Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Property:LithologyInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LithologyInfo LithologyInfo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name LithologyInfo Property Type Text Subproperties This property has the following 93 subproperties: 2 2-M Probe Survey A Active Seismic Methods Active Sensors Aerial Photography Aeromagnetic Survey Analytical Modeling C Caliper Log Cation Geothermometers Cement Bond Log Chemical Logging Compound and Elemental Analysis Conceptual Model Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D Data Acquisition-Manipulation Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques Data and Modeling Techniques Drilling Methods E Electric Micro Imager Log Electromagnetic Sounding Methods Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion F FLIR Fault Mapping Field Techniques Flow Test Fluid Inclusion Analysis Fluid Lab Analysis Formation Testing Techniques

2

Property:Geochemistry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geochemistry Property Type String Description A description of the geofluid geochemistry in the geothermal area, including...

3

Appendix G: Geochemistry  

SciTech Connect

This appendix discusses the geology of the Hanford Site and singe-shell tank (SST) waste management areas (WMAs). The purpose is to provide the most recent geochemical information available for the SST WMAs and the Integrated Disposal Facility. This appendix summarizes the information in the geochemistry data package for the SST WMAs.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Zachara, John M.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Brown, Christopher F.; Freshley, Mark D.

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

Application on lithology recognition with BP artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model is established to recognize the drilled formations' lithologies while drilling. The styles of output and input of ANN are designed. The nerve cells in input layer are weight of bit (WOB), speed of rotary (SOR) ... Keywords: artificial neural network, drilling, formation lithology, recognition

Jinhui Zhou; Jienian Yan; Li Pan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapRockLithology CapRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CapRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the cap rock. Subproperties This property has the following 6 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Pages using the property "CapRockLithology" Showing 6 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + volcanic; lacustrine sediments + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + G Geysers Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + Overlapping a'a' and pahoehoe flows + L Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area + Metasedimentary Landslide Block; Hydrothermal Alteration Layer +

6

Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockLithology HostRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the reservoir rock. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 14 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area S cont. Stillwater Geothermal Area V Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockLithology"

7

Overview of fundamental geochemistry basic research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers in ORNL`s Geochemistry and High Temperature Aqueous Chemistry groups are conducting detailed experimental studies of physicochemical properties of the granite-melt-brine system; sorption of water on rocks from steam-dominated reservoirs; partitioning of salts and acid volatiles between brines and steam; effects of salinity on H and O isotope partitioning between brines, minerals, and steam; and aqueous geochemistry of Al. These studies contribute in many ways to cost reductions and improved efficiency in the discovery, characterization, and production of energy from geothermal resources.

Anovitz, L.M.; Benezeth, P.; Blencoe, J.G. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Simulating CO2 storage in saline aquifers with improved code RCB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geological storage of CO2 in saline aquifers is believed to be one of the most promising ways to reduce the concentration of the greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Injection of CO2 will, however, lead to dissolution of minerals in regions of lowered ... Keywords: CO2, RCB (retrasocodebright), gas density correction, gas solubility correction, geochemistry, geomechanics, improved Newton-Raphson iteration method, multiphase flow, relaxation factor, saline aquifer, simulation

Shunping Liu; Bjorn Kvamme

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

10

WHAT IS MEDICAL MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WHAT IS MEDICAL MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY? The connection between human health of medical mineralogy and geochemistry (MMG) focuses on understanding the equilibria and reaction pathways phases with naturally occurring, inorganic solid phases within the human body. Medical mineralogy

Sahai, Nita

11

Arsenic Geochemistry in Source Waters of the Los Angeles Aqueduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has focused on arsenic geochemistry in natural waters. ThisG402 XU2-7 ARSENIC GEOCHEMISTRY IN SOURCE WATERS OF T H EOrganism Interactions, Geochemistry, Ground Water Quality,

Hering, Janet G; Wilkie, Jennifer A; Chiu, Van Q

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center...

13

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Jump to: navigation, search...

14

Appendix A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs This page intentionally left blank WELL INSTALLATION BLANK CASING: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.0 to 0.35 METHOD WELL SCREEN: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.35 to 3.27 DATE DEVELOPED SUMPIEND CAP: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 3.27 to 3.58 WATER LEVEL (FT BGS) SURFACE SEAL: LOGGED BY P. McKenzie REMARKS Drillers hit water at 5 fl: well point removed. LITHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION LOCATION SHIPROCK, NM SURFACE ELEV. ( FT NGVD) 4890.00 SITE SHIPROCK TOP OF CASING (FT) 4890.00 WELL NUMBER 0602 MEAS. PT. ELEV. (FT) 4890.00 SLOT SIZE (IN) 0.125 WELL INSTALLATION INTERVAL (FT) DRILLING METHOD BLANK CASING: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.0 to 0.35 METHOD WELL SCREEN: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.35 to 3.27 DATE DEVELOPED SUMPIEND CAP: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 3.27 to 3.58

15

USGS Energy Geochemistry Database | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Geochemistry Database Energy Geochemistry Database Dataset Summary Description The Energy Geochemistry Data Base (EGDB) contains chemical analysis data for crude oil, natural gas, coal, water, and rock samples analyzed by the USGS Energy Resources Team's Geochemistry Laboratory, or by contracted-service laboratories. Data was also obtained from the literature and unpublished public domain sources. The sample types included are primarily rock, coal, oil, and gas. Analytical data within the EGDB includes Rock-Eval pyrolysis, organic mass spectrometry, vitrinite reflectance, gas chromatography, stable carbon isotopes, inductively coupled plasma, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, mercury analysis and a number of other related geochemistry analyses that, in some instances, predate the EGDB. The database is in a Microsoft Access format (.mdb).

16

Mechanical properties and modeling of seal-forming lithologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to evaluate the roles of deformation and the occurrence of weak sedimentary lithologies subjected to gravitational loads in shaping conventional and unconventional oil and gas reservoirs. Two sedimentary lithologies that influence the geometries, physical properties, and heterogeneities of oil and gas reservoirs are shale and rocksalt. Both form effect barriers to the flow and communication of petroleum and gas and, in many cases, form the seals to major reservoirs due to their low permeabilities. Both are actively deformed in depositional environments due to their low strengths relative to gravitational loads applied. Thus, the shapes of seal-forming units, and the nature of fractures and faults that may breach them depend upon either the mechanical properties of shale or those of salt, and the loading histories to which they have been subjected. Deformed shales may, in addition, serve as unconventional reservoirs of gas if open fractures within them provide sufficient porosity. The fracture and flow properties of shales are not well constrained, and the authors are currently investigating these properties experimentally. The rheology of rocksalt, on the other hand, is well known and they believe that the time is right to apply the experimentally constrained constitutive relations for rocksalt to deformations in the Earth. Efforts are continuing on modeling fracture anisotropy and the authors have examined simple, two-mica models to evaluate the mechanical interactions they proposed for gneiss and mica-poor schists. Brief summaries of the progress and results to date for (1) the mechanical properties of schist, (2) a two-mica model of fracture anisotropy, (3) deformation of shale, and (4) modeling of salt and shale tectonics of the northern Gulf of Mexico are given in the following sections. 35 refs., 33 figs., 1 tab.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.; Mazariegos, R.; Shea, W.T.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Towards automatic lithological classification from remote sensing data using support vector machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing data can be effectively used as a means to build geological knowledge for poorly mapped terrains. In this study, the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is applied to an automated lithological classification of a study area in northwestern ... Keywords: ASTER, Aeromagnetic, DEM, Lithological classification, Supervised classification, Support vector machine (SVM)

Le Yu; Alok Porwal; Eun-Jung Holden; Michael C. Dentith

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Salinity Intrusion in Estuaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One dimensional time-averaged solutions are examined for salinity intrusion in estuaries with a breadth variation BL(X/?)n and a depth variation H(X/?)m, where X is the distance from the head of the estuary. These solutions emphasize the ...

D. Prandle

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper:...

20

Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom Clay after ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom  ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

Johnson, D.H.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

Johnson, David H. (Lakewood, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

"Environmental Isotope Geochemistry": Past, Present Mark Baskaran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 "Environmental Isotope Geochemistry": Past, Present and Future Mark Baskaran 1.1 Introduction and Early History A large number of radioactive and stable isotopes of the first 95 elements unraveling many secrets of our Earth and its environmental health. These isotopes, because of their suitable

Baskaran, Mark

24

Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 80 0 C. Applied Geochemistry, 13, 905-916. Brown, P.W. ,and 80 0 C. Applied Geochemistry, 13, 905-916. de Combarieu,cells. Applied Geochemistry, 21, 977-992. Finsterle, S. ,

Xu, T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

USGS Energy Geochemistry Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Geochemistry Data Base (EGDB) contains chemical analysis data for crude oil, natural gas, coal, water, and rock samples analyzed by the USGS Energy Resources...

26

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal investigations in...

27

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference...

28

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

29

EMSL: Science: Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeochemistryBiogeochemistry and Subsurface Science pyramid-like surface structure of the mineral, hematite Pyramid-like surface structure of the mineral, hematite Research in this...

30

Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems...

31

Environmental geochemistry of radioactive contamination.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report attempts to describe the geochemical foundations of the behavior of radionuclides in the environment. The information is obtained and applied in three interacting spheres of inquiry and analysis: (1) experimental studies and theoretical calculations, (2) field studies of contaminated and natural analog sites and (3) model predictions of radionuclide behavior in remediation and waste disposal. Analyses of the risks from radioactive contamination require estimation of the rates of release and dispersion of the radionuclides through potential exposure pathways. These processes are controlled by solubility, speciation, sorption, and colloidal transport, which are strong functions of the compositions of the groundwater and geomedia as well as the atomic structure of the radionuclides. The chemistry of the fission products is relatively simple compared to the actinides. Because of their relatively short half-lives, fission products account for a large fraction of the radioactivity in nuclear waste for the first several hundred years but do not represent a long-term hazard in the environment. The chemistry of the longer-lived actinides is complex; however, some trends in their behavior can be described. Actinide elements of a given oxidation state have either similar or systematically varying chemical properties due to similarities in ionic size, coordination number, valence, and electron structure. In dilute aqueous systems at neutral to basic pH, the dominant actinide species are hydroxy- and carbonato-complexes, and the solubility-limiting solid phases are commonly oxides, hydroxides or carbonates. In general, actinide sorption will decrease in the presence of ligands that complex with the radionuclide; sorption of the (IV) species of actinides (Np, Pu, U) is generally greater than of the (V) species. The geochemistry of key radionuclides in three different environments is described in this report. These include: (1) low ionic strength reducing waters from crystalline rocks at nuclear waste research sites in Sweden; (2) oxic water from the J-13 well at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a proposed repository for high level nuclear waste (HLW) in tuffaceous rocks; and (3) reference brines associated with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The transport behaviors of radionuclides associated with the Chernobyl reactor accident and the Oklo Natural Reactor are described. These examples span wide temporal and spatial scales and include the rapid geochemical and physical processes important to nuclear reactor accidents or industrial discharges as well as the slower processes important to the geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Application of geochemical information to remediating or assessing the risk posed by radioactive contamination is the final subject of this report. After radioactive source terms have been removed, large volumes of soil and water with low but potentially hazardous levels of contamination may remain. For poorly-sorbing radionuclides, capture of contaminated water and removal of radionuclides may be possible using permeable reactive barriers and bioremediation. For strongly sorbing radionuclides, contaminant plumes will move very slowly. Through a combination of monitoring, regulations and modeling, it may be possible to have confidence that they will not be a hazard to current or future populations. Abstraction of the hydrogeochemical properties of real systems into simple models is required for probabilistic risk assessment. Simplifications in solubility and sorption models used in performance assessment calculations for the WIPP and the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain are briefly described.

Bryan, Charles R.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Geochemistry of slow-growing corals : reconstructing sea surface temperature, salinity and the North Atlantic Oscillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 225-year old coral from the south shore of Bermuda (64°W, 320N) provides a record of decadal-to-centennial scale climate variability. The coral was collected live, and sub-annual density bands seen in x-radiographs ...

Goodkin, Nathalie Fairbank

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Automatic detection of lithologic boundaries using the Walsh transform: A case study from the KTB borehole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic method of lithologic boundary detection based on Walsh transform theory is developed and applied to the German Continental Deep Drilling Project (KTB) borehole well log data. Walsh functions are natural choices for describing binary waveforms; ... Keywords: Borehole geophysics, KTB, Low-pass filtering, Rock boundary detection, Walsh transforms

Saumen Maiti; R. K. Tiwari

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Application of Self-Organizing Competitive Network in Lithologic Identification of the Logging Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geological information of logging data is very important for people to determine oil reserves and make the plan of exploitation. So it is essential to identify litho logy of the logging data. Neural network with self-organizing, self-learning and ... Keywords: self-organizing, competitive network, log data to identify lithology, MATLAB

Ren Guo-Feng; Tian Zhu-Mei

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Pedogenic calcretes from Coimbatore area, Tamil Nadu: Micromorphology, geochemistry and palaeoclimate significance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pedogenic calcretes from Coimbatore area, Tamil Nadu: Micromorphology, geochemistry and palaeoclimate significance

Hema, A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Lithology identification of aquifers from geophysical well logs and fuzzy logic analysis: Shui-Lin Area, Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to construct a fuzzy lithology system from well logs to identify formation lithology of a groundwater aquifer system in order to better apply conventional well logging interpretation in hydro-geologic studies because well ... Keywords: Aquifer characterization, Artificial intelligence, Groundwater, Hydrogeology, Soft computing

Bieng-Zih Hsieh; Charles Lewis; Zsay-Shing Lin

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Australian Contributions to theAustralian Contributions to the Field of Organic GeochemistryField of Organic Geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by coupling the hard rock geochemistry and geology of kim- berlites and other rocks into the petroleum program on reservoir geochemistry, basin modelling, petroleum migration and shale gas. The main focus in a range of fluid types, temperatures and pressures, including in the weathering of source rocks

Rothman, Daniel

38

Microstructure Estimates of Turbulent Salinity Flux and the Dissipation Spectrum of Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct determination of the irreversible turbulent flux of salinity in the ocean has not been possible because of the complexity of measuring salinity on the smallest scales over which it mixes. Presented is an analysis of turbulent salinity ...

Jonathan D. Nash; James N. Moum

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Mercury Geochemistry Surface Mercury Geochemistry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Shallow, soil-mercury surveys can be used effectively in exploration for geothermal resources. Soil-mercury data from six areas in Nevada, California and New Mexico are analyzed using contour maps, histogram and probability graphs. Plotting on probability graphs allows background and anomalous populations to be resolved even when considerable overlap between populations is present. As is shown in several examples, separate soil-mercury populations can be plausibly interpreted. Mercury data can significantly enhance the structural understanding of a prospect

40

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focuses on element distribution in rocks and minerals using data obtained from natural and experimental systems. Emphasizes models describing trace-element partitioning and applications of trace-element geochemistry to ...

Frey, Frederick August

42

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Details Activities (8) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Most theoretical fundamentals of geothermal geochemistry were established by the mid-1980s, as were numerous practical applications of these fundamentals to geothermal resource evaluation and management. Since that time, these geeochmical tools have been refined to various degrees. Noted developments include: widespread use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); advances in spectral analysis; new and refined

43

Computational Studies in Molecular Geochemistry and Biogeochemistry  

SciTech Connect

The ability to predict the transport and transformations of contaminants within the subsurface is critical for decisions on virtually every waste disposal option facing the Department of Energy (DOE), from remediation technologies such as in situ bioremediation to evaluations of the safety of nuclear waste repositories. With this fact in mind, the DOE has recently sponsored a series of workshops on the development of a Strategic Simulation Plan on applications of high perform-ance computing to national problems of significance to the DOE. One of the areas selected for application was in the area of subsurface transport and environmental chemistry. Within the SSP on subsurface transport and environmental chemistry several areas were identified where applications of high performance computing could potentially significantly advance our knowledge of contaminant fate and transport. Within each of these areas molecular level simulations were specifically identified as a key capability necessary for the development of a fundamental mechanistic understanding of complex biogeochemical processes. This effort consists of a series of specific molecular level simulations and program development in four key areas of geochemistry/biogeochemistry (i.e., aqueous hydrolysis, redox chemistry, mineral surface interactions, and microbial surface properties). By addressing these four differ-ent, but computationally related, areas it becomes possible to assemble a team of investigators with the necessary expertise in high performance computing, molecular simulation, and geochemistry/biogeochemistry to make significant progress in each area. The specific targeted geochemical/biogeochemical issues include: Microbial surface mediated processes: the effects of lipopolysacchardies present on gram-negative bacteria. Environmental redox chemistry: Dechlorination pathways of carbon tetrachloride and other polychlorinated compounds in the subsurface. Mineral surface interactions: Describing surfaces at multiple scales with realistic surface functional groups Aqueous Hydrolysis Reactions and Solvation of Highly Charged Species: Understanding the formation of polymerized species and ore formation under extreme (Hanford Vadose Zone and geothermo) conditions. By understanding on a fundamental basis these key issues, it is anticipated that the impacts of this research will be extendable to a wide range of biogeochemical issues. Taken in total such an effort truly represents a “Grand Challenge” in molecular geochemistry and biogeochemistry.

Felmy, Andrew R.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Dixon, David A.; Dupuis, Michel; Halley, James W.; Kawai, R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Rustad, James R.; Smith, Paul E.; Straatsma, TP; Voth, Gregory A.; Weare, John H.; Yuen, David A.

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Geologic data for ten holes drilled in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Nevada Test Site are presented in this report. The holes include emplacement holes, instrumentation holes, and Underground Test Area wells drilled during calendar years 1991 through 1995. For each hole a stratigraphic log, a detailed lithologic log, and one or two geologic cross sections are presented, along with a supplemental data sheet containing information about the drilling operations, geology, or references. For three of the holes, graphic data summary sheets with geologic and geophysical data are provided as plates.

