluoride data. Evaluation of the phenomena in this system was attempted using a dissolved silica-enthalpy graph. A chalcedomy curve is also plotted. An enthalpy versus chloride plot suggests that either conductive cooling occurs before mixing or that higher chloride content background waters are available for mixing. (MHR)

  19. Llucmajor > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    Durada: 27 min. Cost mitjà del viatge1 : 5,34 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 5,98 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,004 Kg Durada: 50 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg 1 any Temps acumulat3 : 6,60 dies Despesa per any3 : 1.881'09 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 2

  20. Applications of geographic information systems (GIS) in decision analysis for monitoring aquifer systems during oilfield development projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blundell, S.; Baldwin, D.O.; Anderson, N.J. [Integrated Geoscience, Inc., Helena, MT (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) coupled with numerical ground water models provide a powerful Decision Support System (DSS) and visualization tool for monitoring aquifer systems during oilfield development projects. A GIS is a coupled software/hardware system that stores, processes, and displays a variety of data structures (raster, vector, TIN, CAD) that have been geographically referenced to some common map projection and coordinate system. Georeferencing allows the analyst to integrate diverse types of data layers into thematic maps for analysis of spatial trends and analyses. The integration of quasi 3-D numerical ground water models with GIS provides project managers with a Decision Support System (DSS) to assess potential impacts to aquifer systems during oilfield development projects. The rapid advancement in desktop PC computing power and data storage has allowed software developers to produce 32-bit GIS and data integration software applications. A variety of image processing, GIS, and numerical ground water modeling software will be used to demonstrate techniques for monitoring and visualizing the migration of an oilfield brine plume leaking during an oilfield development project. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of data structures and on database design to create a DSS within a desktop GIS to serve Project Managers during oilfield development.

  1. Designing an Optimal Urban Community Mix for an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zizzo, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This research examined what mix of building types result in the most efficient use of a technology known as Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Hourly (more)

  2. Preliminary delineation of natural geochemical reactions, Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Orr, B.R.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a study to determine the natural geochemistry of the Snake River Plain aquifer system at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. As part of this study, a group of geochemical reactions that partially control the natural chemistry of ground water at the INEL were identified. Mineralogy of the aquifer matrix was determined using X-ray diffraction and thin-section analysis and theoretical stabilities of the minerals were used to identify potential solid-phase reactants and products of the reactions. The reactants and products that have an important contribution to the natural geochemistry include labradorite, olivine, pyroxene, smectite, calcite, ferric oxyhydroxide, and several silica phases. To further identify the reactions, analyses of 22 representative water samples from sites tapping the Snake River Plain aquifer system were used to determine the thermodynamic condition of the ground water relative to the minerals in the framework of the aquifer system. Principal reactions modifying the natural geochemical system include congruent dissolution of olivine, diopside, amorphous silica, and anhydrite; incongruent dissolution of labradorite with calcium montmorillonite as a residual product; precipitation of calcite and ferric oxyhydroxide; and oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron. Cation exchange reactions retard the downward movement of heavy, multivalent waste constituents where infiltration ponds are used for waste disposal.

  3. Analysis of No-Flow Boundaries in Mixed Unconfined-Confined Aquifer Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerlan, Kent A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As human population increases, demand for water supplies will cause an increase in pumping rates from confined aquifers which may become unconfined after long-term pumping. Such an unconfined-confined conversion problem has not been fully...

  4. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  6. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  7. A parametric and economic investigation of an energy system utilizing aquifer storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tostengard, Stephen Gilbert

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLIMATE. . 5. RESULTS PROM SOLAR& COLD CLIMATE. . 6. RESULTS PROM SPRAY POR SEVERAL LOCATIONS. . 7. RESULTS PROM SPRAY POR AMARILLO. . 8. EXAMPLE OP SOLAR AVERAGING PROCESS. . 9. WET-BULB DATA POR SPRAY. 39 . . 50 . . 70 . . 76 . . 78 . . 159... aquifer at a mild climate. 52 8. Recovery efficiency for a 30. 48 m aquii'er in a mild climate. 9. Recovery efficiency for a 15. 24 m aquifer in a cold climate. 10 ' Recovery efficiency versus injection volume 53 for cold water injection...

  8. Large sedimentary aquifer system and sustainable management: investigations of hydrogeological and geochemical variations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is roughly half a meter per year. Furthermore, in the south part, around two sites of gas storage and geochemical variations in Eocene sand aquifer, south western France E. MALCUIT 1 , Ph. NEGREL 2 , E. PETELET-GIRAUD 3 , P. DURST 1 1 BRGM, Regional Geological Survey Service Bordeaux, France, 2 BRGM, Metrology

  9. Geochemistry of the Yegua Aquifer system and its relation to microbial processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlichenmeyer, Jeannette Leone

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in southwestern North Dakota and northwestern South Dakota They noted a decrease in sulfate and an increase in HS- along the hydrologic flow path. In a study of the Black Creek aquifer in South Carolina, Chapelle and McMahon (1991) found evidence that sulfate... in South Carolina, Fredrickson et aL (1991) found higher viable counts in the coarse sands of the Middendorf formation than in the fine sands of the Cape Fear formation, or in lignites and lignite-sands. Also, at the Savannah River Site higher numbers...

  10. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifer near the ground surface to the storage formation.below the ground surface. The storage formation is boundedstorage formation, and Aquifer 8 the uppermost aquifer nearest to the ground

  11. Status report on the development of a three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the status of development of a three-dimensional conceptual model for the unconfined aquifer system at Hanford. A conceptual model is needed to support development of a realistic three-dimensional numerical model for predicting ground-water flow and the transport of contaminants. The report focuses on developing a hydrogeologic framework, assessing available hydraulic property data, describing flow-system boundaries, and evaluating areal recharge and leakage. Geologic descriptions of samples obtained during well drilling were used to prepare cross sections that correlate relatively continuous layers. The layers were defined based on textural differences that are expected to reflect differences in hydraulic properties. Assigning hydraulic properties to the layers is a critical part of the conceptual model. Available hydraulic property data for the study area were compiled and were correlated with the geologic layers where possible. Flow-system boundaries are present within the study area at basalt outcrops and at the Columbia River. Boundary conditions have been evaluated for these areas. Available estimates of areal recharge from precipitation were compiled.

  12. Evaluation of kinetic controls on sulfate reduction in a contaminated wetland-aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneeshaw, Tara Ann

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    systems is identifying key kinetic controls on important redox reactions such as sulfate reduction. Anaerobic microbial activities like sulfate reduction are of particular interest because of the important role they play in the degradation of contaminants...

  13. The Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merrifield, John D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Griffin, Ronald C.; Emerson, Peter M.; Collinge, Robert A.

    now served by the Edwards Aquifer. A system of transferable groundwater rights is commendable for several reasons. It is flexible because it accomodates unforeseeable future shifts in demand. Transferable rights allow voluntary action on behalf...

  14. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid-fluid heat storage systems in the ground; extractions0 Thermal storage of cold water in ground water aquifers forA. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravel ground:

  15. aquifers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31 Gulf Service Station... Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen 2012-06-07 331 Evaluation of kinetic controls on sulfate reduction in a contaminated wetland-aquifer system Texas A&M...

  16. Method and system for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for extraction of chemicals from an groundwater remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating groundwater contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  17. Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemical...

  18. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  19. A simulation model for generation of aquifer characteristics and contaminant concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deena, Jayaram

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remediation of natural systems such as aquifers requires a thorough characterization of its physical and hydraulic properties. Variability in physical and hydraulic properties of aquifers makes design and operation of suitable remediation process...

  20. Aquifer behavior with reinjection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonet, Euclides Jose

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By EUCLIDES JOSE BONET Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARUM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, f967 Major Subject... Petroleum Engineering AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By E UC LI DES JOSE BONE T Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) May, 1967 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Thanks are due to Petroleo Brasilerio S...

  1. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  2. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  3. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - teristics of the associated aquifer are vital to proper management of the reservoir. Typically, the reservoir and associated aquifer are located in a geologic setting which is highly faulted. Limited geologic and seismic knowledge exists about...ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  4. Regional aquifers and petroleum in Williston Basin region of US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downey, J.S.; Busby, J.F.; Dinwiddie, G.A.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At least five major aquifers underlie the northern Great Plains of the US, which includes parts of the Williston basin in Montana and North Dakota. These aquifers form a hydrologic system that extends more than 960 km from recharge areas in the Rocky Mountains to discharge areas in eastern North Dakota and the Canadian Provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The regional flow system in the aquifers has had a major effect on the chemical composition of ground water within the Williston basin. Hydrodynamic forces may contribute to the accumulation of petroleum within the basin.

  5. Stream aquifer interactions: analytical solution to estimate stream depletions caused by stream stage fluctuations and pumping wells near streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intaraprasong, Trin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is composed of three parts of contributions. Systems of a fully penetrating pumping well in a confined aquifer near a fully penetrating stream with and without streambeds are discussed in Chapter II. In Chapter III, stream-aquifer...

  6. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energys Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address what if questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  7. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridge

  8. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

  9. Transboundary aquifers: Southwestern states assess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 14 Southwestern states assess Researchers from three universities in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona and from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are partnering on a new project to evaluate aquifers that span the United States... and Mexico borders. The federally funded project, known as United States-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment, will provide a scientific foundation for state and local officials to address pressing water resources challenges in the United States...

  10. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

  11. Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.H.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system`s design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

  12. Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.H.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system's design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

  13. Optimizing energy storage and reproduction for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage. A scientific approach in enhancing ATES system performance at Achmea Apeldoorn through application of smart extraction and infiltration strategies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groot, J.H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??In the subsurface beneath the campus of Apeldoorn Achmea, the groundwater flow velocity is high. This causes a problem for its Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (more)

  14. Precision Dual-Aquifer Dewatering at a Low Level Radiological Cleanup in New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosnell, A. S.; Langman, J. W. Jr.; Zahl, H. A.; Miller, D. M.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleanup of low-level radioactive wastes at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), Wayne, New Jersey during the period October, 2000 through November, 2001 required the design, installation and operation of a dual-aquifer dewatering system to support excavation of contaminated soils. Waste disposal pits from a former rare-earth processing facility at the WISS had been in contact with the water table aquifer, resulting in moderate levels of radionuclides being present in the upper aquifer groundwater. An uncontaminated artesian aquifer underlies the water table aquifer, and is a localized drinking water supply source. The lower aquifer, confined by a silty clay unit, is flowing artesian and exhibits potentiometric heads of up to 4.5 meters above grade. This high potentiometric head presented a strong possibility that unloading due to excavation would result in a ''blowout'', particularly in areas where the confining unit was < 1 meter thick. Excavation of contaminated materials w as required down to the surface of the confining unit, potentially resulting in an artesian aquifer head of greater than 8 meters above the excavation surface. Consequently, it was determined that a dual-aquifer dewatering system would be required to permit excavation of contaminated material, with the water table aquifer dewatered to facilitate excavation, and the deep aquifer depressurized to prevent a ''blowout''. An additional concern was the potential for vertical migration of contamination present in the water table aquifer that could result from a vertical gradient reversal caused by excessive pumping in the confined system. With these considerations in mind, a conceptual dewatering plan was developed with three major goals: (1) dewater the water table aquifer to control radionuclide migration and allow excavation to proceed; (2) depressurize the lower, artesian aquifer to reduce the potential for a ''blowout''; and (3) develop a precise dewatering level control mechanism to insure a vertical gradient reversal did not result in cross-contamination. The plan was executed through a hydrogeologic investigation culminating with the design and implementation of a complex, multi-phased dual-aquifer dewatering system equipped with a state of the art monitoring network.

  15. Saving for dry days: Aquifer storage and recovery may help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 2 Saving for dry days Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 3 Aquifer storage and recovery may help With reoccurring droughts and growing population, Texas will always be looking for better ways to save or use water. Some water... suppliers in Texas are turning to aquifer storage and recovery. During the dry summer of 2008, the San Antonio Water System (SAWS) had enough assets in its ?bank? (of water) to make with- drawals to meet the needs of its customers. The water bank...

  16. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

  17. An evaluation of aquifer intercommunication between the unconfined and Rattlesnake Ridge aquifers on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, E.J.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study of a portion of the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer (confined aquifer) that lies beneath the B Pond - Gable Mountain Pond area of the Hanford Site. The purpose was to determine the extent of intercommunication between the unconfined aquifer and the uppermost regionally extensive confined aquifer, referred to as the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer. Hydraulic head data and chemical data were collected from the ground water in the study area during December 1986. The hydraulic head data were used to determine the effects caused by water discharged to the ground from B Pond on both the water table of the unconfined aquifer and the potentiometric surface of the confined aquifer. The chemical data were collected to determine the extent of chemical constituents migrating from the unconfined aquifer to the confined aquifer. Analysis of chemical constituents in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer demonstrated that communication between the unconfined and confined aquifers had occurred. However, the levels of contaminants found in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer during this study were below the DOE Derived Concentration Guides.

  18. Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  20. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  1. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  2. TWO-DIMENSIONAL REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING OF CO2 INJECTION IN A SALINE AQUIFER AT THE SLEIPNER SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    systems are under consideration for CO2 storage in the subsurface (Holloway, 1997), (i) depleted oil or gas reservoirs, (ii) unmineable coal beds and (iii) saline aquifers. Deep saline aquifers offer) dissolution trapping, which represents CO2 dissolved in the liquid phase (oil or brine), and (iii) mineral

  3. Water conservation reserve program alternatives for the southern Ogallala aquifer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Erin Alexis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The Ogallala Aquifer is a vast resource underlying parts of eight states. The southern portion of the Ogallala Aquifer is considered to be an exhaustible (more)

  4. Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids. Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids....

  5. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-Mathematical modeling; thermal energy storage; aquifers;

  6. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground...

  7. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the complex to be found in the aquifer are volatile organic contaminants - particularly carbon tetrachloride ("carbon tet"). The carbon tet found in the aquifer is attributed to...

  8. Reply to comments by Veling on"A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced Pressure Perturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-Aquitard System"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Veling (2010) pointed to 'a serious mistake' and 'mathematical inconsistency' in Zhou et al. (2009) because the dimensionless flow equations in Equation 4 (in terms of dimensionless hydraulic head rise in the aquifer and the aquitard) would give rise to additional terms when back converting to the groundwater flow equations, in the case that initial conditions for hydraulic head were spatially variable. He added, however, that the conclusions of the paper remain valid when uniform initial conditions are assumed. We accept this comment because we have indeed assumed uniform initial conditions in the system but failed to state this explicitly in the publication, partially because this assumption is very common in groundwater hydrology when deriving analytical and semi-analytical solutions. The same assumption was employed, for example, by Veling in Veling and Maas (2009), as stated 'For the ease of presentation we assume from here on that {phi}{sub i0} (r, z) ... are all equal to zero. An arbitrary initial function ... will complicate the solution, but not essentially'. We shall emphasize that with this assumption, our semi-analytical solutions and their derivations are correct.

  9. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  10. Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunison, Douglas Irvin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

  11. Modelling Bioremediation of Uranium Contaminated Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotter, Ben E G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide extraction, processing and storage have resulted in a legacy of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater aquifers worldwide. An emerging remediation technology for such sites is the in situ immobilisation of ...

  12. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

  13. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersB. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

  14. A new pseudo time for geopressured aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villegas, Mauricio Eduardo

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Fetkovich'ss method. In high, variable compressibility formations none of these methods is theoretically correct. To properly estimate water influx from an aquifer in a highly compressible formation we need (1) a solution to the governing nonlinear...A NEW PSEUDO TIME FOR GEOPRESSURED AQUIFERS A Thesis by MAURICIO EDUARDO VILLEGAS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992...

  15. Aquitard control of stream-aquifer interaction and flow to a horizontal well in coastal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dongmin

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    from aquitard as a source term inside the aquifer which is called Hantushâ??s assumption (1964), we linked flows in aquitard and aquifer by the idea of continuity of flux and drawdown. The result in this chapter is compared with that of Zhan and Park...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer management project Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: aquifer management project Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Seymour Aquifer Water Quality The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer in Northwest Central Texas and the...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic uranium-contaminated aquifer Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (19% of wells) and Other (14% of wells) aquifers and none in the Ogallala-N aquifer. Uranium... ... 69...

  18. A Lumped Parameter Model for the Edwards Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anaya, Roberto; Wanakule, Nisai

    A lumped parameter model has been developed to simulate monthly water levels and spring flows in the Edwards Aquifer. It is less complex and easier to use than the existing complex finite difference models for the Edwards Aquifer. The lumped...

  19. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~rmal1980), 'I'hermal energy storage? in a confined aquifer--al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-

  20. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Hickory Sandstone Aquifer near Camp Air in northern Mason and southern McCulloch counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaney, Cynthia Daphine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hickory Sandstone is the primary source of ground water for the Western Uano Region of Central Texas. Irrigation from the Hickory Aquifer has been intensive for the past 15 years. Available hydrogeologic data for development of a management model... are very limited. Localized detailed studies of the spatial and temporal variations within the aquifer were conducted to provide data for characterization of the ground-water flow system. Field investigations of the Hickory Sandstone included geologic...

  1. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas ?a, storage in aquifers in the midwestern U.S states of Illinois and Indiana and salt caverns

  2. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  3. Radon Concern in the Hickory Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Amanda

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Hickory Aquifer's groundwater poses health risks for residents in the area. Radon is a natural, radioactive gas that may be found indoors in air or drinking water. Radon is the decay product of radium, so radon indi- rectly reflects the presence... of radium. Radon in groundwater occurs from the decay of radium both within the aquifer host rock and in the groundwater itself. It does not react chemically with either, however, because it is a noble or inert gas. About 1 percent to 2 percent...

  4. Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Robert

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

  5. Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchliya, Abhishek

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers...

  6. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability. Preliminary simulation results show good agreement between classical instability solutions and numerical predictions of finger growth and spacing obtained using different gas/liquid viscosity ratios, relative permeability and capillary pressure models. Further studies are recommended to validate these results over a broader range of conditions.

  7. Aquifer characterization and groundwater modeling in support of remedial actions at the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carman, J.D. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., St. Charles, MO (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer characterization studies were performed to develop a hydrogeologic understanding of an unconfined shallow aquifer at the Weldon Spring site west of St. Louis, Missouri. The 88-ha site became contaminated because of uranium and thorium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1960s. Slug and pumping tests provided valuable information on the lateral distribution of hydraulic conductivities, and packer tests and lithologic information were used to determine zones of contrasting hydrologic properties within the aquifer. A three-dimensional, finite- element groundwater flow model was developed and used to simulate the shallow groundwater flow system at the site. The results of this study show that groundwater flow through the system is predominantly controlled by a zone of fracturing and weathering in the upper portion of the limestone aquifer. The groundwater flow model, developed and calibrated from field investigations, improved the understanding of the hydrogeology and supported decisions regarding remedial actions at the site. The results of this study illustrate the value, in support of remedial actions, of combining field investigations with numerical modeling to develop an improved understanding of the hydrogeology at the site.

  8. Aquifer Structure Identification Using Stochastic Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harp, Dylan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wolfsberg, Andrew V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a stochastic inverse method for aquifer structure identification using sparse geophysical and hydraulic response data. The method is based on updating structure parameters from a transition probability model to iteratively modify the aquifer structure and parameter zonation. The method is extended to the adaptive parameterization of facies hydraulic parameters by including these parameters as optimization variables. The stochastic nature of the statistical structure parameters leads to nonconvex objective functions. A multi-method genetically adaptive evolutionary approach (AMALGAM-SO) was selected to perform the inversion given its search capabilities. Results are obtained as a probabilistic assessment of facies distribution based on indicator cokriging simulation of the optimized structural parameters. The method is illustrated by estimating the structure and facies hydraulic parameters of a synthetic example with a transient hydraulic response.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer testing recommendations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of... of estimated aquifer parameters is demonstrated by analysing the pumping test data at Cottam in the Nottingham... the spatial distribution of aquifer properties and...

  11. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.Mathematical modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers,of Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in

  12. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  13. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  14. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencethe Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed by

  15. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer column studies Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the site... of the Aquifer-Test Site The aquifer at the study site is composed of unconsolidated glacial outwash sediments... ESTIMATION OF HYDRAULIC PARAMETERS FROM AN UNCONFINED...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer paris basin Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on which potential site(s) in deep saline aquifers are investigated. KKeeyywwoorrddss:: CO2... geological storage; Site selection; Saline aquifer; Paris Basin; PICOREF I....

  18. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  19. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  20. Characterizing aquifer heterogeneity using hydraulic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wachter, Brian James

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    such as sands and gravels because these materials drain the water so quickly. The K value is highly localized and only represents the portion of the aquifer in which the core was taken. When working with unconsolidated sediments, care must be taken to pack...?????. .?????.1 17 vi LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Map of field site and layout of wells used in study (figure modified from Engard, 2006). Figure 2: MOG setup for tomography study. Figure 3: Packed versus unpacked response in an observation well...

