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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Command and Control in the Iraqi Insurgency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of three critical facets: urban-based, Muslim-centered, or multi-factious. The urban setting of the Iraqi insurgency makes it comparable to the Algerian and Irish Republican Army insurgencies. In these cases, the high population density and built... likely capitalized on each of these distinctly urban advantages to shape and improve its C3 system. The Muslim identity of the Iraqi insurgents parallels the religious beliefs and culture of the insurgents in Afghanistan, Kashmir, and Algeria...

Atkinson, Dwain; Collins, Matthew; Colmenares, Monica; McBane, Carla; Ritter, Kyle; Welling, Glen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Page 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetlands ecology and management. They encountered water treatment and sewage treatment facilities that hadPage 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands DUWC Director says restoration efforts are progressing, but the record is mixed hen Duke University Wetland Center Director Curtis

3

LANGUAGE ATTITUDES OF IRAQI NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ARABIC: A SOCIOLINGUISTIC INVESTIGATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Kurdistan). On the formal level, all legislations, laws, and official documents should be in both languages. The Iraqi constitution itself is written in SA and Kurdish. A range of other minority languages are spoken by different ethnic groups in Iraq...

Murad, Mohammed Kamil

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

Portrayal of the Iraqi Kurdistan Region in U.S. Newspapers: 2000-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract The Iraqi Kurdistan region claims that it is a close ally of the United States and supports its agenda in the Middle East. Therefore, to know what issues, events and sources the U.S. mainstream newspapers use to portray the region...

Ghafour, Goran Sabah

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

A Recent Story of NGOs in Northern Iraqi Kurdistan Giorgio Francia1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Recent Story of NGOs in Northern Iraqi Kurdistan Giorgio Francia1 and Gérard Gautier2 Abstract In comparison to the other areas of Iraq, Kurdistan Region, in the northern part of the country, witnessed very on the day-to-day life in Kurdistan Region, as well as ­ paradoxically ­ a negative one on the funding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

6

A study of the lipid composition of two varieties of Iraqi dates and changes in lipid materials during storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Deen Hussain, University of Baghdad Directed by: Dr. C. W. Dill Two varieties of Iraqi dates were analysed by thin layer and gas liquid chromatography for their lipid classes end their fatty acid composition. Phospholipids and free fatty acids represented... variety ( 11$), A study of the fatty acid composition of the lipid classes revealed that palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids are the most prevalent fatty acids in date lipids and represent approximately 80$ of the acids present...

Hussain, Baha Al-Deen

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke200620062006Canadian Lloydminster Iraqi

8

--No Title--  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algerian| Brazilian| Canadian | Canadian | Canadian Month | Saharan | Marlim | Bow River | Light Sour | Lloydminster | Blend | | Heavy | Blend | ||...

9

Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 ofIBRFComplex"DepartmentMerrimackof

10

Prehistory of Agriculture: New Experimental and Ethnographic Approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigations in Iraqi Kurdistan, edited by R. ]. 'at Iarmo (in Iraqi Kurdistan) and Beidha (in Iordan). We nowand southeast toward Iraqi Kurdistan and southwest Iran. It

Anderson, Patricia C

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Humanity Must Be Defended: War, Politics and Humanitarian Relief in Iraq, 1990-2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haiti, Somalia, Iraqi Kurdistan and Cambodia. A few oldprovinces into Iraqi Kurdistan in the wake of Operationsometimes called Iraqi Kurdistan). The NGO representatives

McIntyre, Adrian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algerian Saharan Blend Brazilian Marlim Canadian Bow River Heavy Canadian Light Sour Blend Canadian Lloydminster Ecuadorian Oriente Ecuadorian Napo 1983 Average ... - -...

13

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average ... W 13.32 - W 12.87 13.24 -...

14

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average ... W 14.07 - W 13.85 13.54 -...

15

Iraqi Civil Society Solidarity initiative Velletri: 25-31 March 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: .........................................................................................19 The Kurds, the boundaries of Kurdistan and Kirkuk

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

Using institutions to moderate separatist tendencies : a focus on Iraqi Kurdistan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis offers an alternate theory to the problem of secessionism by integrating two separate fields of research: nationalism and constitutional engineering. In particular, I apply two prominent theories of nationalism, ...

Weinstock, Adele B., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

In the shadow of segregation : women's identity in the modern Iraqi house  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis intends to develop a critical perspective on the culture and politics of the modern house in Iraq. It advances the discussion from the authoritative religious environment of women's segregation in the Islamic ...

Ani, Raya H

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Maya Zooarchaeology: New Directions in Method and Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investiga- tions in Iraqi Kurdistan. Studies in Ancient Ori-Investigations in Iraqi Kurdistan, edited by R. J. Braidwood

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

US Government Outsourcing, the Private Military Industry, and Operation Iraqi Freedom: A Case Study in Conflict Contracting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Activities Inventory Reform FAR Federal Acquisition Regulations FPDS-NG Federal Procurement Data SystemNext Generation 5 GAO Government Accountability Office GMASS Global Maintenance and Supply Services GOCO government...

