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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 26. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Canadian Lloydminster Iraqi Basrah Light Mexican Mayan Nigerian Qua Iboe Venezuelan Merey 1985 Average .................................. 23.79 - 24.23 - - 1986 Average .................................. 12.77 - 10.93 - - 1987 Average .................................. 15.12 - 15.72 - - 1988 Average .................................. 11.28 - 11.26 - - 1989 Average .................................. W - 14.71 - - 1990 Average .................................. 18.50 - 17.29 - - 1991 Average .................................. 13.51 - 13.02 - - 1992 Average .................................. W -

2

Iraqi oil industry slowly returning to normal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Iraq is making progress in putting its battered petroleum industry back together 1 1/2 years after the Persian Gulf war ended. OPEC News Agency (Opecna) reported the finish of reconstruction of Iraq's Mina al-Bakr oil terminal on the northern tip of the Persian Gulf, using Iraqi know-how and engineering personnel. The terminal, heavily damaged during the gulf conflict, has been restored to its prewar loading capacity of 1.6 million b/d at a cost of $16 million. Ninety per cent of the port had been damaged.

Not Available

1992-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity July 26, 2006 - 4:34pm Addthis Energy Leaders sign MOU to further promote electricity cooperation WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today hosted Iraq's Minister of Oil Hussein al-Shahristani and Minster of Electricity Karim Wahid Hasan to discuss the rehabilitation and expansion of Iraq's energy infrastructure. The Ministers' visit to the Department follows up on Secretary Bodman's invitation to them to come to the United States to talk to professionals in electricity generation, transmission and distribution, and oil sector development. "The U.S. government is committed to providing scientific and technical assistance to help the Iraqi people expand their energy sector," Secretary

4

LANGUAGE ATTITUDES OF IRAQI NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ARABIC: A SOCIOLINGUISTIC INVESTIGATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigates language attitudes of Iraqi native speakers of Arabic towards two Arabic varieties in Iraq, Standard Arabic (SA) and Iraqi Arabic (IA). The sample of the study comprises 196 participants divided into 107 college students...

Murad, Mohammed Kamil

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

EIA - New Iraqi oil production: How much; how fast?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Iraqi oil production: How much; how fast? New Iraqi oil production: How much; how fast? International Energy Outlook 2010 New Iraqi oil production: How much; how fast? Iraq holds a considerable portion of the world's conventional oil reserves, but has been unable to increase oil production substantially in recent years due to conflict and geopolitical constraints. As violence in Iraq has lessened, there has been a concerted effort to increase the country's oil production, both to bolster government revenues and to support wider economic development. Recently, Iraq offered prequalified foreign oil companies two opportunities to bid on designated fields under specific terms of investment. The success of the bidding rounds and the level of interest from foreign companies have raised hopes that oil production could increase substantially over a short period of time, with some Iraqi government officials stating that the country could increase its production to 12 million barrels per day by 2017.[a] Although Iraq has the reserves to support such growth, it will need to overcome numerous challenges in order to raise production to even a fraction of that goal.

6

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F.O.B. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Canadian Lloydminster Iraqi Basrah Light Mexican Mayan Nigerian Qua Iboe Venezuelan Merey 1983 Average .......... 24.54 - 23.99 - - 1984 Average .......... 24.70 - 25.35 - - 1985 Average .......... 23.79 - 24.23 - - 1986 Average .......... 12.77 - 10.93 - - 1987 Average .......... 15.12 - 15.72 - - 1988 Average .......... 11.28 - 11.26 - - 1989 Average .......... W - 14.71 - - 1990 Average .......... 18.50 - 17.29 - - 1991 Average .......... 13.51 - 13.02 - - 1992 Average .......... W - 13.42 - - 1993 Average .......... W - 12.03 - - 1994 Average .......... W - 12.39 - - 1995 Average .......... 14.44 - 14.37 - - 1996 Average .......... 17.14 - 17.43 - - 1997 Average .......... 14.29 - 14.97 - -

7

Iraqi nuclear weapons development program. Final report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an abstract of the final report focusing on the collection, collation, analysis, and recording of information pertaining to Iraqi nuclear weapons development and on the long term monitoring of Iraq.

Not Available

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Agricultural Development Assessments and Strategies in Post Conflict Settings: An Empirical Case Study of Eight Southern Iraqi Provinces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It was found that Iraqi agricultural production lags due to many factors, including counter productive government policies that undermine productivity, distort local economies, and confound security issues and competition via subsidized credit... AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT ASSESSMENTS AND STRATEGIES IN POST CONFLICT SETTINGS: AN EMPIRICAL CASE STUDY OF EIGHT SOUTHERN IRAQI PROVINCES A Record of Study by JAMES C. HAFER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Hafer, James C.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

9

International initiative to engage Iraq's science and technology community : report on the priorities of the Iraqi science and technology community.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of the effort initiated by the Arab Science and Technology Foundation and the Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories to identify, contact, and engage members of the Iraqi science and technology (S&T) community. The initiative is divided into three phases. The first phase, the survey of the Iraqi scientific community, shed light on the most significant current needs in the fields of science and technology in Iraq. Findings from the first phase will lay the groundwork for the second phase that includes the organization of a workshop to bring international support for the initiative, and simultaneously decides on an implementation mechanism. Phase three involves the execution of outcomes of the report as established in the workshop. During Phase 1 the survey team conducted a series of trips to Iraq during which they had contact with nearly 200 scientists from all sections of the country, representing all major Iraqi S&T specialties. As a result of these contacts, the survey team obtained over 450 project ideas from Iraqi researchers. These projects were revised and analyzed to identify priorities and crucial needs. After refinement, the result is approximately 170 project ideas that have been categorized according to their suitability for (1) developing joint research projects with international partners, (2) engaging Iraqi scientists in solving local problems, and (3) developing new business opportunities. They have also been ranked as to high, medium, or low priority.

Littlefield, Adriane C.; Munir, Ammar M. (Arab Science and Technology Foundation, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates); Alnajjar, Abdalla Abdelaziz (Arab Science and Technology Foundation, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates); Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Crude Stream Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Angolan Cabinda 1983-2010 Canadian Bow River 1996-2010 Canadian Light Sour Blend W 90.81 W W W W 2010-2013 Canadian Lloydminster 70.87 79.48 80.36 W 92.04 W 1983-2013 Ecuadorian Oriente 1983-2008 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 1996-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 100.31 W W 97.05 101.32 W 2009-2013 Mexican Mayan 98.74 98.36 96.26 99.63 99.74 99.31 1983-2013 Mexican Olmeca 1996-2010 Nigerian Forcados Blend 1996-2008 Nigerian Qua Iboe W W W 2009-2013 Venezuelan Furrial 1996-2008 Venezuelan Leona 1996-2010

11

F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Angolan Cabinda 64.60 W 1978-2008 Canadian Bow River 52.38 81.82 1978-2008 Canadian Light Sour Blend 74.59 93.75 83.54 2010-2012 Canadian Lloydminster 48.54 79.33 50.11 64.41 78.41 77.01 1978-2012 Ecuadorian Oriente W 74.74 1978-2008 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 71.27 89.56 1978-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 62.98 74.36 104.51 103.17 2009-2012 Mexican Mayan 59.96 82.99 55.07 70.36 98.27 99.81 1978-2012 Mexican Olmeca 72.12 99.40 1978-2008 Nigerian Forcados Blend 93.72 110.57 1978-2008 Nigerian Qua Iboe 65.60 82.66 115.82 115.85 2009-2012 Venezuelan Furrial - - 1978-2008 Venezuelan Leona W W 1978-2008 Venezuelan Merey

12

Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Algerian Saharan Blend 65.95 81.78 115.82 114.02 2009-2012 Angolan Cabinda 69.17 W 1978-2008 Brazilian Marlim 58.94 76.63 107.13 114.32 2009-2012 Canadian Bow River 52.36 84.29 55.71 68.92 82.02 77.19 1978-2012 Canadian Light Sour Blend 59.12 76.56 96.52 87.82 2009-2012 Canadian Lloydminster 50.94 82.50 53.44 68.13 82.24 81.33 1978-2012 Ecuadorian Napo 48.74 72.97 97.91 101.53 2009-2012 Ecuadorian Oriente 64.57 87.25 56.97 75.48 101.74 105.50 1978-2012 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 72.93 95.46 1978-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 64.38 77.96 106.67 106.93 2009-2012 Mexican Mayan 60.93 84.29 56.03 70.87 98.81 100.29 1978-2012 Mexican Olmeca 72.77 101.14 1978-2008

13

US Government Outsourcing, the Private Military Industry, and Operation Iraqi Freedom: A Case Study in Conflict Contracting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prosperous decade for Iraq. Living standards rose for most Iraqis, in large part due to rapidly increasing oil revenues. Saddam Hussein officially assumed the presidency of Iraq in 1979 under the Baath Party, and in 1980 Iraq invaded Iran, waging a war... Iran would cost Iraq more than its oil revenues totaled during those eight years of conflict.55 Hussein then led the country into another unsuccessful war, this time against Kuwait, in 1990. The invasion was considered an attempt to augment state...

Halpin, Allison Ann

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Impact of IRAQI invasion on United States energy and economic security. Hearing before the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second session  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Hearing before the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, September 5, 1990 on the Impact of Iraqi Invasion on United States Energy and Economic Security. This hearing examines the long-term economic and energy security of the United States in relation to the Persian Gulf crisis and how to reduce our dangerous reliance on an unstable energy supply.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Priorities for Rebuilding Civilian Iraqi Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...culture to save date palms Aquaculture Internet and data networks The initiative comes...12 March, p. 1594 ). But the prison abuse scandal has complicated this effort. “It may be...since the first Gulf War in 1991. Most young scientists in Iraq have never spent time...

Richard Stone

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

--No Title--  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algerian| Brazilian| Canadian | Canadian | Canadian Month | Saharan | Marlim | Bow River | Light Sour | Lloydminster | Blend | | Heavy | Blend | ||...

17

Population doses from environmental gamma radiation in Iraq  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exposure rates due to external gamma radiation were measured in 11 Iraqi governerates. Measurements were performed with an Environmental Monitoring System (RSS-111) in open air 1 m above the ground. The average absorbed dose rate in each governerate was as follows (number x 10(-2) microGy h-1): Babylon (6.0), Kerbala (5.3), Al-Najaf (5.4), Al-Kadysia (6.5), Wasit (6.5), Diala (6.5), Al-Anbar (6.5), Al-Muthana (6.6), Maisan (6.8), Thee-Kar (6.6), and Al-Basrah (6.5). The collective doses to the population living in these governerates were 499, 187, 239, 269, 262, 458, 384, 153, 250, 450, and 419 person-Sv, respectively.