  1. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  2. Investigation of Possible Extra ~Recharge During Pumping in Nottinghant .Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Investigation of Possible Extra ~Recharge During Pumping in Nottinghant .Aquifer by Jiu J. Jiaoa Abstract Approaches to investigate possible recharge during a pumping test period are demonstrated by analyzing the pumping test data from the Nottingham aquifer, UK. The pumping lasted more than 200 days

  3. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  4. Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

  5. Changes in sources and storage in a karst aquifer during a transition from drought to wet conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    , and used inverse geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) to con- strain controls on groundwater compositions during more storage. ? 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Karst groundwater systems Keywords: Karst Drought Telogenetic Edwards aquifer Groundwater Texas s u m m a r y Understanding

  6. Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. #31;e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however, contains nitrate levels... are working on ways to manage the nitrate levels in this aquifer. Tracking the source Nitrates in groundwater can come from runo#27;, fertilizer use, leaks from septic tanks, sewage and erosion of natural deposits, according to the U.S. Environmental...

  7. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) second Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 5-year review (DOEIRL-2006-20, The Second CERCLA Five-Year Review Report for the Hanford Site) set a milestone to conduct an investigation of deep hexavalent chromium contamination in the sediments of the Ringold upper mud (RUM) unit, which underlies the unconfined aquifer in the 100-H Area. The 5-year review noted that groundwater samples from one deep well extending below the aquitard (i.e., RUM) exceeded both the groundwater standard of 48 parts per billion (ppb) (Ecology Publication 94-06, Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Statute and Regulation) and the federal drinking water standard of 100 {mu}g/L for hexavalent chromium. The extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in this zone is not well understood. Action 12-1 from the 5-year review is to perform additional characterization of the aquifer below the initial aquitard. Field characterization and aquifer testing were performed in the Hanford Site's 100-H Area to address this milestone. The aquifer tests were conducted to gather data to answer several fundamental questions regarding the presence of the hexavalent chromium in the deep sediments of the RUM and to determine the extent and magnitude of deeper contamination. The pumping tests were performed in accordance with the Description of Work for Aquifer Testing in Support of the 100-H Deep Chromium Investigation (SGW-41302). The specific objectives for the series of tests were as follows: (1) Evaluate the sustainable production of the subject wells using step-drawdown and constant-rate pumping tests. (2) Collect water-level data to evaluate the degree of hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined (upper) aquifer (natural or induced along the well casing). (3) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined permeable layer within the RUM.; (4) Collect time-series groundwater samples during testing to evaluate the extent and persistence of hexavalent chromium in the deeper zones. Use data collected to refine the current conceptual model for the 100-H Area unconfined aquifer and the RUM in this area. (5) Evaluate the concentration 'rebound' in the unconfined aquifer of hexavalent chromium and the contaminants of concern during shutdown of the extraction wells. Measure co-contaminants at the beginning, middle, and end of each pumping test. The RUM is generally considered an aquitard in the 100-HR-3 OU; however, several water-bearing sand layers are present that are confined within the RUM. The current hydrogeologic model for the 100-H Area aquifer system portrays the RUM as an aquitard layer that underlies the unconfined aquifer, which may contain permeable zones, stringers, or layers. These permeable zones may provide pathways for chromium to migrate deeper into the RUM under certain hydrogeologic conditions. One condition may be the discharge of large volumes of cooling water that occurred near the former H Reactor, which caused a mound of groundwater to form 4.9 to 10.1 m (16 to 33 ft) above the natural water table. The cooling water reportedly contained 1 to 2 mglL of hexavalent chromium for corrosion prevention. Three alternate hypotheses for the introduction of hexavalent chromium into the RUM are as follows: (1) Local groundwater with higher concentrations of hexavalent chromium originating from reactor operations at H Reactor was driven by high heads from groundwater mounding in the unconfined aquifer into the RUM via permeable pathways in the upper surface of the RUM. (2) Local groundwater with hexavalent chromium was introduced from the unconfined aquifer via well boreholes, either during drilling or as a result of poor well construction, allowing hydraulic communication between the unconfined aquifer and the RUM. (3) Hexavalent chromium migrated across the Hom area within the more permeable zones of the RUM. The three wells used for the aquifer pumping tests (199-H3-2C, 199-H4-12C, and 199-H4-15CS) exhibit hexavalent chromium contamination in confined aqu

  8. Seawater circulation in coastal aquifers : processes and impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karam, Hanan Nadim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the subterranean domain of chemical cycling in coastal oceans abutting permeable aquifers, where transport through sediments is dominated by advection, rather than diffusion. We investigate the mechanisms ...

  9. Migration and trapping of CO? in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, Christopher William

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigation of climate change requires a reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C0 2) emissions. One promising tool for achieving this is the large-scale injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers. After injection, upward ...

  10. Analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs using a computer-oriented approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flumerfelt, Raymond William

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new computer-oriented approach for analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs incorporates both geological and historical pressure data to determine original hydrocarbons-in-place and to forecast production. This new approach does not rely entirely...

  11. aquifer colombia estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    availability of ground water and the impact of withdrawals on existing users and the environment Sand-And-Gravel Aquifer Santa; Christopher J. Richards 33 Water temperature as a...

  12. Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Abstract This study...

  13. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1971, storage of Solar Energy in a Bandy- Gravel Ground. 2.Aquifer Storage of Heated Water: A Field Experuuent. GroundStorage of Heated Water: Part II - Numerical Simulation of Field Results. Ground

  14. Analysis of pressure data with the aquifer influence function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicks, Theodore D

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE DATA WITH THE AQUIFER INFllJENCE FUNCTION A Thesis by THEODORE D. EICKS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&N University in partial fulfillment of the requirenmts for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... ~r 1989 Major subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE DATA WITH THE AQUIFER INFIIJENCE FUNCTION A Thesis by Approved as to style and content by: R. A. Startzman (Member) T. G. Rozgonyi (Member) W D. Von nten (Head of troleum...

  15. Reduction of trichloroethylene in a model aquifer with methanotrophic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Duane Dee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA A Thesis by Duane Dee Hicks Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for thc degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTEPslA A Thesis by Duane Dec Hicks Approved as to style and content by Bill Batchclor (Chair of Committee...

  16. Methanogens in Central Texas aquifers: a microbiological and molecular study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacRae, Martha Jean Davies

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHANOGENS IN CENTRAL TEXAS AQUIFERS: A MICROBIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR STUDY A Thesis by MARTHA JEAN DAVIES MACRAE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillmen of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Oceanography METHANOGENS IN CENTRAL TEXAS AQUIFERS: A MICROBIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR STUDY A Thesis by MARTHA JEAN DAVIES MACRAE Approved as to style and content by: James W. Ammerman (Chair...

  17. Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, David Bryan

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979... ABSTRACT Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Groundwater Aquifers. (December 1979) David Bryan Reed, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald L. Reddell Solar energy is a promising alternate energy source for space heat...

  18. Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, Christine

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

  19. OPTIMAL GEOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE DISPOSAL IN SALINE AQUIFERS IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan D. Hovorka

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

  20. Geohydrology of bedrock aquifers in the Northern Great Plains in parts of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downey, J.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of energy-related resources in the northern Great Plains of the US will require large quantities of ground water. Because Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming are semiarid, the primary local sources of nonappropriated water are the deep bedrock aquifers of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age. The US Geological Survey undertook a 4-year interdisciplinary study that has culminated in a digital-simulation model of the regional flow system and incorporates the results of geochemical, hydrologic, and geologic studies. Rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age form at least five artesian aquifers that are recharged in the mountainous areas of Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming. The aquifers extend for more than 600 mi to discharge areas in the northeastern part of North Dakota and in Manitoba. In general, the direction of flow in each aquifer is east to northeast, but flow is deflected to the north and south around the Williston basin. Flow through the Williston basin is restricted because of brine (200,000-350,000 mg/l), halite beds, geologic structures, and decreased permeability of rocks in the deeper parts of the basin. Fracture systems and lineaments transverse the entire area and act either as conduits or as barriers to ground-water flow, depending on their hydrogeologic and geochemical history. Vertical leakage from the aquifers is restricted by shale with low permeability, by halite beds, and by stratigraphic traps or low-permeability zones associated with petroleum accumulations. However, interaquifer leakage appears to occur through and along some of the major lineaments and fractures. Interaquifer leakage may be a major consideration in determining the quality of water produced from wells.

  1. Aquifer test at Comore Loma No. 4, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbell, J.M.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aquifer test was conducted at Comore Loma Well {number_sign}4 to determine the aquifer hydraulic characteristics at this location on July 11 and 12, 1991. Water was withdrawn from Comore Loma Well {number_sign}4 at approximately 850 gallons per minute for 8 hours while monitoring the water level in the plumping well and an observation well 930 ft away. The pumped well showed over 12 ft of drawdown with no discernable drawdown in the observation well. The drawdown in the pumped well was nearly instantaneous, showing little additional drawdown after 1 minute. The transmissivity was calculated to be approximately 140,000 ft{sup 2}/day using the Jacob solution. This gives a hydraulic conductivity of 1300 ft/day for the 110 ft interval tested. The high transmissivity and geologic setting suggest the aquifer may in part produce water from the Snake River Plain aquifer. However, the warm water temperature (71{degrees}F) indicates the presence of a geothermal source typical of the foothills aquifer. The storage coefficient could not be calculated since no water level decline was detected in the observation well.

  2. Analysis of Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, M.; Rago, F.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Peters, E.; Dorfman, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer, located southeast of Lake Charles, Louisiana, is modeled by a two-dimensional geopressured-geothermal simulator. This aquifer is a sandstone within the Frio formation at depths between 15,000 to 15,640 ft with a net porous thickness of 250 ft, a calculated in-situ permeability (from drawdown data) of 17 md, an estimated porosity of 24%, a uniaxial compaction coefficient of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ psi/sup -1/ and a solution gas-water ratio of 11 SCF/STB all at the initial reservoir pressure of 12,060 psi. These parameters are typically pressure sensitive in geopressured-geothermal aquifers and are critically important to aquifer performance. Several simulation experiments are conducted which investigate the effects of varying initial values for these parameters with the experimentally determined values as means. The simulations give both optimistic and pessimistic expectations for aquifer performance. The expected life of the geopressured-geothermal well is reported for each simulation.

  3. The 1997 Irrigation Suspension Program for the Edwards Aquifer: Evaluation and Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keplinger, Keith O.; McCarl, Bruce A.

    (drought) Management Rules. The Aquifer region, however, experienced a wet Spring in 1997, so that even irrigators not enrolled in the program applied little or no irrigation water. If conditions were dry in Spring 1997, aquifer simulation results indicate...

  4. Estimation of Recharge to the Middle Trinity Aquifer of Central Texas Using Water-Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Marshall; Chad, Thomas; Burch, John; Creutzburg, Brian; Lambert, Lance

    to the aquifer for 1999 and 2000. As part of the investigation, the Edwards Aquifer Research & Data Center (EARDC) staff worked with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) and local groundwater conservation districts to install five new recording well monitors...

  5. Geochemical modeling of an aquifer storage and recovery project in Union County, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ni, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sparta aquifer in Union County, Arkansas has served as an important potable water supply to the public and industrial sectors in the area. However, increasing water demand and sustained heavy pumping from the aquifer ...

  6. A Farm-Level Evaluation of Agricultural Profit and Ground Water Quality: Texas Seymour Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Manzoor; Lacewell, Ronald D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Ozuna, Teofilo Jr.; Benson, Verel W.; Harris, Billy L.; Dyke, Paul T.

    The Seymour Aquifer of north-central Texas is known to have elevated levels of nitrates. The design of economically sound policies for reducing agriculture's nitrate contribution to the aquifer suggests a need to evaluate alternative management...

  7. Using GIS Tainted Glasses to Help Subdivide the Ogallala/High Plains Aquifer in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Brownie

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using GIS Tainted Glasses to Help Subdivide the Ogallala/High Plains Aquifer Brownie Wilson Geohydrology Section Kansas Geological Survey University of Kansas 12th Annual GIS Day @ KU November 20, 2013 The High Plains Aquifer Kansas Geological...

  8. Modeling the High Plains Aquifer's Response to Land Use and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermyer, Reuben

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Plains Aquifer is extremely important to the economic life of Kansas and the surrounding states, but water is being withdrawn from the aquifer much faster than it is being recharged. Due to the importance of ...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer background study Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactive Summary: . In our ongoing study of the transport of bacteria through an unconsolidated sandy aquifer in the Coastal... of the aquifer was 16.2 molg, a 30% reduction...

  10. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C.F. , 1980, "Aquifer Thermal Energy - Parameter Study" (infrom the Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No.studies in aquifer thermal energy , Presented at the ~~~~~~~

  11. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems, inTwin City district cogeneration system, in Proceedings,proposed system, based on cogeneration of power and heat by

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxic aquifer slurries Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    groundwater and aquifer particles from Bangladesh, India, Vietnam, and Nepal Summary: 1 Comparison of arsenic concentrations in simultaneously-collected...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer recharge stage Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geological Survey, National Research Program Collection: Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 52 Large sedimentary aquifer...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer microbial community Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that sustains microbial communities capable... Biogeochemical Dynamics: Controlling Uranium Mobility and Bioremediation in Contaminated Aquifers... ) at Rifle, Colorado, is a...

  15. Singlehole GPR reflection imaging of solute transport in a granitic aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Singlehole GPR reflection imaging of solute transport in a granitic aquifer Caroline Dorn,1 Niklas mmaperture fractures. A dipole tracer test was performed in a granitic aquifer by injecting a saline solution of solute transport in a granitic aquifer, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L08401, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL047152. 1

  16. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  17. Interactions and Implications of a Collector Well with a River in an Unconfined Aquifer with Regional Background Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dugat, William D., IV

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ; Steward, 1999; Zhan, 1999; Zhan and Cao, 2000]. These wells are often placed near or under rivers, where they collect water from both the surface and aquifer that is naturally filtered through low permeability riverbank sediments. Seines et al. [1994... various conditions [Schafer, 1996; Zhan, 1999; Steward, 1999; Zhan and Cao, 2000; Stewart and Jin, 2001]. Radial collector wells are complex fluid collection systems that induce intricate flow dynamics as a result of their pumping because...

  18. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Will Take Advantage of Abundant Water in Shallow Aquifer. Demonstrate Low Temperature GSHP System Design. Provides a Baseline for Local Industrial Geothermal Project Costs and Benefits.

  19. Seymour Aquifer Water Quality Improvement Project Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sij, J.; Morgan, C.; Belew, M.; Jones, D.; Wagner, K.

    , Wilbarger, and Fisher counties exceeded the federal safe drinking water standard (10 mg/L NO3-N). This high concentration is a concern because although 90% of the water pumped from the aquifer is used for irrigation, it is also used as a municipal water...

  20. Ground-water hydraulics of the deep-basin brine aquifer, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin (Texas Panhandle) underlies thick Permian bedded evaporites that are being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste isolation repository. Potentiometric surface maps of 5 units of the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer were drawn using drill-stem test (DST) pressure data, which were analyzed by a geostatistical technique (kriging) to smooth the large variation in the data. The potentiometric surface maps indicate that the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer could be conceptually modeled as 5 aquifer units; a Lower Permian (Wolfcamp) aquifer, upper and lower Pennsylvanian aquifers, a pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer, and a Pennsylvanian to Wolfcampian granite-wash aquifer. The hydraulic head maps indicate that ground-water flow in each of the units is west to east with a minor northerly component near the Amarillo Uplift, the northern structural boundary of the basin. The Wolfcamp potentiometric surface indicates the strongest component of northerly flow. Inferred flow direction in Pennsylvanian aquifers is easterly, and in the pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer near its pinch-out in the basin center, flow is inferred to be to the north. In the granite-wash aquifer the inferred flow direction is east across the northern edge of the basin and southeast along the Amarillo Uplift.

  1. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key to Large-Scale Cogeneration?" Public Power, v, 35, no.Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems,"Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems, tion from

  2. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. [Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature [>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)] aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

  3. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

  4. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Technical and economic evaluation' of methods; sitefrom economic and systems analyses to evaluation and designeconomic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable sites, and evaluation

  6. Hydrogeophysical methods for analyzing aquifer storage and recovery systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsley, B.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1995. Hydrogeology of the Dammam formation in Umm GudairGeology and hydrogeology of the Dammam formation in Kuwait.freshwater storage in the Dammam formation, Kuwait. Arabian

  7. aquifer system fy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    funds. The 961 million in direct Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth 288 FY 2009 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report EDUCATION; SAFETY, CODES AND STANDARDS; AND...

  8. Geothermal development of the Madison group aquifer: a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geothermal well has been drilled at the St. Mary's Hospital in Pierre, South Dakota. The well is 2176 feet deep and artesian flows 375 gpm at 106/sup 0/F. The well is producing fluids from the Mississippian Madison Group, a sequence of carbonate rocks deposited over several western states. The project was funded to demonstrate the goethermal potential of this widespread aquifer. This case study describes the development of the project through geology, drilling, stimulation, and testing.

  9. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III, "Man-made Geothermal Energy," presented at MiamiA.C.Meyers III; "Manmade Geothermal Energy", Proc. of MiamiBlack is director of Geothermal Energy Systems, Fox Parry is

  10. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Switzerland, district heating accounts for 50% of totalproposed hot-water district heating system in the St. Paul/an industrial in a district heating Washington Market and

  11. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Thermal Energy Energy Sources o Solar Heat o Winter Coldusual Solar Energy System which uses only a heat source andsources and heat sinks not found anywhere else. Furthermore even where Solar energy

  12. The use of a semi-analytical method for matching aquifer influence functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Sheng

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of water-drive gas reservoirs. The method is suitable for hand calculation. Fetkovich ", in 1971, presented an approach that utilizes the "stabilized", or pseudosteady-state aquifer productivity index and an aquifer material balance to represent...THE USE OF A SEMI-ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR MATCHING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by SHENG DING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer thermal energy Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation Research Collection: Fossil Fuels 3 AQUIFER BIOTHERMOREMEDIATION USING HEAT PUMPS: SOUND THEORETICAL BASIS AND RESULTS ON THERMAL, GEOCHEMICAL AND Summary: the...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifers receiving livestock Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approxi- mately 80% of its recharge through losing (influent) streams... legal, political, and economic interests. Much attention is focused on the Edwards aquifer, which is...

  15. Sensitivity analysis of aquifer parameter estimations based on the Laplace equation with linearized boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    boundary conditions Jozsef Szilagyi Conservation and Survey Division, University of Nebraska analysis Citation: Szilagyi, J., Sensitivity analysis of aquifer parameter estimations based on the Laplace

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer sediment reactors Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sediment reactors Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquifer sediment reactors Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Theme 1. Exposure:...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer groundwater brazil Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of rainfall. The karst aquifers on Barbados, Guam and Puerto Rico have similar rainwater and groundwater... by groundwater residence times of years to tens of years....

  18. Feasibility of Aquifer Storage Recovery for the Mustang, Oklahoma Well Field.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Krishna E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The purpose of this study was to determine the economic and geochemical feasibility of utilizing aquifer storage recovery (ASR) technology to store water in the (more)

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer bitter lakes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    paths for fluid movement in fractured-rock aquifers. Mapping rock types... , the interconnectivity of fractures, and frac- ture length with the availability of water....

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer stable isotopes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: aquifer stable isotopes Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Treated domestic wastewater traditionally has been discharged offshore in coastal areas via ocean outfalls. In...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifers geochemical results Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: aquifers geochemical results Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Treated domestic wastewater traditionally has been discharged offshore in coastal areas via ocean outfalls. In...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer subtropical africa Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data source: USDA NASS 12;Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer Shallow, unconsolidated sand Source: Texas A&M University, Spatial Sciences Laboratory Collection:...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer protection studies Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactive Summary: . In our ongoing study of the transport of bacteria through an unconsolidated sandy aquifer in the Coastal... 39 Two different investigations of shallow sandy...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic aquifer column Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic aquifer column Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic...

  5. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2006-November 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the third year of system operation, from December 1, 2006, until November 30, 2007. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation and provides some comparisons with system performance in previous years. The performance of the groundwater restoration systems at Utica in earlier years was summarized in greater detail previously (Argonne 2005, 2006).

  6. Subsurface Geology of Arsenic-Bearing Permian Sedimentary Rocks in the Garber-Wellington Interval of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer, Cleveland County, Oklahoma.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, Ben Nicholas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The Central Oklahoma Aquifer is an important source of drinking water in central Oklahoma. The major formations making up the aquifer, the Garber Sandstone and (more)

  7. Critical analysis of plume containment modeling in a thin heterogeneous unconfined aquifer: application to a bulk fuel storage terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia, Karl Edward

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reported hydrocarbon contamination and subsequent consultant work at a bulk fuel storage terminal has instigated the need to critically analyze modeling techniques in thin, heterogeneous, unconfined aquifers. This study provides an aquifer...

  8. Storage capacity and injection rate estimates for CO? sequestration in deep saline aquifers in the conterminous United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A promising method to mitigate global warming is injecting CO? into deep saline aquifers. In order to ensure the safety of this method, it is necessary to understand how much CO? can be injected into an aquifer and at what ...