Halpin, Allison Ann

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Agricultural Development Assessments and Strategies in Post Conflict Settings: An Empirical Case Study of Eight Southern Iraqi Provinces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................ 44 SWOT Analysis .............................................................................. 45 Change Agents and Agricultural Development ............................. 46 The Sequence...

Hafer, James C.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Civil Wars With or Without an End: Postwar Violence and Civil War Recurrence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PKK: Partiya Karkaren Kurdistan. In Terror, Insurgency,Attacks on Civilians in Iraqi Kurdistan. 20 December.civilians- iraqi-kurdistan (June 23, 2012). Humphreys,

Omae, Masahiro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

University of New Orleans Office of Research and Sponsored Programs Weekly Funding Opportunities August 11, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Iraqi Kurdistan Region Notice seeking proposals to develop and implement a partnership program between universities in the Iraqi Kurdistan Region. Applications are due September 1, 2014. Approximately up to $400

Li, X. Rong

23

International Human Rights Activism in the United States during the Cold War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would be a reemergence of Kurdistan during World War II,the genocides in Iraqi Kurdistan, the former Yugoslavia, orAfghanistan, Somaliland, Iraqi Kurdistan, and Angola all had

Ramirez, Zachary Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Parallel worlds: empirical region and place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the local names in Iraqi Kurdistan are in Arabic. The mostnotably the United States. Kurdistan participates in the

Ford, Of The

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

University of New Orleans Office of Research and Sponsored Programs Weekly Funding Opportunities August 5, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kurdistan Region Notice seeking proposals to develop and implement a university partnership program for ?rural? universities (universities outside major cities) in the Iraqi Kurdistan region that links Iraqi universities in smaller cities in the Iraqi Kurdistan region with U.S. institutions to improve university

Kulp, Mark

26

University of New Orleans Office of Research and Sponsored Programs Weekly Funding Opportunities July 29, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kurdistan Region Notice seeking proposals to develop and implement a university partnership program for ?rural? universities (universities outside major cities) in the Iraqi Kurdistan region that links Iraqi universities in smaller cities in the Iraqi Kurdistan region with U.S. institutions to improve university

Kulp, Mark

27

Groundwater investigation and modeling - western desert of Iraq.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The region of interest is part from Iraqi western desert covering an area about 100,000 km. Several of the large wadis such as Hauran, Amij, (more)

Al-Muqdadi, Sameh Wisam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Aspect and Argument Licensing in Neo-Aramaic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Neo-Aramaic dialect of Kurdistan: Texts, grammar, andlanguages from di?erent communities in Turkish Kurdistan,Iraqi Kurdistan, Iranian Azerbaijan, and Ira- nian

Kalin, Laura Mennen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

For Cause and Comrade: Devoted Actors and Willingness to Fight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wholesale support for the defense of Kurdistan (whetherIraqi Kurdistan orGreater Kurdistan or, most often, both). Here, we find that

Atran, Scott; Sheikh, Hammad; Gomez, Angel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke200620062006Canadian Lloydminster

31

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke200620062006Canadian Lloydminster132.9

32

Research Article Evaluation of changes in the Kuwaiti prawn fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990. The Iraqis released 6­8 million barrels of crude oil into the Arabian and 500 km of coastline were covered by oil (Al-Yamani et al., 1993). The Iraqis also set 604 of Kuwait's oil wells on fire (Al-Awadi, 1992). The oil well fires lasted for eight months, and the conse- quent

Chen, Yong

33

Design of a composite combat helmet liner for prevention of blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air blast-induced traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) represent a significant percentage of military personnel injuries observed in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Prevalence of blast-induced ...

Vechart, Andrew (Andrew Peter)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

THE HUMAN ANIMAL Unlearning what nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Iraqi border in 1991 precisely because Kuwait had oil that Iraq coveted. But knowing that war common triggers are the desires or needs for territory, resources, or mates. Ants are a well

Starks, Philip

35

Examining the influence of civilian casualties on insurgent attacks in Iraq  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although there have been several attempts to tabulate civilian casualties in the Iraq War, the effect of these casualties on the Iraqi population and insurgent organizations has not been thoroughly examined. From the ...

Karnis, Jessica Eve

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Economic interests in the domestic politics of war : evidence from U.S. decisions to go to war with Iraq in 1991 and 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

percent of the worlds oil reserves, additional leverage inin size. Kuwaits oil reserves, while relatively large, onlyto offset Iraqi Proven oil reserves figures from Humphreys

Seljan, Samuel Sierra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Aspect as the Source of Diathesis in North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic and Beyond with Remarks on Transitivity, Accusativity, Ergativity and Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Eastern Neo-Aramaic (NENA), its dialects originate mainly in Kurdistan (currently shared between Turkey, Iraq hand some 20 thousand Jews, most of whom call it Aramaic save those of Northwestern Iraqi Kurdistan

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

Computational modeling of trabecular bone in lower extremity injuries due to impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lower extremity injuries resulting from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) pose a serious threat to the safety of military troops. Reports from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom identify IEDs as the ...