Lance B. Prothro; Sigmund L. Drellack, Jr.; Brian M. Allen

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry  

SciTech Connect

A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation  

SciTech Connect

Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration into an immobile form. Until recently the scientific focus of mineralization reactions with reservoir rocks has been those that follow an aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation mechanism, driven by the sharp reduction in pH that occurs with CO2 partitioning into the aqueous phase. For sedimentary basin formations the kinetics of aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation reactions are sufficiently slow to make the role of mineralization trapping insignificant over a century period. For basaltic saline formations aqueous-phase mineralization progresses at a substantially higher rate, making the role of mineralization trapping significant, if not dominant, over a century period. The overlooked mineralization reactions for both sedimentary and basaltic saline formations, however, are those that occur in liquid or supercritical CO2 phase; where, dissolved water appears to play a catalyst role in the formation of carbonate minerals. A model is proposed in this paper that describes mineral carbonation over sequestration reservoir conditions ranging from dissolved CO2 in aqueous brine to dissolved water in supercritical CO2. The model theory is based on a review of recent experiments directed at understanding the role of water in mineral carbonation reactions of interest in geologic sequestration systems occurring under low water contents.

White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Lake City hot springs and geothermal wells chemically fall into a narrow compositional group. This indicates that, with the exception of a few hot springs, mixing with shallow cold ground waters does not have a significant influence on the chemistry of the hot springs. Narrow ranges in plots of F, B and Li versus Cl, and _D to _18O values indicate minimal mixing. Because of this, the compositions of the natural hot spring waters are fairly representative of the parent geothermal water. The average

48

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Isotopic compositions were determined for hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and siderite from core samples of the Newberry 2 drill hole, Oregon. The Δ15O values for these minerals decrease with increasing temperatures. The values indicate that these hydrothermal minerals precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with water currently present in the reservoirs. The Δ18O values of quartz and calcite from the andesite and basalt flows (700-932 m) have isotopic values which require that the equilibrated water Δ18O values increase slightly (- 11.3 to -9.2‰) with

49

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270°C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature

50

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Studies of the geology, geochemistry of thermal waters, and of one exploratory geothermal well show that two related hot spring systems discharge in Canon de San Diego at Soda Dam (48°C) and Jemez Springs (72°C). The hot springs discharge from separate strands of the Jemez fault zone which trends northeastward towards the center of Valles Caldera. Exploration drilling to Precambrian basement beneath Jemez Springs

51

Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The composition of noble gases in both gas and water samples collected from Horseshoe Spring, Yellowstone National Park, was found to be depth dependent. The deeper the sample collection within the spring, the greater the enrichment in Kr, Xe, radiogenic 4He, and 40Ar and the greater the depletion in Ne relative to 36Ar. The compositional variations are consistent with multi-component mixing. The dominant component consists of dissolved atmospheric gases acquired by the pool at the surface in contact with air. This component is mixed in varying degree with two other

52

Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Carbonation in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Carbonation in an Aqueous Medium (Carbon Mineralization) Jon Benner, Deb Bergfeld, Dave Bish, Darrin Byler, Bill Carey, Steve Chipera, George Guthrie, Klaus Lackner, Hans Ziock Hydrology, Geochemistry, Geology Group Los Alamos National Laboratory LA-UR-01-4206 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited George Guthrie gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340 Mineral Carbonation: Conversion of CO 2 into Carbonates * alkali carbonates too soluble * alkaline earth carbonates ideal sources: Ca-silicates (feldspar) Mg-silicates (olivine, serpentine, clays) Mg 2+ + CO 3 2- => MgCO 3 Mg 2 SiO 4 + 4H + => 2Mg 2+ + SiO 2(aq) Ultramafic rocks are an abundant Mg source (~0.2 km) 3 serpentine / GW-yr Challenges for Mineral-Carbonation

53

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a

54

Property:SalinityAverage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SalinityAverage SalinityAverage Jump to: navigation, search Property Name SalinityAverage Property Type Number Description Mean average of the low and high end measurements of the salinity [ppm] of the fluid. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: C Coso Geothermal Area Pages using the property "SalinityAverage" Showing 19 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 975 + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 700 + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + 4300 + Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 3500 + C Chena Geothermal Area + 325 + D Desert Peak Geothermal Area + 6700 + Dixie Valley Geothermal Area + 2295 + E East Mesa Geothermal Area + 3750 + G Geysers Geothermal Area + 217 + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + 18750 +

55

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

56

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA By G.D. Stricker Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

57

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

58

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

59

Salinity Variations in the Southern California Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic observations southwestward of the Southern California Bight in the period 1937–99 show that temperature and salinity variations have very different interannual variability. Temperature varies within and above the thermocline and is ...

Niklas Schneider; Emanuele Di Lorenzo; Pearn P. Niiler

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Salinity Transport in the Florida Straits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A submarine cable across the Florida Straits yields a time series of volume and temperature transports using previously determined calibrations, and here a calibration is defined for salinity transport using data not yet compared to the cable. ...

Zoltan B. Szuts; Chris Meinen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Solid-sample geochemistry study of western Dixie Valley, Churchill County, Nevada. Part II. Soil geochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous thermal springs present in northern Dixie Valley, Nevada, are the surface expression of a deep-seated geothermal system. The structural setting, a complex asymmetric graben controls the location of surface springs and migration of thermal fluids to the surface. The distribution of arsenic and mercury in the soils of the valley correlates well with the occurrence of structures which may be in communication with the underlying geothermal system. Generally anomalous arsenic values occur along structures near the playa where fine-grained sediments and a high water table occur. Mercury values are uniformly low near the playa but are typically anomalous along structures in the coarser fan deposits. The complementary geochemical signatures of arsenic and mercury which arise from basic differences in elemental chemical behavior have been useful in delineating the structural trends of the valley. The structural model indicated by the geochemistry and results of drilling suggest future targets should be selected east of the Dixie Meadows fault, within the inner graben.

Juncal, R.W. (Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, NV); Bell, E.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Q AS A LITHOLOGICAL/HYDROCARBON INDICATOR: FROM FULL WAVEFORM SONIC TO 3D SURFACE SEISMIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop a method to exploit viscoelastic rock and fluid properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic measurements to the presence of hydrocarbon saturation. To reach the objective, Southwest Research Institute scientists used well log, lithology, production, and 3D seismic data from an oil reservoir located on the Waggoner Ranch in north central Texas. The project was organized in three phases. In the first phase, we applied modeling techniques to investigate seismic- and acoustic-frequency wave attenuation and its effect on observable wave attributes. We also gathered existing data and acquired new data from the Waggoner Ranch field, so that all needed information was in place for the second phase. During the second phase, we developed methods to extract attenuation from borehole acoustic and surface seismic data. These methods were tested on synthetic data constructed from realistic models and real data. In the third and final phase of the project, we applied this technology to a full data set from the Waggoner site. The results presented in this Final Report show that geological conditions at the site did not allow us to obtain interpretable results from the Q processing algorithm for 3D seismic data. However, the Q-log processing algorithm was successfully applied to full waveform sonic data from the Waggoner site. A significant part of this project was technology transfer. We have published several papers and conducted presentations at professional conferences. In particular, we presented the Q-log algorithm and applications at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Development and Production Forum in Austin, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest from the attendees and, at the request of the SEG delegates, it was placed on the Southwest Research Institute Internet site. The presentation can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/Algorithm.pps In addition, we presented a second application of the Q algorithm at the SEG International Conference in Houston, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest there as well, and it can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/attenuation.pps.

Jorge O. Parra; C.L. Hackert; L. Wilson; H.A. Collier; J. Todd Thomas

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Property:SalinityLow | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:SalinityLow Jump to: navigation, search Property Name SalinityLow Property Type Number Description Describes lower end measurements of salinity [ppm] of the geothermal fluid. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 17 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area

66

Lithologic characterization using magnetic and gravity gradient data over an iron ore formation Cericia Martinez,Yaoguo Li, Richard Krahenbuhl, Marco Braga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Guillen (2005) have explored inversion guided by lithologic categories with density and susceptibility., and A. Guillen, 2005, Geologically-inspired Constraints for a Potential Field Litho-inversion Scheme

67

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Indian Wells Valley, the Sierra, Rose Valley, and Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. The isotope ratios of Sierran waters are a function of latitude with both ratios becoming depleted in the heavier isotopes from south to north. Assuming that groundwater recharge is from the Sierra, recharge areas for the various groundwater types can be designated.

68

Large Lenses of Highly Saline Mediterranean Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isolated compact anticyclonic eddies or salt lenses were found in the Canary Basin. Hydrographic surveys of three such lenses show large anomalies of salinity and temperature (0.8, 2.5°C). They are centered at 1100 m, have a vertical extent of ...

Laurence Armi; Walter Zenk

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of hydrous silicate glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this project is the combined appication of infrared spectroscopy and stable isotope geochemistry to the study of hydrogen-bearing species dissolved in silicate melts and glasses. We are conducting laboratory experiments aimed at determining the fractionation of D and H between melt species (OH and H{sub 2}O) and hydrous vapor and the diffusivities of these species in glasses and melts. Knowledge of these parameters is critical to understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes during igneous processes and hydrothermal processes. These results also could be valuable in application of glass technology to development of nuclear waste disposal strategies.

Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

Stolper, Edward

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

White, A.F.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Saline, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saline, Michigan: Energy Resources Saline, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1667072°, -83.7816075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1667072,"lon":-83.7816075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of River Protection (ORP) #12;#12;PNNL-17031 A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford. and funded by DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington

74

Interactions between mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges : constraints from geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies interactions between mid-ocean ridges and mantle plumes using geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling. Chapter 1 investigates the effects of the Marion and Bouvet hotspots on the ultra-slow ...

Georgen, Jennifer E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Geochemistry, Fate, and Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling of Subsurface Cyanide Contamination at a Manufactured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the geochemistry, fate, and three-dimensional transport modeling of subsurface cyanide contamination at a manufactured gas plant.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

76

Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Blackfoot Reservoir region in southeastern Idaho is recognized as a potential geothermal area because of the presence of several young rhyolite domes (50,000 years old), Quaternary basalt flows, and warm springs. North- to northwest-trending high-angle normal faults of Tertiary to Holocene age appear to be the dominant structural control of spring activity. Surface spring-water temperatures average 14°C except for a group of springs west of the Reservoir Mountains which average 33°C.

77

Summary report on the geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and environs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives a detailed description of work at Los Alamos that will help resolve geochemical issues pertinent to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. It is necessary to understand the properties and setting of the host tuff because this rock provides the first natural barrier to migration of waste elements from a repository. The geochemistry of tuff is being investigated with particular emphasis on retardation processes. This report addresses the various aspects of sorption by tuff, physical and chemical makeup of tuff, diffusion processes, tuff/groundwater chemistry, waste element chemistry under expected repository conditions, transport processes involved in porous and fracture flow, and geochemical and transport modeling.

Daniels, W.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Rundberg, R.S.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon Sequestration at a Regional-Scale Background Thermoelectric power plants are...

79

Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2008 Hurricane Ike hit the Texas Gulf Coast with a force stronger than the category 2 storm at which it was rated. With a 3.8 m (12.5 ft) storm surge, the agricultural industry in the area was devastated. The goal of this research was to determine the length of time required to reduce the salt levels brought by the storm surge to near pre-hurricane levels. To do this, four sets of samples were taken across two years and analyzed for salinity using the saturated paste extract method. The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 79% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 30% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In April 2009, 38% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 13% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 71% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 39% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By December 2009, none of the soils sampled in the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 21% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 33% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By October 2010, all soils sampled had leached sufficient salts to be classified as non-saline to very slightly saline soils. Utilizing the November 2008 data set, 28 random samples were selected for exchangeable Na percent (ESP) in order to develop the ESP-SAR (Na adsorption ratio) predictive equation, ESP= 1.19(SAR)^0.82. The SAR-ESP relationship is statistically significant (95% confidence level), with a correlation coefficient of 0.964 (df=26).

Mueller, Ryan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Preface to bLithium isotope geochemistryQ The use of light stable isotopes to elucidate Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Li reflect heavier isotopic ratios. Chemical Geology 212 (2004) 1­4 wwwPreface Preface to bLithium isotope geochemistryQ The use of light stable isotopes to elucidate isotope geochemistry. Taylor and Urey (1938) used ion exchange chromatography to sepa- rate 6 Li from 7 Li

Rudnick, Roberta L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Application of Nonlinear Analysis Methods for Identifying Relationships Between Microbial Community Structure and Groundwater Geochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure can be complex and difficult to assess. We applied nonlinear and generalized linear data analysis methods to relate microbial biomarkers (phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA) to groundwater geochemical characteristics at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings disposal site that is primarily contaminated by uranium, sulfate, and nitrate. First, predictive models were constructed using feedforward artificial neural networks (NN) to predict PLFA classes from geochemistry. To reduce the danger of overfitting, parsimonious NN architectures were selected based on pruning of hidden nodes and elimination of redundant predictor (geochemical) variables. The resulting NN models greatly outperformed the generalized linear models. Sensitivity analysis indicated that tritium, which was indicative of riverine influences, and uranium were important in predicting the distributions of the PLFA classes. In contrast, nitrate concentration and inorganic carbon were least important, and total ionic strength was of intermediate importance. Second, nonlinear principal components (NPC) were extracted from the PLFA data using a variant of the feedforward NN. The NPC grouped the samples according to similar geochemistry. PLFA indicators of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes were associated with the groups of wells with lower levels of contamination. The more contaminated samples contained microbial communities that were predominated by terminally branched saturates and branched monounsaturates that are indicative of metal reducers, actinomycetes, and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that the microbial community at the site is coupled to the geochemistry and knowledge of the geochemistry allows prediction of the community composition.

Schryver, Jack C.; Brandt, Craig C.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Palumbo, A V.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geochemistry of the Colado geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from 18 shallow and 2 intermediate-depth temperature gradient holes outlines an area of anomalous geochemistry related to the fluid flow and temperature distribution within the Colado geothermal area. The concentrations of Hg, As, Li, and Be belong to more than one statistical population and provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal processes. Enrichments of these four elements define anomalous zones which are spatially coincident with a measured temperature anomaly. The spatial distribution suggests that thermal fluid rises into alluvium in the vicinity of a major Basin and Range fault to depths of 200 to 400 feet (60 to 120 m), then flows laterally within shallow alluvial aquifers down the local hydrologic gradient. As the fluid cools, Li, Be, As, and Hg are deposited in response to changing physical and chemical conditions. As and Be appear to be deposited early in higher temperature zones; Li begins to deposit early but forms a rather dispersed geochemical anomaly; Hg is anomalous throughout the entire geothermal area but is concentrated in a shallow halo above the As and Be anomalies. The distributions suggest that the entry of thermal fluids from depth into the alluvium is spatially restricted to a small area and that the larger area of the observed thermal anomaly is due to the flow of warm fluid within shallow aquifers.

Christensen, O.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Following a period of exploration and development in the mid-late 1970's, there was little activity at the Raft River geothermal field for the next ~20 years. US Geothermal Inc. acquired the project in 2002, and began commercial power generation in January 2008. From mid-2004 to present, US Geothermal Inc. has collected geochemical data from geothermal and monitoring wells in the field, as well as other shallow wells in the

84

Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Abstract The fluid chemistry of the geothermal system that feed Amedee and Wendel Hot Springs in eastern California is complex. Two thermal fluids have been identified based on the concentrations of the conservative elements C1 and B, fluid enthalpies, and the application of chemical geothermometers. One is characterized by temperatures above 120°C and a TDS content of 1300 ppm, and will be used by GeoProducts Corporation to produce electricity. The second did lower in temperature, 75°C, and has a TDS content of 650 ppm. This fluid may be used fore direct heat application at the Susanville

85

A Conceptual Model of the Surface Salinity Distribution in the Oceanic Hadley Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model of the salinity distribution in the oceanic Hadley cell is presented. The model pertains to the region of tropical easterly surface winds, where the surface salinity increases poleward from a local salinity minimum near the ...

Johan Nilsson; Heiner Körnich

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Geochemistry of oils from the Junggar basin, northwest China  

SciTech Connect

The Junggar basin of northwestern China is a structural basin containing a thick sequence of Paleozoic-Pleistocene rocks with estimated oil reserves of as much as 5 billion bbl. Analyses of 19 oil samples from nine producing fields and two oil-stained cores in the Junggar basin revealed the presence of at least five genetic oil types. The geo-chemistry of the oils indicates source organic matter deposited in fresh to brackish lake and marine environments, including coaly organic matter sources. The volumetrically most important oil type discovered to date is produced from Late Carboniferous-Middle Triassic reservoirs in the giant Karamay field and nearby fields located along the northwestern margin of the Junggar basin. Oil produced from the Mahu field, located downdip in a depression east of the Karamay field, is from a different source than Karamay oils. Unique oil types are also produced from an upper Permian reservoir at Jimusar field in the southeastern part of the basin, and from Tertiary (Oligocene) rocks at Dushanzi field and Lower Jurassic rocks at Qigu field, both located along the southern margin of the basin. Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of Upper Permian source rocks, and the possibility of Mesozoic or Tertiary sources has been proposed, but not tested by geochemical analysis, although analyses of some possible Jurassic coal source rocks have been reported. Our findings indicate that several effective source rocks are present in the basin, including local sources of Mesozoic or younger age for oil accumulations along the southern and southeastern margins of the basin. Future exploration or assessment of petroleum potential of the basin can be improved by considering the geological relationships among oil types, possible oil source rocks, and reservoirs.

Clayton, J.L.; King, J.D.; Lillis, P.G. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

USD 307 Ell-Saline Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ell-Saline Wind Project Ell-Saline Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name USD 307 Ell-Saline Wind Project Facility USD 307 Ell-Saline Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location KS Coordinates 38.77187°, -97.861519° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.77187,"lon":-97.861519,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Optimal Surface Salinity Perturbations Influencing the Thermohaline Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimal surface salinity perturbations influencing the meridional overturning circulation maximum are exhibited and interpreted on a stable steady state of a 2D latitude–depth ocean thermohaline circulation model. Despite the stability of the ...