  9. Improving land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model better than a deeper soil profile?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer modelAL. : LAND-SURFACE MODEL HYDROLOGY Changnon, S. , et al. (land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model

  10. Position paper on the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Uranium Mill Tailings Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the evaluation of the potential applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer underlying the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah. There are two goals for this evaluation: provide the landowner with information to make an early qualitative decision on the possible use of the Vitro property, and evaluate the proposed application of supplemental standards as the ground water compliance strategy at the site. Justification of supplemental standards is based on the contention that the uppermost aquifer is of limited use due to wide-spread ambient contamination not related to the previous site processing activities. In support of the above, this report discusses the site conceptual model for the uppermost aquifer and related hydrogeological systems and establishes regional and local background water quality. This information is used to determine the extent of site-related and ambient contamination. A risk-based evaluation of the contaminants` effects on current and projected land uses is also provided. Reports of regional and local studies and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site investigations provided the basis for the conceptual model and established background ground water quality. In addition, a limited field effort (4 through 28 March 1996) was conducted to supplement existing data, particularly addressing the extent of contamination in the northwestern portion of the Vitro site and site background ground water quality. Results of the field investigation were particularly useful in refining the conceptual site model. This was important in light of the varied ground water quality within the uppermost aquifer. Finally, this report provides a critical evaluation, along with the related uncertainties, of the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Salt Lake City Vitro processing site.

  11. Determining the Fate of Herbicides in the Ogallala Aquifer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, A. D.; Wiese, A. F.; Jones, O. R.; Mathers, A. C.

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer A. D. SCHNEIDER, A. F. WIESE, 0. R. JONES AND A. C. M.~THERS* 11 , I jvi~i\\ \\~!~llI~llR~ ARE RECHARGED by nat~~ral or arti- ,, , iiti;~l jlrocesses, they may receive runoff from [I. , :iillltar;~l lands. In the Texas High Plains, dual- [, rp..., if needed. Nitrate and nitrite were cleterminetl by tl,c ,i~ mated, colormetric procedures of Kamphake, H.II~I~ - and Cohen (5). Herbicides in the water samples were dete~~ll~~ with a Barber-Coleman Moclel 5360 gas chromatoy equipped with a radium 226...

  12. Application of the decline curve method to aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potnis, Girish Vijay

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    k = value of pointin time = value of point in time n = value of point in time 39 REFERENCES 1. Fetkovich, M. J. : "Decline Curve Analysis Using Type Curves, " JPT (June 1980) 1065-1077. 2. Havlena, D. and Odeh, A. S. : "The Material Balance...APPLICATION OF THE DECLINE CURVE METHOD TO AQUIFERS A Thesis by GIRISH VIJAY POTNIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ADAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December...

  13. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  14. The Influence of Topology on Hydraulic Conductivity in a Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Influence of Topology on Hydraulic Conductivity in a Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer by Roger H. Morin1 and tracer testing was conducted in a single well that penetrated a sand-and-gravel aquifer at the U such as pore geometry and connectivity, and grain size and packing configuration in regulating fluid flow

  15. 1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP) anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailhac, Pascal

    1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP with the geometry of the water table. It follows that 11 SP measurements can be used to estimate aquifer hydraulic and found that we 14 are able to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and the depth 15 and the thickness

  16. Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high-conductivity aquifer scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high for partially-penetrating slug tests in unconfined aquifers (Malama et al., in press) provides a semi the ultimate goal of determining aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity K and specific storage Ss

  17. A Fractal Interpretation of Controlled-Source Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey Data Seco Creek, Edwards Aquifer, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, Kathryn T.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards aquifer lies in the structurally complex Balcones fault zone and supplies water to the growing city of San Antonio. To ensure that future demands for water are met, the hydrological and geophysical properties of the aquifer must be well...

  18. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards., 2007, Characterizing hydraulic properties and ground-water chemistry in fractured-rock aquifers: A user

  19. Limiting Pumping from the Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Investigation of Proposals, Water Markets and Springflow Guarantees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Limiting Pumping from the Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Investigation of Proposals, Water Markets for pumping and springflow which in turn provides water for recreation and habitat for several endangered species. A management authority is charged with aquifer management and is mandated to reduce pumping

  20. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 3. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains two appendices to the main report. The first lists the aquifers in the 12 geographic regions of the USA and characterizes each as containing sands and gravels or limestones or volcanic rock. The second appendix tabulates the hydrologic characteristics of each aquifer. (LCL)

  1. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  2. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  3. Thermal anomalies indicate preferential flow along faults in unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bense, Victor

    Thermal anomalies indicate preferential flow along faults in unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers V in unconsolidated siliciclastic aquifers off-set by normal-faults in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany. High plane. Most current models of fault hydrology in unconsolidated sedimentary sequences assume faults

  4. Effect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    ) in deep saline aquifers is considered one of the most effective methods for carbon sequestration., 48, W09539, doi:10.1029/2012WR011939.* 1. Introduction [2] Carbon sequestration in deep salineEffect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

  5. Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Water Distribution System: A Systems Modeling Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, John

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a water distribution system from groundwater supply, the bulk of energy consumption is expended at pump stations. These pumps pressurize the water and transport it from the aquifer to the distribution system and to elevated storage tanks. Each...

  6. MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH restricted to: (i) supercritical CO2 injection and storage within the Dogger reservoir aquifer, (ii) CO2 the cement-rock formation interface in the abandoned well (iii) impacts on the Albian aquifer water quality

  7. Temporal and spatial scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from a frequency domain analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Temporal and spatial scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from investigate the hydraulic response to recharge of a fractured aquifer, using a frequency domain approach scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from a frequency domain analysis

  8. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers. The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module, we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary parasitic reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, Development of a Rock Mechanical Module, we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species, we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes, We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

  9. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2005-November 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the second year of system operation, from December 1, 2005, until November 31, 2006. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  10. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2007-November 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fourth year of system operation, from December 1, 2007, until November 30, 2008. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3). The report then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated maintenance, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  11. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

  12. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2008-November 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fifth year of system operation, from December 1, 2008, until November 30, 2009. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  13. Seismic reflection imaging of a geothermal aquifer in an urban setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liberty, L. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface] [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic reflection survey that was conducted in downtown Boise, Idaho, to help city planners site a new well for injection of spent geothermal water illustrates some methods to safely and successfully employ a seismic reflection survey in an urban setting. The objective of the seismic survey was to estimate the depth and continuity of a basalt and rhyolite volcanic sequence. Well siting was based on geothermal aquifer depth, location of interpreted faults, projected thermal impact of injection on existing wells, surface pipe extension costs, and public land availability. Seismic acquisition tests and careful processing were used to ensure high-quality data while minimizing the potential for damage along city streets. A video camera placed in a sewer and a blast vibration monitor were used to confirm that energy from the seismic source (a 75-in{sup 3} land air gun) did not damage nearby buildings, street surfaces, or buried utilities along the survey lines. Walkaway seismic tests were also used to compare signal quality of the air-gun source to an explosive source for imaging targets up to 800 m depth. These tests show less signal bandwidth from the air-gun source compared to the buried explosive source, but the air-gun signal quality was adequate to meet imaging objectives. Seismic reflection results show that the top of this rhyolite/basalt sequence dips ({approximately}8--1{degree}) southwest away from the Boise foothills at depths of 200 to 800 m. Seismic methods enabled interpretation of aquifer depths along the profiles and located fault zones where injected water may encounter fracture permeability and optimally benefit the existing producing system. The acquisition and processing techniques used to locate the Boise injection well may succeed for other hydrogeologic and environmental studies in urban settings.

  14. Summary of first-year operations and performance of the Utica Aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands Restoration Project in October 2004-November 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the initial period of system operation, from October 29, 2004, until November 31, 2005. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the first year of operation.

  15. Short-and long-time behavior of aquifer drainage after slow and sudden recharge according to the linearized Laplace equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    not fully penetrate the aquifer, the solution still produces good results [Szilagyi, J. Sensitivity analysis

  16. Aquifer testing data package for 1993 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, L.C.

    1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The following aquifer testing data supported 1993 Interim Remedial Measure field work for the U-1 and U-2 crib area near the uranium technetium and nitrate plumes beneath the U Plant Aggregate Area. The purpose of aquifer testing was to fill in hydraulic conductivity data gaps in the western portion of 200 West Area and help refine the hydrogeologic conceptual model. This data package reports data collected in accordance with the description of work released in 1993 by L.C. Swanson, entitled Description of Work for the 200-UP-1 Aquifer Testing Activity. These data are analyzed in the document Aquifer Test Analysis Results for 1993 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit. Slug tests were conducted at 7 existing wells, and pumping tests were conducted at 2 of those same existing wells.

  17. Simulation Study of Heat Transportation in an Aquifer about Well-water-source Heat Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, X.; Liu, Y.; Yang, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of groundwater reinjection, pumping and heat transportation in an aquifer plays an important theoretical role in ensuring the stability of deep-well water reinjection and pumping as well as smooth reinjection. Based on the related...

  18. Regression Based Investigation of Pumping Limits and Springflow Within the Edwards Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Regression Based Investigation of Pumping Limits and Springflow Within the Edwards Aquifer K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 A Model to Study the Effects of Pumping Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Investigation of the Effects of Pumping Allocations on Springflow

  19. Geophysical Fault Mapping Using the Magnetic Method at Hickory Sandstone Aquifer, Llano Uplift, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Antonio Do Nascimento

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic study over a 95 m x 150 m area of the Hickory sandstone aquifer in central Texas was carried out as part of multitechnique geophysical investigation that included ground penetrating radar (GPR), electromagnetic (EM), seismic...

  20. Hydrologic and hydraulic assessment of artificial recharge in the Sparta Aquifer of Union County, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowby, Robert B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater pumping from the Sparta aquifer in Union County, Arkansas, has long exceeded natural recharge, threatening the regional water supply. An alternative water-supply project, completed in 2004, now provides treated ...

  1. BPA, electric co-op and irrigation district testing aquifer recharge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wednesday, April 4, 2012 CONTACT: Doug Johnson, 503-230-5840 or 503-230-5131 BPA, electric co-op and irrigation district testing aquifer recharge Dispatching recharge pumping...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer heterogeneity completion Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 What can be learned from sequential multi-well pumping tests in fracture-karst media? A case study in Zhangji, China Summary: -karst aquifers, they are...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenious quaternary aquifer Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zones, at higher elevations along the mountain... waters ascend from deep aquifers, a heat-flow value of 75 mWm2 (with a standard deviation of 23 mWm2 Source: Gvirtzman, Haim -...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aveiro quaternary aquifer Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zones, at higher elevations along the mountain... waters ascend from deep aquifers, a heat-flow value of 75 mWm2 (with a standard deviation of 23 mWm2 Source: Gvirtzman, Haim -...

  5. CO[subscript 2] migration in saline aquifers. Part 2. Capillary and solubility trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, C. W.

    The large-scale injection of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing atmospheric CO[subscript 2] emissions to mitigate climate change. An accurate assessment of the post-injection ...

  6. Simulation of microbial transport and carbon tetrachloride biodegradation in intermittently-fed aquifer columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of microbial transport and carbon tetrachloride biodegradation in intermittently associated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) biodegradation in laboratory aquifer columns operated with a pulsed Hydrology: Groundwater transport; KEYWORDS: biodegradation, carbon tetrachloride, microbial transport

  7. Physical and chemical effects of CO2 storage in saline aquifers of the southern North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Niklas

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most promising mitigation strategies for greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere is carbon capture and storage (CCS). Deep saline aquifers are seen as the most efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites, ...

  8. Seasonal dynamics in costal aquifers : investigation of submarine groundwater discharge through field measurements and numerical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Holly Anne, 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fresh and saline groundwater flowing from coastal aquifers into the ocean comprise submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). This outflow is an important pathway for the transport of nutrients and contaminants, and has ...

  9. STIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL AQUIFERS Paul Kruger and Henry J. Ramey, J r .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . STIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL AQUIFERS Paul Kruger and Henry J. Ramey, J r . Co o f Geothermal Formations . . . . . . . . 6 Table 2: Water Quali t y Constituents-Water Distribution Coefficients . . . . . . . . 62 Table 7: Gaseous Constituents i n Geothermal Fluids . . . . . . 64

  10. The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

  11. Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Rondall James

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

  12. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Diffusion of 14C into Nevada Test Site Carbonate Aquifer Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Hershey; William Howcroft; Paul W. Reimus

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of groundwater flow velocities at the Nevada Test Site is important since groundwater is the principal transport medium of underground radionuclides. However, 14C-based groundwater velocities in the carbonate aquifers of the Nevada Test Site are several orders of magnitude slower than velocities derived from the Underground Test Area regional numerical model. This discrepancy has been attributed to the loss or retardation of 14C from groundwater into the surrounding aquifer matrix making 14C-based groundwater ages appear much older. Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the retardation of 14C in the carbonate aquifers at the Nevada Test Site. Three sets of experiments were conducted evaluating the diffusion of 14C into the carbonate aquifer matrix, adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the pore surfaces of the carbonate matrix, and adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the fracture surfaces of the carbonate aquifer. Experimental results a nd published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities from the Lower Carbonate Aquifer were applied to a 14C retardation model. The model produced an extremely wide range of retardation factors because of the wide range of published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities (over three orders of magnitude). Large retardation factors suggest that groundwater with very little measured 14C activity may actually be very young if matrix porosity is large relative to the fracture porosity. Groundwater samples collected from highly fractured aquifers with large effective fracture porosities may have relatively small correction factors, while samples from aquifers with a few widely spaced fractures may have very large correction factors. These retardation factors were then used to calculate groundwater velocities from a proposed flow path at the Nevada Test Site. The upper end of the range of 14C correction factors estimated groundwater velocities that appear to be at least an order of magnitude too high compared to published velocities. The lower end of the range of 14C correction factors falls within the range of reported velocities. From these results, future experimental studies (both laboratory and field scale) to support 14C groundwater age dating should focus on obtaining better estimates of aquifer properties including matrix and fracture porosities.

  13. Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Approved as to style and content by: Chris pher C. Mathewson...

  14. Effect of sediment concentration on artificial well recharge in a fine sand aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Mohammed Ataur

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION ON ARTIFICIAL WELL RECHARGE IN A FINE SAND AQUIFER A Thesis By MD. ATAUR RAHMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1968 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering EFFECT OF SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION ON ARTIFICIAL WELL RECHARGE IN A FINE SAND AqUIFER A Thesis By MD. ATAUR RAHMAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ommitt ) ( a o...

  15. Effect of methane pulsation on methanotropic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in an in-situ model aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Ranjan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Technology Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Charlie G. Coble Trichloroethylene (TCE) which is used as a solvent in many industries is one of the most common contaminant of ground waters. TCE can be degraded by methanotrophic bacteria, along with other... heterotrophic organisms, into inorganic end products. An in situ model aquifer with six sampling zones was used to degrade TCE aerobically by stimulating a methanotrophic population. Three experiments were done on the aquifer. TCE concentration for all...

  16. Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2001-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

  17. Developing conservation plan for the Edwards Aquifer: Stakeholders reach consensus resolution to balance protection of endangered species and water use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Courtney

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall 2012 tx H2O 17 Story by Courtney Smith ] Comal and San Marcos springs are the only known habitats for eight federally listed threatened or endangered species. Photo courtesy of the Edwards Aquifer Authority. What does it take... Aquifer region of Texas achieved a milestone in a struggle that has lasted nearly six decades. Working together, participants in the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program (EARIP) developed a habitat conservation plan that will protect...

  18. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  19. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

  20. Colloid-facilitated transport of radium and thorium in the Memphis Aquifer, Memphis, Tennessee, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Vincent Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The significance of groundwater colloidal transport was examined in the context of the Memphis Aquifer (Memphis, Tennessee) in the vicinity of the Sheahan well field. (more)

  1. Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  2. Aquifer restoration at in-situ leach uranium mines: evidence for natural restoration processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.; Bell, N.E.; Martin, W.J.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments with aquifer sediments and leaching solution (lixiviant) from an in-situ leach uranium mine. The data from these laboratory experiments and information on the normal distribution of elements associated with roll-front uranium deposits provide evidence that natural processes can enhance restoration of aquifers affected by leach mining. Our experiments show that the concentration of uranium (U) in solution can decrease at least an order of magnitude (from 50 to less than 5 ppM U) due to reactions between the lixiviant and sediment, and that a uranium solid, possibly amorphous uranium dioxide, (UO/sub 2/), can limit the concentration of uranium in a solution in contact with reduced sediment. The concentrations of As, Se, and Mo in an oxidizing lixiviant should also decrease as a result of redox and precipitation reactions between the solution and sediment. The lixiviant concentrations of major anions (chloride and sulfate) other than carbonate were not affected by short-term (less than one week) contact with the aquifer sediments. This is also true of the total dissolved solids level of the solution. Consequently, we recommend that these solution parameters be used as indicators of an excursion of leaching solution from the leach field. Our experiments have shown that natural aquifer processes can affect the solution concentration of certain constituents. This effect should be considered when guidelines for aquifer restoration are established.

  3. Inducinga CO2 leak into ashallow aquifer (CO2FieldLab EUROGIA+ project): Monitoring the CO2 plume in groundwaters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (saline aquifer, depleted oil/gas reservoir), aquifers are ubiquitousin the overlying sedimentary pile in case of unwanted CO2leakages from a storage site. Independently from the nature of the reservoir

  4. Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation of a hydraulic barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - up in the storage reservoir. For some man-made leakages (e.g. abandoned well), and more importantlyGHGT-10 Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation emissions. Depleted oil and gas fields or saline aquifers are seen as possible storage reservoirs

  5. A comparison of recharge rates in aquifers of the United States based on groundwater-age data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    complete model-based methods. Keywords Groundwater age . Groundwater recharge/ water budget . USA Introduction Well-constrained water budgets are needed to assess groundwater availability and manage aquifersA comparison of recharge rates in aquifers of the United States based on groundwater-age data P. B

  6. Detections of MTBE in surficial and bedrock aquifers in New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grady, S.J. [Geological Survey, Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was detected in 24% of water samples collected from surficial and bedrock aquifers in areas of New England. MTBE was the most frequently detected volatile organic compound among the 60 volatile chemicals analyzed and was present in 33 of 133 wells sampled from July 1993 through September 1995. The median MTBE concentration measured in ground-water samples was 0.45 microgram per liter and concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 5.8 microgram per liter. The network of wells sampled for MTBE consisted of 103 monitoring wells screened in surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers and 30 domestic-supply wells in fractured crystalline bedrock aquifers. Seventy-seven percent of all MTBE detections were from 26 shallow monitoring wells screened in surficial aquifers. MTBE was detected in42% of monitoring wells in urban areas. In agricultural areas, MTBE was detected i 8% (2 of 24) of wells and was not detected in undeveloped areas. Sixty-two percent of the MTBE detections in surficial aquifers were from wells within 0.25 mile of gasoline stations or underground gasoline storage tanks; all but one of these wells were in Connecticut and Massachusetts, where reformulated gasoline is used. MTBE was detected in 23% of deep domestic-supply wells that tapped fractured bedrock aquifers. MTBE was detected in bedrock wells only in Connecticut and Massachusetts; land use near the wells was suburban to rural, and none of the sampled bedrock wells were within 0.25 mile of a gasoline station.