Marouf, B.A.; Mohamad, A.S.; Taha, J.S.; al-Haddad, I.K. (Iraq Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Research Center, Tuwaitha, Baghdad, (Iraq))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nuclear proliferation: Lessons learned from the Iraqi case. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear weapons inspection regime implemented in Iraq following the United Nations coalition victory in Desert Storm is the most intrusive in history. Important conclusions about the current non-proliferation regime can therefore be determined from a study of Iraq's progress. This thesis examines Iraq's efforts to acquire nuclear weapons. The supply side of the equation is also studied, with a concentration upon the contributions of NATO nations. The strategic culture of Iraq is discussed, in an effort to discover why Iraq sought nuclear weapons. Finally, policy prescriptions are advanced. The current non-proliferation regime needs to be improved if the spread of nuclear weapons is to be halted, or even slowed. The most promising way to improve this regime is to involve the U.N. Special Commission and the U.N. Security Council in the management of the problem of nuclear proliferation.... Iraq, Strategic culture, Non-Proliferation treaty, International atomic energy agency, Nuclear weapons, Middle east security, Nuclear suppliers group, United Nations.

Dixon, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Nationalism, Conflict and the Feminist Subject Among Modern Iraqi Women  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that narrative. As the ‘new Iraq’ takes shape, newnarratives of the old Iraq will be constructed to give it athe new narratives about the old Iraq that has come to light

MacDougall, Susan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ESTIMATION OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT BURDEN RESULTING FROM A PROLONGED INHALATION EXPOSURE TO AEROSOLS OF DU, BASED ON THE U IN A 24-H URINE SAMPLE TAKEN YEARS AFTER EXPOSURE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......kinetic energy penetrators, armour plating for military vehicles and earth-penetrating weapons. In late 1979, a report...Uranium and incidence of cancer in Basrah: a preliminary ecological study. Med. J. Basrah Univ. (2009) 27(1):1-6......

M. Valdés

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Novel Method for Separation and Identification of Sulphur Compounds in Naphtha (30–200°C) and Middle Distillate (200–350°C) Fractions of Lloydminster Heavy Oil by GC/MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......5-diethylthiophene thiophene diethyl sulphide tetrahydrothiophene ethyl phenyl sulphide naphthalene...benzothiophene dibenzothiophene methyl tetrahydrothiophene methyl tetrahydrothiopyran dimethyl tetrahydrothiophene ethyl butyl sulphide amyl ethyl......

M.A. Poirier; G.T. Smiley

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average ... W 13.32 - W 12.87 13.24 -...

23

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algerian Saharan Blend Brazilian Marlim Canadian Bow River Heavy Canadian Light Sour Blend Canadian Lloydminster Ecuadorian Oriente Ecuadorian Napo 1983 Average ... - -...

24

In the shadow of segregation : women's identity in the modern Iraqi house  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis intends to develop a critical perspective on the culture and politics of the modern house in Iraq. It advances the discussion from the authoritative religious environment of women's segregation in the Islamic ...

Ani, Raya H

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Iraqi Exiles Find New Lives in Bay Area, Reflect on War's Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

passed since the U. S. invasion of Iraq. Do you think theinvasion was worth it? Is Iraq a better place today, and areU.S. should have liberated Iraq a long time ago. I think it

Ahmed, Huda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Humanity Must Be Defended: War, Politics and Humanitarian Relief in Iraq, 1990-2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yaphe, Judith S. 2004. “Iraq Considered: Review Article. ”Post-war Reconstruction in Iraq: The Case Study of BasrahWord: Political Discourse in Iraq. Oxford University Press.

McIntyre, Adrian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Deferred Involvement: Memories and Praxes of Iraqi Intellectuals as Civil-Society Activists between Iraq, Jordan and Syria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between Iraq, Jordan and Syria Paper prepared for the workshop on Memories of Iraq May 1st -2nd , 2009 limited by the lack of direct access the author had to Iraq in the 1990s. Looking specifically at state intelligentsia started finding its way inside Iraq at a time when the coercive apparatus of the regime loosened

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

28

Studies on the soil fungi of Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation was carried out on soil fungi in the area around Basrah. Of the 37 species isolated, 3 belong to the phycomycetes, 32 to the fungi imperfecti and 2 to the Mycelia sterilia. In general, the myc...

A L S Ismail; Samir K Abdullah

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

ESTIMATION OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT BURDEN RESULTING FROM A PROLONGED INHALATION EXPOSURE TO AEROSOLS OF DU, BASED ON THE U IN A 24-H URINE SAMPLE TAKEN YEARS AFTER EXPOSURE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the link between cancer and depleted uranium. (2009) Available...Environmental pollution by depleted uranium in Iraq with special...possible effects on cancer and birth defect...Al-Saad H. T. Depleted Uranium and incidence of cancer in Basrah: a......

M. Valdés

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Groundwater investigation and modeling - western desert of Iraq.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The region of interest is part from Iraqi western desert covering an area about 100,000 km². Several of the large wadis such as Hauran, Amij,… (more)

Al-Muqdadi, Sameh Wisam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The New Militarism, Global Terrorism, and the American University: Making Sense of the Assault on Democracy “Here, There, Somewhere”  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancers and other illnesses in Iraqi children as a result of the use of biologically hazardous weapons, including radioactive depleted uranium.

Rhoads, Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Translating Iraq: The “Unknown Soldiers” of the US Occupation of Iraq.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Iraqis who worked with the US occupation Army in Iraq after the war in 2003 experienced extraordinary challenges and risks as a result of… (more)

AL Baldawi, Wisam Qusay Majeed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Research Article Evaluation of changes in the Kuwaiti prawn fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990. The Iraqis released 6­8 million barrels of crude oil into the Arabian and 500 km of coastline were covered by oil (Al-Yamani et al., 1993). The Iraqis also set 604 of Kuwait's oil wells on fire (Al-Awadi, 1992). The oil well fires lasted for eight months, and the conse- quent

Chen, Yong

34

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Algerian Saharan Blend Brazilian Marlim Canadian Bow River Heavy Canadian Light Sour Blend Canadian Lloydminster 1985 Average .................................. - - 25.42 - 24.38 1986 Average .................................. - - 12.71 - 13.52 1987 Average .................................. - - 16.49 - 15.98 1988 Average .................................. - - 12.68 - 12.21 1989 Average .................................. - - 15.99 - 15.36 1990 Average .................................. - - 19.32 - 19.55 1991 Average .................................. - - 14.31 - 14.63 1992 Average .................................. - - 15.01 - W 1993 Average .................................. - -

35

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

was not entirely unexpected, as the first shipments of crude oil from Iraqi storage tanks took place beginning on June 22, implying arrival at U.S. shores in late July based on...

36

The Reproductive Effects in Rats after Chronic Oral Exposure to Low-dose Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......I (2009) Depleted uranium: properties, military...Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: a review...expression in female breast cancer among an Iraqi population exposed to depleted uranium. J Carcinog 7: 8......

Yuhui Hao; Rong Li; Yanbing Leng; Jiong Ren; Jing Liu; Guoping Ai; Hui Xu; Yongping Su; Tianmin Cheng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

THE HUMAN ANIMAL Unlearning what nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Iraqi border in 1991 precisely because Kuwait had oil that Iraq coveted. But knowing that war common triggers are the desires or needs for territory, resources, or mates. Ants are a well

Starks, Philip

38

Proportionality, Territorial Occupation, and Enabled Terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some collateral harms affecting enemy civilians during a war are agentially mediated – for example, the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 sparked an insurgency which killed thousands of Iraqi civilians. I call ...

Saba Bazargan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Computational modeling of trabecular bone in lower extremity injuries due to impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lower extremity injuries resulting from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) pose a serious threat to the safety of military troops. Reports from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom identify IEDs as the ...

Pino, Wendy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Spare Capacity (2003) and Peak Production in World Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reliable estimates of minimum spare capacity for world oil production can be obtained by comparing production ... before and following the collapse of the Iraqi oil industry in March 2003. Spare production was .....

Alfred J. Cavallo

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries: A Unique Case from Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A severely cyanotic 27-month-old Iraqi child was transferred to the United States for surgical treatment of suspected tetralogy of Fallot. Her diagnostic studies showed dextrocardia, congenitally corrected transp...

Jared L. Antevil; Thomas P. Doyle; David P. Bichell…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Examining the influence of civilian casualties on insurgent attacks in Iraq  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although there have been several attempts to tabulate civilian casualties in the Iraq War, the effect of these casualties on the Iraqi population and insurgent organizations has not been thoroughly examined. From the ...

Karnis, Jessica Eve

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

How an Elite-Engineered Moral Panic Led to the U.S. War on Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critics argue that the G.W. Bush administration deliberately misled the U.S. public about an Iraqi threat after 9/11 but empirical evidence that presidential deception influenced public support for war has been l...

Scott A. Bonn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

from Iraq for several weeks, since it is still unclear when Iraqi oil exports will resume. With Saudi Arabia and other countries already pumping at high levels, its likely...

45

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

46

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Spot WTI crude oil prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

47

Conceptual Framework for the Use of Fish Parasites as Bioindicators of Acute and Chronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Perturbation After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico 1Auburn University: Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico- exploratory oil well Ixtoc explodes, sinks (10.8, 5%) March 24th, 1989: Prince: Gulf of Mexico- oil tanker Megaborg fire (378, 189%) January 21st, 1991: Kuwait- Gulf War I, Iraqi

Kane, Andrew S.

48

Captain Erik Stohlmann graduated from high school in Fort Worth, TX before attending the United States Naval Academy. He was commissioned in 1992 after earning a Bachelor of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science. Following the Naval Academy, he was assigned to NAS Pensacola, FL for Flight Training. After flown during OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM as well as numerous contingency operations in the CENTCOM AOR. He was selected for redesignation as a Navy Foreign Area Officer. Captain Stohlmann' s staff assignments include

49

Revue de presse ANGLAIS Semaine du 10 au 16 octobre 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kicks up a storm about black women and marriage. Middle East and Africa American visas for Iraqis - Lost. Learning English Parents get key to safer teenage driving : (By Janet Hardy-Gould) : Teenagers are not the most reliable drivers, which is why car maker Ford is offering parents remote control when

Rennes, Université de

50

Transcript of Wilkerson interview Col Lawrence Wilkerson, the chief of staff to former US Secretary of State Colin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to sit in Kuwait until the military forces had moved into Baghdad, and then going to Baghdad and other with some oil-field fires, put Ahmed Chalabi or some other similar Iraqi in charge and leave correct in assuming that? Well in the two decision-making processes into which I had the most insight

Colquhoun, David

51

Drilling continues upward momentum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses how the drilling recovery that began during the second half of 1989 is continuing into 1990. On top of this, the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait has caused disarray in oil markets, driving up oil prices, and disrupting access to oil supplies. Potentially, this upheaval could lead to an upward spike in worldwide drilling activity.

Moritis, G.