Florian Sévellec; Mahdi Ben Jelloul; Thierry Huck

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thermal Mass Correction for the Evaluation of Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper revisits the thermal mass inertia correction of Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc., (SBE4) conductivity probes for the calculation of salinity. In particular, it is shown that the standard parameters recommended for the correction method are ...

Vigan Mensah; Marc Le Menn; Yves Morel

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Temperature and Salinity Variability in Heterogeneous Oceanic Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In regions of active oceanic convection, such as the Labrador Sea, small- and mesoscale spatial variability is observed in the temperature and salinity fields (T and S). Often T and S structures are “density-compensated,” with the density ...

Sonya Legg; James C. McWilliams

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimating Salinity Variance Dissipation Rate from Conductivity Microstructure Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the smallest length scales, conductivity measurements include a contribution from salinity fluctuations in the inertial–convective and viscous–diffusive ranges of the turbulent scalar variance spectrum. Interpreting these measurements is ...

Jonathan D. Nash; James N. Moum

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Chemie der Erde 67 (2007) 151174 Petrology, geochemistry and zircon age for redwitzite at Abertamy,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemie der Erde 67 (2007) 151­174 Petrology, geochemistry and zircon age for redwitzite at Abertamy. / Chemie der Erde 67 (2007) 151­174152 #12;2. Geological setting The studied redwitzites occur in the Krus´kova´ et al. / Chemie der Erde 67 (2007) 151­174 153 #12;eastern contact to a distance of approximately 15

Siebel, Wolfgang

93

A new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquired a wide set of data of molecular and isotopic composition of gas sampled in several Lusi vents, in the surrounding mud volcanoes, in the closest natural gas field (Wunut), and in the hydrothermal ventsA new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

Mazzini, Adriano

94

When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan A Petroleum Research, Oslo Research Park, 0349 Oslo, Norway c Geology Institute Azerbaijan, Husein Avenue 29A, Baku, Azerbaijan d Moscow State University, Faculty of Geology, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow 119992, Russia e

Mazzini, Adriano

95

When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Songliao basin form a major part of the basin fill and are the important petroleum reservoir rocks volcanic rocks could be derived from metasomatized enriched MORB-like sources, but the Cretaceous rhyolites: geochemistry, Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes, Mesozoic, volcanic rock, Songliao basin plate in Mesozoic (e.g., Zhao et al

Svensen, Henrik

96

The Role of Averaging for Improving Sea Surface Salinity Retrieval from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Satellite and Impact of Auxiliary Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) was chosen as the European Space Agency’s second Earth Explorer Opportunity mission. One of the objectives is to retrieve sea surface salinity (SSS) from measured brightness temperatures (TBs) at L band ...

Sabine Philipps; Christine Boone; Estelle Obligis

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Optimal Geological Enviornments for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susan D. Hovorka susan D. Hovorka Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 130 P.O. Box X Austin, TX 78713 512-471-4863 susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu Optimal GeOlOGical envirOnments fOr carbOn DiOxiDe stOraGe in saline fOrmatiOns Background For carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration to be a successful component of the United States emissions reduction strategy, there will have to be a favorable intersection of a number of factors, such as the electricity market, fuel source, power plant design and operation, capture technology, a suitable geologic sequestration site, and a pipeline right-of-way from the plant to the injection site. The concept of CO 2 sequestration in saline water-bearing formations (saline reservoirs), isolated at

98

one mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection, mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection, which will occur over a three-year period and is slated to start in early 2010, will compress up to 1 million metric tonnes of CO 2 from the ADM ethanol facility into a liquid-like, dense phase. The targeted rock formation, the Mt. Simon Sandstone, is the thickest and most widespread saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin, with an estimated CO 2 storage capacity of 27 to 109 billion metric tonnes. A comprehensive monitoring program, which will be evaluated yearly, will be implemented after the injection to ensure the injected CO 2 is stored safely and permanently. The RCSP Program was launched by the Office of Fossil Energy (FE)

99

into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at Cranfield have been monitoring the injected CO 2 with instrumentation installed nearly two miles beneath the surface to ensure the safe and permanent storage in the Lower Tuscaloosa Formations. The Cranfield project also has been successful in the deployment of pressure-response monitoring techniques in the injection zone ("in-zone") and above the injection zone ("above zone"). Real-time data collected since July 2008

100

Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Details Activities (18) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: Noncondensible gases from hot springs, fumaroles, and deep wells within the Valles caldera geothermal system (210-300°C) consist of roughly 98.5 mol% CO2, 0.5 mol% H2S, and 1 mol% other components. 3He/4He ratios

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A reconnaissance survey of Hg° was designed to model the 1912 Novarupta vent structure and delineate zones of near-surface high heat

102

Moored Salinity Time Series Measurements at 0°, 140°W  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes moored salinity time series measurements in a biologically productive equatorial upwelling regime in the Pacific Ocean (0°, 140°W). Data were collected at 26 m and at 100 m for 13 months during 1987–1988 using four SEACAT ...

Michael J. McPhaden; H. Paul Freitag; Andrew J. Shepherd

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

On Sea Surface Salinity Skin Effect Induced by Evaporation and Implications for Remote Sensing of Ocean Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of a cool and salty sea surface skin under evaporation was first proposed by Saunders in 1967, but few efforts have since been made to perceive the salt component of the skin layer. With two salinity missions scheduled to launch in ...

Lisan Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Error Covariance Matrices Characterization in the Ocean Salinity Retrieval Cost Function within the SMOS Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interests of the scientific community working on the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) ocean salinity level 2 processor definition are currently focused on improving the performance of the retrieval algorithm, which is based on an ...

M. Talone; C. Gabarró; A. Camps; R. Sabia; J. Gourrion; M. Vall-llossera; J. Font

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Addressing agricultural salinity in the American West : harnessing behavioral diversity to institutional design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salinity accumulation in the Lower Arkansas Basin (LAB) of Colorado threatens environmental quality, the agricultural economy and the potential for efficient reuse of water. Salinity is a threat to "hydraulic sustainability", ...

Kock, Beaudry E. (Beaudry Evan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of a linear predictive model for carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline carbonate aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO"2 injection into deep saline aquifers is a preferred method for mitigating CO"2 emission. Although deep saline aquifers are found in many sedimentary basins and provide very large storage capacities, several numerical simulations are needed before ... Keywords: CO2 sequestration, Deep saline carbonate aquifer, Latin hypercube space filling design, Predictive model

Sultan Anbar; Serhat Akin

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Adaptive Fluid Electrical Conductivity Logging to Determine the Salinity Profiles in Groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Fluid Electrical Conductivity Logging to Determine the Salinity Profiles in Groundwater(t) Analysis Method · Integrate C(z,t), or FEC profile, over z of logged interval to get salinity mass per unit salinity TMDL requires wetland management of salt loads to the San Joaquin River · Dearth of groundwater

Quinn, Nigel

108

Hydraulic fracturing with a refractory proppant combined with salinity control  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for controlling fines or sand in an unconsolidated or loosely consolidated formation, or reservoir which method additionally improves heat transfer. It comprises: placing at least one wellbore in the formation; hydraulically fracturing the formation via the wellbore via a fracturing fluid which creates at least one fracture; placing a fused refractory proppant consisting essentially of silicon carbide or silicon nitride into the fracture which proppant gravel packs the fracture while providing for increased heat transfer into the formation; determining the critical salinity rate and the critical fluid flow velocity of the formation or reservoir surrounding the wellbore; injecting a saline solution into the formation or reservoir at a velocity exceeding the critical fluid flow velocity and at a saline concentration sufficient to cause the fines or clay particles to be transferred and fixed deep within the formation or reservoir without plugging the formation, fracture or wellbore; and producing via a thermal oil recovery method a hydrocarbonaceous fluid from the formation or reservoir at a velocity such that the critical flow velocity is not exceeded deep within the formation, fracture or wellbore.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.; Stowe, L.R.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of hydrous silicate glasses. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this project is the combined appication of infrared spectroscopy and stable isotope geochemistry to the study of hydrogen-bearing species dissolved in silicate melts and glasses. We are conducting laboratory experiments aimed at determining the fractionation of D and H between melt species (OH and H{sub 2}O) and hydrous vapor and the diffusivities of these species in glasses and melts. Knowledge of these parameters is critical to understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes during igneous processes and hydrothermal processes. These results also could be valuable in application of glass technology to development of nuclear waste disposal strategies.

Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin, South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin and hydrothermal vent complexes (HVC) in the Karoo Basin in South Africa. The HVC formed during phreatic eruptions from the lower stratigraphic units of the Karoo Basin shows that the vitrinite reflectance and d15 N

Svensen, Henrik

111

EAS 6216 Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Fall 2012 TuTh 9:35-10:55, 1229 ES&T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Applications, 3rd edition, Wiley. Recommended Textbooks: Dickin, Alan. P. 1995. Radiogenic isotope geology/6 Carbon isotopes in the biosphere 11/8 Carbon isotopes in the geologic record 11/13 "Clumped" isotopes1 EAS 6216 ­ Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Fall 2012 TuTh 9:35-10:55, 1229 ES&T Instructor

Weber, Rodney

112

EAS 6216 Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Fall 2010 TuTh 3:05-4:25, 1229 ES&T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Recommended Textbooks: Dickin, Alan. P. 1995. Radiogenic isotope geology. Cambridge University Press. Hoefs isotopes 11/9 Carbon isotopes in the biosphere 11/11 Carbon isotopes in the geologic record 11/16 "Clumped1 EAS 6216 ­ Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Fall 2010 TuTh 3:05-4:25, 1229 ES&T Instructor: Kim

Black, Robert X.

113

Oxygen and sulfur isotope geochemistry revealing a significant crustal signature in the genesis of the post-collisional granitoids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inclusions, (2) coral tissue (3) the HYC stratiform sediment-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag deposit and (4) petroleum source-rocks-Pb-Ag deposit and (4) petroleum source-rocks and kerogens. Australian Synchrotron Grant. Professional Societies and dinosteranes in oils and source-rocks from East Sirte Basin (Libya). Applied Geochemistry 26: 1694

Arehart, Greg B.

114

Initial investigation of soil mercury geochemistry as an aid to drill site selection in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mercury-in-soil survey was conducted at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), Utah, to evaluate mercury soil geochemistry as a method of selecting exploration well sites in a hot-water geothermal system. Samples of -80 mesh soil were collected at 30.5 m intervals along traverses crossing known structures, surficial geothermal alteration, and exploration well sites, and were analyzed using a Gold Film Mercury Detector. Strong mercury anomalies occur at locations along known structures in close proximity to subsurface thermal activity; examples include areas over hot spring deposits and near a shallow producing well. In contrast, background mercury concentrations are present in nearby locations with little or no indication of subsurface thermal activity, such as areas around deep marginal producing wells and dry wells, and areas lacking hot spring deposits. These results indicate that mercury geochemical surveys can be useful for identifying and mapping structures controlling fluid flow in geothermal systems and for delineating areas overlying near-surface thermal activity. Soil mercury geochemistry thus provides information which may aid in the cost-effective selection of exploratory well sites.

Capuano, R.M.; Bamford, R.W.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

EMSL Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science-Science Theme Advisory Panel Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the topics of discussion and the recommendations of the panel members. On December 8 and 9, 2010, the Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, and Subsurface Science (GBSS) Science Theme Advisory Panel (STAP) convened for a more in-depth exploration of the five Science Theme focus areas developed at a similar meeting held in 2009. The goal for the fiscal year (FY) 2011 meeting was to identify potential topical areas for science campaigns, necessary experimental development needs, and scientific members for potential research teams. After a review of the current science in each of the five focus areas, the 2010 STAP discussions successfully led to the identification of one well focused campaign idea in pore-scale modeling and five longer-term potential research campaign ideas that would likely require additional workshops to identify specific research thrusts. These five campaign areas can be grouped into two categories: (1) the application of advanced high-resolution, high mass accuracy experimental techniques to elucidate the interplay between geochemistry and microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems and (2) coupled computation/experimental investigations of the electron transfer reactions either between mineral surfaces and outer membranes of microbial cells or between the outer and inner membranes of microbial cells.

Brown, Gordon E.; Chaka, Anne; Shuh, David K.; Roden, Eric E.; Werth, Charles J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Baer, Donald R.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Grate, Jay W.; Hoyt, David W.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Lea, Alan S.; Mueller, Karl T.; Oostrom, Martinus; Orr, Galya; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Plata, Charity; Robinson, E. W.; Teller, Raymond G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Wiley, H. S.; Wilkins, Michael J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Linking Molecular Microbiology and Geochemistry to Better Understand Microbial Ecology in Coastal Marine Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall objective of the research presented here was to combine multiple geochemical parameters and molecular characterizations to provide a novel view of active microbial community ecology of sediments in a large-river deltaic estuary. In coastal and estuarine environments, a large portion of benthic respiration has been attributed to sulfate reduction and implicated as an important mechanism in hypoxia formation. The use of high-resolution sampling of individual sediment cores and high throughput nucleic acid extraction techniques combined with 454 FLX sequencing provided a robust understanding of the metabolically active benthic microbial community within coastal sediments. This was used to provide further understanding and show the importance of simultaneously analyzing the connectivity of sulfur and iron cycling to the structure and function of the microbial population. Although aqueous sulfide did not accumulate in the sediments of the northern Gulf of Mexico, active sulfate reduction was observed in all locations sampled. Microbial recycling and sequestration as iron sulfides prevented the release of sulfide from the sediment. Prominent differences were observed between the sample locations and with depth into the sediment column. This study emphasized the importance of combining novel molecular techniques with simultaneous traditional geochemical measurements to show the interdependence of microbiology and geochemistry. In addition, this study highlights the need to consider microbial community biogeography along with small-scale variations in geochemistry and biology that impact the overall cycling of redox elements when constructing biogeochemical models in marine sediments.

Reese, Brandi Kiel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Geochemistry of Precambrian carbonates: 3-shelf seas and non-marine environments of the Archean  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive whole-rock study of mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic attributes of Archean carbonates suggests that their lithologies and facies have been controlled by tectonic setting. In the first two papers of this series they have shown that the dominant lithology of sedimentary carbonates in greenstone belt settings is limestone. In this paper the authors suggest that the Archean shelf sequences are mostly dolostone, and the contemporaneous lacustrine playa lakes are characterized by limestone facies. The present study is of the shelf environments of the Archean, represented by the Pongola Supergroup of South Africa and the Hamersley Group of Australia. The lacustrine playa examples have been sampled from the Ventersdorp Supergroup of South Africa and the Fortescue Group of Australia. Geological, trace element, and oxygen isotope considerations of the shelf carbonates suggest that their original mineralogy may have been aragonite and that the Pongola dolostones probably represent a direct dolomitization product of this precursor. In contrast, the stabilization of the Hamersley carbonates may have involved an additional step of transformation of a metastable precursor into limestone prior to dolomitization.

Veizer, J. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada) Ruhr Universitaet, Bochum (West Germany)); Clayton, R.N. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA)); Hinton, R.W. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA) Grant Institute of Geology, Edinburgh (England)); von Brunn, V. (Univ. of Natal Pietermaritzburg (South Africa)); Mason, T.R. (Univ. of Natal, Durban (South Africa)); Buck, S.G. (Anglo-American Corp. of South Africa Ltd., Welkom (South Africa)); Hoefs, J. (Geochemisches Institut der Universitaet, Goettingen (West Germany))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Geochemistry of the Yegua Aquifer system and its relation to microbial processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two sediment cores (NP-I and NP-3) were taken from the Yegua formation in East-central Texas and analyzed for sedimentology, geochemistry, and microbiology to assess the relationship between geochemistry and microbial processes. Both cows suggest a deltaic origin for this region. NP-1 is likely an overbank or floodplain deposit. NP-3 is likely a bar or channel deposit. Groundwater wells were installed in the boreholes and screened in the watersaturated sands (37-42 feet and 9 1-I 01 feet below the surface, respectively). Another well (NP-2), 50 feet to the south of NP-3, was screened at 37-47 feet below the surface. The wells were sampled routinely for geochemistry and microbiology. Total organic carbon (TOC) contents range from 0.01 to over 60 weight percent, and, except in soil intervals, have the 813C signature Of C3 plants. Soil intervals have a noticeable 13C contribution from C4 plants. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) contents and 5 13C values suggest that NP-I water has been influenced by dissolution of a carbonate with a 813C of less than 09o'o. NP-2 and NP-3 waters have been influenced by carbonate dissolution and organic matter oxidation. Microbial and geochemical data suggest that sulfide oxidation is occurring in NP-I and NP-2 waters. These waters have moderate to high sulfate and Fe2+ concentrations, low pH (-6 or less), and are supersaturated with respect to jarosite, a weathering product of pyrite, according to the speciation model WATEQF. Both sulfur oxidizing and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are present in these waters. NP-3 sediments from the screened interval contain SRB. NP-3 waters are low in sulfate and Fe2+, and have a pH above 7. This suggests that sulfate reduction is more dominant at deeper depths. Sulfur oxidizing bacteria and SRB can be cultured from these waters as well. A syntrophic relationship may exist in these sediments and waters between sulfur oxidizers and sulfate reducers. Iron cycling in these sediments appears to be dependent on sulfur cycling, rather than an independent process. SRB numbers correlate with sand content, and bacterial numbers are not limited by carbon source or electron acceptors.