  7. Legal and regulatory issues affecting the aquifer thermal energy storage concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of legal and regulatory issus that potentially can affect implementation of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) concept are examined. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  8. Apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Moses, John M. (Dedham, MA); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from an aquifer remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating aquifers contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  9. Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapaka, Saikiran

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

  10. Update on the aquifer/wetlands restoration project at Utica, Nebraska, with recommendations for remapping of the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992-1993, Argonne National Laboratory investigated potential carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be linked to the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) at Utica, Nebraska. These initial studies identified carbon tetrachloride in a plume of contaminated groundwater, extending approximately 3,500 ft southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, within a shallow upper aquifer that had been used previously as a municipal water source by the town (Figure 1.1). A deeper aquifer used as the current municipal water source was found to be free of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Although the shallow aquifer was no longer being used as a source of drinking water at Utica, additional studies indicated that the carbon tetrachloride could pose an unacceptable health threat to potential future residents who might install private wells along the expected downgradient migration pathway of the plume. On the basis of these findings, corrective action was recommended to decrease the carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the upper aquifer to acceptable levels (Argonne 1993a,b, 1995). Initial discussions with the Utica village board indicated that any restoration strategies involving nonbeneficial discharge of treated groundwater in the immediate vicinity of Utica would be unacceptable to the town. To address this concern, the CCC/USDA and Argonne, in cooperation with multiple federal and state regulatory and environmental agencies (Table 1.1) proposed a treatment strategy for the Utica groundwater employing groundwater extraction coupled with the seasonal use of agricultural spray irrigation equipment to simultaneously (1) remove carbon tetrachloride from the groundwater (by volatilization to the atmosphere) and (2) discharge the treated groundwater to enhance the development of wetlands in the North Lake Basin Wildlife Management Area, just north of the town (Argonne 2000). To develop this treatment approach, additional groundwater sampling was conducted to update the distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater identified in the preliminary studies in 1992-1993. In March 1998, detailed mapping of the carbon tetrachloride plume was performed by using the Argonne cone penetrometer (CPT) vehicle to collect groundwater samples for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 13 locations (PS01-PS09, PS12, PS16, PS17, PS19; Figure 1.2). The samples were collected in vertical profiles through the aquifer, at 10-ft intervals. The results of this 1998 study (Table 1.2) demonstrated that the three-dimensional distribution of carbon tetrachloride in the aquifer is complex, with multiple 'hot spots' occurring in the plume at various depths and distances along its length (Argonne 2000). In October 2002, the CCC/USDA requested that Argonne perform targeted groundwater sampling at Utica to document the migration of the carbon tetrachloride plume since the 1998 sampling event. In February 2003, vertical-profile groundwater sampling for VOCs analyses was conducted at 8 selected locations (PS01, PS04-PS07, PS12, PS19, PS20; Figure 1.2 and Table 1.3). The lateral and vertical configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume, as identified in the 2003 study (Argonne 2003), is illustrated in Figures 1.3-1.7. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing four extraction wells (GWEX 1-GWEX 4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented at Utica, with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies identified in Table 1.1. The principal components of the Utica system (shown in Figure 1.8) are described briefly in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

  11. Introduction Competition for H2 in a PCE-contaminated aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Competition for H2 in a PCE-contaminated aquifer Noam Shani1, Pierre Rossi2. -1.0 0.0 0.8 -0.8 0.0 1.0 %PCE %VC Fe(II) Mn(II) NO3 SO4 PCE TCE VC tVOCs T pH Cond Redox TOC Na K Mg

  12. Monitoring aquifer storage and recovery using multiple geophysical methods , Kristofer Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -gravity methods to monitor an aquifer storage recovery (ASR) project. An abandoned coal mine has been developed into an underground water reservoir in Leyden, Colorado. Excess water from surface sources is injected into the reservoir during winter and then retrieved for use in the summer. Understanding the storage-recovery process

  13. Time-lapse gravity monitoring of an aquifer storage recovery project in Leyden, Colorado Kristofer Davis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on using time-lapse micro-gravity surveying to monitor an aquifer storage recovery project. An abandoned coal mine is being developed into an underground water reservoir in Leyden, Colorado. Excess water from surface sources is poured into the reservoir during winter and then retrieved for use in the summer

  14. Siderite zonation within the Brent Group: microbial influence or aquifer flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    isotopic data (n = 32) to determine which of these two controls (i.e. biochemistry or pore-water flowSiderite zonation within the Brent Group: microbial influence or aquifer flow? M. WILKINSON1 , *, R versa. There is a strong facies control upon siderite formation, with ripple cross-laminated sands being

  15. Vadose zone influences on aquifer parameter estimates of saturated-zone hydraulic theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Szilagyi* Conservation and Survey Division, University of Nebraska, 113 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588 aquifer properties at the scale of the watershed (Szilagyi et al., 1998). Such work is of the utmost-mail address: jszilagyil@unl.edu (J. Szilagyi). #12;(Fig. 1), and h is the changing phreatic surface

  16. BENEFITS OF IMPROVING WATER QUALITY IN THE ABBOTSFORD AQUIFER: AN APPLICATION OF CONTINGENT VALUATION METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that, with further development of the region, there may be pesticide or heavy metal leaching problems of the Canadian Department of the Environment. #12;Executive Summary Nitrate pollution is a problem in many exmple of groundwater pollution. This aquifer is the primary source of municipal water for the District

  17. Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap Jiu Jimmy Jiao1 October 2009. [1] Most analytical and numerical models developed to analyze pumping test data focus on saturated flow below the water table. Traditionally the soil above the initial water table prior to pumping

  18. The Different Characteristics of Aquifer Parameters and Their Implications on Pumping-Test Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    The Different Characteristics of Aquifer Parameters and Their Implications on Pumping-Test Analysis and storativity, under constant-rate pumping conditions. A two-way coordinate is such that the conditions implications on pumping-test designs and interpretation. For example, to estimate the parameters

  19. Controls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0053, USA b Department of Geological Sciences, The University of TexasControls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA Sunil Mehtaa, *, Alan E. Fryara , Jay L. Bannerb a Department of Geological Sciences, University

  20. Numerical solutions of moment equations for flow in heterogeneous composite aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    Numerical solutions of moment equations for flow in heterogeneous composite aquifers C. L. Winter on the composite media theory of Winter and Tartakovsky [2000, 2002], which allows one to derive and solve moment a representative composite medium to investigate the robustness of perturbation approximations in porous medium

  1. 2013 Faculty Publications A Cloud-Based Framework for Automating MODFLOW Simulations for Aquifer Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    2013 Faculty Publications A Cloud-Based Framework for Automating MODFLOW Simulations for Aquifer Performance-Based Liquefaction Triggering Models for the SPT. Seismological Society of America 2013 Annual. A Simplified Uniform Hazard Liquefaction Analysis Procedure for Bridges. Transportation Research Record. Kevin

  2. The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs Sean T Description Date 0 Original document 1/29/2008 1 Estimate for carbon content of crude oil was incorrect (see p an invaluable summer at the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin working with Sue

  3. HighResolution Numerical Methods for MicellarPolymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trangenstein, John A.

    been used to study the micellar polymer flooding process in enhanced oil recovery [12], [18], [19 in practical im plementation of enhanced oil recovery techniques at this time, there is increasing interestHighResolution Numerical Methods for MicellarPolymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer

  4. AQUIFER BIOTHERMOREMEDIATION USING HEAT PUMPS: SOUND THEORETICAL BASIS AND RESULTS ON THERMAL, GEOCHEMICAL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    example, the long-term use of groundwater heat pumps for air conditioning of homes or buildings can induce and hydrogeological background. The presence of organic pollutants in the aquifer can amplify these phenomena/or the well productivity, (ii) an inappropriate temperature for the use of groundwater heat pumps for air

  5. Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material bioremediation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) at the Hanford site in south- central Washington state. Benzoate in south- central Washington state has been a defense materials pro- duction complex since 1943. Carbon

  6. Investigating the stratigraphy of an alluvial aquifer using crosswell seismic traveltime tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    can be used in situations where surface seismic reflection has failed e.g., Liberty et al., 1999Investigating the stratigraphy of an alluvial aquifer using crosswell seismic traveltime tomography In this study, we investigate the use of crosswell P-wave seismic tomography to obtain spatially extensive

  7. Evaluating the impact of aquifer layer properties on geomechanical response during CO2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical models play an essential role in understanding the facts of carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration in the life cycle of a storage reservoir. We present a series of test cases that reflect a broad and realistic range of aquifer reservoir properties to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts on the geomechanical response to CO2 injection. In this study, a coupled hydro-mechanical model was introduced to simulate the sequestration process, and a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was introduced to efficiently sample the value of aquifer properties and geometry parameters. Aquifer permeability was found to be of significant importance to the geomechanical response to the injection. To study the influence of uncertainty of the permeability distribution in the aquifer, an additional series of tests is presented, based on a default permeability distribution site sample with various distribution deviations generated by the Monte Carlo sampling method. The results of the test series show that different permeability distributions significantly affect the displacement and possible failure zone.

  8. An analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of China. 1. Introduction In most coastal areas, groundwater and seawater are in con- stant communicationAn analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer Jiu of the solution presented in this paper. This solution is based on a conceptual model under the assumption

  9. Assessment of Managed Aquifer Recharge Site Suitability Using a GIS and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    with a regional groundwater model to assess the hydrologic impact of potential MAR placement and operating planning, including evaluation of options for enhancing groundwater resources. Introduction ManagedAssessment of Managed Aquifer Recharge Site Suitability Using a GIS and Modeling by Tess A. Russo1

  10. Estimation of regional aquifer parameters using baseflow recession data Victor M. Ponce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    's (1963) theoretical model of groundwater flow to a stream is used to estimate regional aquifer parameters diffusiv- ity, hydrogeology, Mexico, Papaloapan. 1 #12;1. Introduction In groundwater hydrology basin. More recent studies have applied Rorabaugh's model to estimate groundwater recharge in diverse

  11. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

  12. High Resolution Simulation and Characterization of Density-Driven Flow in CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are routinely used to study the process of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers. In this paper TOUGH2-MP. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration involves injecting CO2

  13. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

  14. Options, knowledge, and satisfaction of Texas residents affected by Edwards Aquifer issues: implications for education and government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Amy Suzette

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPINIONS, KNOWLEDGE, AND SATISFACTION OF TEXAS RESIDENTS AFFECTED BY EDWARDS AQUIFER ISSUES: IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION AND GOVERNMENT A Thesis by AMY SUZETTE KINNEY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Education ABSTRACT Opinions, Knowledge, and Satisfaction of Texas Residents Affected by Edwards Aquifer Issues: Implications for Education and Government. (December 1994) Amy Suzette Kinney, B. S. , Tarleton State University Chair of Advisory Committee...

  15. Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Supporting Phase II of the T Area Technetium-99 Data Objectives Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 operable unit, specifically for the immediate area of the 241-T Tank Farm. This report provides a general discussion of the six identified hydrologic test methods for possible subsequent characterization within the 241-T Tank Farm area and details for implementing the large-scale recovery test after terminating pumping at the 241-Tank Farm extraction well locations.

  16. Microbial Activity during Biodegradation and its Effects on Groundwater Velocity in a Contaminated Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schillig, Peter C.

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    , toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene isomers (BTEX) (Yerushalmi et al., 1999; Landmeyer and Bradley 2003). Such passive methods rely on the ambient groundwater velocity to deliver contaminants to the reactive zone. Biostimulation techniques operate... Microbial Activity during Biodegradation and its Effects on Groundwater Velocity in a Contaminated Aquifer by Copyright 2008 Peter Curtis Schillig B.S. (Dept. Hons), Ohio University, 2005 Submitted to the Department...

  17. Delineating Alluvial Aquifer Heterogeneity Using Resistivity and GPR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailhac, Pascal

    systems is a fundamental but challenging aspect of ground water remediation and typically revolves around; Ponzini et al. 1984; Frohlich et al. 1996). Geophysical studies may therefore contribute to producing an overall better sub- surface model for ground water flow and contaminant transport. Electrical resistivity

  18. Compressed air energy storage: preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Final draft, Task 1: establish facility design criteria and utility benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) has been identified as one of the principal new energy storage technologies worthy of further research and development. The CAES system stores mechanical energy in the form of compressed air during off-peak hours, using power supplied by a large, high-efficiency baseload power plant. At times of high electrical demand, the compressed air is drawn from storage and is heated in a combustor by the burning of fuel oil, after which the air is expanded in a turbine. In this manner, essentially all of the turbine output can be applied to the generation of electricity, unlike a conventional gas turbine which expends approximately two-thirds of the turbine shaft power in driving the air compressor. The separation of the compression and generation modes in the CAES system results in increased net generation and greater premium fuel economy. The use of CAES systems to meet the utilities' high electrical demand requirements is particularly attractive in view of the reduced availability of premium fuels such as oil and natural gas. This volume documents the Task 1 work performed in establishing facility design criteria for a CAES system with aquifer storage. Information is included on: determination of initial design bases; preliminary analysis of the CAES system; development of data for site-specific analysis of the CAES system; detailed analysis of the CAES system for three selected heat cycles; CAES power plant design; and an economic analysis of CAES.

  19. Electrodic voltages accompanying stimulated bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Druhan, J.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Banfield, J.F.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The inability to track the products of subsurface microbial activity during stimulated bioremediation has limited its implementation. We used spatiotemporal changes in electrodic potentials (EP) to track the onset and persistence of stimulated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate amendment. Following acetate injection, anomalous voltages approaching -900 mV were measured between copper electrodes within the aquifer sediments and a single reference electrode at the ground surface. Onset of EP anomalies correlated in time with both the accumulation of dissolved sulfide and the removal of uranium from groundwater. The anomalies persisted for 45 days after halting acetate injection. Current-voltage and current-power relationships between measurement and reference electrodes exhibited a galvanic response, with a maximum power density of 10 mW/m{sup 2} during sulfate reduction. We infer that the EP anomalies resulted from electrochemical differences between geochemically reduced regions and areas having higher oxidation potential. Following the period of sulfate reduction, EP values ranged from -500 to -600 mV and were associated with elevated concentrations of ferrous iron. Within 10 days of the voltage decrease, uranium concentrations rebounded from 0.2 to 0.8 {mu}M, a level still below the background value of 1.5 {mu}M. These findings demonstrate that EP measurements provide an inexpensive and minimally invasive means for monitoring the products of stimulated microbial activity within aquifer sediments and are capable of verifying maintenance of redox conditions favorable for the stability of bioreduced contaminants, such as uranium.

  20. Desorption Behavior of Carbon Tetrachloride and Chloroform in contaminated Low Organic Carbon Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Robert G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Sklarew, Debbie S.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Gent, Philip M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Thompson, Christopher J.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental determination of contaminant behavior in deep aquifer sediments is challenging because of the cost and difficulty associated with sample collection. On the other hand, parameter values important to contaminant transport (e.g., distribution coefficient) derived from such sediments may be more accurate than those determined by estimation methods. Furthermore, experiments performed with sediments where the contaminants have been in contact with the sediments for decades are more likely to reveal kinetic controls on contaminant transport not as readily revealed in short contact time experiments. We report the first measurements of CCl4 and CHCl3 distribution coefficients in contaminated Hanford sediments with varying physical/chemical properties.

  1. WSU's conservation program is primarily driven by the desire to minimize impacts on water resources, namely the regional aquifer, and to meet regulatory requirements. The official goal is to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    in the Palouse Basin Aquifer Committee (PBAC). Do not mail, fax, or email this report to DOH For the reporting

  2. METHANE AND METHANOTROPHY IN TEXAS AQUIFERS ETHAN L. GROSSMAN,1 CHUANLUN ZHANG,1* JAMES W. AMMERMAN,2 AND MARTHA J. D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    1 METHANE AND METHANOTROPHY IN TEXAS AQUIFERS ETHAN L. GROSSMAN,1 CHUANLUN ZHANG,1* JAMES W-occurring methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) have been shown to degrade the halogenated hydrocarbons, especially for deep pristine aquifers. Many Texas groundwaters contain significant to abundant methane

  3. Well injectivity during CO2 storage operations in deep saline aquifers6 1: Experimental investigation of drying effects, salt precipitation and7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technique than can potentially limit the accumulation29-17Jan2014 #12;3 1. Introduction51 52 Geological sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers studied54 much less than mature oil & gas reservoirs. Injection of carbon dioxide into saline aquifers55

  4. Dynamics of microbial community composition and function during in-situ bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nostrand, J.D. Van; Wu, L.; Wu, W.M.; Huang, A.; Gentry, T.J.; Deng, Y.; Carley, J.; Carrol, S.; He, Z.; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C.S.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter{sup -1}). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  5. Dynamics of Microbial Community Composition and Function during In Situ Bioremediation of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Wu, Weimin [Stanford University; Huang, Zhijian [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Deng, Ye [University of Oklahoma; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter 1). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  6. Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers --Treiman et al. 282 (5397): 21... http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/282/5397/2194e?maxtosh... 1 of 2 2/19/2008 1:26 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers -- Treiman et al. 282 (5397): 21... http. 2194 DOI: 10.1126/science.282.5397.2194e LETTERS Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers In their report "Evidence against hydrogen-based microbial ecosystems in basalt aquifers" (14 Aug., p. 976), Robert T

  7. ALCOHOL FLUSHING FOR REMOVING DNAPL'S FROM CLAY AND SAND LAYERED AQUIFER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.J. Hayden; P. Padgett; C. Farrell; J. Diebold; X. Zhou; M. Hood

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alcohol flushing, also called cosolvent flushing, is a relatively new in-situ remediation technology that shows promise for removing organic solvents from the soil and groundwater. Soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents and petroleum products is one of the most serious and widespread environmental problems of our time. Most of the DOE facilities and inactive sites are experiencing soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents. These water immiscible solvents have entered the subsurface from leaking underground storage tanks and piping, and from past waste handling and disposal practices such as leaking lagoons, holding ponds and landfills. In many cases, they have traveled hundreds of feet down into the saturated zone. If left in the soil, these chemicals may pose a significant environmental and human health risk. Alcohol flushing has potential for application to spilled solvents located deep within the saturated zone which are difficult if not impossible to remove by current remediation strategies, thus, greatly expediting restoration time, reducing total remediation cost and reducing risk.

  8. Revised Hydrogeology for the Suprabasalt Aquifer System, 200-West Area and Vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.

    2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to refine the conceptual groundwater flow model for the 200-West Area and vicinity. This is the second of two reports that combine to cover the 200 Area Plateau, an area that holds the largest inventory of radionuclide and chemical waste on the Hanford Site.

  9. TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelka, Walter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In warmer climates air source heat pumps have gained widestadvantages over air source heat pumps. For example, theair conditioning is required, water is pumped from the cold water well to the heat pump.

  10. The effects of faults on the groundwater system in the Hickory Sandstone Aquifer in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randolph, Leslie Carolyn

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    imgation interval . . Relationship of the water-level slope in the southern end of Region C and the water-level difference between well 426 in Region A and well 427 in Region C . . . 47 . . 47 25 Well locations and water-level characteristics...) of this subunit is coarser grained and has few laterally extensive silt and clay beds compared to the overlying 150 ft (46 m). The frequency of silt and clay interbeds increases progressively in the upper half of the subunit. Extensive cultivation on soils...

  11. TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelka, Walter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In warmer climates air source heat pumps have gained widestadvantages over air source heat pumps. For example, theair source equipment is much less. The source for this kind of heat pump

  12. Mineralogical and Microbial Controls on Iron Reduction in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Andrea Melissa

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and lepidocrocite); moderately reducible iron (such as goethite, akageneite, and hematite); organically bound iron; magnetite; and pyrite. The second phase of this research involved creating in situ microcosm experiments that exposed native microbial communities...

  13. Revised Hydrogeology for the Suprabasalt Aquifer System, 200-East Area and Vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This study supports the Hanford Groundwater/Vadose integration project objectives to better understand the risk of groundwater contamination and potential risk to the public via groundwater flow paths. The primary objective of this study was to refine the conceptual groundwater flow model for the 200-East Area and vicinity.

  14. An analytical solution of two-dimensional reactive solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Hongbin Zhan,1 Zhang Wen,2 and Guangyao Gao3 Received 27 September 2008; revised 7 May 2009; accepted 21

  15. System Design and Optimization of CO2 Storage in Deep Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamshiri, Hossein

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of waterflooding sweep efficiency has been widely applied in reservoir engineering to improve hydrocarbon recovery while delaying water breakthrough and minimizing the bypassed oil in reservoirs. We develop a new framework to optimize...

  16. Increased fermentation activity and persistent methanogenesis in a model aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Oil & Gas Pollution Control, China University of Petroleum-Beijing, 18 Fuxue Rd., Beijing 102249 of ethanol, despite clean air-saturated water flowing continuously through the tank at a relative high@rice.edu (P.J.J. Alvarez). 1 Current address: State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Lab

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer system north Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was re- ported by Gribovszki et al. (2008 Source: Szilagyi, Jozsef - School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Collection: Geosciences 98 Comparison of arsenic...

  18. Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

  19. Flow Instabilities During Injection of CO2 into SalineAquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Julio E.; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability so that waves or rounded lobes of saturation may appear and grow into fingers that lead to enhanced dissolution, bypassing, and possibly poor sweep efficiency. This paper presents an analysis, through high-resolution numerical simulations, of the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. We explore the influence of viscosity ratio, relative permeability functions, and capillary pressure on finger growth and spacing. In addition, we address the issues of finger triggering, convergence under grid refinement and boundary condition effects. Simulations were carried out on scalar machines, and on an IBM RS/6000 SP (a distributed-memory parallel computer with 6080 processors) with a parallelized version of TOUGH2.