1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Kuwait: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the major event in Kuwait today is the ongoing effort to control blowouts stemming from Iraqi demolition of oil wells and producing facilities last February. A total of 732 wells---about two- thirds of all wells in Kuwait---were blown up. All but 80 caught on fire.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Oil Market Caught between Economics and Politics: The Persian Gulf Crisis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The “Gulf crisis” began on the night of Wednesday 1st1990 with the invasion of Kuwait by Iraqi military forces. It ended at dawn on February 28th 1991 with U.S. President George Bush’s announcement of the order f...

Alberto Clô

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Overview of physical oceanographic measurements taken during the Mt. Mitchell Cruise to the ROPME Sea Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ROPME Sea Area (RSA) is one of the most important commercial waterways in the world. However, the number of direct oceanographic observations is small. An international program to study the effect of the Iraqi oil spill on the environment was sponsored by the ROPME, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Reynolds, R.M.

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Statement by NSC Spokesperson Caitlin Hayden on the U.S.-Iraq Energy Joint Coordination Committee Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today in Baghdad, Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman and Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs at the State Department Carlos Pascual co-chaired the Energy Joint Coordination Committee with Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Dr. Hussain Al Shahristani.

56

The potential impact on socio-economic groups of rising energy prices due to the Kuwaiti crisis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, triggered immediate increases in the world price of petroleum. With US imports of petroleum and residential, commercial, and industrial consumption of petroleum products on the rise, these price increases are already evident in the US. The differential impact of these increases on poor and minority households raises significant and potentially long-term research and policy issues for various government agencies, including the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of the potential impact of Iraqi-induced petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and non-poor households. As this paper is written, the US is continuing the deployment of several hundred thousand troops, aircraft, naval vessels, and other equipment to the Persian Gulf. The objectives of this deployment are to deter Iraqi invasion of Saudi Arabia and to encourage Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait. The outcome of these initiatives, particularly the response of the government of Iraq, could stimulate additional changes in world petroleum prices and subsequent impacts on the household energy consumption and expenditure patterns of US black, Hispanic, and poor households. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Henderson, L. (Baltimore Univ., MD (USA)); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Oil market power and United States national security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Organization of the Petroleum Exporting...occupation of China (8). Unlike...Moreover, U.S. exports were 80% of...protection from imports (ref. 1...Relationship of Oil Imports to the National...Force on Oil Import Control, Washington...History of Petroleum (I. B. Tauris...suspension of Iraqi exports to punish the...

Roger Stern

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Iraq: Eastern flank of the Arab world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iraq, holding oil reserves second only to those of Saudi Arabia in the Middle East, is locked in a war with Iran whose outcome will affect Western energy supplies and the prospects for stability in the Arabian Gulf. Yet Iraq even now remains little known to Western governments and publics. This study is intended to enlarge understanding of Iraqi behavior and of the concerns that motivate its leaders. Rather than selecting issues of importance to other countries, the author focuses on the forces that influence policy formulation in Iraq and evokes the perspective from which the Iraqi government itself views its problems and sets its priorities. Part 1 examines the country's evolution into modern Iraq, explaining why problems that have recurred throughout Iraqi history have bedeviled all recent Iraqi governments and created tension between ''Iraq the nation'' and ''Iraq the state.'' Part 2 discusses the Arab Ba'th Socialist party, which has dominated Iraqi political life since 1968. The author neither condemns nor praises this controversial party and its current leader, President Saddam Husain, but seeks to explain why they have adopted the positions and taken the actions that have characterized their rule. Part 3 analyzes the war between Iraq and Iran, its causes, and the decisions Iraq has made in light of its goals and its assumptions about Iran. The author finds that this is not simply ''a war over borders'' but a deeper conflict between Islamic conservatism and Arab nationalism. Looking beyond the war, the final chapter assesses Iraq's potential importance in the Middle East and to the world economy. 8 figs.

Helms, C.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Secretary Bodman Visits Iraq | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Iraq Iraq Secretary Bodman Visits Iraq July 18, 2006 - 3:12pm Addthis Meets with Iraqi Ministers of Oil, Electricity, and Science and Technology BAGHDAD, IRAQ - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today visited Iraq to talk first hand with his counterparts, the Ministers of Oil, Electricity, and Science and Technology, and to discuss ways the Department can help them build the energy infrastructure of their nation. "The Iraqi people are showing tremendous fortitude as they move forward in building their new democracy and we, the United States, will stand with them," Secretary Bodman said. "The U.S. Department of Energy is prepared to support their efforts related to all elements of the energy sector here in Iraq, in whatever capacity they see fit."

60

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. From the fourth quarter of 1999 to the 4th quarter of 2000, worldwide oil production increased by about 3.7 million barrels per day to a level of 77.8 million barrels per day. After being sharply curtailed in December 2000, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports only partially return in January. By February, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels reached last year.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. Over the course of the past year, worldwide oil production has increased by about 3.7 million barrels per day to a level of 77.8 million barrels per day in the last months of 2000. After being nearly completely curtailed in December 2000, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports only partially return in January. By February, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels reached last year.

62

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. From the fourth quarter of 1999 to the 4th quarter of 2000, worldwide oil production increased by about 3.8 million barrels per day to a level of 77.9 million barrels per day. After being sharply curtailed in December and January, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports return closer to more normal levels in February. By the second half of 2001, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels

63

Highlights.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2003 June 2003 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Average crude oil prices rose in May as continued reports of low oil inventories trumped expectations that Iraqi oil production would quickly return to pre-war levels. Those hopes faded on the news that post-war looting would postpone for some months the return of the Iraqi oil sector to normal operations. In addition, a terrorist attack in Saudi Arabia and estimates of lower production in Saudi Arabia by some analysts combined to push prices upward. By early June, the OPEC basket price had risen to its highest level in two months, and is now in the upper end of OPEC's target range of $22-$28 per barrel (Figure 1). U.S. Natural Gas Markets. The natural gas spot price at the Henry Hub has remained well above $5 per

64

Saudi Aramco describes crisis oil flow hike  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On Aug. 2, 1990, Iraqi forces invaded Kuwait and triggered one of the most severe crises in the world's oil supplies since World War II. Within a few days of the invasion, Iraqi and Kuwaiti oil exports were embargoed, and almost 4.6 million b/d oil of production was removed from world markets. This shortfall amounted to about 20% of total Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries production at the time and could have proven disastrous to the world's industrial and financial well-being. However, there was no disruption to the major economies of the world. This paper reports that the primary reason for the cushioning of this impact was the massive expansion in production undertaken by Saudi Arabian Oil Co. (Saudi Aramco).

Not Available

1991-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

65

Chemical Weapons: The legacy of Operation Desert Storm. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

United States and allied forces deploying in the 1991 War in the Persian Gulf region faced a formidable Iraqi offensive chemical weapons capability. This threat immediately challenged U.S. policy and resolve as outlined in the 1990 bilateral chemical weapons treaty with the Soviet Union. The necessity to assess retaliatory options, in the event of Iraqi chemical use, was apparent, and are evaluated in this analysis. The proliferation of chemical weapons worldwide, disarmament efforts, and chemical defense readiness are also reviewed in the context of the 1991 Gulf War. The conclusion that retaliation by conventional means alone as the only acceptable alternative supporting the presidential goal of increased stability in the Middle East is reached. Prospects for revitalized post-war multilateral chemical disarmament efforts, and a reduction in chemical warfare proliferation are also assessed. Recommendations for a post-war national chemical defense policy are made.

Henscheid, M.R.

1991-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Strengthening Our Continued Partnership with Iraq | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Continued Partnership with Iraq Continued Partnership with Iraq Strengthening Our Continued Partnership with Iraq February 28, 2011 - 2:43pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman and Iraqi President Jalal Talabani exchanging official photographs as they conclude their meeting. | Energy Department Photo Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman and Iraqi President Jalal Talabani exchanging official photographs as they conclude their meeting. | Energy Department Photo Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs Last week, as part of a week-long trip to the Middle East, Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman led a U.S. interagency delegation for a three-day visit to Baghdad. The trip is part of the U.S. Government's broad commitment to partner with Iraq as it continues to rebuild and grow its economy.

67

UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.gov/vhapublications/ViewPublication.asp?pub_ID=1158 See also, Depleted Uranium Fact Sheet http://www1.va.gov/gulfwar/docs/DepletedUraniumFAQSheet.doc EVALUATION PROTOCOL FOR NON-GULF WAR VETERANS WITH POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DEPLETED URANIUM (DU) http://www1.va.gov/vhapublications/ViewPublication.asp?pub_ID=315 EVALUATION PROTOCOL FOR GULF WAR AND IRAQI FREEDOM VETERANS WITH POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DEPLETED

Kasman, Alex

68

Lessons from post-war Iraq for the international full-scope safeguards regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery after the Gulf War of the extensive Iraqi nuclear weapon program severely shook public confidence in the nuclear non-proliferation regime in general, and the safeguards program of the IAEA under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, in particular. Iraq provided the justification for evaluating the safeguards regime under new political circumstances, so that appropriate corrective measures could be taken when necessary. It is now up to the individual states within the international system to take advantage of this opportunity.

Scheinman, L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Lessons from UNSCOM/IAEA applicable to nuclear arms control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1991, the Security Council of the United Nations tasked the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, with the assistance and cooperation of the United Nations Special Commission, to oversee the destruction, removal or rendering harmless of nuclear weapons material and capabilities in Iraq. The conduct of the nuclear inspections, and the subsequent activities (identification, destruction, removal rendering harmless), have provided a wealth of experience and insight into the inspection and monitoring process as well as into the political realities of such an operation. The early inspections were conducted in an atmosphere of discovery and inexperience on both the part of the Iraqis and the IAEA and UNSCOM. As time went on, the Iraqis became more adept at hiding and obscuring relevant documents and equipment, and the inspection teams became more knowledgeable about inspection and investigative techniques, and the pre-existing Iraqi programs. A continuous monitoring presence in Iraq has now been established and an import/export monitoring regime is being developed. While steps taken to date have proven effective in inhibiting resumption of nuclear weaponization activities, it remains to be seen how effective these measures will be in the future. The external and internal conditions which led the Iraqi leadership to undertake a nuclear weaponization program have not changed, and the prognosis for the long term is uncertain. The entire process in Iraq has shown how fragile are the tools available to the international community, and how a determined proliferator can evade inspection and monitoring measures. Such measures cannot prevent nuclear proliferation, they can only hope to deter it, or, failing in that, detect it.

Dorn, D.W.

1995-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

JPRS report: Arms control, [February 12, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on arms control. Titles include: Foreign Minister Opens Regional Disarmament Workshop; North Korea Heavily Involved in Missile Production; Ministry Spokesman on Soviet Troop Withdrawal; Foreign Minister on Soviet Troops, Baltics; Soviet Role in Iraqi Scud Acquisition Viewed; Churkin on Comprehensive Test Ban, New York Conference; GDR Supported Iraq`s Chemical Weapons Armament; and others.