Schlichenmeyer, Jeannette Leone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geochemical Determination of the Fate and Transport of Injected Fresh Wastewater to a Deep Saline Aquifer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Deep well injection into non-potable saline aquifers of treated domestic wastewater has been used in Florida for decades as a safe and effective alternative… (more)

Walsh, Virginia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Salinity trends, variability, and control in the northern reach of the San Francisco Estuary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. 1990. STL: a seasonal-trend decomposition procedure basedinfluence on salinity trends. Presentation at 2004 CALFEDFox JP, Miller BJ. 1990. Trends in freshwater inflow to San

Enright, Christopher; Culberson, Steven D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Water use potential and salt tolerance of riparian species in saline-sodic environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Salinization of soil and water resources exists on a global scale, largely due to irrigated agriculture in semi-arid climates. Coal bed methane (CBM) development, resulting… (more)

Sessoms, Holly Nicol.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessing constructed wetlands for beneficial use of saline-sodic water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Changes in agricultural practices, and irrigation strategies combined with natural processes, have led to increased salinization of soil and water resources worldwide. Coal bed methane… (more)

Kirkpatrick, Amber Denise.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Meteoric waters from cold springs and streams outside of the 1912 eruptive deposits filling the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS) and in the upper parts of the two major rivers draining the 1912 deposits have similar chemical trends. Thermal springs issue in the mid-valley area along a 300-m lateral section of ash-flow tuff, and range in temperature from 21 to 29.8°C in early summer and from 15 to 17°C in mid-summer. Concentrations of major and minor chemical constituents in the thermal waters are nearly identical regardless of temperature. Waters in the

125

Geochemistry and materials studies in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geochemistry and materials studies are being performed in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program. The scope of the studies is dictated by the sites under consideration and the designs of the drilling and energy extraction systems. The work has been largely restricted to characterizing magmatic environments at sites of interest and testing engineering materials in laboratory simulated rhyolite magmatic environments. The behavior of 17 commercially available materials has been examined at magmatic conditions. Analysis of reaction products reveal that oxidation, and not sulfidation, is the main corrosion problem for most alloys in rhyolite, and that reaction with other magmatic components is limited. Considerations of corrosion resistance, high-temperature strength, and cost indicate nickel-base superalloys offer the most promise as candidates for use in rhyolitic magma.

Westrich, H.R.; Weirick, L.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Salinity gradient solar pond technology applied to potash solution mining  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solution mining facility at the Eddy Potash Mine, Eddy County, New Mexico has been proposed that will utilize salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) technology to supply industrial process thermal energy. The process will include underground dissolution of potassium chloride (KCl) from pillars and other reserves remaining after completion of primary room and pillar mining using recirculating solutions heated in the SGSP. Production of KCl will involve cold crystallization followed by a cooling pond stage, with the spent brine being recirculated in a closed loop back to the SGSP for reheating. This research uses SGSP as a renewable, clean energy source to optimize the entire mining process, minimize environmental wastes, provide a safe, more economical extraction process and reduce the need for conventional processing by crushing, grinding and flotation. The applications of SGSP technology will not only save energy in the extraction and beneficiation processes, but also will produce excess energy available for power generation, desalination, and auxiliary structure heating.

Martell, J.A.; Aimone-Martin, C.T.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

Evolution of the Geysers (US) - Data From Fluid-Inclusion Microthermometry and Gas Geochemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers, California, is the site of an active hydrothermal system that initially developed between about 1.5 and 2 Ma in response to intrusion of a hypabyssal granitic pluton. Mineralogic and fluid-inclusion data demonstrate that the present vapor-dominated regime evolved from an earlier and more extensive, liquid-dominated hydrothermal system. Circulation of these early fluids produced veins characterized by tourmaline and/or biotite {+-} actinolite {+-} clinopyroxene within the pluton and adjacent biotite-rich hornfels, actinolite {+-} ferroaxinite {+-} epidote, and epidote {+-} chlorite {+-} wairakite within the intermediate parts of the thermal system, and calcite in the outer parts. Potassium feldspar and quartz are present in all assemblages. Maximum pressure-corrected homogenization temperatures and apparent salinities of fluid-inclusions in these veins range from 440 C and 44 weight percent NaCl equivalent within the hornfels (<600 m from the pluton) to 325 C and 5 weight percent NaCl equivalent at approximately 1500 m from the intrusion. We suggest that the shallow, moderate-salinity fluids are crustal waters modified by water-rock interactions and that the high-salinity fluids are magmatic brines. The formation of vapor-dominated conditions is reflected in the abrupt appearance of low salinity (0.0 to 0.4 weight percent NaCl equivalent) fluid inclusions with homogenization temperatures near 265 C. These inclusion fluids are thought to represent steam condensate formed as the liquid-dominated system boiled off.

Moore, J.N.; Hulen, J.B.; Norman, D.I.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Interannual Variability of the Subsurface High Salinity Tongue South of the Equator at 165°E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 14-yr time series of salinity at thermocline level was constructed from repeated meridional CTD sections (averaging about 110 days apart) spanning the equator along 165°E during 1984–97. A tongue of high salinity water extends along the ...

William S. Kessler

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

Ahmad, Sajjad

130

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect

Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability. Preliminary simulation results show good agreement between classical instability solutions and numerical predictions of finger growth and spacing obtained using different gas/liquid viscosity ratios, relative permeability and capillary pressure models. Further studies are recommended to validate these results over a broader range of conditions.

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

SciTech Connect

The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Evaluation of available saline water resources in New Mexico for the production of microalgae  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers evaluated saline water resources in New Mexico for their suitability as sites for large-scale microalgae production facilities. Production of microalgae could provide a renewable source of fuel, chemicals, and food. In addition, making use of the unused saline water resources would increase the economic activity in the state. After analyzing the 15 billion acre-ft of unused saline water resources in the state, scientists narrowed the locations down to six sites with the most potential. With further analysis, they chose the Tularosa Basin in southern New Mexico as the best-suited area for 100-hectare microalgae production facility. 34 refs., 38 figs., 14 tabs.

Lansford, R.; Hernandez, J.; Enis, P.; Truby, D.; Mapel, C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geology and surface geochemistry of the Roosevelt Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available data on the Roosevelt area were synthesized to determine the spatial arrangement of the rocks, and the patterns of mass and energy flow within them. The resulting model lead to a new interpretation of the geothermal system, and provided ground truth for evaluating the application of soil geochemistry to exploration for concealed geothermal fields. Preliminary geochemical studies comparing the surface microlayer to conventional soil sampling methods indicated both practical and chemical advantages for the surface microlayer technique, which was particularly evident in the case of As, Sb and Cs. Subsequent multi-element analyses of surface microlayer samples collected over an area of 100 square miles were processed to produce single element contour maps for 41 chemical parameters. Computer manipulation of the multi-element data using R-mode factor analysis provided the optimum method of interpretation of the surface microlayer data. A trace element association of As, Sb and Cs in the surface microlayer provided the best indication of the leakage of geothermal solutions to the surface, while regional mercury trends may reflect the presence of a mercury vapour anomaly above a concealed heat source.

Lovell, J.S.; Meyer, W.T.; Atkinson, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Standard Analytic Curve of Potential Temperature versus Salinity for the Western North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is described for computing salinity as a continuous function of potential temperature for the western North Atlantic. The algorithm uses historical data compiled by Worthington and Melcalf (1961) for the deep western North Atlantic, ...

L. Armi; N. A. Bray

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Nonnormal Multidecadal Response of the Thermohaline Circulation Induced by Optimal Surface Salinity Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimal perturbations of sea surface salinity are obtained for an idealized North Atlantic basin using a 3D planetary geostrophic model—optimality is defined with respect to the intensity of the meridional overturning circulation. Both optimal ...

Florian Sévellec; Thierry Huck; Mahdi Ben Jelloul; Jérôme Vialard

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The influence of geothermal sources on deep ocean temperature, salinity, and flow fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a study of the effect of geothermal sources on the deep circulation, temperature and salinity fields. In Chapter 1 background material is given on the strength and distribution of geothermal heating. In ...

Speer, Kevin G. (Kevin George)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Estimation of CO2 injection well requirements into saline aquifers for pre-feasibility CCS economics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sub-surface saline aquifers are candidates as CO2 injection sites because they could have significant storage potential. One of the long-standing issues in assessing such storage… (more)

Bukhteeva, Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Tropical Subsurface Salinity and Tritium Distributions in the Pacific: Their Differences and Formation Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While high salinity water extends to the equator in the upper thermocline of the Pacific in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), it hits the western boundary (WB) farther north of the equator in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), suggesting that no interior ...

Masami Nonaka; Kensuke Takeuchi

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Optimizing Performance of a Microwave Salinity Mapper: STARRS L-Band Radiometer Enhancements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne microwave radiometers for salinity remote sensing have advanced to a point where operational surveys can be conducted over the inner continental shelf to observe the evolution of freshwater plumes emanating from rivers and estuaries. To ...

Derek M. Burrage; Joel C. Wesson; Mark A. Goodberlet; Jerry L. Miller

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Vicarious Calibration of an Ocean Salinity Radiometer from Low Earth Orbit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical properties of the brightness temperature (TB) measured by a low-earth-orbiting radiometer operating at 1.4 GHz are considered as a means of calibrating and validating the sensor. Mapping of ocean salinity by such an instrument ...

Christopher S. Ruf

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Droplet Spectra Broadening by Ripening Process. Part I: Roles of Curvature and Salinity of Cloud Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The “ripening process” occurs due to thermodynamic instability of droplet size spectra in clouds. This instability results from the existence of droplets with different salinity and size in the droplet spectra. The ripening process is independent ...

Fikrettin Çelik; John D. Marwitz

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Thermohaline Oscillations Induced by Strong Steady Salinity Forcing of Ocean General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of numerical experiments is conducted with a three-dimensional ocean general circulation model and a two-dimensional counterpart both designed for efficient integration over diffusive (millennial) time scales. With strong steady salinity ...

Michael Winton; E. S. Sarachik

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Double-Diffusive Intrusions in a Stable Salinity Gradient “Heated from Below”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to investigate the growth and nonlinear equilibration of spatially periodic double-diffusive intrusion for negative vertical temperature Tz < 0 and salinity Sz < 0 gradients, which are ...

Julian Simeonov; Melvin E. Stern

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fifty-Year Trends in Global Ocean Salinities and Their Relationship to Broad-Scale Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using over 1.6 million profiles of salinity, potential temperature, and neutral density from historical archives and the international Argo Program, this study develops the three-dimensional field of multidecadal linear change for ocean-state ...

Paul J. Durack; Susan E. Wijffels

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Effect of Groundwater Inflow on Evaporation from a Saline Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade study of the hydrometeorology of Big Quill Lake in Saskatchewan, a saline prairie lake, has effectively used remote sensing to delineate groundwater inflow. The lake covers an area of 250 square kilometers with the groundwater seeping ...

Jeffrey M. Whiting

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Subtidal Salinity and Velocity in the Hudson River Estuary: Observations and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tidally and cross-sectionally averaged model based on the temporal evolution of the quasi-steady Hansen and Rattray equations is applied to simulate the salinity distribution and vertical exchange flow along the Hudson River estuary. The model ...

David K. Ralston; W. Rockwell Geyer; James A. Lerczak

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A study of low salinity water flooding in 1D and 2D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of this research was to study the effect of salinity on the waterflood of initially oil-wet clay-rich sand packs. Two one-foot long sand… (more)

Fu, Joseph Yuchun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Simulation Errors Associated with the Neglect of Oceanic Salinity in an Atmospheric GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In all the atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) at the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA), the influence of oceanic salinity on the saturation vapor pressure of seawater is ignored. Since the relative humidity in the oceanic ...

Y. C. Sud; G. K. Walker

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Salinization of Irrigated Urban Soils: A Case Study of El Paso, TX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to assess soil salinity levels in large landscape areas, such as golf courses, parks, and school grounds which were developed on various soil types in El Paso, Texas. The survey encompassed the East, the Central, the Northwest, and the Upper and Lower Valleys, covering 16 fairways at seven golf courses, 37 city parks, 30 school grounds, and 13 apartment landscapes on the Westside. The highest soil salinity (6 to 11 dS m-1) was found in the clayey soils of the Upper and Lower valleys, even when water of low salinity (650 to 750 ppm) had been used for irrigation. Spadoratic soil salinization was also observed in loamy soils of the South Central irrigated with city potable water, and topdressed soils of the Northwest after conversion to reclaimed water. Soil salinization was not observed in deep sand along I-10, and seldom in sandy calcic soils in the East and North Central, even though these soils contain a layer of caliche. Soil types play a role on soil salinization as much as does water quality.

Miyamoto, S.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Geochemistry and migration of contaminants at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site, St. Charles County, Missouri, 1989--91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations were conducted by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the US Department of Energy at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site to determine the geochemistry of the shallow aquifer and geochemical controls on the migration of uranium and other constituents from the raffinate (waste) pits. Water-quality analyses from monitoring wells at the site and vicinity property indicate that water in the shallow aquifer is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type that is at equilibrium with respect to calcite and slightly supersaturated with respect to dolomite.

Schumacher, J.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Mechanism of Improved Oil Recovery by Low-Salinity Waterflooding in Sandstone Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injection of low-salinity water showed high potentials in improving oil recovery when compared to high-salinity water. However, the optimum water salinity and conditions are uncertain, due to the lack of understanding the mechanisms of fluid-rock interactions. The main objective of this study is to examine the potential and efficiency of low-salinity water in secondary and tertiary oil recovery for sandstone reservoirs. Similarly, this study aims to help in understanding the dominant mechanisms that aid in improving oil recovery by low-salinity waterflooding. Furthermore, the impact of cation type in injected brines on oil recovery was investigated. Coreflood experiments were conducted to determine the effect of water salinity and chemistry on oil recovery in the secondary and tertiary modes. The contact angle technique was used to study the impact of water salinity and composition on rock wettability. Moreover, the zeta potential at oil/brine and brine/rock interfaces was measured to explain the mechanism causing rock wettability alteration and improving oil recovery. Deionized water and different brines (from 500 to 174,000 mg/l), as well as single cation solutions were tested. Two types of crude oil with different properties and composition were used. Berea sandstone cores were utilized in the coreflood experiments. Coreflood tests indicated that injection of deionized water in the secondary mode resulted in significant oil recovery, up to 22% improvement, compared to seawater flooding. However, no more oil was recovered in the tertiary mode. In addition, injection of NaCl solution increased the oil recovery compared to injection of CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Contact angle results demonstrated that low-salinity water has an impact on the rock wettability; the more reduction in water salinity, the more a water-wet rock surface is produced. In addition, NaCl solutions made the rock more water-wet compared to CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Low-salinity water and NaCl solutions showed a highly negative charge at rock/brine and oil/brine interfaces by zeta potential measurements, which results in greater repulsive forces between the oil and rock surface. This leads to double-layer expansion and water-wet systems. These results demonstrate that the double-layer expansion is a primary mechanism of improving oil recovery when water chemical composition is manipulated.

Nasralla, Ramez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Field study of tracer and geochemistry behavior during hydraulic fracturing of a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents tracer and geochemistry data from several hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill, NM, HDR geothermal reservoir. Tracers have been injected at various times during these tests: (1) initially, before any flow communication existed between the wells; (2) shortly after a flow connection was established; and (3) after the outlet flow had increased to its steady state value. An idealized flow model consisting of a combination of main fracture flow paths and fluid leakoff into secondary permeability explains the different tracer response curves for these cases, and allows us to predict the fracture volume of the main paths. The geochemistry during these experiments supports our previously developed models postulating the existence of a high concentration indigenous ''pore fluid.'' Also, the quartz and Na-K-Ca geothermometers have been used successfully to identify the temperatures and depths at which fluid traveled while in the reservoir. The quartz geothermometer is somewhat more reliable because at these high temperatures (about 250/sup 0/C) the injected fluid can come to equilibrium with quartz in the reservoir. The Na-K-Ca geothermometer relies on obtaining a sample of the indigenous pore fluid, and thus is somewhat susceptible to problems of dilution with the injection fluid. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Robinson, B.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Petrography and geochemistry of precambrian rocks from GT-2 and EE-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the drilling of GT-2 and EE-1, 27 cores totaling about 35 m were collected from the Precambrian section. Samples of each different lithology in each core were taken for petrographic and whole-rock major- and trace-element analyses. Whole-rock analyses are now completed on 37 samples. From these data four major Precambrian units were identified at the Fenton Hill site. Geophysical logs and cuttings were used to extrapolate between cores. The most abundant rock type is an extremely variable gneissic unit comprising about 75% of the rock penetrated. This rock is strongly foliated and may range compositionally from syenogranitic to tonalitic over a few centimeters. The bulk of the unit falls within the monzogranite field. Interlayered with the gneiss is a ferrohastingsite-biotite schist which compositionally resembles a basaltic andesite. A fault contact between the schist and gneiss was observed in one core. Intrusive into this metamorphic complex are two igneous rocks. A leucocratic monzogranite occurs as at least two 15-m-thick dikes, and a biotite-granodiorite body was intercepted by 338 m of drill hole. Both rocks are unfoliated and equigranular. The biotite granodiorite is very homogeneous and is characterized by high modal contents of biotite and sphene and by high K/sub 2/O, TiO/sub 2/, and P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ contents. Although all of the cores examined show fractures, most of these are tightly sealed or healed. Calcite is the most abundant fracture filling mineral, but epidote, quartz, chlorite, clays or sulfides have also been observed. The degree of alteration of the essential minerals normally increases as these fractures are approached. The homogeneity of the biotite granodiorite at the bottom of GT-2 and the high degree of fracture filling ensure an ideal setting for the Hot Dry Rock Experiment.

Laughlin, A.W.; Eddy, A.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Low-Salinity Waterflooding to Improve Oil Recovery - Historical Field Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of wa-terfloods. Laboratory water-flood tests and single-well tracer tests have shown that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery, but work designed to test the method on a field scale has not yet been undertaken. Historical waterflood records could unintentionally provide some evidence of improved recovery from waterflooding with lower salinity brine. Nu-merous fields in the Powder River basin of Wyoming have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) obtained from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Three Minnelusa formation fields in the basin were identified as potential candidates for waterflood comparisons based on the salinity of the connate and injection water. Historical pro-duction and injection data for these fields were obtained from the public record. Field waterflood data were manipulated to be displayed in the same format as laboratory coreflood re-sults. Recovery from fields using lower salinity injection wa-ter was greater than that using higher salinity injection wa-ter—matching recovery trends for laboratory and single-well tests.