  20. Time-lapse gravity monitoring: A systematic 4D approach with application to aquifer storage and recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An abandoned underground coal mine has been developed into a subsurface water reservoir. Water from surface reservoirs use valuable land needed for develop- ment or the preservation of open space and can have of such reservoirs can reach tens of millions of dollars. The aquifer storage recovery ASR process Pyne, 1995 pro

  1. Hydraulic interference testbetween several doublets in the Dogger aquifer in Ile-de-France region (Val-de-Marne)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Hydraulic interference testbetween several doublets in the Dogger aquifer in Ile-de-France region of the "thermal breakthrough".One uncertainty of these models is the hydraulic interference between the different of the hydraulic test whichwas carried out in September 2013.The test included 5 geothermal doublets (Cachan 1

  2. Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX-ethanol mixtures in aquifer columns amended with sulfate, chelated ferric iron or nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX-ethanol mixtures in aquifer columns amended with sulfate-mail: alvarez@rice.edu) Key words: anaerobic biostimulation, bioremediation, BTEX, ethanol, natural attenuation­Fe(III) or nitrate to enhance the biodegradation of BTEX and ethanol mixtures. The rapid biodegradation of ethanol

  3. CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND-SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE BOISE HYDROGEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND- SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM Crosswell seismic data contain first-arrival information for velocity inversion and reflec- tions for seismic stratigraphic analysis. Seismic velocity information is useful for directly com- paring to

  4. Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank by application to a well-controlled, large-scale tank experiment with 9 m length, 6 m width, and 4.5 m depth, and by data interpretation from a field-scale test. The tank experiment imitates an advection-influenced TRT

  5. Field Test Report: Preliminary Aquifer Test Characterization Results for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the hydrologic test results for both local vertical profile characterization and large-scale hydrologic tests associated with a new extraction well (well 299-W15-225) that was constructed during FY2009 for inclusion within the future 200-West Area Groundwater Treatment System that is scheduled to go on-line at the end of FY2011. To facilitate the analysis of the large-scale hydrologic test performed at newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225 (C7017; also referred to as EW-1 in some planning documents), the existing 200-ZP-1 interim pump-and-treat system was completely shut-down ~1 month before the performance of the large-scale hydrologic test. Specifically, this report 1) applies recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of hydrologic test and pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses for a preliminary determination of large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) provides an assessment of the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225. The hydrologic characterization approach presented in this report is expected to have universal application for meeting the characterization needs at other remedial action sites located within unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

  6. Determining flow, recharge, and vadose zonedrainage in anunconfined aquifer from groundwater strontium isotope measurements, PascoBasin, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mjsingleton@lbl.gov

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) measured in groundwater samples from 273 wells in the Pasco Basin unconfined aquifer below the Hanford Site show large and systematic variations that provide constraints on groundwater recharge, weathering rates of the aquifer host rocks, communication between unconfined and deeper confined aquifers, and vadose zone-groundwater interaction. The impact of millions of cubic meters of wastewater discharged to the vadose zone (103-105 times higher than ambient drainage) shows up strikingly on maps of groundwater 87Sr/86Sr. Extensive access through the many groundwater monitoring wells at the site allows for an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the strontium geochemistry of a major aquifer, hosted primarily in unconsolidated sediments, and relate it to both long term properties and recent disturbances. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr increases systematically from 0.707 to 0.712 from west to east across the Hanford Site, in the general direction of groundwater flow, as a result of addition of Sr from the weathering of aquifer sediments and from diffuse drainage through the vadose zone. The lower 87Sr/86Sr groundwater reflects recharge waters that have acquired Sr from Columbia River Basalts. Based on a steady-state model of Sr reactive transport and drainage, there is an average natural drainage flux of 0-1.4 mm/yr near the western margin of the Hanford Site, and ambient drainage may be up to 30 mm/yr in the center of the site assuming an average bulk rock weathering rate of 10-7.5 g/g/yr.

  7. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  8. Effect of immiscible liquid contaminants on P-wave transmission through natural aquifer samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Jil T.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed core-scale laboratory experiments to examine the effect of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants on P-wave velocity and attenuation in heterogeneous media. This work is part of a larger project to develop crosswell seismic methods for minimally invasive NAPL detection. The test site is the former DOE Pinellas Plant in Florida, which has known NAPL contamination in the surficial aquifer. Field measurements revealed a zone of anomalously high seismic attenuation, which may be due to lithology and/or contaminants (NAPL or gas phase). Intact core was obtained from the field site, and P-wave transmission was measured by the pulse-transmission technique with a 500 kHz transducer. Two types of samples were tested: a clean fine sand from the upper portion of the surficial aquifer, and clayey-silty sand with shell fragments and phosphate nodules from the lower portion. Either NAPL trichloroethene or toluene was injected into the initially water-saturated sample. Maximum NAPL saturations ranged from 30 to 50% of the pore space. P-wave velocity varied by approximately 4% among the water-saturated samples, while velocities decreased by 5 to 9% in samples at maximum NAPL saturation compared to water-saturated conditions. The clay and silt fraction as well as the larger scatterers in the clayey-silty sands apparently caused greater P-wave attenuation compared to the clean sand. The presence of NAPLs caused a 34 to 54% decrease in amplitudes of the first arrival. The central frequency of the transmitted energy ranged from 85 to 200 kHz, and was sensitive to both grain texture and presence of NAPL. The results are consistent with previous trends observed in homogeneous sand packs. More data will be acquired to interpret P-wave tomograms from crosswell field measurements, determine the cause of high attenuation observed in the field data and evaluate the sensitivity of seismic methods for NAPL detection.

  9. Spatial and temporal dynamics of the microbial community in the Hanford unconfined aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Kaluzny, Rachael M.; Lauber, C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Knight, Robbie C.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to study temporal dynamics of groundwater Bacteria and Archaea over 10 months within 3 well clusters separated by ~30 m and located 250 m from the Columbia River on the Hanford Site, WA. Each cluster contained 3 wells screened at different depths ranging from 10 to 17 m that differed in hydraulic conductivities. Representative samples were selected for analyses of prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene copy numbers. Temporal changes in community composition occurred in all 9 wells over the 10 month sampling period. However, there were particularly strong effects near the top of the water table when the seasonal rise in the Columbia River caused river water intrusion at the top of the aquifer. The occurrence and disappearance of some microbial assemblages (such as Actinobacteria ACK-M1) were correlated to river water intrusion. This seasonal impact on microbial community structure was greater in the shallow saturated zone than deeper in the aquifer. Spatial and temporal patterns for several 16S rRNA gene operational taxonomic units associated with particular physiological functions (e.g.methane oxidizers and metal reducers) suggests dynamic changes in fluxes of electron donors and acceptors over an annual cycle. In addition, temporal dynamics in eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene copies and the dominance of protozoa in 18S clone libraries suggest that bacterial community dynamics could be affected not only by the physical and chemical environment, but also by top-down biological control.

  10. Spatial and temporal controls on biogeochemical indicators at the small-scale interface between a contaminated aquifer and wetland surface water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez-Cazull, Susan Enid

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    from three locations exhibiting upward, downward, and negligent hydrologic flow between aquifer and wetland. PCA was used to identify the principal biogeochemical processes and to obtain factor scores for evaluating significant seasonal and hydrological...

  11. The Footprint of the CO[subscript 2] Plume during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers: Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at the Basin Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juanes, Ruben

    We study a sharp-interface mathematical model of CO[subscript 2] migration in deep saline aquifers, which accounts for gravity override, capillary trapping, natural groundwater flow, and the shape of the plume during the ...

  12. Scaling of capillary trapping in unstable two-phase flow: Application to CO[subscript 2] sequestration in deep saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szulczewski, Michael L.

    The effect of flow instabilities on capillary trapping mechanisms is a major source of uncertainty in CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Standard macroscopic models of multiphase flow in porous media are unable to ...

  13. Interactions of microbes in terrestrial systems Initial studies on terrestrial systems focused on aquifer material that was analyzed for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upchurch, Gary - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    and effect of heavy metals in salt marsh sediments. Environmental Pollution 149, 79, for example, that heavy metal contamination leads to shifts in microbial evaluated the usefulness of S. patens in phytoremediation of heavy metal

  14. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inyo County

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

  15. Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer characterization samples: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Keenan, M.A.; Van Pelt, R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Rossabi, J.; Simmons, J.L.

    1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples were collected during the A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer Characterization (Phase I) Program. The samples were analyzed for chlorinated VOCs by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and MicroSeeps Ltd. All samples were sealed in the field immediately upon retrieval of the core and subsampling. A total of 113 samples locations were selected for analysis. The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of SRTC analyzed all locations in duplicate (226 samples). MicroSeeps Ltd was selected as the quality assurance (QA) check laboratory. MicroSeeps Ltd analyzed 40 locations with 4 duplicates (44 samples). The samples were collected from seven boreholes in A/M Area in the interval from 200 feet deep to the total depth of the boring (360 feet deep nominal); samples were collected every 10 feet within this interval. The sampling zone corresponds approximately to the Crouch Branch Aquifer in A/M Area. The overall A/M Area Crouch Branch Aquifer characterization objectives, a brief description of A/M Area geology and hydrology, and the sample locations, field notes, driller lithologic logs, and required procedural documentation are presented in WSRC (1993).

  16. Single-cell genomics reveal metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Kennedy, David W.; Castelle, Cindy; Field, Erin; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site and have been shown to significantly change in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these microorganisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3?type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide-range of both intra-and extra-cellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. CRISPR-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic microorganisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion.

  17. Analysis of Fault Permeability Using Mapping and Flow Modeling, Hickory Sandstone Aquifer, Central Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto Camargo, Jorge E., E-mail: jorge.nietocamargo@aramco.com; Jensen, Jerry L., E-mail: jjensen@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering (Canada)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir compartments, typical targets for infill well locations, are commonly created by faults that may reduce permeability. A narrow fault may consist of a complex assemblage of deformation elements that result in spatially variable and anisotropic permeabilities. We report on the permeability structure of a km-scale fault sampled through drilling a faulted siliciclastic aquifer in central Texas. Probe and whole-core permeabilities, serial CAT scans, and textural and structural data from the selected core samples are used to understand permeability structure of fault zones and develop predictive models of fault zone permeability. Using numerical flow simulation, it is possible to predict permeability anisotropy associated with faults and evaluate the effect of individual deformation elements in the overall permeability tensor. We found relationships between the permeability of the host rock and those of the highly deformed (HD) fault-elements according to the fault throw. The lateral continuity and predictable permeability of the HD fault elements enhance capability for estimating the effects of subseismic faulting on fluid flow in low-shale reservoirs.

  18. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Engel, David W.; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Fang, Zhufeng

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in another scenario, we study the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on CO2 migration. We combine various sampling approaches (quasi-Monte Carlo, probabilistic collocation, and adaptive sampling) in order to reduce the number of forward calculations while trying to fully explore the input parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty. The CO2 migration is simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). For computationally demanding simulations with 3D heterogeneity fields, we combined the framework with a scalable version module, eSTOMP, as the forward modeling simulator. We built response curves and response surfaces of model outputs with respect to input parameters, to look at the individual and combined effects, and identify and rank the significance of the input parameters.

  19. Optimal design of pump-and-treat systems under uncertain hydraulic conductivity and plume distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bau, Domenico A.

    Optimal design of pump-and-treat systems under uncertain hydraulic conductivity and plume of the cleanup by pump-and-treat of polluted shallow aquifers. In the problem being investigated, hydraulic accordingly the design of the pump-and-treat system for the remainder of the remedial process. The study

  20. Analysis of Water and Energy Conservation of Rainwater Capture System on a Single Family Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    . The groundwater is pumped from an aquifer 174 feet below the house. The rainwater system collects the rooftopAnalysis of Water and Energy Conservation of Rainwater Capture System on a Single Family Home. Adrienne LaBranch and David Crawford, Rainwater Management Solutions and Cabell Brand Center provided

  1. Semi-distributed lumped model of a karst system under active1 management2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    system27 28 Keywords29 Impulse response30 Groundwater flow modeling31 Groundwater level fluctuations32 Pumping33 Introduction34 Numerical models for karst aquifers usually fall within two main categories1 Semi-distributed lumped model of a karst system under active1 management2 Bernard LADOUCHE1

  2. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments at the Department of Energys Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  3. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  4. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Kate M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Peacock, Aaron D.; Lesher, E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Bargar, John R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Ranville, James; Davis, James; Long, Philip E.

    2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology, and redox processes that occur in these zones, we examined several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO). Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for uranium and iron content, oxidation state, and mineralogy, reduced sulfur phases, and solid phase organic carbon content using a suite of analytical and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase uranium concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the uranium present as reduced U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced sulfur phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentration of solid phase organic carbon and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic carbon concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic carbon for maintaining reducing conditions and uranium immobilization.

  5. Effect of Ethanol and Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether on Monoaromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation: Response Variability for Different Aquifer Materials Under Various Electron-Accepting Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Aguilar, G L; Fernandez-Sanchez, J M; Kane, S R; Kim, D; Alvarez, P J

    2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer microcosms were used to determine how ethanol and methyl-tert-butyl ether (MtBE) affect monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation under different electron-accepting conditions commonly found in contaminated sites experiencing natural attenuation. Response variability was investigated by using aquifer material from four sites with different exposure history. The lag phase prior to BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and ethanol degradation was typically shorter in microcosms with previously contaminated aquifer material, although previous exposure did not always result in high degradation activity. Toluene was degraded in all aquifer materials and generally under a broader range of electron-accepting conditions compared to benzene, which was degraded only under aerobic conditions. MtBE was not degraded within 100 days under any condition, and it did not affect BTEX or ethanol degradation patterns. Ethanol was often degraded before BTEX compounds, and had a variable effect on BTEX degradation as a function of electron-accepting conditions and aquifer material source. An occasional enhancement of toluene degradation by ethanol occurred in denitrifying microcosms with unlimited nitrate; this may be attributable to the fortuitous growth of toluene-degrading bacteria during ethanol degradation. Nevertheless, experiments with flow-through aquifer columns showed that this beneficial effect could be eclipsed by an ethanol-driven depletion of electron acceptors, which significantly inhibited BTEX degradation and is probably the most important mechanism by which ethanol could hinder BTEX natural attenuation. A decrease in natural attenuation could increase the likelihood that BTEX compounds reach a receptor as well as the potential duration of exposure.

  6. Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

  7. The Well-Group Distribution of Groundwater Source Heat Pump System Optimized Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Lu, L.; Yoshida, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is the key question that how does the well group arrange for application of GWSHP system. Based on the fact that the water movement is the important factor of heat transfer on aquifer, this paper presents two steps analysis method and analyze...

  8. Optimal Well-Group Distribution of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Lu, L.; Yoshida, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is critical to determine how the well group arranges for application of the GWSHP system. Based on the fact that water movement is the most important factor influencing heat transfer in an aquifer, this paper presents a two-step analysis method...

  9. Electrical conductivity as an indicator of iron reduction rates in abiotic and biotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singha, Kamini

    Electrical conductivity as an indicator of iron reduction rates in abiotic and biotic systems Aaron; published 16 April 2011. [1] Although changes in bulk electrical conductivity (b) in aquifers have been. To explore the use of electrical conductivity to measure reaction rates, we conducted iron oxide reduction

  10. Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied by means of experimentally induced water-table fluctuations (Coaraze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied high and low permeability regions are controlled by the hydraulic head gradient. Past studies have addressed this problem mainly considering steady- state hydraulic conditions. To study such exchanges during

  11. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  12. Accounting for StreamAquifer Interactions in the State-Space Discretization of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    ­Milyukov­Nash Cascade for Streamflow Forecasting Jozsef Szilagyi1 Abstract: A sample-data system discretization

  13. Semi-Analytical Solutions of One-Dimensional Multispecies Reactive Transport in a Permeable Reactive Barrier-Aquifer System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieles, John Michael

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    3251 g2019g3003g3036 , g2019g3013g3005g3036 = g3003 g3118 g3005g3251 g2019g3013g3036 , g2016 = g3041g3261g3041g3251 , and g1868 = g3003 g3118 g3005g3251 g1871 (9) where the subscript ?D? denotes a dimensionless term, B the PRB thickness [L], g1845...2879g3091g3119 g4667g3004g3117g3284g3289g3100g3119 g2878g3087g3083g3104g3119 g4670g4666g2033g2869 ? g2033g2871 g4667g4666 g1836g3003 g1834g3003 ? g1836g1834g4667 + g4666g2033g2870 ? g2033g2871 g4667g1835 g4666g1834 ? g1834g3003 g4667g4671 + 2g2029g2871...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer nicaragua estudio Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The CENTER for AGROECOLOGY & SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS UNIvERSITY OF CALIFORNIA,SANTA CRUz RESEARCH BRIEF 12,SpRING 2008 Summary: Networks in Northern Nicaragua - Christopher...

  15. Subsurface Biogeochemical Heterogeneity (Field-scale removal of U(VI) from groundwater in an alluvial aquifer by electron donor amendment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Derek R. Lovley; A. L. NGuessan; Kelly Nevin; C. T. Resch; Evan Arntzen; Jenny Druhan; Aaron Peacock; Brett Baldwin; Dick Dayvault; Dawn Holmes; Ken Williams; Susan Hubbard; Steve Yabusaki; Yilin Fang; D.C. White; John Komlos; Peter Jaffe

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determine if biostimulation of alluvial aquifers by electron donor amendment can effectively remove U(VI) from groundwater at the field scale. Uranium contamination in groundwater is a significant problem at several DOE sites. In this project, the possibility of accelerating bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) as a means of decreasing U(VI) concentrations in groundwater is directly addressed by conducting a series of field-scale experiments. Scientific goals include demonstrating the quantitative linkage between microbial activity and U loss from groundwater and relating the dominant terminal electron accepting processes to the rate of U loss. The project is currently focused on understanding the mechanisms for unexpected long-term ({approx}2 years) removal of U after stopping electron donor amendment. Results obtained in the project successfully position DOE and others to apply biostimulation broadly to U contamination in alluvial aquifers.

  16. Field-Derived Hydraulic Properties for Perched-Water Aquifer Wells 299-E33-350 and 299-E33-351, Hanford Site B-Complex Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During February and March 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted hydraulic (slug) tests at 200-DV-1 Operable Unit wells 299-E33-350 (C8914) and 299-E33-351 (C8915) as part of B-Complex Area Perched-Water characterization activities at the Hanford Site 200-East Area. During the construction/completion phase of each well, two overlapping depth intervals were tested within the unconfined perched-water aquifer contained in the silty-sand subunit of the Cold Creek Unit. The purpose of the slug-test characterization was to provide estimates of transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity for the perched-water aquifer at these selected well locations.

  17. Characterization of 200-UP-1 Aquifer Sediments and Results of Sorption-Desorption Tests Using Spiked Uncontaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Brown, Christopher F.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Core characterization showed only 4 out of 13 core liner samples were intact samples and that the others were slough material. The intact samples showed typical Ringold Unit E characteristics such as being dominated by gravel and sand. Moderately reducing conditions are inferred in some core from borehole C4299. This reducing condition was caused by the hard tool process used to drill the wells. One core showed significant presence of ferric iron oxide/clay coatings on the gravels. There were no highly contaminated sediments found in the cores from the three new boreholes in UP-1 operable unit, especially for uranium. The presence of slough and ''flour'' caused by hard tooling is a serious challenge to obtaining field relevant sediments for use in geochemical experiments to determine the adsorption-desorption tendencies of redox sensitive elements such as uranium. The adsorption of COCs on intact Ringold Formation sediments and Fe/clay coatings showed that most of the anionic contaminants [Tc(VII), Se(VI), U(VI), Cr(VI), and I(-I)] did not adsorbed very well compared to cationic [Np(V), Sr(II), and Cs(I)] radionuclides. The high hydrous iron oxide content in Fe/clay coatings caused the highest Kd values for U and Np, suggesting these hydrous oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the sediments. Enhanced adsorption behavior for Tc, and Cr and perhaps Se on the sediments was considered an ?artifact? result caused by the induced reducing conditions from the hard tool drilling. Additional U(VI) adsorption Kd studies were performed on Ringold Formation sediments to develop more robust Kd data base for U. The <2 mm size separates of three UP-1 sediments showed a linear U(VI) adsorption isotherm up 1 ppm of total U(VI) concentration in solution. The additional U(VI) Kds obtained from varying carbonate concentration indicated that U(VI) adsorption was strongly influenced by the concentration of carbonate in solution. U(VI) adsorption decreased with increasing concentrations of carbonate up to a point. Then as carbonate and calcium concentrations in the groundwater reach values that exceed the solubility limit for the mineral calcite there is a slight increase in U(VI) Kd likely caused by uranium co-precipitation with the fresh calcite. If remediation of the UP-1 groundwater plume is required, such as pump and treat, it is recommended that the aquifer be treated with chemicals to increase pH and alkalinity and decrease dissolved calcium and magnesium [so that the precipitation of calcite is prevented]. Alternative methods to immobilize the uranium in place might be more effective than trying to remove the uranium by pump and treat. Unfortunately, no aquifer sediments were obtained that contained enough Hanford generated uranium to perform quantitative desorption tests germane to the UP-1 plume remediation issue. Recommended Kd values that should be used for risk predictions for the UP-1 groundwater plume traveling through the lithologies within the aquifer present at the UP-1 (and by proxy ZP-1) operable units were provided. The recommended values Kd values are chosen to include some conservatism (lower values are emphasized from the available range) as is standard risk assessment practice. In general, desorption Kd values for aged contaminated sediments can be larger than Kd values determined in short-term laboratory experiments. To accommodate the potential for desorption hysteresis and other complications, a second suite of uranium desorption Kd values were provided to be used to estimate removal of uranium by pump and treat techniques.

  18. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROSTRATIGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION METHODS BASED ON WELL LOGS FOR GROUNDWATER MODELING OF THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER IN SOUTHWEST KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitzer, Sarah R.

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    unconfined aquifer that consists mainly of unconsolidated to cemented deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel. Measures of saturated thickness (ST) assume that all saturated deposits contribute water to pumping wells equally. However, fine...-grained sediments like clay and silt, as well as locally cemented zones, form low permeability units that impede ground-water flow (Gutentag et al., 1981; Macfarlane and Wilson, 2006; Macfarlane, 2009). In southwest Kansas, unconsolidated sand and gravel deposits...