NONE

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Algerian Saharan Blend Brazilian Marlim Canadian Bow River Heavy Canadian Light Sour Blend Canadian Lloydminster Ecuadorian Oriente Ecuadorian Napo 1983 Average .......... - - 25.62 - 25.27 28.90 - 1984 Average .......... - - 25.46 - 25.35 28.79 - 1985 Average .......... - - 25.42 - 24.38 26.97 - 1986 Average .......... - - 12.71 - 13.52 14.39 - 1987 Average .......... - - 16.49 - 15.98 17.60 - 1988 Average .......... - - 12.68 - 12.21 13.77 - 1989 Average .......... - - 15.99 - 15.36 17.69 - 1990 Average .......... - - 19.32 - 19.55 21.63 - 1991 Average .......... - - 14.31 - 14.63 17.52 - 1992 Average .......... - - 15.01 - W 18.52 - 1993 Average .......... - - 13.56 - 13.65 15.79 - 1994 Average

72

Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Crude Stream Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Algerian Saharan Blend W W W W 2009-2013 Angolan Cabinda 1983-2010 Brazilian Marlim W W W W W 2009-2013 Canadian Bow River 75.11 81.32 80.69 90.70 94.40 88.54 1996-2013 Canadian Light Sour Blend 86.95 92.97 91.76 94.96 103.23 102.09 2009-2013 Canadian Lloydminster 73.88 80.34 84.17 87.50 94.64 91.89 1983-2013 Ecuadorian Napo W W W 104.38 103.06 101.56 2009-2013 Ecuadorian Oriente 104.18 104.42 101.61 106.94 107.51 105.09 1983-2013 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 1996-2008

73

Baker likes its oil field prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oil field chemicals business is in the middle of a shakeout, and Baker Performance Chemicals (Houston) is working hard to be one of the survivors. In June, Baker acquired Canadian firm Suramco Chemical Research (Lloydminster, AB), and in late August is signed a deal with BASF to take over the German firm`s business in the oil field chemicals market, which will enhance Baker`s position in Europe. According to Baker president Glen Bassett, first among the factors at work in the industry is the decline in oil production in the US. Second is that, although sales and service expenses are the biggest cost in this service-intensive business, the substantial increase in prices of key raw material products such as ethylene oxide and methanol during the past few years has hurt oil field chemical makers` margins. Third, against the background of overcapacity in the industry, the big oil company customers {open_quotes}have been reluctant to talk price increases,{close_quotes} Bassett says.

Hunter, D.

1996-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algerian Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average .......... W 14.07 - W 13.85 13.54 - 1979 Average .......... W 21.51 - 25.40 29.17 20.78 22.23 1980 Average .......... 37.73 34.68 W 37.89 34.61 33.42 29.49 1981 Average .......... 40.03 36.84 W 38.95 33.56 36.87 31.52 1982 Average .......... 33.71 33.08 W 34.95 32.97 33.11 25.86 1983 Average .......... 30.79 29.31 25.27 30.28 28.90 30.00 24.56 1984 Average .......... 28.59 28.63 25.35 29.51 28.79 29.46 25.84 1985 Average .......... 27.21 27.48 24.38 27.94 26.97 27.60 24.57 1986 Average .......... 14.54 14.27 13.52 13.71 14.39 14.28 11.24 1987 Average .......... 17.72 18.43 15.98 18.63 17.60 18.32 16.03 1988 Average .......... W 14.96 12.21 15.21 13.77 14.69 11.65 1989 Average .......... W 18.15 15.36 18.71 17.69 W

75

Puritan Military Justice: American War Crimes and the Global War on Terrorism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brigadier General OEF Operation Enduring Freedom; the U.S. led war in Afghanistan xiii OIF Operation Iraqi Freedom; the U.S. led war in Iraq Panel The rough equivalent of a civilian jury in a court-martial Platoon An army unit numbering... by United States Army Criminal Investigation Command. As a sociology consultant, I participated in giving an opinion on the selection of panel, or jury, members, as well as interpreting the ebbs and flows of the proceeding. The work provided...

Lorenzo, Ronald

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

Oil flow resumes in war torn onshore Neutral Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil production has resumed in the war ravaged onshore fields of the Neutral Zone between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 1 year after the end of Persian Gulf War. Initial production of about 40,000 b/d is expected to rise to 60,000 b/d by year end. This paper reports that prior to the January-February 1991 war to oust occupying Iraqi military forces from Kuwait, the Neutral Zone's Wafra, South Umm Gudair, and South Fuwaris onshore fields produced about 135,000 b/d.

Not Available

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

77

Kuwaiti oil sector shows more signs of recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Kuwait's oil sector continues to show signs of recovery from the Persian Gulf war. On Mar. 23 Kuwait Petroleum Co. (KPC) loaded the country's first shipment of liquefied petroleum gas for export since the Iraqi invasion in August 1990. In addition, the first shipment of Kuwaiti crude recovered from giant oil lakes formed by hundreds of wild wells sabotaged in the war was to arrive by tanker in Naples, Italy, late last month. The tanker is carrying 210,000 bbl of crude. However, the project to clean up the lakes and recover more oil, undertaken by Bechtel Corp. with Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC), has reached a stand still.

Not Available

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

International Medical Aid: Collateral Damage — Médecins sans Frontières Leaves Afghanistan and Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Iraq, in advance of the U.S.-led invasion, establishing three health care clinics in Sadr City that employed a total of 90 Iraqis and 2 international aid workers. Despite U.S. sanctions, Iraq's health care needs were starkly different from Afghanistan's. In 2002, the average life expectancy in Iraq... Owing to escalating violence against aid workers, the Médecins sans Frontières pulled out of Iraq and Afghanistan. In both regions, write Drs. Ingrid Katz and Alexi Wright, aid workers fear being kidnapped or murdered, but they also face the threat of ...

Katz I.T.; Wright A.A.

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Physical properties of soils contaminated by oil lakes, Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In preparation for a marine assault by the coalition forces, the Iraqi Army heavily mined Kuwait`s coastal zone and the oil fields. Over a million mines were placed on the Kuwait soil. Burning of 732 oil wells in the State of Kuwait due to the Iraqi invasion caused damages which had direct and indirect effect on environment. A total of 20-22 million barrels of spilled crude oil were collected in natural desert depressions and drainage network which formed more than 300 oil lakes. The total area covered with oil reached 49 km{sup 2}. More than 375 trenches revealed the existence of hard, massive caliche (CaCO{sub 3}) subsoil which prevent leached oil from reaching deeper horizons, and limited the maximum depth of penetration to 1.75 m. Total volume of soil contaminated reached 22,652,500 m{sup 3} is still causing environmental problems and needs an urgent cleaning and rehabilitation. Kuwait Oil Company has recovered approximately 21 million barrels from the oil lakes since the liberation of Kuwait. In our examined representative soil profiles the oil penetration was not deeper than 45 cm. Infiltration rate, soil permeability, grain size distribution, aggregates formation and water holding capacity were assessed. 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Mohammad, A.S. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait); Wahba, S.A.; Al-Khatieb, S.O. [Arabian Gulf Univ. (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Determination of uranium concentration in surface soil samples of Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of uranium-tipped antitank shells during the Iraq war (2003) caused serious concerns in Iran and the international media over possible contamination of the Iranian environment and consequent long-term health effects. After a shell explosion, uranium is discharged by fire into the air in the form of oxidised particles, which can be dispersed over a radius of several kilometres. Gamma ray spectrometry was used to determine uranium concentrations in soil samples collected from ten sites in Iranian sectors near the Iraqi border. All surface soil samples were taken from the top 5 cm from each site. The concentrations of 238U were assessed from 63 keV and 92 keV emissions of its first daughter nuclide, 234Th. To assess the isotopic ratio of 238U/235U, a secular equilibrium was ensured and the concentration of 235U under 186 keV was deduced. The 226Ra was determined through 295 keV and 352 keV gamma rays of 214Pb. The concentrations of 238U and activity ratios of 238U/235U were determined. The average of measurement activity ratio was 20.0, very close to the value of 21.5 for natural uranium, while the activity ratio of depleted uranium can be as high as 76.9. The analysis of ten surface soil samples from Iranian sites near the Iraqi border showed that uranium isotopes are in natural abundances.

A.A. Fathivand; J. Amidi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lloydminster iraqi basrah" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Testimony to the House Energy and Power Subcommitte  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OF JAY HAKES OF JAY HAKES ADMINISTRATOR, ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 26, 1999 Summary Page Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee, I wish to thank you for the opportunity to testify today on our short-term world oil outlook, paying particular attention to IraqÂ’s role in the international oil market. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has identified four factors that have influenced the world oil market since the end of 1996 which have lead to current weak oil prices. These are: Iraqi oil production (and exports) that have occurred since the beginning of the United NationsÂ’ "oil-for-food" program; the dramatic slowdown in oil demand growth in Asia

82

Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001 and into the beginning of 2002, as illustrated by the low OECD inventory levels. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels in order to avoid continued price volatility. While we saw some stocking in April and May, typical third quarter stock builds may not occur. Even with Iraqi oil exports resuming in early July, OPEC was going to need to increase its oil production to account for demand increases over the 2nd half of the year to prevent stocks from falling further. However, they not only haven't agreed to increase production, but agreed to cut production quotas by 1 million barrels per day beginning on September 1! EIA's forecast of a continued low stock cushion implies we not only

83

Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy April 23, 2012 - 2:25pm Addthis The governments of the United States of America and the Republic of Iraq reaffirmed their commitment to joint cooperation in the areas of oil production and export, natural gas, electricity, and critical energy infrastructure protection during the inaugural meeting of the Joint Coordinating Committee (JCC) on Energy on April 23, 2012. This meeting, held at the U.S. Department of Energy, was co-chaired by Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Dr. Hussain Al Shahristani and U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman and Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs at the U.S. Department of State Ambassador

84

upd0897.PDF  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 1997 (Released August 6, 1997) August 1997 (Released August 6, 1997) Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- August 1997 What's New This Month Here are the highlights of the changes to the forecast that we have made for the month of August, 1997 (all results refer to the mid world oil price case unless otherwise specified): Oil Prices Despite the impending return of Iraq to the world oil market after a two-month hiatus, no sustained sharp reduction in oil prices is expected in the near term. On the other hand, oil prices are not expected to head up very soon either, but may range upward slightly in 1998, once Iraqi crude oil is fully absorbed into the market balance once again (see "The Iraq Situation" below). Currently, based on continued non-Iraq