Eric P. Robertson

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Saline Valley Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saline Valley Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Saline Valley Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Saline Valley Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Inyo County, California Coordinates 36.3091865°, -117.5495846° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

158

Salinity-induced hydrate dissociation: A mechanism for recent CH4 release on Mars  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations of CH4 in the Martian atmosphere suggest that CH4 has been added relatively recently. Several mechanisms for recent CH4 release have been proposed including subsurface biological methanogenesis, abiogenic hydrothermal and/or volcanic activity, dissociation of CH4 hydrates, atmospheric photolysis, or addition of organics via bolide impact. This study examines the effects of increasing salinity on gas hydrate stability and compares estimates of the Martian geothermal gradient to CH4 and CO2 hydrate stability fields in the presence of high salinity brines. The results demonstrate that salinity increases alone result in a significant decrease in the predicted hydrate stability zone within the Martian subsurface and may be a driving force in CH4 hydrate destabilization. Active thermal and/or pressure fluctuations are not required in order for CH4 hydrates to be the source of atmospheric CH4.

Madden, Megan Elwood [ORNL; Ulrich, Shannon M [ORNL; Onstott, Tullis [Princeton University; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from the Hawaiian Islands: Final Technical Report, Year 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microalgae were collected from 48 locations in the Hawaiian Islands in 1985. The sites were an aquaculture tank; a coral reef; bays; a geothermal steam vent; Hawaiian fish ponds; a Hawaiian salt punawai (well); the ocean; river mouths; saline lakes; saline pools; saline ponds; a saline swamp; and the ponds, drainage ditches and sumps of commercial shrimp farms. From 4,800 isolations, 100 of the most productive clones were selected to be maintained by periodic transfer to sterile medium. Five clones were tested for growth rate and production in a full-spectrum-transmitting solarium.

York, R. H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

groundwater levels, land subsidence, soil salinity, and cropeffects such as land subsidence. Under the section “yields, and on land subsidence. A second group of measures

Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On the Mechanisms of Episodic Salinity Outflow Events in the Strait of Hormuz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations in the Strait of Hormuz (26.26°N, 56.08°E) during 1997–98 showed substantial velocity fluctuations, accompanied by episodic changes in the salinity outflow events with amplitude varying between 1 and 2 psu on time scales of several ...

Prasad G. Thoppil; Patrick J. Hogan

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

On Steady Salinity Distribution and Circulation in Partially Mixed and Well Mixed Estuaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbation analysis based on small ? = Ra0.23Fm0.9, where Ra is the Rayleigh number and Fm is the Froude number, is used to study steady-state circulation and salinity distribution in estuaries. The classical Hansen and Rattray's similarity ...

Li-Yauw Oey

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Saline tracer visualized with three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography: Field-scale spatial moment analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) was used to monitor the migration of a saline tracer in a two-well pumping-injection experiment conducted of the bulk media changes as the tracer migrates from the pumping to the injection well. The local Figure 2 as in (c) a photograph of the site (not aligned to schematics). ERT wells are labeled A-D. Injection

Singha, Kamini

164

Effect of Sea Ice on the Salinity of Antarctic Bottom Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brine rejection during the formation of Antarctic sea ice is known to enhance the salinity of dense shelf waters in the Weddell and Ross Seas. As these shelf waters flow off the shelves and descend to the bottom, they entrain ambient deep water ...

J. R. Toggweiler; B. Samuels

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Use of the Temperature–Salinity Relation in a Data Assimilation Context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data analysis using conductivity–temperature–depth (CTD) measurements in the western tropical Pacific is carried out to get an estimate of the timescale over which temperature–salinity (T–S) relationships are preserved. Results show that the T–...

Alberto Troccoli; Keith Haines

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Salinity Variability and Its Role in the Barrier-Layer Formation during TOGA-COARE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the intensive observation period of TOGA-COARE between November 1992 and February 1993, two R/V Franklin cruises, FR09/92 and FR01/93, were carried out to study the response of oceanic surface layer temperature and salinity to atmospheric ...

Yuzhu You

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Soil morphological control on saline and freshwater lake hydrogeochemistry in the Pantanal of Nhecolndia, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

morphological control on saline and freshwater lake hydrogeochemistry in the Pantanal of Nhecolândia, Brazil L-MS, Brazil 4 ­ Laboratório de Pedologia, Departamento de Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo C.P. 8105, 05508-900, São Paulo, Brazil 5 - UFMS, Departamento de Geografia, Campus de Três Lagoas, Av. Ranulfo

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

168

Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil S Geografia, Universidade de SĂŁo Paulo, SĂŁo Paulo, Brazil b Soil & Water Sciences Program, Department SĂŁo Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 August

Ahmad, Sajjad

169

THE EFFECTS OF NON-CONDENSIBLE GAS AND SALINITY ON STEAM ADSORPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECTS OF NON-CONDENSIBLE GAS AND SALINITY ON STEAM ADSORPTION A REPORT SUBMITTED reservoir materials was investigated by a transient flow technique using steam and C02 gas. Theoretical pressure exerted by steam pressure inside the sample was measured against time during a desorption process

Stanford University

170

FY 1984 and FY 1985 geochemistry and materials studies in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geochemistry and materials studies are being performed in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program. The work is largely restricted to: (1) characterizing magmatic environments at sites of interest, (2) testing engineering materials in laboratory simulated magmatic environments, (3) investigating chemical mass transport effects inherent in designs for direct contact heat exchangers, and (4) evaluating degassing hazards associated with drilling into and extracting energy from shallow magma. Magma characterization studies have been completed for shallow magma at Long Valley, Coso volcanic field, and Kilauea volcano. The behavior of 17 commercially available materials has been examined in rhyolite magma at 850/sup 0/C and 200 MPa for periods up to seven days. Analysis of reaction products from materials tests to date indicate that oxidation is the main corrosion problem for most alloys in rhyolitic magma. Considerations of corrosion resistance, high-temperature strength, and cost indicate nickel-base superalloys offer the most promise as candidates for use in rhyolitic magma.

Westrich, H.R.; Weirick, L.J.; Cygan, R.T.; Reece, M.; Hlava, P.F.; Stockman, H.W.; Gerlach, T.M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

TOUGH+CO2: A multiphase fluid-flow simulator for CO2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGH+CO"2 is a new simulator for modeling of CO"2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers. It is a member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 family of codes for multicomponent, multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation. The code accounts for heat ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Modeling, Multiphase flow, Parallel computing, Saline aquifer, TOUGH+, TOUGH2

Keni Zhang; George Moridis; Karsten Pruess

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Understanding Partition Coefficient, Kd, Values Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available Kd Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium (3H), and Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air and Radiation Air and Radiation EPA 402-R-99-004B Environmental Protection August 1999 Agency UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT, K d , VALUES Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available K d Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium ( 3 H), and Uranium UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT, K d , VALUES Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available K d Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium ( 3 H), and Uranium August 1999 A Cooperative Effort By: Office of Radiation and Indoor Air Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

173

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The surface geochemistry sampling at the original Bear Lake demonstration site was updated several months after the prospect was confirmed and production begun. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

SALINITY AND SODICITY INTERACTIONS OF WEATHERED MINESOILS IN NORTHWESTERN NEW MEXICO AND NORTH EASTERN ARIZONA  

SciTech Connect

Weathering characteristics of minesoils and rooting patterns of key shrub and grass species were evaluated at sites reclaimed for 6 to 14 years from three surface coal mine operations in northwestern New Mexico and northeastern Arizona. Non-weathered minesoils were grouped into 11 classifications based on electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Comparisons of saturated paste extracts, from non-weathered and weathered minesoils show significant (p < 0.05) reductions in SAR levels and increased EC. Weathering increased the apparent stability of saline and sodic minesoils thereby reducing concerns of aggregate slaking and clay particle dispersion. Root density of four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canascens), alkali sacaton (Sporobolus airoides), and Russian wildrye (Psathyrostachys junceus) were nominally affected by increasing EC and SAR levels in minesoil. Results suggest that saline and sodic minesoils can be successfully reclaimed when covered with topsoil and seeded with salt tolerant plant species.

Brent Musslewhite; Song Jin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISSUES RELATED TO SEISMIC ACTIVITY INDUCED BY THE INJECTION ISSUES RELATED TO SEISMIC ACTIVITY INDUCED BY THE INJECTION OF CO 2 IN DEEP SALINE AQUIFERS Joel Sminchak (sminchak@battelle.org; 614-424-7392) Neeraj Gupta (gupta@battelle.org; 614-424-3820) Battelle Memorial Institute 505 King Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43201 Charles Byrer (a) and Perry Bergman (b) National Energy Technology Laboratory (a) P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV, 26507-0880 (b) P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236-0940 Abstract Case studies, theory, regulation, and special considerations regarding the disposal of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into deep saline aquifers were investigated to assess the potential for induced seismic activity. Formations capable of accepting large volumes of CO 2 make deep well injection of CO 2 an attractive option. While seismic implications must be considered for injection

176

Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70.degree. C. to 90.degree. C., at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Upper-Ocean Salinity Variability in the Tropical Pacific: Case Study for Quasi-Decadal Shift during the 2000s Using TRITON Buoys and Argo Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-ocean salinity variation in the tropical Pacific is investigated during the 2000s, when TRITON buoys and Argo floats were deployed and more salinity data were observed than in previous periods. We focus on upper-ocean salinity variability ...

Takuya Hasegawa; Kentaro Ando; Iwao Ueki; Keisuke Mizuno; Shigeki Hosoda

179

Geochemistry and hydrothermal alteration at selected Utah hot springs. Final report: Volume 3 (revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of Na-K-Ca geothermometry to warm springs in Utah indicates several areas with sufficiently high apparent temperatures to be of interest as geothermal exploration targets. A zone of warm springs in the Bonneville Basin show Na-K-Ca temperatures from 150/sup 0/C to 233/sup 0/C. Examination of Great Salt Lake, Bonneville sediment pore water, and Jordan Valley well-water chemistry indicates that mixing a small percent of these fluids with warm spring water can cause substantial errors in Na-K-Ca temperature estimates. Other saline deposits which may influence Na-K-Ca temperature estimates are the Paradox formation in southeastern Utah, the Muddy Creek formation in southwestern Utah, the Arapien shale in central Utah, the Preuss formation in northeastern Utah, and Playa salts in much of western Utah. The Roosevelt KGRA is the most attractive target identified by Na-K-Ca geothermometry. Hydrothermal alteration, heavy metal distribution, and water chemistry provide additional characterization of the Roosevelt system. Chemistry of a cool water seep (25/sup 0/C) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 241/sup 0/C and SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 125/sup 0/C. A Phillips well flowing from below 1500' (457m) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 262/sup 0/C, SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 262/sup 0/C, and K of 1.5 times the surface spring value. The near surface alteration assemblage is best explained in terms of a decrease in pH of near surface fluids as sulfide oxidizes. Increasing potassium and pH with depth indicates that a K-feldspar stable zone may be intersected with deeper drilling. Geology and alteration were mapped in the Monroe KGRA. (JGB)

Parry, W.T.; Benson, N.L.; Miller, C.D.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. First quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1993--December 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This multidisciplinary study is designed to provide improvements in advanced reservoir characterization techniques. This goal is to be accomplished through: (1) an examination of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability in the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs of Wyoming; (2) the placement of that variation and anisotropy into paleogeographic, depositional, and diagenetic frameworks; (3) the development of pore-system imagery techniques for the calculation of relative permeability; and (4) reservoir simulations testing the impact of relative permeability anisotropy and spatial variation on Tensleep Sandstone reservoir enhanced oil recovery. Concurrent efforts are aimed at understanding the spatial and dynamic alteration in sandstone reservoirs that is caused by rock-fluid interaction during CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery processes. The work focuses on quantifying the interrelationship of fluid-rock interaction with lithologic characterization in terms of changes in relative permeability, wettability, and pore structure, and with fluid characterization in terms of changes in chemical composition and fluid properties. This work will establish new criteria for the susceptibility of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs to formation alteration that results in a change in relative permeability and wellbore scale damage. This task will be accomplished by flow experiments using core material; examination of regional trends in water chemistry; examination of local water chemistry trends on the scale of a field; and chemical modeling of the reservoir and experimental systems in order to scale-up the experiments to reservoir conditions.

Dunn, T.L.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description Date 0 Original document 1/29/2008 1 Estimate for carbon content of crude oil was incorrect (see pThe Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs Sean T for this work was provided by the US Department of Energy under contract numbers DE-FC26-00NT40935 and DE-AC26

183

Salinity variations and chemical compositions of waters in the Frio Formation, Texas Gulf Coast. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waters produced from sandstone reservoirs of the deep Frio Formation exhibit spatial variations in chemical composition that roughly coincide with the major tectonic elements (Houston and Rio Grande Embayments, San Marcos Arch) and corresponding depositional systems (Houston and Norias deltas, Greta-Carancahua barrier/strandplain system) that were respectively active along the upper, lower, and middle Texas Coast during Frio deposition. Within an area, salinities are usually depth dependent, and primary trends closely correspond to pore pressure gradients and thermal gradients. Where data are available (mainly in Brazoria County) the increases in TDS and calcium with depth coincide with the zone of albitization, smectite-illite transition, and calcite decrease in shales. Waters have fairly uniform salinities when produced from the same sandstone reservoir within a fault block or adjacent fault blocks with minor displacement. In contrast, stratigraphically equivalent sandstones separated by faults with large displacement usually yield waters with substantially different salinities owing to the markedly different thermal and pressure gradients across the faults that act as barriers to fluid movement.

Morton, R.A.; Garrett, C.M. Jr.; Posey, J.S.; Han, J.H.; Jirik, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Soils of Ultramafic Origin from the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although soils developed from ultramafic parent materials have significance to agriculture, ecology and health, their bio-geochemistry is poorly understood. The mineralogical and bio-geochemistry of soils formed from the ultramafic parent materials of the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas was investigated. The objectives were to determine the mineralogical and bio-geochemical properties of the soils in order to assess the potential impact and challenges to agriculture, and environmental quality. Soil samples were taken from the crest, shoulder, footslope and the toeslope. Chemical analyses were performed by nuclear and spectroscopic techniques. Mineral characterization was conducted by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectroscopic techniques. Microbial whole-community structure was determined by the fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) technique. The results indicate wide chemical and mineralogical compositions among the studied sites. The soils contain relatively high concentrations of heavy metals (some sites contain Cr(VI)), but low levels of K and Ca. The highest concentrations of trace metal were associated with chromite, Fe oxides and serpentinite. The concentrations of Mg were higher than those of Ca and varied between Zimbabwe and Texas soils largely due to the parent materials. Unique to these soils is the occurrence of talc, serpentine, chlorite, Fe-rich smectite, amphiboles, pyroxenes, Fe and Cr oxides in relatively large amounts. These soils also lack micas and have neglible amounts of kaolinite and feldspars. Palygorskite and serpentine occurred in specific soil horizons and at specific landscape positions. FAME profiles indicate that the soil microbial community structure is predominantly bacteria and fungi (including arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi) at each landscape position across the transect. Biomarkers for actinomycetes were undetectable. The proportions of Gram-positive bacteria were higher than those of the Gram-negative bacteria. Very low levels of nutrients (Ca and K), higher Mg/Ca molar ratios, and the relatively high concentrations of heavy metals in these soils impact agricultural productivity. High concentrations of heavy metals, the presence of the Cr(VI) as well as its great potential to form in these soils might impact microbial activity and environmental quality. The occurrence of fibrous minerals (e.g serpentine and amphiboles) in these soils will likely impact human health.

Bangira, Courage

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Optimal Surface Salinity Perturbations of the Meridional Overturning and Heat Transport in a Global Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations and modeling studies have stressed the influence of surface salinity perturbations on the North Atlantic circulation over the past few decades. As a step toward the estimation of the sensitivity of the thermohaline circulation ...

Florian Sévellec; Thierry Huck; Mahdi Ben Jelloul; Nicolas Grima; Jérôme Vialard; Anthony Weaver

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Development and Analysis of the Systematically Merged Atlantic Regional Temperature and Salinity Climatology For Oceanic Heat Content Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An oceanic climatology to calculate upper ocean thermal structure was developed for application year-round in the North Atlantic Ocean basin. The Systematically Merged Atlantic Regional Temperature and Salinity (SMARTS) Climatology is used in a ...

P. C. Meyers; L. K. Shay; J. K. Brewster

188

Incorporating State-Dependent Temperature–Salinity Constraints in the Background Error Covariance of Variational Ocean Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several studies have illustrated how the univariate assimilation of temperature data can have a detrimental effect on the ocean-state variables (salinity, currents, etc.) not directly constrained by the data. In this paper, the authors describe ...

S. Ricci; A. T. Weaver; J. Vialard; P. Rogel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Real Freshwater Flux as a Natural Boundary Condition for the Salinity Balance and Thermohaline Circulation Forced by Evaporation and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freshwater flux used as a natural boundary condition for the salinity balance is applied to a primitive equation model of the oceanic general circulation. Instead of the relaxation condition or the virtual salt flux boundary conditions used in ...

Rui Xin Huang

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Storage capacity and injection rate estimates for CO? sequestration in deep saline aquifers in the conterminous United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A promising method to mitigate global warming is injecting CO? into deep saline aquifers. In order to ensure the safety of this method, it is necessary to understand how much CO? can be injected into an aquifer and at what ...

Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Large-Scale Atlantic Salinity Changes over the Last Half-Century: A Model–Observation Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale freshening of the northern Atlantic, and concurrent salinity increases in the low-latitude Atlantic upper layers, have been widely reported for the second half of the twentieth century. The role of anthropogenic and/or unforced ...

Anne Pardaens; Michael Vellinga; Peili Wu; Bruce Ingleby

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Vertical Variability of Near-Surface Salinity in the Tropics: Consequences for L-Band Radiometer Calibration and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two satellite missions are planned to be launched in the next two years; the European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius missions aim at detecting sea ...