  19. Revised Geostatistical Analysis of the Inventory of Carbon Tetrachloride in the Unconfined Aquifer in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Bott, Yi-Ju

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an updated estimate of the inventory of carbon tetrachloride (CTET) in the unconfined aquifer in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The contaminant plumes of interest extend within the 200-ZP-1 and 200-UP-1 operable units. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) currently is preparing a plan identifying locations for groundwater extraction wells, injection wells, transfer stations, and one or more treatment facilities to address contaminants of concern identified in the 200-ZP-1 CERCLA Record of Decision. To accomplish this, a current understanding of the inventory of CTET is needed throughout the unconfined aquifer in the 200 West Area. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) previously developed an estimate of the CTET inventory in the area using a Monte Carlo approach based on geostatistical simulation of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of CTET and chloroform in the aquifer. Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) (the previous site contractor) requested PNNL to update that inventory estimate using as input a set of geostatistical realizations of CTET and chloroform recently created for a related but separate project, referred to as the mapping project. The scope of work for the inventory revision complemented the scope of work for the mapping project, performed for FH by PNNL. This report briefly describes the spatial and univariate distribution of the CTET and chloroform data, along with the results of the geostatistical analysis and simulation performed for the mapping project.

  20. Reactive geochemical transport simulation to study mineral trapping for CO2 disposal in deep saline arenaceous aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO{sub 2} disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO{sub 2} injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO{sub 2} immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not amenable to laboratory experiment under ambient deep-aquifer conditions. Under conditions considered in our simulations, CO{sub 2} trapping by secondary carbonate minerals such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), dolomite (CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and dawsonite (NaAlCO{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}) could occur in the presence of high pressure CO{sub 2}. Variations in precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals strongly depend on rock mineral composition and their kinetic reaction rates. Using the data presented in this paper, CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability after 10,000 years is comparable to CO{sub 2} dissolution in pore waters (2-5 kg CO{sub 2} per cubic meter of formation). Under favorable conditions such as increase of the Mg-bearing mineral clinochlore (Mg{sub 5}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 8}) abundance, the capacity can be larger (10 kg CO{sub 2} per cubic meter of formation) due to increase of dolomite precipitation. Carbon dioxide-induced rock mineral alteration and the addition of CO{sub 2} mass as secondary carbonates to the solid matrix results in decreases in porosity. A maximum 3% porosity decrease is obtained in our simulations. A small decrease in porosity may result in a significant decrease in permeability. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into sequestration mechanisms, and their controlling conditions and parameters.

  1. Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 927937 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    rainfall. Keywords: Chalk, modelling, groundwater recharge Introduction The Chalk is the main aquiferSimplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments 927 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 927­937 (2002) © EGS Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater

  2. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

  3. Stimulating the in situ activity of Geobacter species to remove uranium from the groundwater of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert T. Anderson; Helen A. Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-bernad; Charles T. Resch; Philip E. Long; Richard Dayvault; Ken Karp; Sam Marutzky; Donald R. Metzler; Aaron Peacock; David C. White; Mary Lowe; Derek R. Lovley

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for removing uranium from contaminated groundwater by stimulating the in situ activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms was evaluated in a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, Colo. Acetate (1 to 3 mM) was injected into the subsurface over a 3-month period via an injection gallery composed of 20 injection wells, which was installed upgradient from a series of 15 monitoring wells. U(VI) concentrations decreased in as little as 9 days after acetate injection was initiated, and within 50 days uranium had declined below the prescribed treatment level of 0.18 ?M in some of the monitoring wells. Analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and phospholipid fatty acid profiles demonstrated that the initial loss of uranium from the groundwater was associated with an enrichment of Geobacter species in the treatment zone. Fe(II) in the groundwater also increased during this period, suggesting that U(VI) reduction was coincident with Fe(III) reduction. As the acetate injection continued over 50 days there was a loss of sulfate from the groundwater and an accumulation of sulfide and the composition of the microbial community changed. Organisms with 16S rDNA sequences most closely related to those of sulfate reducers became predominant,

  4. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  5. A comparative evaluation of conceptual models for the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, C.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic and hydrologic data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) are used to evaluate the existing ground water monitoring well network completed in the upper portion of the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) beneath the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The USGS data analyzed and compared in this study include: (a) lithologic, geophysical, and stratigraphic information, including the conceptual geologic models intrawell, ground water flow measurement (Tracejector tests) and (c) dedicated, submersible, sampling group elevations. Qualitative evaluation of these data indicate that the upper portion of the SRPA is both heterogeneous and anisotropic at the scale of the ICPP monitoring well network. Tracejector test results indicate that the hydraulic interconnection and spatial configuration of water-producing zones is extremely complex within the upper portion of the SRPA. The majority of ICPP monitoring wells currently are equipped to sample ground water only the upper lithostratigraphic intervals of the SRPA, primarily basalt flow groups E, EF, and F. Depth-specific hydrogeochemical sampling and analysis are necessary to determine if ground water quality varies significantly between the various lithostratigraphic units adjacent to individual sampling pumps.

  6. Market-based Groundwater Allocation: Considerations for Arizona from the Texas Edwards Aquifer Cap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    challenge, which is emerging conflict between urban and rural demands, "between those who have water and Trade System Zachary P. Sugg Ph.D. Student University of Arizona School of Geography and Development: The University of Arizona, Technology and Research Initiative Fund 2012/2013, Water Sustainability Graduate

  7. Seawater intrusion and aquifer freshening near reclaimed coastal area of Shenzhen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    water supply system was established, and now 80% of the city's water supply is drawn from a river the fill materials may have WaterScience&Technology:WaterSupplyVol7No2pp137­145QIWAPublishing2007 137doi experienced heavy pumping since the 1980s when it began to expand very quickly from a fishing village

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Reactions and reaction rates in the regional aquifer beneath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    properties. Keywords Feldspar Á Inverse mass balance modeling Á USA Á Geochemistry Á Kinetics Introduction modeling with petro- graphic assessment to further knowledge and under- standing of complex natural hydrologic systems. Groundwater geochemistry shows marked evolution along assumed flow paths. The flow path

  9. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served as an ideal method for subsurface biostimulation.

  10. Stimulating the In Situ Activity of Geobacter Species to Remove Uranium from the Groundwater of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R. T.; Vrionis, Helen A.; Ortiz-Bernad, Irene; Resch, Charles T.; Long, Philip E.; Dayvault, R. D.; Karp, Ken; Marutzky, Sammy J.; Metzler, Donald R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; Lowe, Mary; Lovley, Derek R.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for removing uranium from contaminated groundwater by stimulating the in situ activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms was evaluated in a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, Colo. Acetate (1 to 3 mM) was injected into the subsurface over a 3-month period via an injection gallery composed of 20 injection wells, which was installed upgradient from a series of 15 monitoring wells. U(VI) concentrations decreased in as little as 9 days after acetate injection was initiated, and within 50 days uranium had declined below the prescribed treatment level of 0.18 _M in some of the monitoring wells. Analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and phospholipid fatty acid profiles demonstrated that the initial loss of uranium from the groundwater was associated with an enrichment of Geobacter species in the treatment zone. Fe(II) in the groundwater also increased during this period, suggesting that U(VI) reduction was coincident with Fe(III) reduction. As the acetate injection continued over 50 days there was a loss of sulfate from the groundwater and an accumulation of sulfide and the composition of the microbial community changed. Organisms with 16S rDNA sequences most closely related to those of sulfate reducers became predominant, and Geobacter species became a minor component of the community. This apparent switch from Fe(III) reduction to sulfate reduction as the terminal electron accepting process for the oxidation of the injected acetate was associated with an increase in uranium concentration in the groundwater. These results demonstrate that in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater is feasible but suggest that the strategy should be optimized to better maintain long-term activity of Geobacter species.

  11. Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

  12. Approaches to Quantify Potential Contaminant Transport in the Lower Carbonate Aquifer from Underground Nuclear Testing at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada - 12434

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Robert W.; Birdie, Tiraz [Navarro-INTERA LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilborn, Bill; Mukhopadhyay, Bimal [National Nuclear Security Administration/Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative modeling of the potential for contaminant transport from sources associated with underground nuclear testing at Yucca Flat is an important part of the strategy to develop closure plans for the residual contamination. At Yucca Flat, the most significant groundwater resource that could potentially be impacted is the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA), a regionally extensive aquifer that supplies a significant portion of the water demand at the Nevada National Security Site, formerly the Nevada Test Site. Developing and testing reasonable models of groundwater flow in this aquifer is an important precursor to performing subsequent contaminant transport modeling used to forecast contaminant boundaries at Yucca Flat that are used to identify potential use restriction and regulatory boundaries. A model of groundwater flow in the LCA at Yucca Flat has been developed. Uncertainty in this model, as well as other transport and source uncertainties, is being evaluated as part of the Underground Testing Area closure process. Several alternative flow models of the LCA in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU have been developed. These flow models are used in conjunction with contaminant transport models and source term models and models of contaminant transport from underground nuclear tests conducted in the overlying unsaturated and saturated alluvial and volcanic tuff rocks to evaluate possible contaminant migration in the LCA for the next 1,000 years. Assuming the flow and transport models are found adequate by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, the models will undergo a peer review. If the model is approved by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, it will be used to identify use restriction and regulatory boundaries at the start of the Corrective Action Decision Document Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. These initial boundaries may be revised at the time of the Closure Report phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. (authors)

  13. Molecular Analysis of Phosphate Limitation in Geobacteraceae During the Bioremediation of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Mouser, Paula; Methe, Barbara; Woodard, Trevor L.; Manley, Kimberley; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Larsen, Joern T.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphate-limitation were identified via microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU the most up-regulated. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve due to the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  14. Molecular analysis of phosphate limitation in Geobacteraceae during the bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Mouser, Paula; Methe, Barbara; Woodard, Trevor L.; Manley, Kimberley; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Larsen, Joern T.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphatelimitation were identified by microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high-affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU upregulated the most. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium-bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve because of the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  15. Molecular analysis of phosphate limitation in Geobacteraceae during the bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N'Guessan, L.A.; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, K.P.; Mouser, P.J.; Methe, B.; Woodard, T. L.; Manley, K.; Williams, K. H.; Wilkins, M. J.; Larsen, J.T.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. R.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphate-limitation were identified via microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU the most up-regulated. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve due to the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  16. Effect of availability on multi-period planning of subsea oil and gas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz Vasquez, Karla Liliana

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    2.2.5.4 Fetkovich............................................................ 22 2.3 Network System (Surface Facilities)........................................ 24 2.4 Principal Production Constraints... of an aquifer, find out the water influx and predict the reservoir behavior as well as the reservoir pressure profile5,8. The simplest form to express the material balance expression on volumetric basis was stated in 1936 by Schilthuis and can be summarize...

  17. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of mineral accessible surface area, and should not be used in reactive transport modeling. Our work showed that reaction rates would be overestimated by three to five times.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN APPLICATIONS FOR MODELING AND ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN SALINE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, John

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was a computer modeling effort to couple reservoir simulation and ED/RSM using Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Analysis, and Optimization Methods, to assess geologic, geochemical, geomechanical, and rock-fluid effects and factors on CO2 injectivity, capacity, and plume migration. The project objective was to develop proxy models to simplify the highly complex coupled geochemical and geomechanical models in the utilization and storage of CO2 in the subsurface. The goals were to investigate and prove the feasibility of the ED/RSM processes and engineering development, and bridge the gaps regarding the uncertainty and unknowns of the many geochemical and geomechanical interacting parameters in the development and operation of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration and storage sites. The bottleneck in this workflow is the high computational effort of reactive transport simulation models and large number of input variables to optimize with ED/RSM techniques. The project was not to develop the reactive transport, geomechanical, or ED/RSM software, but was to use what was commercially and/or publically available as a proof of concept to generate proxy or surrogate models. A detailed geologic and petrographic mineral assemblage and geologic structure of the doubly plunging anticline was defined using the USDOE RMOTC formations of interest data (e.g., Lower Sundance, Crow Mountain, Alcova Limestone, and Red Peak). The assemblage of 23 minerals was primarily developed from literature data and petrophysical (well log) analysis. The assemblage and structure was input into a commercial reactive transport simulator to predict the effects of CO2 injection and complex reactions with the reservoir rock. Significant impediments were encountered during the execution phase of the project. The only known commercial reactive transport simulator was incapable of simulating complex geochemistry modeled in this project. Significant effort and project funding was expended to determine the limitations of both the commercial simulator and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) R&D simulator, TOUGHREACT available to the project. A simplified layer cake model approximating the volume of the RMOTC targeted reservoirs was defined with 1-3 minerals eventually modeled with limited success. Modeling reactive transport in porous media requires significant computational power. In this project, up to 24 processors were used to model a limited mineral set of 1-3 minerals. In addition, geomechanical aspects of injecting CO2 into closed, semi-open, and open systems in various well completion methods was simulated. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) as a storage method was not modeled. A robust and stable simulation dataset or base case was developed and used to create a master dataset with embedded instructions for input to the ED/RSM software. Little success was achieved toward the objective of the project using the commercial simulator or the LBNL simulator versions available during the time of this project. Several hundred realizations were run with the commercial simulator and ED/RSM software, most having convergence problems and terminating prematurely. A proxy model for full field CO2 injection sequestration utilization and storage was not capable of being developed with software available for this project. Though the chemistry is reasonably known and understood, based on the amount of effort and huge computational time required, predicting CO2 sequestration storage capacity in geologic formations to within the program goals of 30% proved unsuccessful.

  19. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represents initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contaminant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concentrations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the lateral recharge had limited impact on regional flow directions but accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations may have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher lateral recharge caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never approached the DWS. In this preliminary investigation, contaminant concentrations did not exceed the DWS study metric. With the increases in upland fluxes, more mass was transported out of the aquifer, and concentrations were diluted with respect to the base case where no additional flux was considered.

  20. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

  1. Mapping DNAPL transport contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers with high resolution borehole seismic imaging Project No. SF11SS13 FY01 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, J.T.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Williams, K.H.; Flexser, S.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the work performed in the first year of a three-year project funded by the USDOE's Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA). The objectives of this project are to develop, demonstrate and evaluate, at appropriate field sites, the utility of high frequency seismic imaging methods to detect and characterize non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers. Field tests consist of crosswell seismic tomography acquired before, during and after any remediation action that would potentially affect fluid distributions. Where feasible, other characterization data is obtained, such as crosswell radar, borehole conductivity and cone penetration testing (CPT). Crosswell data are processed to obtain tomographic images, or two-dimensional distributions, of velocity and attenuation. The interpretation of the tomograms utilizes all available site characterization data to relate the geophysical attributes to lithology and fluid phase heterogeneities. Interpretations are validated by evaluation and testing of field cores. Laboratory tests on core retrieved from surveyed locations are performed to determine the relationships between geophysical parameters and solid and fluid phase composition. In the case of sedimentary aquifers, proof of principle has been demonstrated previously in homogeneous sand-packs at the centimeter and half-meter scale (Geller and Myer, 1995; Geller et al., 2000). The field tests will provide proof-of-principle at the field-scale, by working in an unconsolidated sand aquifer with known presence of NAPL. The ability to upscale from the laboratory to the field is evaluated by conducting field measurements over a range of frequencies that overlap the lowest frequencies used in the laboratory tests. In the fractured rock case, previous field work has shown that fracture zones can be detected by crosswell seismic tomography (Daley et al., 2001; Daley et al., 2000). Laboratory studies have demonstrated that the seismic wave signature is sensitive to the fracture stiffness, and that stiffness is affected by fracture-filling fluids (Pyrak-Nolte and Morris, 2000; Pyrak-Nolte, 1996). The field and laboratory experience provide a physical basis for the potential detection of fractures that would be the important flow paths for NAPL contaminants.

  2. Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

    into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

  3. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  4. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  5. Machel, H.G., Buschkuehle, B.E. and Michael, K., 2001, Squeegee flow in Devonian carbonate aquifers in Alberta, Canada. In: Cidu, R. (ed.), Water-Rock Interaction, Vol. 1. Proceedings of the Tenth International Symposium on Water-Rock-Interaction WRI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    in thickness. Across much of the basin the four Devonian aquifers, which contain oil, sweet and sour gas reservoirs, are interbedded with marly and evaporitic aquitards, and are confined by tight evaporites

  6. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  7. Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

  8. 2009-2010 Special Projects Boellstorff: A Southern Region Well Owner Network to Safeguard Private Well and Aquifer Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , improper well construction techniques, abandoned wells, improperly sited and functioning on-site wastewater treatment systems, and changes in land use. The aim of the proposed Southern Region Well Owner Network integrity. The SRWON will improve rural and rural-urban interface environmental management by providing

  9. Contaminant Transport in Hydrogeologic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, C.; Redden, D. L.

    ) of an aquifer. Therefore, additional objectives were developed to (1) derive analytical solutions describing the steady and unsteady temperature distribution around a well with a finite caprock thickness and (2) establish a technique for determining the thermal...

  10. Fate of human viruses in groundwater recharge systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research program was to determine the ability of a well-managed tertiary effluent-recharge system to return virologically acceptable water to the groundwater aquifer. The study assessed the quality of waters renovated by indigenous recharge operations and investigated a number of virus-soil interrelationships. The elucidation of the interactions led to the establishment of basin operating criteria for optimizing virus removal. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and renovated wastewater from the aquifer directly beneath a uniquely designed recharge test basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. High concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from influents but were isolated only on four occasions from tertiary-treated sewage effluents. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were isolated from the groundwater observation well, indicating their ability to penetrate the unsaturated zone. Results of poliovirus seeding experiments carried out in the test basin clearly indicated the need to operate recharge basins at low (e.g. 1 cm/h) infiltration rates in areas having soil types similar to those found at the study site. The method selected for reducing the test basin infiltration rate involved clogging the basin surface with settled organic material from highly turbid effluent. Alternative methods for slowing infiltration rates are discussed in the text.

  11. GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities during the reoxidation of a bioreduced uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Deng, Ye [University of Oklahoma; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Luo, Jian [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hazen, T. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale system was established for in situ biostimulation of U(VI) reduction by ethanol addition at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN). After achieving U(VI) reduction, stability of the bioreduced U(IV) was evaluated under conditions of (i) resting (no ethanol injection), (ii) reoxidation by introducing dissolved oxygen (DO), and (iii) reinjection of ethanol. GeoChip, a functional gene array with probes for N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation genes, was used for monitoring groundwater microbial communities. High diversity of all major functional groups was observed during all experimental phases. The microbial community was extremely responsive to ethanol, showing a substantial change in community structure with increased gene number and diversity after ethanol injections resumed. While gene numbers showed considerable variations, the relative abundance (i.e. percentage of each gene category) of most gene groups changed little. During the reoxidation period, U(VI) increased, suggesting reoxidation of reduced U(IV). However, when introduction of DO was stopped, U(VI) reduction resumed and returned to pre-reoxidation levels. These findings suggest that the community in this system can be stimulated and that the ability to reduce U(VI) can be maintained by the addition of electron donors. This biostimulation approach may potentially offer an effective means for the bioremediation of U(VI)-contaminated sites.

  12. Effects of Nitrate Exposure on the Functional Structure of a Microbial Community in a Uranium-contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, Joy; Waldron, P.; Wu, W.; Zhou, B.; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; Carley, J.; He, Zhili; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P.; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.

  13. Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection ProcessDuring CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten; Zhang, Keni

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For purposes of geologic storage, CO2 would be injected into saline formations at supercritical temperature and pressure conditions, and would form a separate phase that is immiscible with the aqueous phase (brine). At typical subsurface temperature and pressure conditions, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) has lower density than the aqueous phase and would experience an upward buoyancy force. Accordingly, the CO2 is expected to accumulate beneath the caprock at the top of the permeable interval, and could escape from the storage formation wherever (sub-)vertical pathways are available, such as fractures or faults through the caprock, or improperly abandoned wells. Over time, an increasing fraction of CO2 may dissolve in the aqueous phase, and eventually some of the aqueous CO2 may react with rock minerals to form poorly soluble carbonates. Dissolution into the aqueous phase and eventual sequestration as carbonates are highly desirable processes as they would increase permanence and security of storage. Dissolution of CO2 will establish phase equilibrium locally between the overlying CO2 plume and the aqueous phase beneath. If the aqueous phase were immobile, CO2 dissolution would be limited by the rate at which molecular diffusion can remove dissolved CO2 from the interface between CO2-rich and aqueous phases. This is a slow process. However, dissolution of CO2 is accompanied by a small increase in the density of the aqueous phase, creating a negative buoyancy force that can give rise to downward convection of CO2-rich brine, which in turn can greatly accelerate CO2 dissolution. This study explores the process of dissolution-diffusion-convection (DDC), using high-resolution numerical simulation. We find that geometric features of convection patterns are very sensitive to small changes in problem specifications, reflecting self-enhancing feedbacks and the chaotic nature of the process. Total CO2 dissolution rates on the other hand are found to be quite robust against modest changes in problem parameters, and are essentially constant as long as no dissolved CO2 reaches the lower boundary of the system.

  14. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period I.

  15. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the third quarter of Budget Period II.

  16. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re- injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fourth quarter of Budget Period II.

  17. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful redevelopment and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period I.

  18. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the second quarter of Budget Period II.

  19. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the twelfth quarter of Budget Period I.

  20. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period II.

  1. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the final quarter of Budget Period I.