Pino, Wendy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

Baker, Arnold Barry

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Spatial resolution of temperature and chemical species in a flame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Winefordner et al. (51). AE . /k A. g. I. B. ln ~ + ln ? + 1n? 1 A. g. i B. (36) where: subscript i = the level excited by the source subscript j = the thermally assisted level flame temperature AE . . ij the difference in energy between i and j.... Schweikert (Member) Abdel-Kad Ayou (Memb ) Vaneica . Y ng (Member) May 1984 ABSTRACT Spatial Resolution of Temperature and Chemical Species in a Flame. (May 1984) Fakhrildeen Niema Albahadily, B. S. , University of Basrah/Iraq Chairman of Advisory...

Albahadily, Fakhrildeen Niema

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Iraq hedges on arms inspections; CIA warns of ongoing programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International inspection terms received distinctly mixed signals from Iraqi officials during December inspection visits. Iraq's liasion to U.N. Special Commission (UNSCOM) inspection teams told the head of an UNSCOM chemical and biological weapons team that began a visit December 5 that Iraqi citizens would like to drink the blood' of the inspectors, and that Iraq would no longer cooperate with U.N. weapon inspection activities. An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear inspection team in Iraq at the same time, however, was told by its chief Iraqi liasion officer that Baghdad was finally willing to answer questions about Iraq's foreign procurement network for nuclear equipment and technology. These contradictory developments came only days before the head of U.S. Intelligence made renewed allegations about Iraq's weapons capabilities.

Wolfsthal, J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Revue de presse ANGLAIS Semaine du 10 au 16 octobre 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kicks up a storm about black women and marriage. Middle East and Africa American visas for Iraqis - Lost. Learning English Parents get key to safer teenage driving : (By Janet Hardy-Gould) : Teenagers are not the most reliable drivers, which is why car maker Ford is offering parents remote control when

Rennes, Université de

43

Transcript of Wilkerson interview Col Lawrence Wilkerson, the chief of staff to former US Secretary of State Colin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to sit in Kuwait until the military forces had moved into Baghdad, and then going to Baghdad and other with some oil-field fires, put Ahmed Chalabi or some other similar Iraqi in charge and leave correct in assuming that? Well in the two decision-making processes into which I had the most insight

Colquhoun, David

44

Drilling continues upward momentum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses how the drilling recovery that began during the second half of 1989 is continuing into 1990. On top of this, the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait has caused disarray in oil markets, driving up oil prices, and disrupting access to oil supplies. Potentially, this upheaval could lead to an upward spike in worldwide drilling activity.

Moritis, G.

1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

45

Kuwait: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the major event in Kuwait today is the ongoing effort to control blowouts stemming from Iraqi demolition of oil wells and producing facilities last February. A total of 732 wells---about two- thirds of all wells in Kuwait---were blown up. All but 80 caught on fire.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Aramaic, the language of the Babylonian Talmud and other important sacred texts,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Today JNA is still actively spoken by two ancient Jewish communities: the Jews of Kurdistan and the Nash in Kurdistan. Dr. Hezy Mutzafi of the TAU Department of Hebrew Culture Studies has been documenting the diverse only by a handful of elderly Jews from the area of Barzan in Iraqi Kurdistan. His description

Greenspan, Hayit

47

Counterpoint Returning Evidence to the Scene of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be Repatriated to Iraqi Kurdistan BRUCE P. MONTGOMERY R?SUM? Le 22 avril 2008, cinq ans après l documents du renseignement saisis et d'intervenir auprès du « gou vernement du Kurdistan » afin de retourner'Anfal au Kurdistan iraquien. ABSTRACT On 22 April 2008, five years after the American invasion of Iraq

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

48

a monthly publication of outreach and international affairs volume 2, issue 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

." The educators were part the Iraqi Kurdistan Rural Universities Partnership Program, an initiative funded in rural Kurdistan and the U.S. and to help advance English language departments in the region. In addition Kurdistan Rural Universities Partnership Program pose on graduation day with professors and administrators

Buehrer, R. Michael

49

UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HOUSE PERMANENT SELECT COMMITTEE ON INTELLIGENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Department of Energy in the Carter Administration my responsibilities included our nuclear weapons program points: Intelligence on WMD was a high priority concern of the Clinton administration, just as it was in the George H.W. Bush administration. The apparent misestimate of the presence and readiness of Iraqi

Deutch, John

50

Conceptual Framework for the Use of Fish Parasites as Bioindicators of Acute and Chronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Perturbation After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico 1Auburn University: Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico- exploratory oil well Ixtoc explodes, sinks (10.8, 5%) March 24th, 1989: Prince: Gulf of Mexico- oil tanker Megaborg fire (378, 189%) January 21st, 1991: Kuwait- Gulf War I, Iraqi

Kane, Andrew S.

51

Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago 5550 South Greenwood Avenue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago 5550 South Greenwood Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60637 Iraqi cuisine on the streets of Chicago, the University of Chicago's Smart Museum of Art surveys Director and Chief Curator of the Smart Museum of Art. "But it wasn't until the last few decades

He, Chuan

52

Overview of physical oceanographic measurements taken during the Mt. Mitchell Cruise to the ROPME Sea Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ROPME Sea Area (RSA) is one of the most important commercial waterways in the world. However, the number of direct oceanographic observations is small. An international program to study the effect of the Iraqi oil spill on the environment was sponsored by the ROPME, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Reynolds, R.M.