Claire Henocq; Jacqueline Boutin; Gilles Reverdin; François Petitcolin; Sabine Arnault; Philippe Lattes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E.G. [Atomic Energy of Russia (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N. [Russian Federation Committee on Geological and Subsurface Usage (Russian Federation)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Water Infiltration and Permeability of Selected Urban Soils as Affected by Salinity and Sodicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil sodicity is known to affect soil structural stability and permeability. However, the impact differs depending on salinity of irrigation water, soil types as well as irrigation management practices. This study examined water infiltration into two alluvial soils (Torrifluvents), and two upland soils (Paleorthid and Calciorthid, Aridisols) placed in greenhouse pots. For the first experiment, irrigation solutions simulating the Rio Grande water, city potable water, and two sources of reclaimed water (EC of 1.4 and 2.2 dS m-1 and SAR of 6 and 11) were applied twice a week at 1.7 cm per application for a total of 27 irrigation events using 46 cm of water. No significant effect of water quality was detected in Delnorte gravelly loam (Paleorthid) and a small effect on infiltration into Harkey silt loam (Torrifluvent). However, the use of distilled water curtailed infiltration mainly in Harkey soil. In the second greenhouse experiment using a carefully crafted soil packing and water application protocols, the impact of water quality on infiltration into two Torrifluvents, Harkey silt loam and Glendale silty clay loam appeared after water application of 40 to 50 cm (16" - 20"). When saline solutions were applied as deep as 10 cm per application, the infiltration time nearly doubled when SAR of the solution increased from 1 to 6 or 12 in alluvial soils, but not in Turney silty clay loam (Calciorthid, Aridisol). When the irrigation depth per application was reduced to 7.5, 5.0, and 2.5 cm per application, the difference in infiltration rate was markedly reduced. The impact of elevated sodicity (SAR of 6 to 12) on infiltration can be an issue in alluvial soils, but unlikely in upland soils at irrigation water salinity of 1 to 2 dS m-1.

Miyamoto, S.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

Rapaka, Saikiran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Enhanced Oil Recovery in High Salinity High Temperature Reservoir by Chemical Flooding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in a high-temperature/high-salinity (HT/HS) reservoir will help expand the application of chemical EOR to more challenging environments. Until recently, chemical EOR was not recommended at reservoirs that contain high concentrations of divalent cations without the need to recondition the reservoir by flooding it with less saline/ less hardness brines. This strategy was found ineffective in preparing the reservoir for chemical flooding. Surfactants used for chemical flooding operating in high temperatures tend to precipitate when exposed to high concentrations of divalent cations and will partition to the oil phase at high salinities. In this study amphoteric surfactant was used to replace the traditionally used anionic surfactants. Amphoteric surfactants show higher multivalent cations tolerance with better thermal stability. A modified amphoteric surfactant with lower adsorption properties was evaluated for oil recovery. Organic alkali was used to eliminate the water softening process when preparing the chemical solution and reduce potential scale problems caused by precipitation due to incompatibility between chemical slug containing alkali and formation brine. Using organic alkali helped in minimizing softening required when preparing an alkali-surfactant-polymer (ASP) solution using seawater. Solution prepared with organic alkali showed the least injectivity decline when compared to traditional alkalis (NaOH and Na2CO3) and sodium metaborate. Adding organic alkali helped further reduce IFT values when added to surfactant solution. Amphoteric surfactant was found to produce low IFT values at low concentrations and can operate at high salinity / high hardness conditions. When mixed with polymer it improved the viscosity of the surfactant-polymer (SP) solution when prepared in high salinity mixing water (6% NaCl). When prepared in seawater and tested in reservoir temperature (95°C) no reduction in viscosity was found. Unlike the anionic surfactant that causes reduction in viscosity of the SP solution at reservoir temperature. This will not require increasing the polymer concentration in the chemical slug. Unlike the case when anionic surfactant was used and more polymer need to be added to compensate the reduction in viscosity. Berea sandstone cores show lower recovery compared to dolomite cores. It was also found that Berea cores were more sensitive to polymer concentration and type and injectivity decline can be a serious issue during chemical and polymer injection. Dolomite did not show injectivity decline during chemical and polymer flooding and was not sensitive to the polymer concentration when a polymer with low molecular weight was used. CT scan was employed to study the displacement of oil during ASP, SP, polymer and surfactant flooding. The formation and propagation oil bank was observed during these core flood experiments. ASP and SP flooding showed the highest recovery, and formation and propagation of oil bank was clearer in these experiments compared to surfactant flooding. It was found that in Berea sandstone with a permeability range of 50 to 80 md that the recovery and fluid flow was through some dominating and some smaller channels. This explained the deviation from piston-like displacement, where a sharp change in saturation in part of the flood related to the dominated channels and tapered front with late arrival when oil is recovered from the smaller channels. It was concluded that the recovery in the case of sandstone was dominated by the fluid flow and chemical propagation in the porous media not by the effectiveness of the chemical slug to lower the IFT between the displacing fluid and oil.

Bataweel, Mohammed Abdullah

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR; VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The main news this reporting period is the confirmed discovery of producing hydrocarbons at the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 demonstration well in Manistee County. This well was spudded in late November, tested and put on production in December 2003. To date it is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. The surface geochemistry sampling at the Springdale demonstration site will be repeated this spring after the well has been on production for several months to see if the anomaly pattern changes. We expect that the anomaly will diminish as the original positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. This is the behavior that we observed at the Bear lake demonstration well reported last quarter.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Engineering and Economic Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Economic Assessment of and Economic Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Formations Lawrence A. Smith (smithla@battelle.org; 614-424-3169) Neeraj Gupta (gupta@battelle.org; 614-424-3820)* Bruce M. Sass and Thomas A. Bubenik Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 *Corresponding Author Charles Byrer (a) and Perry Bergman (b) National Energy Technology Laboratory (a) P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV, 26507-0880 (b) P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236-0940 ABSTRACT Concern over the potential effects of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) on global climate has triggered research about ways to mitigate the release of these gases to the atmosphere. A project to study the engineering feasibility and costs of sequestering CO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluation of materials for systems using cooled, treated geothermal or high-saline brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lack of adequate quantities of clean surface water for use in wet (evaporative) cooling systems indicates the use of high-salinity waste waters, or cooled geothermal brines, for makeup purposes. High-chloride, aerated water represents an extremely corrosive environment. In order to determine metals suitable for use in such an environment, metal coupons were exposed to aerated, treated geothermal brine salted to a chloride concentration of 10,000 and 50,000 ppM (mg/L) for periods of up to 30 days. The exposed coupons were evaluated to determine the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion characteristics of the metals. The metals exhibiting corrosion resistance at 50,000 ppM chloride were then evaluated at 100,000 and 200,000 ppM chloride. Since these were screening tests to select materials for components to be used in a cooling system, with primary emphasis on condenser tubing, several materials were exposed for 4 to 10 months in pilot cooling tower test units with heat transfer for further corrosion evaluation. The results of the screening tests indicate that ferritic stainless steels (29-4-2 and SEA-CURE) exhibit excellent corrosion resistance at all levels of chloride concentration. Copper-nickel alloys (70/30 and Monel 400) exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the high-saline water. The 70/30 copper-nickel alloy, which showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, exhibited mild pitting in the 30-day tests. This pitting was not apparent, however, after 6 months of exposure in the pilot cooling tower tests. The nickel-base alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, but their high cost prevents their use unless no other material is found feasible. Other materials tested, although unsuitable for condenser tubing material, would be suitable as tube sheet material.

Suciu, D.F.; Wikoff, P.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Genome of a low-salinity ammoniaoxidizing archaeon determined by single-cell and metagenomic analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are thought to be among the most abundant microorganisms on Earth and may significantly impact the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. We sequenced the genome of AOA in an enrichment culture from low-salinity sediments in San Francisco Bay using single-cell and metagenomic genome sequence data. Five single cells were isolated inside an integrated microfluidic device using laser tweezers, the cells ’ genomic DNA was amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) in 50 nL volumes and then sequenced by high-throughput DNA pyrosequencing. This microscopy-based approach to single-cell genomics minimizes contamination and allows correlation of high-resolution cell images with genomic sequences. Statistical properties of coverage across the five single cells, in combination with the contrasting properties of the metagenomic dataset allowed the assembly of a high-quality draft genome. The genome of this AOA, which we designate Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum limnia SFB1, is,1.77 Mb with.2100 genes and a G+C content of 32%. Across the entire genome, the average nucleotide identity to Nitrosopumilus maritimus, the only AOA in pure culture, is,70%, suggesting this AOA represents a new genus of Crenarchaeota. Phylogenetically, the 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes of this AOA are most closely related to sequences reported from a wide variety of freshwater ecosystems. Like N. maritimus, the low-salinity AOA genome appears to have an ammonia oxidation pathway distinct from ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In contrast to other described AOA, these lowsalinity

Paul C. Blainey; Annika C. Mosier; Anastasia Potanina; Christopher A. Francis; Stephen R. Quake

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geochemistry, isotopic composition and origin of fluids emanating from mud volcanoes in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two compositionally different groups of mud volcanoes exist in the Copper River Basin: the Tolsona group which discharges Na-Ca rich, HCO/sub 3/-SO/sub 4/ poor saline waters accompanied by small amounts of gas, composed predominately of CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/; and the Klawasi group which discharges Ca poor, Na-HCO/sub 3/ rich saline waters accompanied by enormous amounts of CO/sub 2/. The Tolsona-type water chemistry and isotopic composition could have been produced through the following processes: dilution of original interstitial seawaters with paleo-meteoric waters, possibly during a period of uplift in the mid-Cretaceous; loss of HCO/sub 3/ and SO/sub 4/ and modification of other constituent concentrations by shale-membrane filtration; further depletion of Mg, K, HCO/sub 3/, and SO/sub 4/, and enrichment in Ca and Sr through dolomitization, hydrolysis, and clay-forming processes; and leaching of B, I, Li, and SiO/sub 2/ from marine sediments. Compared to the Tolsona waters, the Klawasi waters are strongly enriched in Li, Na, K, Mg, HCO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, B, SiO/sub 2/ and delta/sup 18/O and strongly depleted in Ca, Sr and D. The Klawasi wates also contain high concentrations of arsenic (10 to 48 ppM). The differences in fluid chemistry between Klawasi and Tolsona can be explained as the result of the interaction of fluids derived from a magmatic intrusion and contact decarbonation of limestone beds underlying the Klawasi area with overlying Tolsona-type formation waters.

Motyka, R.J.; Hawkins, D.B.; Poreda, R.J.; Jeffries, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evolution of the Arctic Ocean Salinity, 2007–08: Contrast between the Canadian and the Eurasian Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the variability of salinity in the Arctic Ocean and in the Nordic and Labrador Seas over recent years to see how the freshwater balance in the Arctic and the exchanges with the North Atlantic have been affected by the ...

Camille Lique; Gilles Garric; Anne-Marie Treguier; Bernard Barnier; Nicolas Ferry; Charles-Emmanuel Testut; Fanny Girard-Ardhuin

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Offshore Detachment Process of the Low-Salinity Water around Changjiang Bank in the East China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A patchlike structure of low-salinity water detached from the Chanjiang “Diluted Water” (CDW) is frequently observed in the East China Sea (ECS). In this study, the offshore detachment process of CDW into the ECS is examined using a three-...

Jae-Hong Moon; Naoki Hirose; Jong-Hwan Yoon; Ig-Chan Pang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nonlinear model identification and adaptive control of CO2 sequestration process in saline aquifers using artificial neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, storage of carbon dioxide (CO"2) in saline aquifers has gained intensive research interest. The implementation, however, requires further research studies to ensure it is safe and secure operation. The primary objective is to secure ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide sequestration, Extended Kalman filter (EKF), GAP-RBF neural network, Nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC), System identification, Unscented Kalman filter (UKF)

Karim Salahshoor; Mohammad Hasan Hajisalehi; Morteza Haghighat Sefat

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Investigations on the use of anodic stripping voltammetry for the analyses of lead in saline environments  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported directed to modification of the anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) analytic method in order to acquire data for lead from ambient sea water conditions, and development of a chemical model which uses these data to identify inorganic lead species for saline environments. Laboratory and field samples were analyzed for lead partitioning in: (a) KCl electrolyte solutions; (b) I.A.P.S.O. Standard Sea Water; (c) seawater samples from Quatsino Sound, British Columbia; (d) a series of seawater samples from San Francisco Bay; and (e) seawater samples from the Gulf of Mexico. The electrochemical traits of the lead species and the ASV oxidation potential expression are the fundamental constituents of the chemical model. The model uses the data from the analyses to provide the mass balance relationships for lead partitioned among the major anions in seawater. The laboratory analyses of KCl electrolyte and Standard Seawater give the following results. The modified ASV method and chemical model provide information on ambient labile and non-labile inorganic lead complexes in these saline solutions down to the parts-per-billion level. No purge and the simple electrodes cause some erratic behavior and spurious potentials, but the data are reproducible. In addition to Pb/sup 2 +/, the most dominant measured lead species in order include PbCO/sub 3//sup 0/, PbSO/sub 4//sup 0/, PbCl/sup +/, and Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup 0/ from the lead additions solution. The analyses of the field samples give the following results. Samples were taken from the partially anoxic basin in Quatsino Sound, British Columbia with one successful analysis which is for somewhat normal dissolved oxygen conditions. Data show that lead is partitioned among Pb/sup 2 +/, Pb(OH)/sub 2//sup 0/, PbCO/sub 3//sup 0/, and PbSO/sub 4//sup 0/. The analyses with purge for the San Francisco Bay water partitions lead among Pb/sup 2 +/, PbCO/sub 3//sup 0/, PbSO/sub 4//sup 0/, PbCl/sup +/, and PbOH/sup +/. With successive lead additions Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup 0/ is decidedly the dominant species.

Case, C.W.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

A principal goal of the Budget Period I was to demonstrate that surface geochemistry could be used to locate bypassed hydrocarbons in old fields. This part of the program was successful. A surface geochemical survey, employing 5 different techniques, was carried out in the Spring and Summer of 2000 and a demonstration well, the State Vernon & Smock 13-23 HD1 (permit number: PN 53945) was drilled in Vernon Township, Isabella County, Michigan in the late fall of 2000. A demonstration well was selected and drilled based on geologic considerations and surface geochemistry. Over 460 soil samples were collected and analyzed over the drill site. A good anomaly was detected near the proposed well site and the demonstration well, the Smock 13-23, was drilled to a depth of 3157 feet by November 17, 2000. Two laterals were drilled, and hydrocarbons were located in a zone approximately 175 feet in length. However, it was determined that the pay zone was too small and difficult reservoir conditions (water production) prevented putting the well in production. The Smock 13-23 was shut in and abandoned January 15, 2001. A post-mortem determined that the main reason the well was not economic was because the zone was nearly completely flushed by earlier recovery operations. The post mortem also revealed the presence of an unmapped shale plug crossing the first lateral. It appears that this shale was detected by the geochemical survey, but its significance was not appreciated at the time. It is possible that sections of the well were faulty, ''porposing'' up and down so as to create water blockages. We are continuing to use the Vernon Field and the demonstration well to calibrate the geochemical data. Eventually, this study may provide a standard site that can be used to test and calibrate geochemical anomalies, something that does not presently exist. A postmortem report on the well, including the geology and geochemistry used to site the well, is presented in Appendix I. Five geochemical techniques have been tested in Phase I. These include surface iodine, microbial, enzyme leaching, soil gas and subsurface iodine. We are most comfortable with the results of the microbial surveys but feel that direct measurement of soil gas is the best method if analytical difficulties can be overcome. The reason the microbial surveys are presently favored is because they provide a logical, consistent picture that is easy to interpret and easy to explain. This in turn is because the microbial anomaly is manifested as an ''apical'' as opposed to an ''edge'' or ''halo'' anomaly. Several lessons were learned during Phase I activities. The main one was that surface geochemistry could locate anomalies over old fields such as Vernon. We also learned that horizontal drilling has advantages and disadvantages in situations such as this. On the plus side, it does provide a means to probe for pockets of bypassed oil, but it is expensive relative to vertical (or slant wells?) and is difficult to control in a narrow pay zone. We tentatively conclude that horizontal wells do not provide a cost-effective solution in this setting and suggest that geochemical anomalies be investigated via a single vertical well or multiple vertical wells.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan; E. Taylor

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now interpreted as a large negative anomaly associated with the entire field. The results of the State Smock horizontal well and the Bowers 4-25 well confirmed the lack of additional recoverable hydrocarbons in the Vernon Field. (4) The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach, Burke County, North Dakota area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the geological and geophysical data; the microbial values here were the highest we have observed. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling, however, a pipeline has not yet been completed that would allow the wells to be placed into production. We also present in this annual report the results of recent efforts to map carbonate facies tracts in the middle Devonian Dundee and Rogers City Limestones using gamma ray, bulk density, and photoelectric effect geophysical well log amplitudes. This work was undertaken to identify fairways for exploration in the Dundee and Rogers City where surface geochemical techniques could then be used to screen potential leads.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

Two major accomplishments resulted from Phase I. One is the success of the surface geochemistry program, which collected over 800 samples from the site of the 1st demonstration well in Vernon Field and has pretty well provided us with the tools to delineate favorable ground from unfavorable. The second is the recent detailed mapping of the Central Michigan Basin that for the first time revealed the presence of at least two major faults that control the location of many of the reservoirs in the Michigan Basin. These faults were located from structure maps obtained by contouring the surface of the Dundee Formation using top picks from 9861 wells in 14 counties. Faults were inferred where the contour lines were most dense (''stacked'').