  2. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the tenth quarter of Budget Period I.

  3. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period II.

  4. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the eleventh quarter of Budget Period I.

  5. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the ninth quarter of Budget Period II.

  6. Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release scenarios were provided to compare with the results of the WIF and convolution approaches.

  7. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »LabSustainabilitySyntheticaquifer THE INL & THE

  8. Carbon-13 variations in fluids from the Cerro Prieto geothermal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janik, C.J.; Nehring, N.L.; Huebner, M.A.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The carbon isotope compositions of CO/sub 2/ in steam from Cerro Prieto production well have been measured for 1977, 1979, and 1982. Variations in the delta/sup 13/C values are caused by production-related changes in the chemical and physical parameters of the geothermal system. In 1977, most CO/sub 2/ in the reservoir was isotopically light (delta/sup 13/C = -6.4 +/- 0.4). Heavier CO/sub 2/ was produced from wells in the center of the field (M5,M26,M27) due to deposition of isotopically light calcite caused by near-well boiling. In 1979 nearly all well showed relatively heavy CO/sub 2/, probably due to expansion of aquifer boiling and calcite precipitation. In 1982, many wells in the central part of the field were shut in. The amount of drawndown decreased and as temperatures and pressures near the wells increased, the boiling zones collapsed. The CO/sub 2/ in the fluid then exchanged with the precipitated calcite and became isotopically lighter. The sensitivity of carbon isotopes to calcite precipitations caused by aquifer boiling and to reequilibration with this deposited calcite upon decrease of boiling suggests use as an indicator of these aquifer processes. Surficial CO/sub 2/ of thermal origin was collected in 1981. Generally, the carbon-13 contents were close to CO/sub 2/ from production wells except for high-temperature mud pots and fumaroles containing isotopically light CO/sub 2/ derived from near surface alteration of organic matter.

  9. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaobing [Oak Ridge National Lab] [Oak Ridge National Lab

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High initial cost and lack of public awareness of ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, which is a heating only central GSHP system using shallow aquifer as heat source and installed at a warehouse and truck bay at Kalispell, MT. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, utility bills, and calculations of energy consumptions of conventional central heating systems for providing the same heat outputs as the central GSHP system did. The evaluated performance metrics include energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of GSHP system compared with conventional heating systems. This case study also identified areas for reducing uncertainties in performance evaluation, improving operational efficiency, and reducing installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future. Publication of ASHRAE at the annual conference in Seattle.

  10. Tomographic Characterization of Aquifer Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyle, Shane

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    that extend the 3D homogenous spherical radial equation to the heterogeneous case. A numerical model was used to check the heterogeneous extension for accuracy. High quality zero-offset profile ray paths (ZOP) were used to determine hydraulic conductivity, K...

  11. AQUIFER CHARACTERIZATION JOHN S. BRIDGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-99ID13727 Institute of Environmental Science,theSocietyisdedicatedtothedissemination of scientific information on sedimentology, stratigraphy, paleontology, environmental sciences, marine geology objectives by publication of two major scientific journals, the Journal of Sedimentary Research (JSR

  12. Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008 2009 2010from2009Vehicle2.996,950

  13. Microsoft Word - S08542_Aquifer

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. .09Annual10 NaturalFourthWork Plan for

  14. Natural Gas Aquifers Storage Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Monthly Annual530 47421 20 210 0

  15. Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

  16. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Engineering Systems Engineering is a holistic engineering discipline that provides systems analysis, systems integration, decision analysis, and systems science products...

  17. Application of a New Structural Model & Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Relevance of research: Improve exploration technologies for range-hosted geothermal systems:Employ new concept models and apply existing methods in new ways; Breaking geothermal exploration tasks into new steps, segmenting the problem differently; Testing new models for dilatent structures; Utilizing shallow thermal aquifer model to focus exploration; Refining electrical interpretation methods to map shallow conductive featuresIdentifying key faults as fluid conduits; and Employ soil gas surveys to detect volatile elements and gases common to geothermal systems.

  18. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline. The geochemistry of the thermal waters of three active hot springs, Big Spring, White Sulfur Spring, and Teepee Fountain, is similar in composition; the geochemistry is characteristic of carbonate or carbonate-bearing siliciclastic aquifers. Previous studies of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system postulate that the thermal waters are a mixture of waters from Paleozoic formations. Major element geochemical analyses available for waters from these formations is not of sufficient quality to determine whether the thermal waters are a mixture of the Paleozoic aquifers. In the time frame of this study (1 year), the geochemistry of all three springs was constant through all four seasons, spanning spring snowmelt and recharge as well as late summer and fall dryness. This relationship is consistent with a deep source not influenced by shallow, local hydrogeology. Anomalies are evident in the historic dataset for the geochemistry of Big Spring. We speculate that anomalies occurring between 1906 and 1926 suggest mixing of source waters of Big Spring with waters from a siliciclastic formation, and that anomalies occurring between 1926 and 1933 suggest mixing with waters from a formation containing gypsum or anhydrite. Decreased concentrations measured in our study, relative to concentrations measured between 1933 and 1976, may reflect mixing of thermal waters with more dilute waters. Current data is not sufficient to rigorously test these suggestions, and events of sufficient scale taking place in these timeframes have not been identified.

  19. In-situ remediation system for volatile organic compounds with deep recharge mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jr., Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (Augusta, SC); Phifer, Mark A. (Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the treatment and remediation of a contaminated aquifer in the presence of an uncontaminated aquifer at a different hydraulic potential. The apparatus consists of a wellbore inserted through a first aquifer and into a second aquifer, an inner cylinder within the wellbore is supported and sealed to the wellbore to prevent communication between the two aquifers. Air injection is used to sparge the liquid having the higher static water level and, to airlift it to a height whereby it spills into the inner cylinder. The second treatment area provides treatment in the form of aeration or treatment with a material. Vapor stripped in sparging is vented to the atmosphere. Treated water is returned to the aquifer having the lower hydraulic potential.

  20. Library System Library System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Library System #12;Library System 5150 Anthony Wayne Drive David Adamany Undergraduate Library that for the current fiscal year, we've been given an additional $600,000 for our library materials budget. We're very subscriptions. The Wayne State University Libraries are deeply committed to providing our faculty and students

  1. A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 can be injected into oil reservoirs in a process known assaline aquifers, oil and gas reservoirs, un-mineable coal

  2. Analysis of the Hydrologic Response Associated With Shutdown and Restart of the 200-ZP-1 WMA T Tank Farm Pump-and-Treat System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines possible hydrologic effects of pump-and-treat remediation actions and provides a detailed analysis of water-level measurements for selected 200-ZP-1 T Tank Farm pump-and-treat system monitor wells during a recent shutdown (May 1, 2008) and restart activity (June 4, 2008) involving extraction well 299-W11-46. Specifically, this report 1) applies to recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses to determine large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) assesses characteristics and conditions that influence hydrologic responses (both laterally and vertically) associated with pump-and-treat systems. The general findings presented in this report have universal application for unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

  3. Five-year summary and evaluation of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in 2004-2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division) [Environmental Science Division

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reviews the performance of the groundwater (and wetlands) restoration program implemented by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the first five years (2004-2009) of this initiative. The report summarizes treatment system operational data and regulatory compliance monitoring results for the site during this period, together with the results of the targeted groundwater sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted in early 2010 (following completion of the fifth year of systems operation), to assess the initial five years of progress of the Utica remediation effort. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing 4 extraction wells (GWEX1-GWEX4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies (Table 1.1). The principal components of the system are shown in Figure 1.3 and are briefly described in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

  4. Conceptual Design of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan M. Ogden

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this final progress report, we describe research results from Phase I of a technical/economic study of fossil hydrogen energy systems with CO{sub 2} sequestration. This work was performed under NETL Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41623, during the period September 2002 through August 2005 The primary objective of the study is to better understand system design issues and economics for a large-scale fossil energy system co-producing H{sub 2} and electricity with CO{sub 2} sequestration. This is accomplished by developing analytic and simulation methods for studying the entire system in an integrated way. We examine the relationships among the different parts of a hydrogen energy system, and identify which variables are the most important in determining both the disposal cost of CO{sub 2} and the delivered cost of H{sub 2}. A second objective is to examine possible transition strategies from today's energy system toward one based on fossil-derived H{sub 2} and electricity with CO{sub 2} sequestration. We carried out a geographically specific case study of development of a fossil H{sub 2} system with CO{sub 2} sequestration, for the Midwestern United States, where there is presently substantial coal conversion capacity in place, coal resources are plentiful and potential sequestration sites in deep saline aquifers are widespread.

  5. Engineering geology and geohydrology of the Burkeville Confining System northeast of Conroe, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Joseph Hawkins

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    is Sa nd e Lower unit Goliad Sa nd Fleming Formation aquifer ur eve e confining la er Oakville Sandstone Jasper aquifer Figure 2. Stratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic unit names (from Carr et al. , 1985). D 0 en mt Ib er ~ I rr...

  6. Porous media compressed air energy storage (PM-CAES): Theory and simulation of the coupled wellbore-reservoir system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of selected compressed air energy storage studes, Pacificaspects of compressed-air energy storage in aquifers, J. ofresources and compressed air energy storage (CAES), Energy,

  7. Modeling CO2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing UpModeling &

  8. HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS OF THREE-PHASE FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    , not the exception, in recovery processes in oil and gas reservoirs ! Primary production (gasdrive or waterdrive) ! Secondary and tertiary production (waterflooding, steamflooding, CO2 injection, ...) + Contamination reservoirs ! Unminable coal beds ! Deep (saline) aquifers #12;3 WHAT DO WE PROPOSE, AND WHY + Objective

  9. Systems Synthesis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis. Integration, and Control System synthesis, integration, and control requires creativity and a broad vision of the big picture of the system to be able to select the best...

  10. System Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S Ystem Brock; Portal E Ngine; P Roduct; Enhydra E Nterprise; S Ystem; R Equirements; T Able; Of C Ontents

    2.1 Overview *..........................................................................................................................................4 2.2 Purpose of the system *....................................................................................................................4 2.3 Product perspective..........................................................................................................................4 2.4 Objectives and success criteria for the system *............................................................................4

  11. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

  12. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

  13. Beneficial effects of groundwater entry into liquid-dominated geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In all active liquid-dominated geothermal systems there is continuous circulation of mass and transfer of heat, otherwise they would slowly cool and fade away. In the natural state these systems are in dynamic equilibrium with the surrounding colder groundwater aquifers. The ascending geothermal fluids cool conductively, boil, or mix with groundwaters, and ultimately may discharge at the surface as fumaroles or hot springs. With the start of fluid production and the lowering of reservoir pressure, the natural equilibrium is disrupted and cooler groundwater tends to enter the reservoir. Improperly constructed or damaged wells, and wells located near the margins of the geothermal system, exhibit temperature reductions (and possibly scaling from mixing of chemically distinct fluids) as the cooler-water moves into the reservoir. These negative effects, especially in peripheral wells are, however, compensated by the maintenance of reservoir pressure and a reduction in reservoir boiling that might result in mineral precipitation in the formation pores and fractures. The positive effect of cold groundwater entry on the behavior of liquid-dominated system is illustrated by using simple reservoir models. The simulation results show that even though groundwater influx into the reservoir causes cooling of fluids produced from wells located near the cold-water recharge area, it also reduces pressure drawdown and boiling in the exploited zone, and sweeps the heat stored in the reservoir rocks toward production wells, thus increasing the productive life of the wells and field. 9 refs.

  14. Microfluidic Systems Integrated Microfluidic Systems**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Microfluidic Systems Integrated Microfluidic Systems** Rustem F. Ismagilov* Keywords: analytical methods · enzymes · microfluidics · microreactors · protein structures Microfluidic systems use networks of channels thinner than a human hair to manipulate nanoliter volumes of re- agents. The goal of microfluidics

  15. Hydraulisk och termisk grundvattenmodellering av ett geoenergilager i Stockholmssen; Hydraulic and thermal groundwater modelling of a geothermal energy system in the Stockholmesker.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landstrm, Carolin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Geothermal energy can be extracted from an aquifer, where the groundwater is used as heat exchange medium while heat and cold are stored in (more)

  16. INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SYSTEMS Providing an efficient, seamless virtual work environment To accelerate progress toward mission goals, our business and operations processes will be aggressively...

  17. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III, "Man-made Geothermal Energy," presented at MiamiA.C.Meyers III; "Manmade Geothermal Energy", Proc. of Miamiin soils extraction of geothermal energy heat storage in the

  18. Simulation of Pollutant Movement in Groundwater Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaleel, R.; Reddell, D. L.

    A three-dimensional model describing the two-phase (air-water) fluid flow equations in an integrated saturated-unsaturated porous medium was developed. Also, a three-dimensional convective-dispersion equation describing the movement of a...

  19. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    abandoned. The two-dimensional model gives a rotationally symmetrical approxima- tion to the reservoir.

  20. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. Meyer Walter Hausz General Electric Co. -TEMPO Center forUtilities, GE72TMP-56, General Electric Co. -TEMPO, Santaof the Interior; General Electric Co. -TEMPO, Santa Barbara,

  1. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Interior; General Electric Co. -TEMPO, Santa Barbara,Utilities, GE72TMP-56, General Electric Co. -TEMPO, SantaF. Meyer Walter Hausz General Electric Co. -TEMPO Center for

  2. AQUIFER STORAGE SITE EVALUATION AND MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Mike

    on the market sectors of electricity transmission, gas transmission, storage and distribution and process science information and expertise. It is responsible for advising the UK government on all aspects research and has extensive state of the art facilities for geomechanics, geochemistry and enhanced oil

  3. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot tap water, air conditioning, and industrial process heat demands could also be readily satisfied, with high-temperature

  4. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FUTURE CONSIDERATIONS FOR CAVERN STORAGE Some of the topicsgravel or sand into the cavern in order to reduce the volumeAbove ground equipment for cavern storage opera- tions.

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high-pressure hot water and cavern of hot oil the potentialC, 18.6 MPa (2 1 700 and deep cavern of hot oil (Collins andprocedures, well design, and cavern leaching have been

  6. The Sparta aquifer, northern Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauters, John F

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the Texas Water Supply Corporation. Chemi- cal tests made on the water from Production Wells No, 1 and 2 (36 and 37) in- dicated that the water produced was turbid but of unusually good chemical quality. A request was made to the United States Goo... limestene (See Table 3, page 2$ . The "Eaton leatel" of Renick and Stensel (1931) Ls included Ln the lower part of the overlying Stone City formation. In accordance with the c), assificatioa of Stexxsel (1935), the upper contact of the surface Sparta has...

  7. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal applications include the recognition of and exploration for deep fracture permeability in crystalline rocks. It is well known that the best currently available...

  8. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legalization of Ground Water Storage," Water Resourcesprocedure to above ground storage of heat in huge insulatedthis project is heat storage in ground-water regions storage

  9. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    summer heat as by solar ponds or "heating towers"; some goodsolar cooking (third world) Relieve firewood depletion Year-round exploitation No cooling towers

  10. Modeling of CO2 storage in aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos,,,

    Feb 6, 2011 ... atmosphere, increasing its temperature (greenhouse effect). To minimize climate change impacts, geological sequestration of CO2 is an...

  11. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8 T. E. 8 1977, Subsurface waste heat ' experimental study:to process heat and waste heat recovery in the primaryand use what is now waste heat. The ability to provide heat

  12. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. J. Molz. Subsurface Waste Heat Storage, Experimentalfor land disposal of waste heat and waste water. Inst. forfor land disposal of waste heat and waste water. Inst. for

  13. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    first passed through a steam turbine to produce electrtcityhigh pressure steam turbines, could have detrimentalwhich flashes into steam to feed turbines when the sun is

  14. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    source of energy, proceedings, International Solar Energybuilding and solar energy could be used as sources of heat

  15. Battery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Thomas J; Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B; Andrew, Michael G

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery module includes a plurality of battery cells and a system configured for passing a fluid past at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells in a parallel manner.

  16. Non-uniqueness problem in estimating original gas in place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a negligence of the effect of a considerable encroaching aquifer that could be thought not to exist. This study shows several examples for synthetic gas reservoir/aquifer systems that are modeled mathematically, then programmed, to simulate...

  17. LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems Presented by: Michael Marti SRF for implementing and monitoring research results (RIC) #12;LRRB Pavement Management Systems LRRB Structure LRRB Current Pavement Management System Used ICON (Goodpointe) Year of Pavement Management System

  18. File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified ForcesFile Systems File Systems For

  19. Investigating Army systems and Systems of Systems for value robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Kevin C. K. (Kevin Cheng Keong)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a value robustness approach to architect defense systems and Systems of Systems (SoS). A value robust system or SoS has the ability to provide continued value to stakeholders by performing well to meet ...

  20. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, Steve; Ershaghi, Iraj

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to over 10,000,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intended to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. In the first phase of the project, state of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic, interference tests and production logs were employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database were used in the construction of a new geologic model of the fracture network. An innovative fracture network reservoir simulator was developed to better understand and manage the aquifers role in pressure maintenance and water production. In the second phase of this project, simulation models were used to plan the redevelopment of the field using high angle wells. Correct placement of the wells is critical to intersect the best-developed fracture zones and to avoid producing large volumes of water from the water leg. Particula r attention was paid to those areas of the field that have not been adequately developed with the existing producers. In cooperation with the DOE and the PTTC, the new data and the new fracture simulation model were shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during Budget Periods I and II. Venoco elected to terminate the project after Budget Period II and not to proceed with the activities planned for Budget Period III.

  1. Gasification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

  2. Gasification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

  3. Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Directives System is the means by which DOE policies, requirements, and responsibilities are developed and communicated throughout the Department. Directives are used to inform, direct, and guide employees in the performance of their jobs, and to enable employees to work effectively within the Department and with agencies, contractors, and the public. Cancels: DOE O 251.1, DOE M 251.1-1

  4. NETL: Coal Gasification Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gasification Systems News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project...

  5. Heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishman, P.J.

    1983-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system utilizing solar panels and buried ground conduits to collect and store heat which is delivered to a heatpump heat exchanger. A heat-distribution fluid continuously circulates through a ground circuit to transfer heat from the ground to the heat exchanger. The ground circuit includes a length of buried ground conduit, a pump, a check valve and the heat exchanger. A solar circuit, including a solar panel and a second pump, is connected in parallel with the check valve so that the distribution fluid transfers solar heat to the heat exchanger for utilization and to the ground conduit for storage when the second pump is energized. A thermostatically instrumented control system energizes the second pump only when the temperature differential between the solar panel inlet and outlet temperatures exceeds a predetermined value and the ground temperature is less than a predetermined value. Consequently, the distribution fluid flows through the solar panel only when the panel is capable of supplying significant heat to the remainder of the system without causing excessive drying of the ground.

  6. Braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norgren, D.U.

    1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

  7. The concepts of total stress, effective stress, and fluid pressure are important to understanding where water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singha, Kamini

    to understanding where water comes from when producing water from a confined aquifer system. However, the overall is not drained, but rather water is produced as a function of the water and aquifer compressibilities. I present describing the extraction of water from confined aquifers is not difficult, understanding how water

  8. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics 208 (2007) 7281 www.elsevier.com/locate/cam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Ian W.

    to the process of modelling a groundwater system. In an unconfined aquifer, the problem is more complex because groundwater estimation; Unconfined aquifer 1. Introduction It is common to assume that groundwater flow.elsevier.com/locate/cam The reconstruction of groundwater parameters from head data in an unconfined aquifer Ian Knowlesa, , Aimin Yanb a

  9. Bearing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kapich, Davorin D. (Carlsbad, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  10. Gasification Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with BigGASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (SPDES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    ;6 Alternate Disposal Options Hold & Haul · Collect waste in drums or tanks and ship offsite Small scale Influent: 100-200 ppt Clarifier: 5-45 ppt Discharge: 60- 120 ppt85% 15% Water table Under drain collection Groundwater: 2-9 ppt Sewage Treatment Plant Sand Filter Beds Rainwater: 5-9 ppt Aquifer #12;8 Factors

  12. Computer Systems Administrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Systems Administrator Fort Collins, CO POSITION A Computer Systems Administrator (Non activities. RESPONSIBILITIES The System Administrator will provide Unix/Linux, Windows computer system or computer science, and three years computer systems administration experience. DURATION The work is planned

  13. Transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurosawa, Kanji (Tokyo, JP); Koga, Bunichiro (Miyagi, JP); Ito, Hideki (Miyagi, JP); Kiriyama, Shigeru (Miyagi, JP); Higuchi, Shizuo (Kanagawa, JP)

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A transport system includes a traveling rail (1) which constitutes a transport route and a transport body (3) which is capable of traveling on the traveling rail in the longitudinal direction of the traveling rail. Flexible drive tubes (5) are arranged on the traveling rail in the longitudinal direction of the traveling rail. The transport body includes a traveling wheel (4) which is capable of rolling on the traveling rail and drive wheels (2) which are capable of rolling on the drive tubes upon receiving the rotational drive power generated by pressure of a pressure medium supplied to the drive tubes while depressing the drive tubes. The traveling rail includes a plurality of transport sections and the transport body is capable of receiving a rotational drive force from the drive tubes at every transport sections. If necessary, a transport route changeover switch which changes over the transport route can be provided between the transport sections.