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Saudi Aramco describes crisis oil flow hike  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On Aug. 2, 1990, Iraqi forces invaded Kuwait and triggered one of the most severe crises in the world's oil supplies since World War II. Within a few days of the invasion, Iraqi and Kuwaiti oil exports were embargoed, and almost 4.6 million b/d oil of production was removed from world markets. This shortfall amounted to about 20% of total Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries production at the time and could have proven disastrous to the world's industrial and financial well-being. However, there was no disruption to the major economies of the world. This paper reports that the primary reason for the cushioning of this impact was the massive expansion in production undertaken by Saudi Arabian Oil Co. (Saudi Aramco).

Not Available

1991-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e-announcements about the cen- sus and other NASS products and programs, go to www.usda.gov/nass/, click on News and Coming Events then click on Subscribe to News Releases and Announcements. For additional information re- garding the Census, call... will host a tour for the delega- tion, highlighting current rice research efforts. Jim Willis, President of Inter- national Programs for the US Rice Producers Association attended the meetings in Jordan last month where discussions focused on the Iraqi...

55

11/10/09 12:30 PMIraq Swears by Bomb Detector U.S. Sees as Useless -NYTimes.com Page 1 of 4http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/04/world/middleeast/04sensors.html?_r=1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/10/09 12:30 PMIraq Swears by Bomb Detector U.S. Sees as Useless - NYTimes.com Page 1 of 4http.Y. / REGION BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE HEALTH SPORTS OPINION ARTS STYLE TRAVEL JOBS REAL ESTATE AUTOS AFRICA Detector U.S. Sees as Useless Johan Spanner for The New York Times A device used by Iraqi forces to detect

Llope, William J.

56

UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.gov/vhapublications/ViewPublication.asp?pub_ID=1158 See also, Depleted Uranium Fact Sheet http://www1.va.gov/gulfwar/docs/DepletedUraniumFAQSheet.doc EVALUATION PROTOCOL FOR NON-GULF WAR VETERANS WITH POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DEPLETED URANIUM (DU) http://www1.va.gov/vhapublications/ViewPublication.asp?pub_ID=315 EVALUATION PROTOCOL FOR GULF WAR AND IRAQI FREEDOM VETERANS WITH POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DEPLETED

Kasman, Alex

57

Oil flow resumes in war torn onshore Neutral Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil production has resumed in the war ravaged onshore fields of the Neutral Zone between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 1 year after the end of Persian Gulf War. Initial production of about 40,000 b/d is expected to rise to 60,000 b/d by year end. This paper reports that prior to the January-February 1991 war to oust occupying Iraqi military forces from Kuwait, the Neutral Zone's Wafra, South Umm Gudair, and South Fuwaris onshore fields produced about 135,000 b/d.

Not Available

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

58

Kuwaiti oil sector shows more signs of recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Kuwait's oil sector continues to show signs of recovery from the Persian Gulf war. On Mar. 23 Kuwait Petroleum Co. (KPC) loaded the country's first shipment of liquefied petroleum gas for export since the Iraqi invasion in August 1990. In addition, the first shipment of Kuwaiti crude recovered from giant oil lakes formed by hundreds of wild wells sabotaged in the war was to arrive by tanker in Naples, Italy, late last month. The tanker is carrying 210,000 bbl of crude. However, the project to clean up the lakes and recover more oil, undertaken by Bechtel Corp. with Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC), has reached a stand still.

Not Available

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

59

Meeting report:Iraq oil ministry needs assessment workshop.3-5 Septemner 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and Sandia National Laboratories met with mid-level representatives from Iraq's oil and gas companies and with former employees and senior managers of Iraq's Ministry of Oil September 3-5 in Amman, Jordan. The goals of the workshop were to assess the needs of the Iraqi Oil Ministry and industry, to provide information about capabilities at DOE and the national laboratories relevant to Iraq, and to develop ideas for potential projects.

Littlefield, Adriane C.; Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006.......... 54.96 57.89Canadian| Iraqi |

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006.......... 54.96 57.89Canadian| Iraqi

62

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006.......... 54.96 57.89Canadian| Iraqi132.9

63

Vapour extraction (VAPEX) process for recovery of heavy oil and bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over 90% of the vast resources of bitumen and heavy oil in Canada, in situ recovery processes have to be developed to produce and utilize them efficiently and economically. Thermal recovery processes using steam, although effective for thick reservoirs with good quality sands, are increasingly proving to be uneconomical, particularly for thin, shaley, or bottom water reservoirs. The inefficiency is caused by large heat losses, high water requirement, extensive surface facilities, and adverse environmental impact. To overcome these problems, a new non-thermal vapour extraction (VAPEX) process has been developed. The process is closely related to the Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) concept. However, in the VAPEX process the steam chamber is replaced with a chamber containing light hydrocarbon vapours close to its dew point at the reservoir pressure. If the pressure used is close to the saturation pressure of hydrocarbons, deasphalting may occur in the reservoir causing a substantial reduction in viscosity and heavy metal contents. Experiments conducted in a Hele-Shaw cell and in a 2D physical scaled model using Lloydminster, Cold Lake, and Peace River heavy oil/bitumen and ethane, propane, and butane as solvents demonstrated that this process is very promising technically as well as economically. An active aquifer underlying the bitumen zone made the reservoir more valuable because of spreading of the solvent vapour directly underneath the formation which increased the vapour-bitumen contact extensively. The investigation was extended from a dual horizontal continuous injection/production well strategy described above to a single horizontal well cyclic process for the Cold Lake reservoir in a 3D physical scaled model. The tests illustrated that ethane was an effective solvent in producing Cold Lake bitumen and that the cyclic VAPEX process has the potential to be a breakthrough recovery technology.