85

Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy April 23, 2012 - 2:25pm Addthis The governments of the United States of America and the Republic of Iraq reaffirmed their commitment to joint cooperation in the areas of oil production and export, natural gas, electricity, and critical energy infrastructure protection during the inaugural meeting of the Joint Coordinating Committee (JCC) on Energy on April 23, 2012. This meeting, held at the U.S. Department of Energy, was co-chaired by Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Dr. Hussain Al Shahristani and U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman and Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs at the U.S. Department of State Ambassador

86

Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 17, 2013 May 17, 2013 Sandia Wounded Warriors discover they were united in battle years ago BROTHERS IN ARMS - Jason Shelton (2998), left, and John Bailon (5627) reminisce while walking in terrain at Sandia Labs that reminds them of Iraq. They both fought for the US military in Operation Iraqi Freedom. (Photo by Randy Montoya) by Nancy Salem Jason Shelton and John Bailon left a recent Sandia Military Support Committee meeting side by side, sharing stories of combat in Iraq. John (5627) talked about a day in the summer of 2005 when his Marine unit was called to help a small Joint Special Operations team holed up and taking mortar and gunfire in a house next to a school booby-trapped with explosives. The hair stood up on Jason's neck. "It sounded really familiar," Jason (2998) says. "I asked if the

87

upd1297.PDF  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 1997 (Released December 8, 1997) December 1997 (Released December 8, 1997) Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- December 1997 Overview Prices Crude Oil. Higher OPEC oil production quotas, agreed to over the Thanksgiving weekend, along with the lessened uncertainty that Iraq's oil-for-food deal with the United Nations will be significantly interrupted have resulted in expected crude oil prices somewhat lower than those projected last month. OPEC agreed to raise their crude oil production ceiling from 25.033 million barrels per day to 27.500 million barrels per day, an increase of just under 10 percent. However, OPEC crude oil production is not expected to increase by 10 percent since many countries are already producing at maximum capacity. Bottom line: Even if Iraqi crude oil production remains constant ,

88

Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Average crude oil prices for July were little changed from June. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) spot average for July was $30.75 per barrel compared to $30.66 in June. EIA's Outlook is for prices to remain firm through the rest of 2003, or at least until autumn, when OECD oil inventories may rebuild above observed 5-year lows. Once inventories have been rebuilt, WTI oil prices may slide gradually to $26 per barrel during 2004, as Iraqi oil exports return to near pre-war levels (Figure 1). U.S. Natural Gas Markets. At the end of July, working gas in storage is estimated (based on data through July 25) to have been about 17 percent below end-of-July 2002 levels and about 9 percent below the

89

Highlights.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2003 July 2003 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price for June was up by about $2.50 per barrel from the May average, in part because OECD oil inventories remain low by historical standards. Oil prices are not likely to fall significantly until commercial inventories rise to levels observed in recent years. EIA's Outlook is for prices to remain firm throughout the rest of 2003 (in the $29- $30 per barrel range for WTI) then gradually slide toward $26 per barrel by the end of 2004 as Iraqi oil exports return to near pre-war levels (Figure1). U.S. Natural Gas Markets. Working gas storage injections for June made up considerable ground following a slow start in early spring, posting a record increase of 487 billion cubic feet for the month and

90

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 of 17 3 of 17 Notes: After declining in 1999 due to a series of announced production cuts, OPEC 10 (OPEC countries excluding Iraq) production has been increasing during 2000. EIA's projected OPEC production levels for fourth quarter 2000 have been lowered by 300,000 barrels per day from the previous Outlook. Most of this decrease is in OPEC 10 production, which is estimated to be 26.5 million barrels per day. EIA still believes that only Saudi Arabia, and to a lesser degree, the United Arab Emirates, will have significant short-term capacity to expand production. EIA's forecast assumes that OPEC 10 crude oil production will decline by 400,000 barrels per day to 26.1 million barrels per day by mid-2001. Iraqi crude oil production is estimated to have increased from 2.3 million

91

Neutral zone: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the Neutral Zone between Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, much in the news during the Gulf war, that returned to production in June when offshore output resumed at a rate of 100,000 bpd. By this month, offshore production should have attained near its pre-war level of 250,000 bpd. Because of war damage onshore, production will not be restarted onshore for some time. Neutral Zone oil is jointly owned by Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Texaco's Getty unit operates some 900 mostly pumping wells in South Umm Gudair, Wafra and South Fawaris onshore fields. However, only about 50 were producing 130,000 bpd last August when Iraqis invaded. Japan's Arabian Oil Co. operates 165 wells-all flowing-in offshore Khafji, Hout and Lulu fields that have a maximum productive capacity of about 300,000 bpd.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

How postcapping put Kuwait`s wells back onstream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late february 1991, the retreating Iraqi army blew up, or otherwise caused to blowout, some 700 wells in Kuwait. Between March and November, all of the fires were extinguished and the wells were capped. Work began in July 1991 to recomplete the damaged wells with replaced or reworked tubulars and well heads so that production could be resumed. Except for some of the earlier-capped wells into which cement was pumped, thus requiring more extensive downhole work, many of the damaged wells, particularly in Burgan field, were put back into production mode by the procedure described here, which became known as postcapping. This paper describes the equipment and techniques used in postcapping damaged wellheads.

Wilson, D. [ABB Vetco Gray Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Kuwait pressing toward preinvasion oil production capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil field reconstruction is shifting focus in Kuwait as the country races toward prewar production capacity of 2 million b/d. Oil flow last month reached 1.7 million b/d, thanks largely to a massive workover program that has accomplished about as much as it can. By midyear, most of the 19 rigs in Kuwait will be drilling rather than working over wells vandalized by retreating Iraqi troops in February 1991. Seventeen gathering centers are at work, with capacities totaling 2.4 million b/d, according to state-owned Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC). This article describes current work, the production infrastructure, facilities strategy, oil recovery, well repairs, a horizontal pilot project, the drilling program, the constant reminders of war, and heightened tensions.

Tippee, B.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Iraq: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that no reliable information on Iraqi E and P operations and only a few reports on oil field facilities damage have been available since last August. Most of what is known originated from the Middle East Economic Survey (MEES), the authoritative newsletter covering the Middle East. According to MEES reports in major northern oil fields (Kirkuk, Bai Hasan and Jambur) is put at 800,000 bpd. The northern fields and the pipeline system through Turkey to the Mediterranean Sea that serves as an export outlet for the area apparently were not damaged much by coalition air strikes or subsequent fighting by the Kurds. Last May production was estimated at 250,000 bpd, presumably from northern fields. If and when U.N. sanctions are lifted, Iraq should be able to export promptly through the Turkish line.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Modelling oil price volatility with structural breaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we provide two main innovations: (i) we analyze oil prices of two prominent markets namely West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Brent using the two recently developed tests by Narayan and Popp (2010) and Liu and Narayan, 2010 both of which allow for two structural breaks in the data series; and (ii) the latter method is modified to include both symmetric and asymmetric volatility models. We identify two structural breaks that occur in 1990 and 2008 which coincidentally correspond to the Iraqi/Kuwait conflict and the global financial crisis, respectively. We find evidence of persistence and leverage effects in the oil price volatility. While further extensions can be pursued, the consideration of asymmetric effects as well as structural breaks should not be jettisoned when modelling oil price volatility.

Afees A. Salisu; Ismail O. Fasanya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Responding to chemical attack. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In view of Iraq's stated intention of using chemical weapons in the Persian Gulf War, the Coalition forces must be prepared to respond. Iraq is capable of conducting such an attack. While the use of chemical weapons may not be militarily significant, the political effect of the use and the response to it may be very significant. Responses including the use of chemical and nuclear weapons are assessed in terms of their legality, political cost, and military effectiveness and found unacceptable. Reliance on diplomatic protests and on post-war criminal sanctions are judged ineffective. A response in the form of increased conventional attack on the Iraqi chemical infrastructure is recommended because that response will preserve the present Coalition, effectively counter the chemical attack, contribute to regional stability, and enhance the reputation of the United States for lawfulness and dependability.

Bagley, R.W.

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

Chemical arms not cause of Gulf War syndrome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A task force commissioned by the Pentagon's Defense Science Board has found no evidence that US troops were exposed to chemical or biological weapons or to any other environmental hazard during the Persian gulf War that could resolve the mystery of unexplained symptoms now dubbed the Gulf War Syndrome.'' A Czech chemical weapons monitoring team reported detecting the nerve gas sarin and sulfur mustard at two sites in Saudi Arabia near the Iraqi border in mid-January 1991. Despite the Pentagon's uncertainties about the Czech reports, many US soldiers believe they were exposed to low levels of chemical agents. They are not convinced that all of the many chemical sensor alarms that went off during the air war were false alarms.

Ember, L.

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

The post-war Middle East  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Middle East remains today the global energy fulcrum. One year after the Persian Gulf war, the region is in greater turmoil and political uncertainty than it has known in modern times. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and subsequent external military intervention forced neighboring states to question the need for a foreign military presence in the future. The rift between the secular revolutionary states in the region led by Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Algeria, and Syria and the traditional monarchy of Saudi Arabia and the emirates of the gulf has widened. Egypt provides, at present, an uncomfortable bridge. The balance of political forces may be shifting. This paper attempts to answer the following questions: Where will we see the new leadership in the Middle East Will it again play a role through the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and determination of the oil price in shaping the structure of global energy supply and demand

Tempest, P.

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

Oil spills - increasing US dependence on oil imports heightens risks to environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calamitous oil spills in recent years have focused attention on the devastation the world`s leading energy source can wreak on the environment. In Alaska, the 1989 grounding of the supertanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound caused the worst U.S. oil spill ever and promoted Congress to pass stringent oil-pollution legislation. In the Persian Gulf, {open_quotes}eco-terroism{close_quotes} committed by Iraqi forces during the gulf war left hundreds of wells burning and oil free-flowing out of Kuwait`s refineries and oil-shipping terminals. With the United States and much of the global community increasingly dependent on petroleum moved by supertankers, oil spills will continue to threaten the environment for the foreseeable future.

NONE

1992-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Global arms proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the United States delivered some US $11 billion of military hardware to Iran between 1969 and 1979, in the hopes of helping stabilize a volatile situation in the Middle East. That did not work. When Iran used the weapons against Iraq, the USSR, France, and a number of developing countries helped arm Iraq. It was this vast arsenal that Iraq deployed in its Kuwait-Persian Gulf War venture. Granted, those weapons were augmented by some U.S.-made equipment like TOW antitank missiles and Hawk antiaircraft missiles that were captured in the Iraqi attack on Kuwait. A report issued by the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) in June cited that chain of events to demonstrate that the U.S. and other major exporters are gradually losing control of the weapons transferred (to other countries) as well as the technology and industry necessary to produce and support them.