  14. Ignition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, T.; Ohno, S.

    1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an ignition system of an internal combustion engine which consists of: a permanent magnet supported by a rotary member of the engine adapted to rotate in synchronism with a rotary shaft of the engine; a generating coil for generating an electromotive force to produce an electric current as the permanent magnet acts on the generating coil during the rotation of the rotary member; an ignition capacitor charged by the electric current generated by the generating coil; a thyristor caused to turn on by a counter electromotive force generated by the generating coil to thereby cause the ignition capacitor to begin to discharge; and an ignition coil generating a high voltage as the ignition capacitor begins to discharge, to cause a spark discharge to take place in an ignition plug of the internal combustion engine.

  15. A 3D partial-equilibrium model to simulate coupled hydrogeological, microbiological, and geochemical processes in subsurface systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a laboratory column and redox zonation in a contaminated aquifer. INDEX TERMS: 1615 Global and Lasaga, 1994] or kinetic [e.g., Zheng, 1999; MacQuarrie and Sudicky, 2001] descriptions, efforts

  16. Systems Biology and Systems Medicine: Technology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems Biology and Systems Medicine: Technology, Measurement and Validation Lee Hood Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle How Might One Think About Systems Biology? #12;Radio Waves Sound Waves #12;Immune Response Intra- and inter- cellular networks Development Physiology #12;Contemporary Systems Biology

  17. System architecture of offshore oil production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, James (James Thomas)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an approach to applying Systems Architecture methods to the development of large, complex, commercial systems, particularly offshore oil and gas productions systems. The aim of this research was to ...

  18. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray distribution systems for wastewater are much like lawn sprinkler systems, in that they spray treated wastewater over the surface of a yard. This publication explains how spray distribution systems work, what their design requirements are...

  19. Examining Survivability of Systems of Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekdeci, Brian

    Previous research has identified design principles that enable survivability for systems, but it is unclear if these principles are appropriate and sufficient for systems of systems as well. This paper presents a preliminary ...

  20. Systemic Risk in the International System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingo Piepers

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The risk of systemic war seems dependant on the level of criticality and sensitivity of the International System, and the system's conditions. The level of criticality and sensitivity is dependant on the developmental stage of the International System. Initially, following a systemic war, the increase of the level of criticality and sensitivity go hand in hand. However, at a certain stage the sensitivity of the International System for larger sized wars decreases; as a consequence of a network effect, we argue. This network effect results in increased local stability of the System. During this phase the criticality of the International System steadily increases, resulting in a release deficit. This release deficit facilitates a necessary build up of energy to push the International System, by means of systemic war, into a new stability domain. Systemic war is functional in the periodic rebalancing of an anarchistic international system.

  1. TheU-Tube: A Novel System for Acquiring Borehole Fluid Samplesfrom a Deep Geologic CO2 Sequestration Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

    2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase (supercritical CO2-brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The datasets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydro-geochemical issues affecting CO2 sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-Tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-Tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

  2. Separation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, Leslie S. (Newton, MA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separation system for dewatering radioactive waste materials includes a disposal container, drive structure for receiving the container, and means for releasably attaching the container to the drive structure. Separation structure disposed in the container adjacent the inner surface of the side wall structure retains solids while allowing passage of liquids. Inlet port structure in the container top wall is normally closed by first valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the inlet port and discharge port structure at the container periphery receives liquid that passes through the separation structure and is normally closed by second valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the discharge ports. The container also includes coupling structure for releasable engagement with the centrifugal drive structure. Centrifugal force produced when the container is driven in rotation by the drive structure opens the valve structures, and radioactive waste material introduced into the container through the open inlet port is dewatered, and the waste is compacted. The ports are automatically closed by the valves when the container drum is not subjected to centrifugal force such that containment effectiveness is enhanced and exposure of personnel to radioactive materials is minimized.

  3. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down Gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, U. S. Department of Energy Grant DE-RW0000233 2010 Project Report, prepared by The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC for Inyo County Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Michael J; Bredehoeft, John D., Dr.

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Inyo County completed the first year of the U.S. Department of Energy Grant Agreement No. DE-RW0000233. This report presents the results of research conducted within this Grant agreement in the context of Inyo County's Yucca Mountain oversight program goals and objectives. The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC prepared this report for Inyo County Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office. The overall goal of Inyo County's Yucca Mountain research program is the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, of radionuclide into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Data collected within the Grant is included in interpretive illustrations and discussions of the results of our analysis. The centeral elements of this Grant prgoram was the drilling of exploratory wells, geophysical surveys, geological mapping of the Southern Funeral Mountain Range. The cullimination of this research was 1) a numerical ground water model of the Southern Funeral Mountain Range demonstrating the potential of a hydraulic connection between the LCA and the major springs in the Furnace Creek area of Death Valley, and 2) a numerical ground water model of the Amargosa Valley to evaluate the potential for radionuclide transport from Yucca Mountain to Inyo County, California. The report provides a description of research and activities performed by The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC on behalf of Inyo County, and copies of key work products in attachments to this report.

  4. Object Management Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollu, Aleks Ohannes

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Object-Oriented Database Management Systems for EngineeringR. Cassel. Distribution Management Systems: Functions and8-PWR 1988. Network Management Systems 52 Subodh Bapat.

  5. Environmental Management System Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R-3 Environmental Management System Plan References 30.of Energy, Safety Management System Policy, DOE P 450.4 (E), Environmental Management Systems ? Requirements with

  6. Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems Michael S. Zisman*Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target andthe Neutrino Factory systems downstream of the target and

  7. Franklin File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Files systems Files systems NERSC's global home and project file systems are available on Franklin. Additionally, Franklin has over 400 TB of locally attached high-performance...

  8. Communication Systems Chair of Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    , porn sites, web services, ... :-)) #12;8 | 28 Communication Systems network insecurity Inner and intra

  9. Logical Systems Incorporated The Help Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Tim

    Logical Systems Incorporated The Help Systems T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S Introduction ..................................... page 2 HELP/CMD ..................................... page 3 HELPRESx ................................... page 17 #12;LDOS Help System Page 1 The LDOS HELP Systems Introduction This documentation covers all

  10. System design description cone penetrometer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seda, R.Y., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The system design description documents in detail the design of the cone penetrometer system. The systems includes the cone penetrometer physical package, raman spectroscopy package and moisture sensor package. Information pertinent to the system design, development, fabrication and testing is provided.

  11. D0 Cryo System Control System Autodialer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbin, J.; /Fermilab

    1990-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The DO cryogenic system is controlled by a TI565-PLC based control system. This allows the system to be unmanned when in steady state operation. System experts will need to be contacted when system parameters exceed normal operating points and reach alarm setpoints. The labwide FIRUS system provides one alarm monitor and communication link. An autodialer provides a second and more flexible alarm monitor and communication link. The autodialer monitors contact points in the control system and after receiving indication of an alarm accesses a list of experts which it calls until it receives an acknowledgement. There are several manufacturers and distributors of autodialer systems. This EN explains the search process the DO cryo group used to fmd an autodialer system that fit the cryo system's needs and includes information and specs for the unit we chose.

  12. Industrial and Systems engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Industrial and Systems engineering COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofIndustrialandSystemsEngineering EDGE Engineering Entrepreneur Certificate Program is a great addition to an industrial and systems to expert clinical recommendations. engineering.wayne.edu/isefaculty Industrial and systems engineering

  13. Complex System Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Christopher

    2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of terms such as Engineering Systems, System of systems and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

  14. NETL: Energy Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and increase the efficiency of producing syngas. Gasifipedia | Feed Systems | Gasifier Optimization | Syngas Processing | Systems Analyses | Gasification Plant Databases...

  15. Gasification Systems Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project...

  16. Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Themes Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems...

  17. N Controller Target System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Arch Evaluator Adaptation Engine Model Manager Adaptation Executor Running System System API System Layer Probes Resource Discovery Effectors Running System System API System Layer Probes Resource COSMOS asynchronous push pull COSMOS (a)synchronous pull Local SCA binding Remote SCA binding (REST, RPC

  18. March 23, 2008 Databases: Information Systems 1 Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 23, 2008 Databases: Information Systems 1 Information Systems #12;March 23, 2008 Databases: Information Systems 2 Objectives What is an Information System (IS) + Classification of Information Systems + Evolution of Information Systems + Information System Management + Performance Requirements of ISs + #12

  19. Influence strategies for systems of systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Nirav Bharat, 1979-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed decision making has been identified as a source of managerial complexity for leaders of systems of systems (SoS). A new framework, AIR (Anticipation-Influence-Reaction), is proposed to capture the feedback ...

  20. Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Nancy

    Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

  1. Landscape Management Systems The Visual Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Landscape Management Systems The Visual Management System of the Forest Service, USDA1 Warren R presentation on how the Visual Management System (VMS) functions. 1/ Presented at the National Conference Manual 2380, Landscape Management, USDA. INTRODUCTION The American people are concerned about the quality

  2. Modeling and assessment of flow and transport in the Hueco Bolson, a transboundary groundwater system: the El Paso / Cuidad Juarez case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nwaneshiudu, Okechukwu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Additionally, historical, current, and future stresses on the Hueco Bolson alluvial aquifer in the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez area due to excessive groundwater withdrawal can affect contaminant migration in the area. In the current study, an updated and improved...

  3. Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Could Sequestration of CO2 be Combined with the DevelopmentTOUGH2 Code for Studies of CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers,and J. Ennis- King. CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological

  4. Systems Science Harder House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems Science Harder House 1604 SW 10th Avenue 503-725-4960 www.sysc.pdx.edu/ M.S. Ph.D. Systems governing systems of widely differing types. Systems concepts and techniques are used extensively for both who are skilled in modern methods of decision making and systems design and who are capable

  5. Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems Maximal Parabolics Results Minimal Fusion Systems Ellen Henke University of Birmingham Ellen Henke Minimal Fusion Systems #12;Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems Maximal Parabolics Results Contents 1 Introduction 2 Minimal Fusion Systems 3 Maximal Parabolics 4 Results Ellen

  6. Conclusions Fractionated Space Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Conclusions Fractionated Space Systems There is a growing interest in fractionated space system design. Fractionated space systems are inherently flexible and modular. There are many key technologies of flexibility serves as a source of motivation for system designers to embed flexibility into a system design (i

  7. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  8. Analyzing Scrip Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kristine Dianne

    Scrip systems provide a nonmonetary trade economy for exchange of resources. We model a scrip system as a stochastic game and study system design issues on selection rules to match potential trade partners over time. We ...

  9. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

  10. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work...

  11. Umbra's system representation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Michael James

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Umbra System representation. Umbra System representation, initially developed in the spring of 2003, is implemented in Incr/Tcl using concepts borrowed from Carnegie Mellon University's Architecture Description Language (ADL) called Acme. In the spring of 2004 through January 2005, System was converted to Umbra 4, extended slightly, and adopted as the underlying software system for a variety of Umbra applications that support Complex Systems Engineering (CSE) and Complex Adaptive Systems Engineering (CASE). System is now a standard part Of Umbra 4. While Umbra 4 also includes an XML parser for System, the XML parser and Schema are not described in this document.

  12. Control Systems Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems within the nation's critical infrastructure. The CSSP assists control systems vendors and asset ownersoperators in identifying security vulnerabilities and developing...

  13. Flex Fuel Vehicle Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Variable Advanced Management Injection Injection Sensors Control Units Fuel Supply & Plastic Parts Control Transmission Engineering Gasoline Systems GSENS, GSENS-NA System...

  14. Control system design method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, David G. (Tijeras, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  15. Euclid File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File storage File storage Disk Quota Change Request Form Euclid File Systems Euclid has 3 kinds of file systems available to users: home directories, scratch directories and...

  16. Characterization of a Dipole Flow System Using Point Velocity Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ian Reed

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    of DFRTTs at the CFB Borden site, in Ontario, Canada, suggested that a homogeneous aquifer model was insufficient to replicate the experimental breakthrough curves. The DFRTT breakthrough data showed earlier arrival 6 times than expected from the model... holes drilled into the downgradient end of that container (Figures 1 and 2). Sand was contained within the second compartment by lining the irrigation fittings and the effluent end of the compartment with Nitex mesh. Because all the compartments...

  17. Evaluation of Analytical and Numerical Techniques for Defining the Radius of Influence for an Open-Loop Ground Source Heat Pump System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Mackley, Rob D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Horner, Jacob A.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In an open-loop groundwater heat pump (GHP) system, groundwater is extracted, run through a heat exchanger, and injected back into the ground, resulting in no mass balance changes to the flow system. Although the groundwater use is non-consumptive, the withdrawal and injection of groundwater may cause negative hydraulic and thermal impacts to the flow system. Because GHP is a relatively new technology and regulatory guidelines for determining environmental impacts for GHPs may not exist, consumptive use metrics may need to be used for permit applications. For consumptive use permits, a radius of influence is often used, which is defined as the radius beyond which hydraulic impacts to the system are considered negligible. In this paper, the hydraulic radius of influence concept was examined using analytical and numerical methods for a non-consumptive GHP system in southeastern Washington State. At this location, the primary hydraulic concerns were impacts to nearby contaminant plumes and a water supply well field. The results of this study showed that the analytical techniques with idealized radial flow were generally unsuited because they over predicted the influence of the well system. The numerical techniques yielded more reasonable results because they could account for aquifer heterogeneities and flow boundaries. In particular, the use of a capture zone analysis was identified as the best method for determining potential changes in current contaminant plume trajectories. The capture zone analysis is a more quantitative and reliable tool for determining the radius of influence with a greater accuracy and better insight for a non-consumptive GHP assessment.

  18. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - 400sec 464 MMscfd - Minimum Pressure - 830 psi CAES Aquifer Storage System Geology of Iowa Mt. Simon Sandstone Jordan Sandstone St. Peter Sandstone Glenwood Fm....

  20. Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Mariner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L. Sorey, Robert H. Mariner, Alfred H. Truesdell (1979) Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long Valley, California Michael...

  1. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Access Control and Traffic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or hazardous constituents as defined by RCRA are called AOCs. The different geologic media of the canyons system-sediments, aquifers, and parent material-are categorized as...

  2. americium sulfates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    behavior in these environments is affected Kaufman, Laura 292 Evaluation of kinetic controls on sulfate reduction in a contaminated wetland-aquifer system Texas A&M...

  3. actinium sulfates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    behavior in these environments is affected Kaufman, Laura 310 Evaluation of kinetic controls on sulfate reduction in a contaminated wetland-aquifer system Texas A&M...

  4. a-calcium sulfate hemihydrate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    behavior in these environments is affected Kaufman, Laura 302 Evaluation of kinetic controls on sulfate reduction in a contaminated wetland-aquifer system Texas A&M...

  5. (This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    -aquifer system John Mieles a , Hongbin Zhan a,b, a Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - almeria spain alteracion Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    del Grup d'Hidrologia Subterrnia Dept. Enginyeria del Terreny, Cartogrfica i Geofsica UPC Summary: Groundwater flow and recharge in the Doana aquifer system (Huelva, SW Spain)...

  7. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  8. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USA, Jacksonville, FL Jacksonville Solar Energy Generation Facility Constructed Systems that produce electricity

  9. Space System Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McManus, Dr. Hugh

    Final Report of SSPARC: the Space Systems, Policy, and Architecture Research Consortium (Thrust II and III)

  10. SYSTEM DESIGN Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · 48% Efficiency PREREFORMER ZNO HDS TURBO EXPANDER FUEL CONDENSER FUEL EXHAUST H2 FUEL H2 A C FUEL Cell Systems High Power Shipboard System 625kW SSFC Demo 45-50% Efficient System Low Power High EfficiencyLow Power, High Efficiency Tactical Power System · Enable 3X improvement in Ship Service Fuel Cell

  11. An Evaluation of Long-Term Performance of Liner Systems for Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur S. Rood; Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional liner systems consisting of a geosynthetic membrane underlying a waste disposal facility coupled with a leachate collection system have been proposed as a means of containing releases of low-level radioactive waste within the confines of the disposal facility and thereby eliminating migration of radionuclides into the vadose zone and groundwater. However, this type of hydraulic containment liner system is only effective as long as the leachate collection system remains functional or an overlying cover limits the total infiltration to the volumetric pore space of the disposal system. If either the leachate collection system fails, or the overlying cover becomes less effective during the 1,000s of years of facility lifetime, the liner may fill with water and release contaminated water in a preferential or focused manner. If the height of the liner extends above the waste, the waste will become submerged which could increase the release rate and concentration of the leachate. If the liner extends near land surface, there is the potential for contamination reaching land surface creating a direct exposure pathway. Alternative protective liner systems can be engineered that eliminate radionuclide releases to the vadose zone during operations and minimizing long term migration of radionuclides from the disposal facility into the vadose zone and aquifer. Non-traditional systems include waste containerization in steel or composite materials. This type of system would promote drainage of clean infiltrating water through the facility without contacting the waste. Other alternatives include geochemical barriers designed to transmit water while adsorbing radionuclides beneath the facility. Facility performance for a hypothetical disposal facility has been compared for the hydraulic and steel containerization liner alternatives. Results were compared in terms of meeting the DOE Order 435.1 low-level waste performance objective of 25 mrem/yr all-pathways dose during the 1) institutional control period (0-100 years), compliance period (0-1000 years) and post-compliance period (>1000 years). Evaluation of the all pathway dose included the dose from ingestion and irrigation of contaminated groundwater extracted from a well 100 meters downgradient, in addition to the dose received from direct contact of radionuclides deposited near the surface resulting from facility overflow. Depending on the disposal facility radionuclide inventory, facility design, cover performance, and the location and environment where the facility is situated, the dose from exposure via direct contact of near surface deposited radionuclides can be much greater than the dose received via transport to the groundwater and subsequent ingestion.

  12. Hydrogeologic properties and ground-water chemistry of the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed at well 699-25-80 (DB-14) Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Howland, M.D.; Strait, S.R.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offsite migration studies were conducted to characterize the hydraulic properties and groundwater chemistry of confined aquifer systems within the Hanford Site. These studies support the recommendations in ERDA-1538 to provide input for hydrologic modeling of groundwater flow within the Hanford Site, to afford information concerning possible contamination of underlying confined aquifer systems and to make the results available to the public. This report presents analytical results and aquifer test procedures used in characterizing the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed at well 699-25-80. The overall close association in groundwater chemistries and presence of elevated nitrate levels suggest that the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed may be locally in communication with the overlying unconfined aquifer system. Other physical evidence which indicates a potential local communication with the unconfined aquifer system includes: favorable stratigraphic position; absence of the confining Elephant Mountain basalt in surrounding areas; and intersection of a recharge boundary during aquifer tests of well 699-25-80.

  13. 3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly In The

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitec doWinvestFlume Facility Jump to:EnergyLlucmajor

  14. Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - LBNL 57406 Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and I.S. Walker and Air Conditioning), and Stacy Hunt and Ananda Harzell (IBACOS). #12;- 3 - Renovating Residential HVAC Guideline for Residential HVAC Retrofits (http

  15. ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    countries to install solar energy technologies into local schools and hospitals. In its Energy PolicyMEng ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS #12;MEng ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS Electrical energy is vital aspects of modern life. One of the biggest challenges facing society is the need for reliable energy

  16. System Design | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    System Design System Design This template is used to define the system design System Design More Documents & Publications Transition Plan Training Plan Feasibility Study Report...

  17. AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC INSPECTION EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David N. Rocheleau, Senior Investigator; Edward A. Hamilton, Associate Director, SCUREF; Jerry L. Hudgins, Senior Investigator; Paul McCarty, Graduate Research Assistant; Robert J. Schalkoff, Senior Investigator; Robert O. Pettus, Project Manager & Principal Investigator

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains appendices on these topics: COMPUTERS AND CONTROLS; COMPUTER VISION SYSTEM; ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS; MECHANICAL SYSTEMS; ROBOTIC VEHICLE SYSTEMS; FIELD TRIALS.

  18. Performance of Integrated Systems of Automated Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byoung-Chul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming SystemsRoller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming SystemsBerkeley, CA 94720 Abstract Daylight responsive dimming

  19. Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system, system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard-C cabinet arrangement system design description for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System.

  20. Hydrostratigraphy of the General Separations Area, Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aadland, R.K.; Harris, M.K.; Lewis, C.M.; Gaughan, T.F. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Westbrook, T.M. (Dames and Moore, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed analysis and synthesis of geophysical, core, and hydrologic data from 230 wells were used to delineate the hydrostratigraphy and aquifer characteristics of the General Separations Area at SRS. The study area is hydrologically bounded on the north and northwest by Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and on the south by Fourmile Branch (FB). The Cretaceous-Tertiary sedimentary sequence underlying the study area is divided into two Aquifer Systems; in ascending order, Aquifer Systems I and 11. The study concentrated on Aquifer System U, which includes all the Tertiary sediments above the Black Mingo Group (Paleocene) to the water table. This report includes a series of lithostratigraphic cross-sections, piezometric gradient profiles, head ratio contour maps, aquifer isopach maps, and potentiometric surface maps which illustrate the aquifer characteristics of the study area.