Jha, K.N. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Butler, R.M. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Lim, G.B. [Imperial Oil Resources Limited, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Physical properties of soils contaminated by oil lakes, Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In preparation for a marine assault by the coalition forces, the Iraqi Army heavily mined Kuwait`s coastal zone and the oil fields. Over a million mines were placed on the Kuwait soil. Burning of 732 oil wells in the State of Kuwait due to the Iraqi invasion caused damages which had direct and indirect effect on environment. A total of 20-22 million barrels of spilled crude oil were collected in natural desert depressions and drainage network which formed more than 300 oil lakes. The total area covered with oil reached 49 km{sup 2}. More than 375 trenches revealed the existence of hard, massive caliche (CaCO{sub 3}) subsoil which prevent leached oil from reaching deeper horizons, and limited the maximum depth of penetration to 1.75 m. Total volume of soil contaminated reached 22,652,500 m{sup 3} is still causing environmental problems and needs an urgent cleaning and rehabilitation. Kuwait Oil Company has recovered approximately 21 million barrels from the oil lakes since the liberation of Kuwait. In our examined representative soil profiles the oil penetration was not deeper than 45 cm. Infiltration rate, soil permeability, grain size distribution, aggregates formation and water holding capacity were assessed. 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Mohammad, A.S. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait); Wahba, S.A.; Al-Khatieb, S.O. [Arabian Gulf Univ. (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

Marshall, Albert Christian

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Neutral zone: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the Neutral Zone between Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, much in the news during the Gulf war, that returned to production in June when offshore output resumed at a rate of 100,000 bpd. By this month, offshore production should have attained near its pre-war level of 250,000 bpd. Because of war damage onshore, production will not be restarted onshore for some time. Neutral Zone oil is jointly owned by Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Texaco's Getty unit operates some 900 mostly pumping wells in South Umm Gudair, Wafra and South Fawaris onshore fields. However, only about 50 were producing 130,000 bpd last August when Iraqis invaded. Japan's Arabian Oil Co. operates 165 wells-all flowing-in offshore Khafji, Hout and Lulu fields that have a maximum productive capacity of about 300,000 bpd.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Oil spills - increasing US dependence on oil imports heightens risks to environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calamitous oil spills in recent years have focused attention on the devastation the world`s leading energy source can wreak on the environment. In Alaska, the 1989 grounding of the supertanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound caused the worst U.S. oil spill ever and promoted Congress to pass stringent oil-pollution legislation. In the Persian Gulf, {open_quotes}eco-terroism{close_quotes} committed by Iraqi forces during the gulf war left hundreds of wells burning and oil free-flowing out of Kuwait`s refineries and oil-shipping terminals. With the United States and much of the global community increasingly dependent on petroleum moved by supertankers, oil spills will continue to threaten the environment for the foreseeable future.

NONE

1992-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

68

Libya: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Libya is moving forward with plans to sell most of its crude as refined products and should have the capacity to handle most of its production, about 1.3 million bpd, by the mid-90s. Production was increased after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, and peak capacity could be over 1.5 million bopd. Exploration pace is still increasing but U.S. sanctions have taken their toll. Gas projects are advancing as officials push to develop and utilize more domestic gas reserves. Libya has commissioned a new gas processing plant in Sahl gas field in Sirte basin and plans are under way for development of Tahaddi field, Libya's largest gas field with 9 Tcf.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

How postcapping put Kuwait`s wells back onstream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late february 1991, the retreating Iraqi army blew up, or otherwise caused to blowout, some 700 wells in Kuwait. Between March and November, all of the fires were extinguished and the wells were capped. Work began in July 1991 to recomplete the damaged wells with replaced or reworked tubulars and well heads so that production could be resumed. Except for some of the earlier-capped wells into which cement was pumped, thus requiring more extensive downhole work, many of the damaged wells, particularly in Burgan field, were put back into production mode by the procedure described here, which became known as postcapping. This paper describes the equipment and techniques used in postcapping damaged wellheads.

Wilson, D. [ABB Vetco Gray Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Kuwait pressing toward preinvasion oil production capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil field reconstruction is shifting focus in Kuwait as the country races toward prewar production capacity of 2 million b/d. Oil flow last month reached 1.7 million b/d, thanks largely to a massive workover program that has accomplished about as much as it can. By midyear, most of the 19 rigs in Kuwait will be drilling rather than working over wells vandalized by retreating Iraqi troops in February 1991. Seventeen gathering centers are at work, with capacities totaling 2.4 million b/d, according to state-owned Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC). This article describes current work, the production infrastructure, facilities strategy, oil recovery, well repairs, a horizontal pilot project, the drilling program, the constant reminders of war, and heightened tensions.