Christiansen, D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Americans and Iraq, twelve years apart: Comparing support for the US wars in Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Significant differences exist in Americans’ support for force between the 1991 Persian Gulf War and 2003 Iraq War, even when holding all demographic variables constant. Nearly every group decreased their support from 1991 to 2003, including men and women, Whites and racial minorities, people with high school degrees or higher, nearly all age categories, and Democrat and Independent affiliated individuals. When examining potential causes for decreased support in the 2003 Iraq War, the “nature of the conflict” presents the strongest argument and evidence. The Persian Gulf War aimed to force the Iraqi army from Kuwait, while the Iraq War was aimed at changing the governmental regime of Iraq. The latter conflict was less socially acceptable than the former to Americans. These differences between the conflicts are the best explanation for the change in support, while other explanations, including the changing composition of the population and a less pro-military populace, are insufficient.

Dana M. Williams; Suzanne R. Slusser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Stopping the emergence of nuclear weapon states in the Third World: An examination of the Iraq weapons inspection program. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Gulf War and the implementation of United Nation (UN) resolutions uncovered an Iraqi multi-billion dollar nuclear weapons program. Iraq's ability to pursue this clandestine program for more than a decade, despite periodic inspections, suggest that the myriad of treaties and agreements designed to curb proliferation may be inadequate. Clearly more must be done to deter and counter the spread of these deadly weapon. The UN weapons inspections in Iraq provide insight into possible solutions to the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology in the developing world. This study examines the policy and operational aspects associated with an intrusive United Nations inspection program. In its final analysis, this paper suggests that an effective challenge inspection program is a necessary element in countering the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Further, it suggests that the UN, as the only internationally accepted enforcement organization, be fully engaged in nonproliferation issues and support the challenge inspection program.

Block, D.A.

1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

International Energy Outlook - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Oil Markets World Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2004 World Oil Markets In the IEO2004 forecast, OPEC export volumes are expected to more than double while non-OPEC suppliers maintain their edge over OPEC in overall production. Prices are projected to rise gradually through 2025 as the oil resource base is further developed. Throughout most of 2003, crude oil prices remained near the top of the range preferred by producers in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), $22 to $28 per barrel for the OPEC “basket price.” OPEC producers continued to demonstrate disciplined adherence to announced cutbacks in production. Throughout 2003, the upward turn in crude oil prices was brought about by a combination of three factors. First, a general strike against the Chavez regime resulted in a sudden loss of much of Venezuela’s oil exports. Although the other OPEC producers agreed to increase their production capacities to make up for the lost Venezuelan output, the obvious strain on worldwide spare capacity kept prices high. Second, price volatility was exacerbated by internal conflict in Nigeria. Third, prospects for a return to normalcy in the Iraqi oil sector remained uncertain as residual post-war turmoil continued in Iraq.

104

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Friday, January 3, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 9) Friday, January 3, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 9) A trend of generally declining natural gas spot prices across the country since mid-December came to an abrupt halt yesterday (Thursday, January 2) owing to new forecasts of an Arctic front expected to arrive soon in the Lower 48. During the first day of trading in the New Year, the Henry Hub spot price moved up 34 cents per MMBtu to $4.94, but was still 6 cents lower in comparison with the average last Thursday. For the week (Thursday-Thursday), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February increased just over $0.26 per MMBtu to $5.251. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,417 Bcf, which trails the 5-year average by 3.8 percent, for the week ending December 27. Crude oil prices have provided little reprieve from the cautious energy outlook for the rest of the winter, as they continue to hover around 2-year highs owing to political strife in Venezuela and the Iraqi situation, both of which contribute to supply concerns for U.S. markets. Although the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $0.64 per barrel on the week, the spot price gained $0.76 yesterday to an average of $31.97, or $5.51 per MMBtu.

105

Everything depends on the Saudis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that oil markets are at their lowest level in 18 months, since before the Persian Gulf crisis. What is remarkable is that the world oil industry is producing essentially at capacity, yet OPEC shows no sign of taking advantage of this situation to drive up prices. Rather, commodity market forces are quickly exploiting any short-term surplus or shortage, and the oil market is exposed to continuing price volatility. Oil market uncertainties - the return of Iraqi and Kuwaiti production, prospects for exports from former Soviet republics, and the fragility of economic recovery - appear bigger than normal and threaten to oversupply markets in the spring when oil demand declines seasonally. The downward trend in world oil prices that began in November may continue into the second quarter of 1992. However, by the second half an economic recovery may be underway. If that happens, demand should grow and the market firm. At any rate, prices in 1992 may be more stable than commonly expected, because Saudi Arabia does not seem to want prices much above or below 1991 levels. That would be a range of $20 - $21 for WTI.

Sauer, J.W. (Conoco Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Measurement of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume of Kuwait oil well fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following their retreat from Kuwait during February and March of 1991, the Iraqi Army set fire to over 500 oil wells dispersed throughout the Kuwait oil fields. During the period of sampling from July to August 1991, it was estimated that between 3.29 {times} 10{sup 6} barrels per day of crude oil were combusted. The resulting fires produced several plumes of black and white smoke that coalesced to form a composite ``super`` plume. Because these fires were uncontrolled, significant quantities of organic materials were dispersed into the atmosphere and drifted throughout the Middle East. The organic particulants associated with the plume of the oil well fires had a potential to be rich in polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Based on the extreme mutagenic and carcinogenic activities of PAHs found in laboratory testing, a serious health threat to the population of that region potentially existed. Furthermore, the Kuwait oil fire plumes represented a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric chemistry associated with PAHs in the plume. If samples were collected near the plume source and from the plume many kilometers downwind from the source, comparisons could be made to better understand atmospheric reactions associated with particle-bound and gas-phase PAHs. To help answer health-related concerns and to better understand the fate and transport of PAHs in an atmospheric environment, a sampling and analysis program was developed.

Olsen, K.B.; Wright, C.W.; Veverka, C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ball, J.C. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Scientific Research Lab.; Stevens, R. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States). Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ground level concentration of sulfur dioxide at Kuwait`s major population centers during the oil-field fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Iraqi occupation, Kuwait`s oil wells were ignited. the fires were damaging to the country`s oil resources and air quality. The impact of the oil-field fires on the air quality was studied to determine the level of exposure to pollutants in major population centers. The period of July-September 1991 was selected for examination. A mathematical model was used to compute the ground-level concentration isopleths. The results of these computations are supported by significant concentrations measured and reported by the Environmental Protection Council, Kuwait. The ground-level concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the major population centers, whether measure or estimated, were less than the ambient standards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s air pollution index. The dispersive characteristics were classified according to wind conditions. The results of this assessment provide historical data on Kuwait`s oil fires and may be useful in assessing risks resulting from this catastrophe. 6 refs., 10 fig., 2 tab.

Al-Ajmi, D.N.; Marmoush, Y.R. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)] [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Chemical and physical properties of emissions from Kuwait oil fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the Iraqi retreat from Kuwait in 1991, airborne sampling was conducted in the oil fire plumes near Kuwait City and ground-level samples were taken of the air within the city. For the airborne sampling, a versatile air pollution sampler was used to determine the SO(2), elemental concentrations, the aerosol mass loadings and SO4(2-) and NO3(1-) concentrations. Striking differences between the black and white plumes were associated with high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl(2) measured in the white plumes and large numbers of carbon chain agglomerates in the black plumes. For the ground-based measurements, an annular denuder system was used to determine levels of SO(2), SO4(2-), trace elements, and mass loadings. Certain pollutant levels rose in the city during inversion conditions, when winds were too weak to continue moving the combustion products directly to the Persian Gulf, and the increased levels of Pb and certain trace elements were comparable to those in other large urban areas in Europe.

Stevens, R.; Pinto, J.; Mamane, Y.; Ondov, J.; Abdulraheem, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Smoke plumes from Kuwaiti oil fires as atmospheric experiment of opportunity: An early look. Final report, Mar-Oct 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document sets in context the smoke plume phenomenology associated with the large number of oil fires lit by the Iraqi military in Kuwait in February 1991, and which are probably the worst man-made air pollution event in human history. Based on the simple phenomenology given here, and considered an unfortunate 'experiment of opportunity', the question is raised of what actions should be taken, and what one can hope to learn from these events. From the standpoint of SDIO, most of the basic physical elements of the fire and smoke phenomenology appear to be understood although there are some new effects and the initial quantitative predictions of the experts appear to differ significantly from the results of the detailed measurements. Many observations have been made. They require analysis followed by review and publication before being incorporated in the DoD integrated phenomenology models. This document represents an early look at the smoke plumes before most of the observations have been analyzed, reviewed, and published; its main function is to raise questions that should be addressed more carefully later.

Bauer, E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Effects of Magnetic Field on Fuel Consumption and Exhaust Emissions in Two-Stroke Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy of permanent magnets was used in this research for the treatment of vehicle fuel (Iraqi gasoline), to reducing consumption, as well as reducing the emission of certain pollutants rates. The experiments in current research comprise the using of permanent magnets with different intensity (2000, 4000, 6000, 9000) Gauss, which installed on the fuel line of the two-stroke engine, and study its impact on gasoline consumption, as well as exhaust gases. For the purpose of comparing the results necessitated the search for experiments without the use of magnets. The overall performance and exhaust emission tests showed a good result, where the rate of reduction in gasoline consumption ranges between (9-14) %, and the higher the value of a reduction in the rate of 14% was obtained using field intensity 6000 Gauss as well as the intensity 9000 Gauss. It was found that the percentages of exhaust gas components (CO, HC) were decreased by 30%, 40% respectively, but CO2 percentage increased up to 10%. Absorption Spectrum of infrared and ultraviolet radiation showed a change in physical and chemical properties in the structure of gasoline molecules under the influence of the magnetic field. Surface tension of gasoline exposed to different intensities of magnetic field was measured and compared with these without magnetization.

Ali S. Faris; Saadi K. Al-Naseri; Nather Jamal; Raed Isse; Mezher Abed; Zainab Fouad; Akeel Kazim; Nihad Reheem; Ali Chaloob; Hazim Mohammad; Hayder Jasim; Jaafar Sadeq; Ali Salim; Aws Abas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Oil and economic development in OPEC countries, with case studies about Iraq and Algeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the impact of the increase in oil prices in 1973 and thereafter on economic development in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in general, and in Iraq and Algeria in particular. It attempts to investigate the extent to which these countries have succeeded in utilizing oil revenues to achieve their projected goals: diversification of their economies in order to reduce dependence on exporting crude oil which is an exhaustible resource; and acceleration of the rate of growth of the non-oil sector in order to increase its contribution to GDP and foreign-exchange earnings as well as to maintain the growth of the economy in the post-oil age. While the increase in oil revenues greatly reduced the capital constraint to growth, it did not remove all other constraints at the same time. Thus, bottlenecks in transportation, institutions, skilled labor, raw and construction materials remained important obstacles. According to the criteria used by this study to judge the performance of the Iraqi and the Algerian economies after 1973, both countries did quite well. However, one of the findings about Iraq is that while the rate of growth of real per capita GDP accelerated after 1973, the rate of growth of real per capita non-oil GDP did not. Algeria succeeded in diversifying her economy, since the rate of growth of non-oil GDP accelerated after 1973, compared to the earlier period.