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, we extended the fault study to include more faults and developed new techniques to visualize the faults. We now have used data from the Dundee Formation to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin and are in the process of reviewing data from other horizons. These faults appear to control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review has been set for March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Is compositional data analysis a way to see beyond the illusion?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Notwithstanding the numerous contributions that have been published on theoretical and practical aspects of the management of compositional (constrained) data during the last thirty years, in geochemistry most of the scientific papers in international ... Keywords: Compositional data analysis, Geochemistry, Isometric log-ratio transformation, River chemistry, Volcanic gases, Worldwide lithology

Antonella Buccianti

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development of a point-electrode conductivity salinometer with high-spatial-resolution for use in very-saline solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conductivity probe and circuit were developed to measure salinities in sodium chloride salt-gradient solar ponds. A point-electrode salinometer design was chosen to give a spatial resolution of approximately 1 mm (0.039 in.). Such high spatial resolution was necessary to study the behavior of thermohaline columns in the vicinity of convective/conductive zone boundaries. The point-electrode conductivity instrument was designed for use in up to 25 wt % salinities with immersion times of about 0.1 year or longer. Drift in the instrument, however, caused principally by changes in the surface condition of the platinum probe tip and reflected by changes in the probe cell constant, required periodic in situ calibration against the measured specific gravity of withdrawn fluid samples.

Jones, G.F.; Grimmer, D.P.; Tafoya, J.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Deltaic sedimentation in saline, alkaline Lake Bogoria, Kenya: Response to environmental change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake Bogoria is a meromictic, saline (90 g/l TDS), alkaline (pH: 10.3) lake with Na-CO[sub 3]-Cl waters, located in a narrow half-graben in the central Kenya Rift. It is fed by hot springs, direct precipitation, and a series of ephemeral streams that discharge into the lake via small deltas and fan-deltas. Examination of the exposed deltas and >50 short cores from the lake floor, have revealed a wide range of deltaic and prodeltaic sediments, including turbidites and subaqueous debris-flow deposits. Studies of 3 long cores and the exposed delta stratigraphy have shown how the style of deltaic sedimentation has responded to environmental changes during the last 30,000 years. During humid periods when lake level is high the lake waters are fresher and less dense. Theoretically, high sediment yield and more constant discharge may promote underflow (hyperpycnal flow), generating low-density turbidity currents. In contrast, during low stages with dense brine, the less dense, inflowing waters carry fine sediment plumes toward the center of the lake where they settle from suspension (hypopycnal flow). Although applicable as a general model, the sediment record shows that reality is more complex. Variations in meromixis and level of the chemocline, together with local and temporal differences in sediment yield and discharge, may permit density flows even when the lake is under a predominant hypopycnal regime. During periods of aridity when sodium carbonate evaporites were forming, exposed delta plains were subject to desiccation with local development of calcrete and zeolitic paleosols.

Renaut, R.W. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Tiercelin, J.J. (Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Domaines Oceaniques)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

Doughty, Christine

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Studies of marine macroalgae: saline desert water cultivation and effects of environmental stress on proximate composition. Final subcontract report. [Gracilaria tikvahiae; Ulva lactuca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results presented in this report address the growth potential of marine macroalgae cultivated in desert saline waters, and the effects of certain environmental stresses (e.g., nitrogen, salinity, and temperature) on the proximate composition of several marine macroalgae. Two major desert saline water types were assayed for their ability to support the growth of Gracilaria, Ulva, and Caulerpa. Both water types supported short term growth, but long term growth was not supported. Carbohydrate levels in Gracilaria were increased by cultivation under conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and low nitrogen and phosphorous availability. Data suggests that it may be possible to maximize production of useful proximate constituents by cultivating the algae under optimum conditions for growth, and then holding the resulting biomass under the environmental conditions which favor tissue accumulation of the desired storage products. 16 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

Ryther, J.H.; DeBusk, T.A.; Peterson, J.E.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Footprint of the CO[subscript 2] Plume during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers: Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at the Basin Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a sharp-interface mathematical model of CO[subscript 2] migration in deep saline aquifers, which accounts for gravity override, capillary trapping, natural groundwater flow, and the shape of the plume during the ...

Juanes, Ruben

220

Effects of Subgrid-Scale Mixing Parameterizations on Simulated Distributions of Natural 14C, Temperature, and Salinity in a Three-Dimensional Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of parameterizations of subgrid-scale mixing on simulated distributions of natural 14C, temperature, and salinity in a three-dimensional ocean general circulation model are examined. The parameterizations studied are 1) the Gent–...

Philip B. Duffy; Ken Caldeira; Jerry Selvaggi; Martin I. Hoffert

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Climate Model Simulations of Effects of Increased Atmospheric CO2 and Loss of Sea Ice on Ocean Salinity and Tracer Uptake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations show a decrease in the extent of Northern Hemisphere sea ice; this decrease has been attributed to human activities. Climate model simulations are presented that examine how loss of sea ice affects the ocean salinity and ...

P. B. Duffy; M. Eby; A. J. Weaver

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Waterflood and Enhanced Oil Recovery Studies using Saline Water and Dilute Surfactants in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water injection has been practiced to displace the hydrocarbons towards adjacent wells and to support the reservoir pressure at or above the bubble point. Recently, waterflooding in sandstone reservoirs, as secondary and tertiary modes, proved to decrease the residual oil saturation. In calcareous rocks, water from various resources (deep formation, seawater, shallow beds, lakes and rivers) is generally injected in different oil fields. The ions interactions between water molecules, salts ions, oil components, and carbonate minerals are still ambiguous. Various substances are usually added before or during water injection to enhance oil recovery such as dilute surfactant. Various methods were used including surface charge (zeta potential), static and dynamic contact angle, core flooding, inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, CAT scan, and geochemical simulation. Limestone and dolomite particles were prepared at different wettability conditions to mimic the actual carbonate reservoirs. In addition to seawater and dilute seawater (50, 20, 10, and 1 vol%), formation brine, shallow aquifer water, deionized water and different crude oil samples were used throughout this study. The crude oil/water/carbonates interactions were also investigated using short and long (50 cm) limestone and dolomite rocks at different wettability and temperature conditions. The aqueous ion interactions were extensively monitored via measuring their concentrations using advanced analytical techniques. The activity of the free ions, complexes, and ion pairs in aqueous solutions were simulated at high temperatures and pressures using OLI electrolyte simulation software. Dilute seawater decreased the residual oil saturation in some of the coreflood tests. Hydration and dehydration processes through decreasing and increasing salinity showed no impact on calcite wettability. Effect of individual ions (Ca, Mg, and Na) and dilute seawater injection on oil recovery was insignificant in compare to the dilute surfactant solutions (0.1 wt%). The reaction mechanisms were confirmed to be adsorption of hydroxide ions, complexes and ion pairs at the interface which subsequently altered the surface potential from positive to negative. Results in this study indicate multistage waterflooding can enhance oil recovery in the field under certain conditions. Mixed streams simulation results suggest unexpected ions interactions (NaCO3-1, HSO4-1, NaSO4-1 and SO4-2) with various activities trends especially at high temperatures.

Alotaibi, Mohammed

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING): A Model for Estimating Microbial Communities in Repository Drifts at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geochemical and microbiological modeling was performed to evaluate the potential quantities and impact of microorganisms on the geochemistry of the area adjacent to and within nuclear waste packages in the proposed repository drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The microbial growth results from the introduction of water, ground support, and waste package materials into the deep unsaturated rock. The simulations, which spanned one million years, were accomplished using a newly developed computer code, Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING). MING uses environmental thresholds for limiting microbial growth to temperatures below 120 C and above relative humidities of 90 percent in repository drifts. Once these thresholds are met, MING expands upon a mass balance and thermodynamic approach proposed by McKinley and others (1997), by using kinetic rates to supply constituents from design materials and constituent fluxes including solubilized rock components into the drift, to perform two separate mass-balance calculations as a function of time. The first (nutrient limit) assesses the available nutrients (C, N, P and S) and calculates how many microorganisms can be produced based on a microorganism stoichiometry of C{sub 160}(H{sub 280}O{sub 80})N{sub 30}P{sub 2}S. The second (energy limit) calculates the energy available from optimally combined redox couples for the temperature, and pH at that time. This optimization maximizes those reactions that produce > 15kJ/mol (limit on useable energy) using an iterative linear optimization technique. The final available energy value is converted to microbial mass at a rate of 1 kg of biomass (dry weight) for every 64 MJ of energy. These two values (nutrient limit and energy limit) are then compared and the smaller value represents the number of microorganisms that can be produced over a specified time. MING can also be adapted to investigate other problems of interest as the model can be used in saturated and unsaturated environments and in laboratory situations to establish microbial growth limitations. Other projected uses include investigations of contaminated locations where monitored natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation could be employed.

D.M. Jolley; T.F. Ehrhorn; J. Horn

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Changes in Hepatic Blood Flow During Transcatheter Arterial Infusion with Heated Saline in Hepatic VX2 Tumor  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. This study evaluates the influence of transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline on hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to tumor and normal hepatic tissues in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods. All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Twenty rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into the following two groups: (a) the treated group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL transarterial injection of 60 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery; (b) the control group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL injection of 37 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery. Using ultrasonography, the blood flows in both the portal vein and hepatic artery were measured, and the changes in the hemodynamic indices were recorded before and immediately after the injection. The changes in the tumor and normal liver tissues of the two groups were histopathologically examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining after the injection. Results. After the transcatheter arterial heated infusion, there was a decrease in the hepatic arterial blood flow to the tumor tissue, a significant decrease in the hepatic artery mean velocity (P < 0.05), and a significant increase in the resistance index (P < 0.05). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in the normal liver tissue or the tumor tissue after heated perfusion, and coagulated blood plasma was observed in the cavities of intratumoral blood vessels in the treated group. Conclusions. The changes in tumor blood flow in the rabbit VX2 tumor model were presumably caused by microthrombi in the tumor vessels, and the portal vein likely mediated the heat loss in normal liver tissue during the transarterial heated infusion.

Cao Wei, E-mail: cawe-001@163.com [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Li Jing, E-mail: lijing02@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery (China); Wu Zhiqun, E-mail: zhiqunwu@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Zhou Changxi, E-mail: changxizhou@163.com [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Respiratory Disease (China); Liu Xi, E-mail: xiliu@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound Diagnostics (China); Wan Yi, E-mail: yiwan@163.com [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Health Statistics, Institute for Health Informatics (China); Duan Yunyou, E-mail: yunyouduan@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound Diagnostics (China)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Vernon Field demonstration project in Isabella County, Michigan. This new case history and well summary format organizes and presents the technical and historical details of the Vernon Field demonstration, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion. Planning for the annual project meeting in Tampa, Florida has begun. This meeting will be held March 7-9, 2003 at the same site as the last three meetings. The goals of this project were to: (1) test the use of multi-lateral wells to recover bypassed hydrocarbons and (2) to access the potential of using surface geochemistry to reduce drilling risk. Two new demonstration wells, the State-Smock and the Bowers 4-25, were drilled to test the Dundee Formation at Vernon Field for bypassed oil. Neither well was commercial, although both produced hydrocarbon shows. An extensive geochemical survey in the vicinity of Vernon Field, covering much of Isabella County, has produced a base map for interpretation of anomalies in Michigan. Several potential new anomalies were discovered that could be further investigated.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III  

SciTech Connect

In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field.

Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of the study was to test a new analytical technique, Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME), for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. This involved measuring the effectiveness of SPME to extract hydrocarbons under controlled conditions in the laboratory. As part of the study, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the laboratory results. Presented in this quarterly report is the condensed version of the Case History and Well Summary for the Bear Lake area in Manistee County, Michigan. The full version will be in the annual report. The condensed case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and horizontal lateral for Bear Lake, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Potential Impacts of Desalination Concentrate on Salinity of Irrigation Water: A Case Study in the El Paso Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Winter returnflow has not been fully utilized for crop irrigation in the El Paso Valley. There are, however, emerging interests in utilizing it for urban water supply through desalting. This study examined the potential impact of concentrate discharge on salinity, sodicity, and ionic composition of irrigation water supply, using historical or published records. The analyses performed consisted of the estimate of riverflow rates on river water quality, a review of concentrate and permeate quality from nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO), and the impacts of dilution or blending on water quality. Riverflow and quality data from the U.S. Section, International Boundary and Water Commission (US-IBWC) were examined first. This analysis has shown that salinity and ionic composition of riverflow can be described by a simple power function as related to the momentary riverflow rate when water samples were taken for chemical analyses. This method provides more accurate estimates of monthly salinity than the use of monthly average flow which has a high degree of variation. In addition, this approximation technique allows for the estimation of river salinity and ionic compositions at any riverflow rates of interest. A review of published articles on NF processes indicates that there are essentially two types of membranes: one has a low rejection rate for Na and Cl, and the other has a high rejection rate. If the objective is to minimize Na and Cl ions while maximizing Ca and Mg concentrations in the concentrate, the first type is preferred. However, the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) of concentrate from the first type of NF membrane is also influenced by feed water quality. Typically, the SAR of the concentrate does not change appreciably in water that is rich in SO4, as the rejection rate of SO4 is high, and SO4 ions remain in the concentrate along with accompanying cations. The SAR of the concentrate is not necessarily lower than that of feed water, due to the salt concentration effect on SAR. The SAR value which directly impacts the cation exchange reaction in soils decreases with dilution, but increases due to the increased formation of sulfate-divalent cation ion-pairs. Sodicity of the concentrate from the second type is higher than the sodicity of feed water or that of the concentrate from the first type, and approaches the concentrate composition from a RO process. The most significant changes that take place in the concentrate composition from the first type are an increase in TDS and divalent cations and anions, whereas sodicity and chloride concentrations remain more or less the same as those of feed water. Permeate from the first type of NF membrane is likely to be higher in Na, Cl, and TDS than from the second type. These elevated salt levels limit the opportunity for blending with the river water, which has elevated salinity and SO4 concentrations, especially at a low riverflow of 5 Mm3/mo or less. Sodicity and the concentrations of Na and Cl in the permeate could also exceed the unofficial water quality guidelines for irrigating urban landscape. If the RO process or the second type of NF membrane is used, the permeate can be blended with river water at nearly a 1:1 ratio. This means that a lesser quantity of water needs to be treated when a RO process is used. If river water high in Na and Cl concentrations is used for blending, the salt load of the concentrate from the NF process can actually be greater than that from the RO process, because of the limited blending possibility. If the NF option is to be retained, a NF membrane with some rejection of Cl ions may be warranted, unless blending water low in Cl is available at or near the site. Assuming that flow and salinity monitoring data at the Courchesne Bridge are realistic, the disposal of NF concentrate from 5 and 10 MGD membrane processes at a riverflow rate of 5 Mm3/mo may increase salinity of riverwater by around 7 and 16%, respectively, over the existing salinity. This estimate is for a NF membrane with a low

Miyamoto, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Plant response to Na/sup +/, K/sup +/ and K/sup +//Na/sup +/ ratios under saline conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was undertaken to more clearly determine plant response to saline-sodic waters. In the first experiment, the response of wheat and sorghum to different K/sup +//Na/sup +/ ratios at different osmotic potentials was investigated. The plants were grown in outdoor solution culture tanks containing polyethylene glycol and/or NaCl as osmoticum with 1/2 strength Hoagland as the base nutrient solution. The mass of the root system for both wheat and sorghum was determined primarily by the osmotic potential. However, root elongation was controlled primarily by the Na/sup +/ concentration. Sorghum root elongation rates decreased with increasing Na/sup +/ while those for wheat increased. Sodium was not translocated out of the sorghum root system until a critical Na/sup +/ root saturation level of .6 moles/kg was obtained. The second experiment was designed to investigate the water, nutrient and growth responses of the second crop of wheat in a wheat-sorghum-wheat rotation to zonal saline-sodic conditions.

Devitt, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect

A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Response of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Karenia brevis to Current and Projected Environmental Conditions: Salinity and Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasing in frequency and duration worldwide. Karenia brevis, the major toxic dinoflagellate in the Gulf of Mexico, produces potent neurotoxins, known as brevetoxins. For K. brevis, only minor concentrations of brevetoxins are needed to induce toxicity and environmental conditions appear to have the most direct impact on the cellular content of these toxins. A better understanding of K. brevis biology is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying toxin production and the ecology of such HABs, as well as to better anticipate and respond to such blooms. Here we present findings on the effect of salinity and availability of carbon on cellular physiology and brevetoxin and brevenal production by K. brevis. When grown at salinities of 35 and 27, but otherwise identical conditions, total brevetoxin cellular concentration varied between 0 to 18.5 pg cell-1 and brevenal varied between 0 and 1 pg cell-1. In response to hypoosmotic stress brevetoxin production was triggered, as a result, brevetoxin production increased up to 53%, while growth rates remained unchanged. A significant hypoosmotic event of >11%, was needed to trigger the response in brevetoxin production. To determine if K. brevis was sensing changes in specific ions within seawater (K+, Cl- or Ca2+), we systematically removed one ion while keeping the remaining ions at equivalent molar concentration for salinity of 35. Dilution in seawater K+ concentrations triggered the production of brevetoxins, increasing production ?44%. Ecosystem changes due to climate change have increased the production of toxins in other HAB species; here we examined the impact on K. brevis. We have shown that modification of pCO2 level and temperature did not influence brevetoxin production; however, predicted climate change scenarios (increased temperature and pCO2) did significantly increase the growth rate of K. brevis, by 60% at 25°C and 55% at 30°C. We suggest that K. brevis blooms could benefit from predicted increase in pCO2 over the next 100 years. Overall, our findings close a critical gap in knowledge regarding the function of brevetoxin in K. brevis by identifying a connection between brevetoxin production and osmoacclimation.

Errera, Reagan Michelle

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Geochemistry of U and Th and its Influence on the Origin and Evolution of the Crust of Earth and the Biological Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the migration behaviors of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) in Earth and other terrestrial planets. Theoretical models of U and Th migration have been proposed. These models suggest that the unique features of Earth are closely connected with its unique U and Th migration models and distribution patterns. In the Earth, U and Th can combine with oxidative volatile components and water, migrate up to the asthenosphere position to form an enrichment zone (EZ) of U and Th first, and then migrate up further to the crusts through magmatism and metamorphism. We emphasize that the formation of an EZ of U, Th and other heat-producing elements is a prerequisite for the formation of a plate tectonic system. The heat-producing elements, currently mainly U and Th, in the EZ are also the energy sources that drive the formation and evolution of the crust of Earth and create special granitic continental crusts. In other terrestrial planets, including Mercury, Venus, and Mars, an EZ can not be formed because of a lack of oxidative volatile components and water. For this reason, a plate tectonic system can not been developed in these planets. We also emphasize the influence of U and Th in EZ on the development and evolution of life on Earth. We propose that since the Earth and planets were born in a united solar system, there should be some common mechanisms to create the similarities and differences between them. We have tried to develop an integrated view to explain some problems in the tectonics of Earth and evolution, bio-evolution, and planetary dynamics through U and Th geochemistry. We believe that a comprehensive exploration on energy sources and their evolution is a good way to build bridges between different disciplines of science in order to better understand the Earth and planets.