Tippee, B.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

UAE-Abu Dhabi: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that production expansion projects remain the focus in Abu Dhabi, with increased drilling operations underway both on and offshore. Only Abu Dhabi Co. for Onshore Operations (Adco) and Abu Dhabi Marine Operating Co. (Adma-Opco) provide any information about activity in the Emirate. Plans call for boosting productive capacity by 1 million bpd to near 3 million bpd. Present sustainable capacity is estimated at 1.8 million bpd by the CIA. This rate has been exceeded recently (it reached over 2 million bpd) to take advantage of higher prices in late 1990 and to make up for the shortfall due to loss of Iraqi and Kuwaiti exports. However, it does not appear higher rates can be sustained for a long period of time. By year-end 1992, sustainable output has been projected to reach 2.3 million bpd.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The post-war Middle East  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Middle East remains today the global energy fulcrum. One year after the Persian Gulf war, the region is in greater turmoil and political uncertainty than it has known in modern times. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and subsequent external military intervention forced neighboring states to question the need for a foreign military presence in the future. The rift between the secular revolutionary states in the region led by Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Algeria, and Syria and the traditional monarchy of Saudi Arabia and the emirates of the gulf has widened. Egypt provides, at present, an uncomfortable bridge. The balance of political forces may be shifting. This paper attempts to answer the following questions: Where will we see the new leadership in the Middle East Will it again play a role through the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and determination of the oil price in shaping the structure of global energy supply and demand

Tempest, P.

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

Iraq: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that no reliable information on Iraqi E and P operations and only a few reports on oil field facilities damage have been available since last August. Most of what is known originated from the Middle East Economic Survey (MEES), the authoritative newsletter covering the Middle East. According to MEES reports in major northern oil fields (Kirkuk, Bai Hasan and Jambur) is put at 800,000 bpd. The northern fields and the pipeline system through Turkey to the Mediterranean Sea that serves as an export outlet for the area apparently were not damaged much by coalition air strikes or subsequent fighting by the Kurds. Last May production was estimated at 250,000 bpd, presumably from northern fields. If and when U.N. sanctions are lifted, Iraq should be able to export promptly through the Turkish line.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

War curbs oil exports by Iran and Iraq  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discussion of the effects of the war between Iran and Iraq on oil exports from the area covers damage (extent unknown) to the Abadan, Iran, and Basra, Iraq, oil refineries, to the Iraqi petrochemical complex under construction at Basra, to oil export terminals at Kharg Island and Mina-al-Bakr, and to other oil facilities; war-caused reductions in oil production, refining, shipping, and export, estimated at 2.05-3.35 million bbl/day; the possible effects of the war on OPEC's decisions concerning oil production and pricing; the significance of the Strait of Hormuz for the export of oil by several countries in addition to the belligerents; the U.S. and non-Communist oil stocks which might enable the world to avoid an oil shortage if the war is ended in the near future; and the long-term effects of the war on Iran's and Iraq's oil industries.

Not Available

1980-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Petroleum prices and profits in the 90 days following the invasion of Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the third in the past 20 years the world has experienced an interruption in the flow of oil from the Persian Gulf. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and shut down of Kuwait oil production capacity followed by the United Nations boycott of Iraqi oil removed 8 percent of the world's oil supply. The result was a sharp increase in the process of crude oil and petroleum products. These events raised numerous questions about the performance of energy markets and energy firms. This report supplies a first answer for some of those questions. At the time this report was prepared the invasion has been in effect for 90 days. Not all the data is available to fully answer every question. Some issues can only be completely resolved after more time has passed in which the invasion and its effects have had an opportunity to be fully assimilated. This report was specifically requested by W. Henson Moore, Deputy Secretary of Energy as a way of supplying the American public with what could be said about the current situation. Rumors abound and mixconceptions have proliferated. This report strives to give a proper perspective on some of the more vexing issues which the invasion produced. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has addressed many questions in this report. By the way of summary these are the 10 most most frequently asked questions and EIA's quick answers. The page references tell the reader where to look in the report for further explanation. These are not the only issues addressed and EIA hopes that readers will be able to satisfy their curiosity about their own questions within the pages of this report.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The impact of rising energy prices on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns: The Persian Gulf crisis as a case example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered immediate increases in world oil prices. Increases in world petroleum prices and in US petroleum imports resulted in higher petroleum prices for US customers. In this report, the effects of the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath are used to demonstrate the potential impacts of petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and nonpoor households. The analysis is done by using the Minority Energy Assessment Model developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The differential impacts of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raise significant issues for a variety of government agencies, including DOE. Although the Persian Gulf crisis is now over and world oil prices have returned to their prewar levels, the differential impacts of rising energy prices on poor and minority households as a result of any future crisis in the world oil market remains a significant long-term issue.