Al-Khalil, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

North Korea: The next nuclear nightmare  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crisis in the Persian Gulf has reawakened concerns over the spread of nuclear arms. Even before its invasion of Kuwait, Iraq's history of aggression and support for international terrorism triggered fears in Washington that its acquisition of nuclear weapons might damage international stability and US interests far more than the emergence of India, Israel, Pakistan, and South Africa as de facto nuclear powers. Thus, when the Gulf War began on January 16, Iraq's nuclear sites were among the first attacked by allied air strikes. Unfortunately, Iraq has not been the only hostile proliferator looming on the horizon. North Korea, which has been no less dedicated than Iraq to the use of violence to advance its expansionist goals, has also tenaciously pursued a nuclear-weapons capability. Moreover, the North Korean program is considerably closer to bearing fruit than the Iraqi effort. And although North Korea, like Iraq, has signed the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, unlike Iraq it has refused to conclude the safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency that the treaty requires.

Spector, L.S.; Smith, J.R.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Decommissioning of the Iraq former nuclear complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A number of sites in Iraq have some degree of radiological contamination and require decommissioning and remediation in order to ensure radiological safety. Many of these sites in Iraq are located at the nuclear research centre at Al Tuwaitha. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors has approved a project to assist the Government of Iraq in the evaluation and decommissioning of former facilities that used radioactive materials. The project is divided into three phases: Phase 1: collect and analyze all available data and conduct training of the Iraqi staff, Phase 2: develop a decommissioning and remediation plan, and Phase 3: implement field activities relating to decommissioning, remediation and site selection suitable for final disposal of waste. Four working groups have been established to complete the Phase 1 work and significant progress has been made in drafting a new nuclear law which will provide the legal basis for the licensing of the decommissioning of the former nuclear complex. Work is also underway to collect and analysis existing date, to prioritize future activities and to develop a waste management strategy. This will be a long-term and costly project. (authors)

Abbas, Mohammed [Ministry of Science and Technology (Iraq); Helou, Tuama; Ahmead, Bushra [Ministry of Environment (Iraq); Al-Atia, Mousa; Al-Mubarak, Mowaffak [Iraqi Radiation Sources Regulatory Authority (Iraq); Danneels, Jeffrey; Cochran, John; Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Coates, Roger [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 - 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nuclear proliferation: Learning from the Iraq experience. Hearing before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, October 17 and 23, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of this hearings record is devoted to brief statements to the committee and prepared statements submitted for the record by: (1) Dr. David Kay, Deputy Leader, IAEA Action Team for Nuclear Inspections; and (2) Dr. Hans Blix, Director General, IAEA. Dr. Kay spent considerable time in Iraq during the seven IAEA inspections of Iraqi facilities between May 14-23, 1991 and October 11-21, 1991. He says (1) it is overwhelmingly clear that Iraq had a clandestine nuclear weapons program of considerable breadth; and (2) there is a very high probability that Iraq is still withholding information from the inspection effort of the IAEA. He concludes that IAEA, with firm backing of the U.N. Security Council and a minimum of constraints, has a substantial proven capacity to carry out inspections. Dr. Blix reviews briefly the history of the IAEA inspection effort, starting with the 1950s' Atoms for Peace Program. He emphasizes that the one factor that enabled IAEA inspectors to find out in 5 months in Iraq what had not been uncovered in 10 years, was intelligence information; further, IAEA will make special efforts in the future to obtain such intelligence information.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Crustal structure along geotransect Baghdad-Dohuk, northern Iraq  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic reflection data correlated to five exploration wells along with geological, gravity, and magnetic data are used to construct the subsurface structure along an approximately 100 km wide corridor that traverses central Iraq in a SE-NW direction for a distance of about 500 km from Baghdad in the central part of Iraq to Dohuk near the Turkish border. This transect is one of few such transects that represents the Iraqi contribution to the Global Geoscience Transects (GGT) project. A strong reflector has been identified at a depth of about 10- 13 km. This reflector is believed to be the top surface of the crystalline basement. This seismic evidence finds support in the interpretation of gravity and magnetic data. The crystalline basement becomes shallower as the authors approach the Turkish border, until about 100 km from the border, and then becomes deeper again to subduct under the Anadolian plate. In central Iraq the basement also becomes deeper as they approach the Iranian border to subduct under the Iranian plate. It appears that the thickness of the crust varies between 35.5 km in the central part of Iraq and about 30.5 km near the Turkish border.

Al-Saigh, N.H. (Mosul Univ. (Iraq)); Namik, I.; Hameed, I.A.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Support of the Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Iraq's former nuclear facilities contain large quantities of radioactive materials and radioactive waste. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the Iraq NDs Program) is a new program to decontaminate and permanently dispose of radioactive wastes in Iraq. The NDs Program is led by the Government of Iraq, under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) auspices, with guidance and assistance from a number of countries. The U.S. participants include Texas Tech University and Sandia National Laboratories. A number of activities are ongoing under the broad umbrella of the Iraq NDs Program: drafting a new nuclear law that will provide the legal basis for the cleanup and disposal activities; assembly and analysis of existing data; characterization of soil contamination; bringing Iraqi scientists to the world's largest symposium on radioactive waste management; touring U.S. government and private sector operating radwaste disposal facilities in the U.S., and hosting a planning workshop on the characterization and cleanup of the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Facility. (authors)

Coates, Roger [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 - 1400 Vienna (Austria); Cochran, John; Danneels, Jeff [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Chesser, Ronald; Phillips, Carlton; Rogers, Brenda [Center for Environmental Radiation Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Big questions cloud Iraq's future role in world oil market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Iraq raises questions for the world oil market beyond those frequently asked about when and under what circumstances it will resume exports. Two wars since 1981 have obscured encouraging results from a 20 year exploration program that were only beginning to come to light when Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990. Those results indicate the country might someday be able to produce much more than the 3.2 million b/d it was flowing before a United Nations embargo blocked exports. If exploratory potential is anywhere near what officials asserted in the late 1980s, and if Iraq eventually turns hospitable to international capital, the country could become a world class opportunity for oil companies as well as an exporter with productive capacity approaching that of Saudi Arabia. But political conditions can change quickly. Under a new, secular regime, Iraq might welcome non-Iraqi oil companies and capital as essential to economic recovery. It's a prospect that warrants a new industry look at what the country has revealed about its geology and exploration history.

Tippee, B.

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

118

The economic development of oil-exporting countries: The case of Iraq  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to measure the response of Iraqi development to the influx of oil-export revenues. The study employs several econometric techniques using data from 1960 to 1980. From 1960 to 1980, Iraq achieved remarkable economic growth, a high rate of investment and employment, more equitable income distribution, a favorable balance of trade, and a stabilized economy. The 1972 government takeover of oil industries and the oil price boom of 1973 brought even more unprecedented growth and prosperity to the nation. Despite this remarkable performance however, the economic structure of Iraq remains dominated by the oil-export sector. In other words, Iraq's ability to reduce its dependence on oil revenues has been constructed because home sectors were not yet developed sufficiently to provide outputs and revenues needed by the country. Recommendations include development of policies designed to link the oil export sector with the rest of the economy, to encourage more investment by the private sector, to expand and improve the productivity of the agricultural and industrial sectors, and to develop inter-nation regional cooperatives capable of expanding the market for locally produced goods.

Khalil, M.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The impact of rising energy prices on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns: The Persian Gulf crisis as a case example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered immediate increases in world oil prices. Increases in world petroleum prices and in US petroleum imports resulted in higher petroleum prices for US customers. In this report, the effects of the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath are used to demonstrate the potential impacts of petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and nonpoor households. The analysis is done by using the Minority Energy Assessment Model developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The differential impacts of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raise significant issues for a variety of government agencies, including DOE. Although the Persian Gulf crisis is now over and world oil prices have returned to their prewar levels, the differential impacts of rising energy prices on poor and minority households as a result of any future crisis in the world oil market remains a significant long-term issue.

Henderson, L.J. (Baltimore Univ., MD (United States)); Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

TTW - PageMaker 2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9, 2004 9, 2004 By the Numbers WIPP employee reports from Iraq Shipments scheduled to arrive at WIPP week of 5/2/04 - 5/8/04: 34 Total shipments received at WIPP: 2,529 Total volume disposed at WIPP: 19,711 m 3 FY04 Performance Metrics D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T ES O F A M E R I C A TeamWorks TeamWorks TRU A weekly e-newsletter for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant team Former WTS employee Ricardo Sanchez left WIPP in February to join the Washington Group International organization in Iraq. Sanchez says he exchanged life in the New Mexico desert for a life in the Iraqi desert. But that's where the similarities end. To begin with, the Army base Ricardo and fellow contractors call home experiences mortar shell- ing on a regular basis. A second difference: at WIPP safety is priority one,

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121

International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to developing technologies to meet escalating requirements for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) monitoring and associated inspections. This commitment involves the customization and transfer of existing remote monitoring/information management technologies for use by the IAEA. This paper describes an information management system called INSIST International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool, which was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to support the IAEA Action Team in its role of monitoring and verifying compliance under United Nations Special Commission (UNSC) Resolutions 687, 707, and 715. Initial emphasis was placed on developing and deploying functionality and databases customized to support the Action Team. Throughout the design and customization of INSIST, emphasis was placed on information storage and retrieval capabilities for data gathered by the Action Team. In addition, PNL provided the Action Team with maps and satellite images and other relevant Iraqi databases to further facilitate the following activities: monitoring nuclear activities, facility operations, and nuclear material inventories assisting in inspection planning and training providing post inspection analysis providing onsite inspection support reporting on inspection findings.

Steinmaus, K.L.; Wukelic, G.E.; Beal, O.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hydrologic impacts of engineering projects on the Tigris-Euphrates System and its marshlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rising demands for fresh water supplies are leading to water management practices that are altering natural flow systems world-wide. One of the most devastated of these natural systems is the Tigris-Euphrates watershed that over the past three decades has witnessed the construction of over 60 engineering projects that eliminated seasonal flooding, reduced natural flow and dramatically reduced the areal extent (1966: 8000 km{sup 2}; 2002: 750 km{sup 2}) of the Mesopotamian Marshes downstream. We constructed a catchment-based continuous (1964-1998) rainfall runoff model for the watershed (area: 10{sup 6} km{sup 2}) using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to understand the dynamics of the natural flow system, and to investigate the impacts of reduced overall flow and the related land cover and land use change downstream in the marshes. The model was calibrated (1964-1970) and validated (1971-1998) against stream flow gauge data. Using the calibrated model we calculated the temporal variations in the average monthly flow rate (AMFR), the average monthly peak flow rate (AMPFR), and annual flow volume (AFV) of the Tigris and Euphrates into the marshes at a location near Al-Basrah city (31{sup o}N, 47.5{sup o}E) throughout the modeled period. Model results indicate that the AMPFR (6301 m{sup 3}/s) and average annual flow volume (AAFV: 80 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}/yr) for period A (10/1/1965-09/30/1973), preceding the construction of the major dams is progressively diminished in periods B1 (10/1/1973-09/30/1989; AMPFR: 3073 m{sup 3}/s; AAFV: 55 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}/yr) and B2 (10/1/1989-09/30/1998; AMPFR, 2319 m{sup 3}/s; AAFV: 50 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}/yr) that witnessed the construction of the major dams (B1: Keban, Tabqa, Hamrin, Haditha, Mosul, Karakaya; B2: Ataturk) due to the combined effects of filling artificial lakes, evaporation and infiltration of impounded water and its utilization for irrigation purposes. To investigate the impacts of reduced flow on the areal extent of the marshes, we examined the variation in marsh size extracted from temporal satellite data (1966, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987) acquired around the same approximate time period (July to September) of the year versus simulated AFV for the period preceding the onset (1987) of major local engineering projects (e.g., Crown of Battles River, Loyalty to the Leader Canal, Mother of Battles River) in and around the investigated marshes. Results indicate that the areal extent of the Central and Al-Hammar marshes (e.g., 1966: 7970 km2, 1977: 6680 km2, 1984: 5270 km2) decreases with a decrease in AFV (e.g., 1966: 60.8 x 109 m3, 1977: 56.9 x 109 m3, 1984: 37.6 x 109 m3). Using a relationship that describes the impact of reduced AFV on the areal extent of the marshes, we evaluated the impact of additional reductions in flow that will result from the implementation of the planned engineering projects on the Tigris-Euphrates system over the next few years. Upon completion of the ongoing South Eastern Anatolia project, with projected reductions in AFV exceeding 5 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}/yr, the sustainable marshes in the Central and Al-Hammar area will be reduced by at least an additional 550 km{sup 2}.

Jones, C.; Sultan, M.; Yan, E.; Milewski, A.; Hussein, M.; Al-Dousari, A.; Al-Kaisy, S.; Becker, R.; Environmental Science Division; Western Michigan Univ.; Iraq Reconstruction Management Office, U.S. Embassy, Baghdad, Iraq; Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait City, Kuwait; University of Tikrit

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Environmental and health consequences of depleted uranium use in the 1991 Gulf War  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the 235U radionuclide enrichment processes for nuclear reactors or nuclear weapons. DU in the metallic form has high density and hardness as well as pyrophoric properties, which makes it superior to the classical tungsten armour-piercing munitions. Military use of DU has been recently a subject of considerable concern, not only to radioecologists but also public opinion in terms of possible health hazards arising from its radioactivity and chemical toxicity. In this review, the results of uranium content measurements in different environmental samples performed by authors in Kuwait after Gulf War are presented with discussion concerning possible environmental and health effects for the local population. It was found that uranium concentration in the surface soil samples ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 ?g g?1 with an average value of 1.1 ?g g?1, much lower than world average value of 2.8 ?g g?1. The solid fallout samples showed similar concentrations varied from 0.3 to 1.7 ?g g?1 (average 1.47 ?g g?1). Only the average concentration of U in solid particulate matter in surface air equal to 0.24 ng g?1 was higher than the usually observed values of ?0.1 ng g?1 but it was caused by the high dust concentration in the air in that region. Calculated on the basis of these measurements, the exposure to uranium for the Kuwait and southern Iraq population does not differ from the world average estimation. Therefore, the widely spread information in newspapers and Internet (see for example: [CADU NEWS, 2003. http://www.cadu.org.uk/news/index.htm (3–13)]) concerning dramatic health deterioration for Iraqi citizens should not be linked directly with their exposure to DU after the Gulf War.

Henryk Bem; Firyal Bou-Rabee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Knowledge, attitude & practice towards breast cancer & breast self examination in Kirkuk University, Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective To evaluate the level of knowledge, attitude and practice towards breast cancer and breast self examination (BSE) among a sample of educated Iraqi population affiliated to Kirkuk University in Iraq. Methods The total number of participants was 304 (256 females and 48 males); comprising students (85.2%; n=259), teaching staff (8.2%; n=25) and administrative university staff (6.6%; n=20). The mean age of the participants was (23.8±8.3) years. Each was asked to complete a pre-coded standardized questionnaire. Variables were dichotomized and multiple logistic regressions were applied to test the association of independent variables with practicing BSE. Results It was observed that 177 (69.1%) of females have heard about the BSE. One hundred and nine of the female respondents (42.6%) reported that they have practiced BSE. Of those who have heard about BSE only 57.4% were in fact practicing the technique. Multiple logistic regression revealed that age of the respondents and knowledge on the means of early detection, the effect of nulliparity on the probability of contacting the disease and factors that could decrease the incidence of breast cancer were significantly associated with practicing BSE (P=0.019, 0.03, 0.03 and 0.007 respectively). Overall, it has been demonstrated that 89.7% of the female participants in this study presented a positive attitude towards learning the correct procedure of BSE with an intention to instruct others on the technique. Conclusions although the knowledge about breast cancer and practice of BSE was relatively weak in Kirkuk, probably attributable to the long standing conflicts in the city, yet the positive attitude towards learning the screening techniques and the intention to teach others were fairly encouraging. Knowledge and practice can be endorsed by promoting nationwide public health awareness campaigns and establishing sustained educational framework and policy guidelines.

Nada A.S. Alwan; Jwad K.A. Al-Diwan; Wafa' M. Al-Attar; Raghad A. Eliessa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the Kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered first immediate and then fluctuating world petroleum prices. Increases in petroleum prices and in U.S. petroleum imports resulted in increases in the petroleum prices paid by U.S. residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. The result was an immediate price shock that reverberated throughout the U.S. economy. The differential impact of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raised immediate, significant, and potentially long-term research, policy, and management issues for a variety of federal, state, and local government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Among these issues are (1) the measurement of variations in the impact of petroleum price changes on poor, nonpoor, minority, and majority households; (2) how to use the existing policy resources and policy innovation to mitigate regressive impacts of petroleum price increases on lower-income households; and (3) how to pursue such policy mitigation through government agencies severely circumscribed by tax and expenditure limitations. Few models attempt to assess household energy consumption and energy expenditure under various alternative price scenarios and with respect to the inclusion of differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of potential impacts of petroleum price changes attributable to the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath on majority, black, and Hispanic households and on overlapping poor and nonpoor households. At the time this was written, the Persian Gulf War had concluded with Iraq`s total surrender to all of the resolutions and demands of the United Nations and United States.

Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1989-1990 1989-1990 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. In his April 2003 introduction to the 1989-1990 Digest, then Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV stated in part: "The year 1989-90 was a transitional period in international relations, as the world community continued to deal with implications of the end of the Cold War and the unsteady emergence of a new era. Many of the tensions and ambiguities of the time are reflected in the documents excerpted in this volume. For example, the Immigration Act of 1990 was adopted against the background of domestic U.S. concerns about terrorism, admission of refugees and exclusion of aliens-issues that continue to be important today. Other significant domestic law issues involved reservations to treaties (in this case, the 1948 Genocide Convention), the application of doctrines of foreign sovereign immunity (the Wallenberg Case), the interplay between sanctions and foreign assistance (e.g., Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the German Democratic Republic), and the allocation of foreign affairs authority in our federal system. "At the same time, the volume records U.S. efforts to deal effectively with the legal dimensions of very diverse issues on the international plane, including the Iraqi attack on the U.S.S. Stark, the downing of Iran Air Flight 655, the deployment of U.S. armed forces in Panama, maritime interdiction incidents, irregular rendition of criminal suspects, and the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe. Concerns about human rights, terrorism, and the war on drugs are indicated by the adoption of domestic legislation implementing, or relating to the implementation of, the UN Convention on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, the UN Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, the Montreal Protocol on Suppression of Unlawful Acts of Violence at Airports, and the IMO Convention on the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (negotiated in the aftermath of the Achille Lauro incident) and its related Protocol on Fixed Platforms. . . ."

127

Molecular characterization of multi-resistant tuberculosis isolated from Baghdad, Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity all over the world. Multi-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is an important cause for mortality among TB patients, and management of MDR-TB remains a major challenge for national TB programs. Early detection of MDR-TB provides better treatment outcomes and reduces the transmission of MDR. Nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) like Line Probe Assays have been recently approved for use in low-income settings and can be used to screen smear-positive sputum specimens for diagnosis of resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid in 1–2 days. Objective The specific objective of this study was to determine the type of MDR-TB and to detect the mutation in rpoB, KatG and inhA from culture specimens isolated from Iraqi patients. Materials and methods The DNA extracted from 51 clinical isolates obtained from patients living in Baghdad/Iraq (2010–2011) who were previously characterized as MDR has been analyzed. Sixty sensitive isolates were chosen randomly as the control characterized as fully susceptible to anti-TB drugs. Line Probe Assays [GenoType® \\{MTBDRplus\\} (Hain Lifescience, GmbH, Nehren, Germany)] at Supra-national TB Reference Laboratory/San Raffaele Scientific Institute (FCSR)/San Raffaele University/Italy in (2012) were used for identification and diagnosis of the type of MDR-TB and for the detection of the mutation, performed according to the instructions of the manufacturer. Results and conclusion Line Probe Assays were performed for 51 multidrug-resistances of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains; 6 strains were excluded due to un-interpretable results; 5 strains were identified as sensitive to both rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) by MTBDR plus assay. The most common genetic mutation conferring RIF resistance was S531L of rpoB gene which was detected in 33 (82.5%) resistant strains. Other mutations in this gene were \\{D516Vand\\} H526Y which were detected in a single strain (2.5%) for each. Also, there were 5 (12.5%) RIF-resistant strains with mutations that could not be identified specifically in this assay. INH resistance due to KatG mutation \\{S315T1was\\} found in 17 (42.5%) strains of INH-resistant M. tuberculosis. The second most common site of mutation was in the upstream promoter sequence of inhA, which was found in 15 (37.5%) strains, 14 (35%) strains of which carried a C ? T transition at the ?15 position, and single strains (2.5%) carried a T ? A mutation at the ?8 position. The result showed 8 (20%) strains missing a band on the wild-type region of these strains, but no hybridization with mutation probes on this gene suggested resistance due to mutations other than those included in this assay. LiPA is an appropriate tool for rapid screening for MDR-TB and has the potential to substantially reduce the turnaround time of drug sensitive test (DST) results.

Ruqaya Mustafa Ali; Amina N. Al-Thwani; Daniela M. Cirillo; Emanuele Borroni; Ahmed A. Mankhi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z