Henderson, L.J. (Baltimore Univ., MD (United States)); Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Measurement of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume of Kuwait oil well fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following their retreat from Kuwait during February and March of 1991, the Iraqi Army set fire to over 500 oil wells dispersed throughout the Kuwait oil fields. During the period of sampling from July to August 1991, it was estimated that between 3.29 {times} 10{sup 6} barrels per day of crude oil were combusted. The resulting fires produced several plumes of black and white smoke that coalesced to form a composite ``super`` plume. Because these fires were uncontrolled, significant quantities of organic materials were dispersed into the atmosphere and drifted throughout the Middle East. The organic particulants associated with the plume of the oil well fires had a potential to be rich in polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Based on the extreme mutagenic and carcinogenic activities of PAHs found in laboratory testing, a serious health threat to the population of that region potentially existed. Furthermore, the Kuwait oil fire plumes represented a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric chemistry associated with PAHs in the plume. If samples were collected near the plume source and from the plume many kilometers downwind from the source, comparisons could be made to better understand atmospheric reactions associated with particle-bound and gas-phase PAHs. To help answer health-related concerns and to better understand the fate and transport of PAHs in an atmospheric environment, a sampling and analysis program was developed.

Olsen, K.B.; Wright, C.W.; Veverka, C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ball, J.C. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Scientific Research Lab.; Stevens, R. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States). Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Ground level concentration of sulfur dioxide at Kuwait`s major population centers during the oil-field fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Iraqi occupation, Kuwait`s oil wells were ignited. the fires were damaging to the country`s oil resources and air quality. The impact of the oil-field fires on the air quality was studied to determine the level of exposure to pollutants in major population centers. The period of July-September 1991 was selected for examination. A mathematical model was used to compute the ground-level concentration isopleths. The results of these computations are supported by significant concentrations measured and reported by the Environmental Protection Council, Kuwait. The ground-level concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the major population centers, whether measure or estimated, were less than the ambient standards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s air pollution index. The dispersive characteristics were classified according to wind conditions. The results of this assessment provide historical data on Kuwait`s oil fires and may be useful in assessing risks resulting from this catastrophe. 6 refs., 10 fig., 2 tab.

Al-Ajmi, D.N.; Marmoush, Y.R. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)] [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Chemical and physical properties of emissions from Kuwait oil fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the Iraqi retreat from Kuwait in 1991, airborne sampling was conducted in the oil fire plumes near Kuwait City and ground-level samples were taken of the air within the city. For the airborne sampling, a versatile air pollution sampler was used to determine the SO(2), elemental concentrations, the aerosol mass loadings and SO4(2-) and NO3(1-) concentrations. Striking differences between the black and white plumes were associated with high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl(2) measured in the white plumes and large numbers of carbon chain agglomerates in the black plumes. For the ground-based measurements, an annular denuder system was used to determine levels of SO(2), SO4(2-), trace elements, and mass loadings. Certain pollutant levels rose in the city during inversion conditions, when winds were too weak to continue moving the combustion products directly to the Persian Gulf, and the increased levels of Pb and certain trace elements were comparable to those in other large urban areas in Europe.

Stevens, R.; Pinto, J.; Mamane, Y.; Ondov, J.; Abdulraheem, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Smoke plumes from Kuwaiti oil fires as atmospheric experiment of opportunity: An early look. Final report, Mar-Oct 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document sets in context the smoke plume phenomenology associated with the large number of oil fires lit by the Iraqi military in Kuwait in February 1991, and which are probably the worst man-made air pollution event in human history. Based on the simple phenomenology given here, and considered an unfortunate 'experiment of opportunity', the question is raised of what actions should be taken, and what one can hope to learn from these events. From the standpoint of SDIO, most of the basic physical elements of the fire and smoke phenomenology appear to be understood although there are some new effects and the initial quantitative predictions of the experts appear to differ significantly from the results of the detailed measurements. Many observations have been made. They require analysis followed by review and publication before being incorporated in the DoD integrated phenomenology models. This document represents an early look at the smoke plumes before most of the observations have been analyzed, reviewed, and published; its main function is to raise questions that should be addressed more carefully later.

Bauer, E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Support of the Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Iraq's former nuclear facilities contain large quantities of radioactive materials and radioactive waste. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the Iraq NDs Program) is a new program to decontaminate and permanently dispose of radioactive wastes in Iraq. The NDs Program is led by the Government of Iraq, under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) auspices, with guidance and assistance from a number of countries. The U.S. participants include Texas Tech University and Sandia National Laboratories. A number of activities are ongoing under the broad umbrella of the Iraq NDs Program: drafting a new nuclear law that will provide the legal basis for the cleanup and disposal activities; assembly and analysis of existing data; characterization of soil contamination; bringing Iraqi scientists to the world's largest symposium on radioactive waste management; touring U.S. government and private sector operating radwaste disposal facilities in the U.S., and hosting a planning workshop on the characterization and cleanup of the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Facility. (authors)

Coates, Roger [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 - 1400 Vienna (Austria); Cochran, John; Danneels, Jeff [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Chesser, Ronald; Phillips, Carlton; Rogers, Brenda [Center for Environmental Radiation Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Everything depends on the Saudis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that oil markets are at their lowest level in 18 months, since before the Persian Gulf crisis. What is remarkable is that the world oil industry is producing essentially at capacity, yet OPEC shows no sign of taking advantage of this situation to drive up prices. Rather, commodity market forces are quickly exploiting any short-term surplus or shortage, and the oil market is exposed to continuing price volatility. Oil market uncertainties - the return of Iraqi and Kuwaiti production, prospects for exports from former Soviet republics, and the fragility of economic recovery - appear bigger than normal and threaten to oversupply markets in the spring when oil demand declines seasonally. The downward trend in world oil prices that began in November may continue into the second quarter of 1992. However, by the second half an economic recovery may be underway. If that happens, demand should grow and the market firm. At any rate, prices in 1992 may be more stable than commonly expected, because Saudi Arabia does not seem to want prices much above or below 1991 levels. That would be a range of $20 - $21 for WTI.

Sauer, J.W. (Conoco Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Oil and economic development in OPEC countries, with case studies about Iraq and Algeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the impact of the increase in oil prices in 1973 and thereafter on economic development in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in general, and in Iraq and Algeria in particular. It attempts to investigate the extent to which these countries have succeeded in utilizing oil revenues to achieve their projected goals: diversification of their economies in order to reduce dependence on exporting crude oil which is an exhaustible resource; and acceleration of the rate of growth of the non-oil sector in order to increase its contribution to GDP and foreign-exchange earnings as well as to maintain the growth of the economy in the post-oil age. While the increase in oil revenues greatly reduced the capital constraint to growth, it did not remove all other constraints at the same time. Thus, bottlenecks in transportation, institutions, skilled labor, raw and construction materials remained important obstacles. According to the criteria used by this study to judge the performance of the Iraqi and the Algerian economies after 1973, both countries did quite well. However, one of the findings about Iraq is that while the rate of growth of real per capita GDP accelerated after 1973, the rate of growth of real per capita non-oil GDP did not. Algeria succeeded in diversifying her economy, since the rate of growth of non-oil GDP accelerated after 1973, compared to the earlier period.

Al-Khalil, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to developing technologies to meet escalating requirements for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) monitoring and associated inspections. This commitment involves the customization and transfer of existing remote monitoring/information management technologies for use by the IAEA. This paper describes an information management system called INSIST International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool, which was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to support the IAEA Action Team in its role of monitoring and verifying compliance under United Nations Special Commission (UNSC) Resolutions 687, 707, and 715. Initial emphasis was placed on developing and deploying functionality and databases customized to support the Action Team. Throughout the design and customization of INSIST, emphasis was placed on information storage and retrieval capabilities for data gathered by the Action Team. In addition, PNL provided the Action Team with maps and satellite images and other relevant Iraqi databases to further facilitate the following activities: monitoring nuclear activities, facility operations, and nuclear material inventories assisting in inspection planning and training providing post inspection analysis providing onsite inspection support reporting on inspection findings.

Steinmaus, K.L.; Wukelic, G.E.; Beal, O.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy Independence for North America - Transition to the Hydrogen Economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. transportation sector is almost totally dependent on liquid hydrocarbon fuels, primarily gasoline and diesel fuel from conventional oil. In 2002, the transportation sector accounted for 69 percent of the U.S. oil use; highway vehicles accounted for 54 percent of the U.S. oil use. Of the total energy consumed in the U.S., more than 40 percent came from oil. More significantly, more than half of this oil is imported and is projected by the Energy Information Agency (EIA) to increase to 68 percent by 2025 [1]. The supply and price of oil have been dictated by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2002, OPEC accounted for 39 percent of world oil production and this is projected by the EIA to increase to 50 percent in 2025. Of the world's oil reserves, about 80 percent is owned by OPEC members. Major oil price shocks have disrupted world energy markets four times in the past 30 years (1973-74, 1979-80, 1990-1991, and 1999- 2000) and with each came either a recession or slowdown in the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) of the United States. In addition, these market upheavals have cost the U.S. approximately $7 trillion (in 1998 dollars) in total economic costs [2]. Finally, it is estimated that military expenditures for defending oil supplies in the Middle East range from $6 billion to $60 billion per year [3] and do not take into account the costs of recent military operations in Iraq (i.e., Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2003). At the outset of his administration in 2001, President George W. Bush established the National Energy Policy Development (NEPD) Group to develop a national energy policy to promote dependable, affordable, and environmentally sound energy for the future in order to avert potential energy crises. In the National Energy Policy report [4], the NEPD Group urges action by the President to meet five specific national goals that America must meet--''modernize conservation, modernize our energy infrastructure, increase energy supplies, accelerate the protection and improvement of the environment, and increase our nation's energy security.'' It is generally recognized that energy security can be achieved partially by reducing importation of oil from sources that are less politically stable.

Eberhardt, J.

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

88

Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21-25, 2008. As noted in the report, there was significant teaming between the various participants to best help the GOI. On-the-ground progress is the focus of the Iraq NDs Program and much of the work is a transfer of technical and practical skills and knowledge that Sandia uses day-to-day. On-the-ground progress was achieved in July of 2008 when the GOI began the physical cleanup and dismantlement of the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) facility at Al Tuwaitha, near Baghdad.

Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z