Xuezhao Bao; Ali Zhang

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTRY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. A major part of the remaining project will focus on using surface geochemistry to delineate prospects. A Niagaran reef field geochemical survey, the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan is scheduled to take place this summer. Previous wells drilled in Bagley Prospect area in the early 1970's and in place in late 2002 and early 2003 resulted in discoveries and numerous hydrocarbon shows in the Brown Niagaran reservoir interval. The Bagley region is still considered an area of interest by the industry and appears ripe for a geochemical survey. Our industry partner is interested in a possible test in the Bagley prospect because subsurface geophysical and geological interpretation indicates the presence of structures. Anomalous production and pressure data further suggest the region is not yet well understood and should not be considered mature. The most recent well, the Bagley 1-22A sidetrack, was unsuccessful at locating a new reef culmination to the south of the original vertical well and did not encounter hydrocarbon shows. The sidetrack and well were plugged and abandoned. The proposed geochemical survey will concentrate on areas away from the Bagley 1-22A to the north and west but will include the entire prospect so that the existing data can be used in interpretations. Bagley appears to offer a unique combination of potential and data for a geochemical study that focuses on looking for new oil in an area that has exhausted traditional geologic and geophysical methods. The Bear Lake pinnacle reef trend in Manistee County, Michigan, is also scheduled for further geochemical work this summer. Industry interest, mostly by small companies, is picking up in this area and it is also ripe for targeted geochemical surveys for the same reasons cited above.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Evaluation of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir. Part I. Heat extraction performance and modeling. Part II. Flow characteristics and geochemistry. Part III. Reservoir characterization using acoustic techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On May 28, 1977, as the production well GT-2 at Fenton Hill was being redrilled along a planned trajectory, it intersected a low-impedance hydraulic fracture in direct communication with the injection well, EE-1. Thus, a necessary prerequisite for a full-scale test of the LASL Hot Dry Rock Concept, that of establishing a high flow rate between wells at low wellhead differential pressures, was satisified. Full-scale operation of the loop occurred for 75 days from January 27 to April 12, 1978. This test is referred to as Phase 1, Segment 2 and was designed to examine the thermal drawdown, flow characteristics, water losses, and fluid geochemistry of the system in detail. Results of these studies are the major topic of this paper which is divided into three separate parts covering first the heat extraction performance, second the flow characteristics and geochemistry and third the use of acoustic techniques to describe the geometry of the fracture system. In the third section, dual-well acoustic measurements used to detect fractures are described. These measurements were made using modified Dresser Atlas logging tools. Signals intersecting hydraulic fractures in the reservoir under both hydrostatic and pressurized conditions were simultaneously detected in both wells. Signal attenuation and characteristic waveforms can be used to describe the extent of fractured rock in the reservoir.

Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Tester, J.W.; Albright, J.N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

An Event in Water Exchange between Continental Shelf and the Kuroshio off Southern Japan: Lagrangian Tracking of a Low-Salinity Water Mass on the Kuroshio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-salinity water masses were occasionally observed in spring and summer on the surface of the Kuroshio, south of Japan. Many of the masses were accompanied by excessive discharge of fresh water from major rivers in southern Japan and were ...

Norihisa Imasato; Bo Qiu

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Model for the Thickness and Salinity of the Upper Layer in the Arctic Ocean and the Relationship between the Ice Thickness and Some External Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a dynamical model for the salinity and thickness of the upper layer in the Arctic. The parameters are the river runoff to the Arctic, the buoyancy supply through the Bering Strait, the export of ice from the Arctic and a ...

Anders Stigebrandt

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the primary storage forma- tion, the overlying Eau Claire Shale (henceforth referred to as Eau Claire properties: (1) an upper unit of sandstone and shale that was tidally influenced and deposited, (2) a thick of the Maquoketa Shale (Hart et al. 2006; Eaton et al. 2007). In Situ Temperature and Salinity Profiles Many

Zhou, Quanlin

240

Post-injection spreading and trapping of CO[subscript 2] in saline aquifers: impact of the plume shape at the end of injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use an analytical model for the post-injection spreading of a plume of CO[subscript 2] in a saline aquifer under the action of buoyancy and capillary trapping to show that the spreading behavior is at all times strongly ...

Juanes, Ruben

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mating behaviour, epibiotic growth, and the effect of salinity on grooming activity in the hermaphroditic shrimp Lysmata wurdemanni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many species of caridean shrimp are protandrous hermaphrodites, maturing initially as males but developing into females as they age and grow. A unique sexual system was recently discovered in the peppermint shrimp, Lysmata wurdemanni. In this species, individuals are initially male, but become simultaneous functional hermaphrodites over time. As in most caridean shrimp, L. wurdemanni can mate as a male during the intermoult period, but can reproduce through female function for only a short period after moulting. Ecdysis does not occur en masse in this species, and thus the operational sex ratio found in populations of L. wurdemanni is extremely male-biased. Sexual selection theory suggests that these conditions will result in increased competition for access to mates. Evolutionary pressures should therefore have selected for mechanisms that permit individuals to quickly identify and locate potential mating partners. L. wurdemanni were exposed to chemical stimuli collected from recently moulted conspecifics of varying reproductive condition. Test animals were able to distinguish among the different conditions, and physically manipulated only the plastic nozzle used to pump solutions collected from shrimp with ovaries filled with vitellogenic oocytes. It was subsequently hypothesized that methyl farnesoate, a hormone associated with ovarian maturation in crustaceans, might be a key component of sex pheromones used by L. wurdemanni. However, a series of methyl farnesoate concentrations did not elicit responses, indicating this species does not use this hormone alone when determining reproductive condition. Reproductive behaviour in L. wurdemanni was observed to differ both before and after copulation, as well as with increasing population density. Intermoult individuals were more likely to approach, follow and remain in the vicinity of a near-moult shrimp before mating could occur, and under high density conditions. The near-moult shrimp approached conspecifics only under low density conditions, and performed rapid escape behaviours only after copulation had occurred. The unusual occurrence of epibiota upon L. wurdemanni was described, and the location, size and age of barnacles quantified. The effect of salinity upon grooming activities was tested. Results indicated that carapace grooming was depressed at low salinities, and could account for the considerable epibiota found in this region.

Giri, Tuhin

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric...

243

Coalbed Methane Resources in the Powder River Basin: Lithologic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Wyoming and North Dakota. Specifically, the analysis looked at: total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high-pressure methane adsorption isotherm data from 963 cored coal samples...

244

Mechanical properties and modeling of seal-forming lithologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specific goals and accomplishments of this research include: (1) The evaluation of models of salt diaper ascent that involve either power law, dislocation creep as determined experimentally by Horseman et al. (1993) or linear, fluid-assisted creep as reported by Spiers et al. (1988, 1990, 1992). We have compared models assuming these two, experimentally evaluated flow laws and examined the predictions they make regarding diaper incubation periods, ascent velocities, deviatoric stresses and strain rates. (2) The evaluation of the effects of differential loading on the initiation an of salt structures. (3) Examination of the role of basement faults on the initiation and morphologic evolution of salt structures. (4) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of shale as a function of pressure and determination of the nature of its brittle-ductile transition. (5) Evaluation of the mechanical anisotropies of shales with varying concentrations, distributions and preferred orientations of clay. (6) The determination of temperature and ratedependencies of strength for a shale constitutive model that can be used in numerical models that depend on viscous formulations. (7) Determination of the mechanisms of deformation for argillaceous rocks over awide range of conditions. (8) Evaluation of the effects of H[sub 2]O within clay interlayers, as adsorbed surface layers.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.; Mazariegos, R.; Ibanez, W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Implications for the creation of warm saline deep water: Late Paleocene reconstructions and global climate model simulations  

SciTech Connect

A global warming trend began during the late Paleocene that culminated in the early Eocene with the highest global temperatures of the Cenozoic. We have reconstructed late Paleocene surfacial boundary conditions and modeled atmospheric conditions using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model version II (GISS GCM II). These experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that warm saline deep water formed during the late paleocene and to understand atmospheric circulation near the beginning of a period of global warming. The warming is attributed primarily to increased sea surface temperatures at high latitudes. The sensitivity of the climate to ocean temperature was tested using two sea surface temperature distributions, each delimited latitudinally by oxygen isotope values, but with different east-west gradients. The simulations discussed here contain several features unique among warm climate experiments. The first experiment (P-1) used latitudinally constant (zonal) sea surface temperatures. The zonally distributed sea surface temperatures strengthen the general circulation of the atmosphere. In particular, Hadley Cell circulation is intensified, leading to extremes of precipitation in the equatorial region and extreme evaporation across subtropical oceans. The unusual results prompted a second experiment with modern east-west sea surface temperature gradients superimposed and referred to as P-Gradient (P-Grad). 84 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

O`Connell, S. [Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States); Chandler, M.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[Goddard Inst. of Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Ruedy, R. [Goddard Inst. of Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Solar heating and hot water system installed at Southeast of Saline, Unified School District 306, Mentor, Kansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cooperative agreement was negotiated in April 1978 for the installation of a space and domestic hot water system at Southeast of Saline, Kansas Unified School District 306, Mentor, Kansas. The solar system was installed in a new building and was designed to provide 52 percent of the estimated annual space heating load and 84 percent of the estimated annual potable hot water requirement. The collectors are liquid flat plate. They are ground-mounted and cover a total area of 5125 square feet. The system will provide supplemental heat for the school's closed-loop water-to-air heat pump system and domestic hot water. The storage medium is water inside steel tanks with a capacity of 11,828 gallons for space heating and 1,600 gallons for domestic hot water. This final report, which describes in considerable detail the solar heating facility, contains detailed drawings of the completed system. The facility was declared operational in September 1978, and has functioned successfully since.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Assessing the impacts of future demand for saline groundwater on commercial deployment of CCS in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary assessment of the potential impact that future demand for groundwater might have on the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies within the United States. A number of regions within the U.S. have populations, agriculture and industries that are particularly dependent upon groundwater. Moreover, some key freshwater aquifers are already over-utilized or depleted, and others are likely to be moving toward depletion as demand grows. The need to meet future water demands may lead some parts of the nation to consider supplementing existing supplies with lower quality groundwater resources, including brackish waters that are currently not considered sources of drinking water but which could provide supplemental water via desalination. In some areas, these same deep saline-filled geologic formations also represent possible candidate carbon dioxide (CO2) storage reservoirs. The analysis presented here suggests that future constraints on CCS deployment due to potential needs to supplement conventional water supplies by desalinating deeper and more brackish waters are likely to be necessary only in limited regions across the country, particularly in areas that are already experiencing water stress.

Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

Modeling of fate and transport of co-injection of H2S with CO2 in deep saline formations  

SciTech Connect

The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. However, costs of capture and compression of CO{sub 2} from industrial waste streams containing small quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds such as SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} are very expensive. Therefore, studies on the co-injection of CO{sub 2} containing other acid gases from industrial emissions are very important. In this paper, numerical simulations were performed to study the co-injection of H{sub 2}S with CO{sub 2} in sandstone and carbonate formations. Results indicate that the preferential dissolution of H{sub 2}S gas (compared with CO{sub 2} gas) into formation water results in the delayed breakthrough of H{sub 2}S gas. Co-injection of H{sub 2}S results in the precipitation of pyrite through interactions between the dissolved H{sub 2}S and Fe{sup 2+} from the dissolution of Fe-bearing minerals. Additional injection of H{sub 2}S reduces the capabilities for solubility and mineral trappings of CO{sub 2} compared to the CO{sub 2} only case. In comparison to the sandstone (siliciclastic) formation, the carbonate formation is less favorable to the mineral sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Different from CO{sub 2} mineral trapping, the presence of Fe-bearing siliciclastic and/or carbonate is more favorable to the H{sub 2}S mineral trapping.

Zhang, W.; Xu, T.; Li, Y.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

A method for quick assessment of CO2 storage capacity in closedand semi-closed saline formations  

SciTech Connect

Saline aquifers of high permeability bounded by overlying/underlying seals may be surrounded laterally by low-permeability zones, possibly caused by natural heterogeneity and/or faulting. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into and storage in such 'closed' systems with impervious seals, or 'semi-closed' systems with nonideal (low-permeability) seals, is different from that in 'open' systems, from which the displaced brine can easily escape laterally. In closed or semi-closed systems, the pressure buildup caused by continuous industrial-scale CO{sub 2} injection may have a limiting effect on CO{sub 2} storage capacity, because geomechanical damage caused by overpressure needs to be avoided. In this research, a simple analytical method was developed for the quick assessment of the CO{sub 2} storage capacity in such closed and semi-closed systems. This quick-assessment method is based on the fact that native brine (of an equivalent volume) displaced by the cumulative injected CO{sub 2} occupies additional pore volume within the storage formation and the seals, provided by pore and brine compressibility in response to pressure buildup. With nonideal seals, brine may also leak through the seals into overlying/underlying formations. The quick-assessment method calculates these brine displacement contributions in response to an estimated average pressure buildup in the storage reservoir. The CO{sub 2} storage capacity and the transient domain-averaged pressure buildup estimated through the quick-assessment method were compared with the 'true' values obtained using detailed numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} and brine transport in a two-dimensional radial system. The good agreement indicates that the proposed method can produce reasonable approximations for storage-formation-seal systems of various geometric and hydrogeological properties.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Tsang, C.F.; Rutqvist, J.

2008-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Salinity Management Desalination Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the latter determined by the thickness of the spacer gaskets. Since the calcium fluoride windows were found that enables the fluid to be reused for many 100 expo- sure fields will be both necessary and possible

Scott, Christopher

251

Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Geochemistry of Delaware Basin groundwaters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluids from various formations were sampled and analyzed in order to characterize groundwaters in the Delaware Basin. Waters were analyzed for solute content and/or stable isotope ratios (D/H and /sup 18/O//sup 16/O). Three lines of geochemical arguments are summarized, in order to present the natures and probable origins of analyzed fluids: solute chemistry, thermodynamic modelling of low-temperature aqueous species, and stable isotope ratios. (JGB)

Lambert, S.J.

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Modeling Density Effects in CO2 Injection in Oil Reservoirs and A Case Study of CO2 Sequestration in a Qatari Saline Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 injection has been used to improve oil recovery for several decades. In recent years, CO2 injection has become even more attractive because of a dual effect; injection in the subsurface 1) allows reduction of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere to reduce global warming, and 2) improves the oil recovery. In this study, the density effect from CO2 dissolution in modeling of CO2 injection is examined. A method to model the increase in oil density with CO2 dissolution using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the Pedersen viscosity correlation is presented. This method is applied to model the observed increase in oil density with CO2 dissolution in a West Texas crude oil. Compositional simulation of CO2 injection was performed in a 2D vertical cross section and a 3D reservoir with the density effect. The results show that the density increase from CO2 dissolution may have a drastic effect on CO2 flow path and recovery performance. One main conclusion from this work is that there is a need to have accurate density data for CO2/oil mixtures at different CO2 concentrations to ensure successful CO2 injection projects. While CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is part of the solution, saline aquifers have the largest potential for CO2 sequestration. A literature review of the CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers is performed. The dominant trapping mechanisms and transport processes and the methods used to model them are discussed in detail. The Aruma aquifer, a shallow saline aquifer in southwest Qatar is used as a case study for CO2 sequestration. A compositional simulation model is prepared for the Aruma aquifer using the available log data and flow test data. It was found that the grid size is a key parameter in modeling CO2 sequestration accurately. It affects the propagation of the CO2 plume and amount of CO2 dissolved in brine.

Ahmed, Tausif

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

DOI 10.1007/s11103-005-7876-2 Sorghum bicolor’s transcriptome response to dehydration, high salinity and ABA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genome wide changes in gene expression were monitored in the drought tolerant C4 cereal Sorghum bicolor, following exposure of seedlings to high salinity (150 mM NaCl), osmotic stress (20 % polyethylene glycol) or abscisic acid (125 lM ABA). A sorghum cDNA microarray providing data on 12 982 unique gene clusters was used to examine gene expression in roots and shoots at 3- and 27-h post-treatment. Expression of 2200 genes, including 174 genes with currently unknown functions, of which a subset appear unique to monocots and/or sorghum, was altered in response to dehydration, high salinity or ABA. The modulated sorghum genes had homology to proteins involved in regulation, growth, transport, membrane/protein turnover/repair, metabolism, dehydration protection, reactive oxygen scavenging, and plant defense. Real-time PCR was used to quantify changes in relative mRNA abundance for 333 genes that responded to ABA, NaCl or osmotic stress. Osmotic stress inducible sorghum genes identified for the first time included a beta-expansin expressed in shoots, actin depolymerization factor, inositol-3-phosphate synthase, a non-C4 NADP-malic enzyme, oleosin, and three genes homologous to 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase that may be involved in ABA biosynthesis. Analysis of response profiles demonstrated the

Christina D. Buchanan; Sanghyun Lim; Ron A. Salzman; Ioannis Kagiampakis; Daryl T. Morishige; Brock D. Weers; Robert R. Klein; Lee H. Pratt; Marie-miche Le; Patricia E. Klein; John E. Mullet

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Interpretation of drill cuttings from geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems in interpreting drill cuttings, as opposed to drill cores, and methods to solve these problems are outlined. The following are covered: identification of lithology; recognition of faults and fractures; interpretation of hydrothermal alteration; geochemistry; sample collection; sample preparple examination; and sample storage. (MHR)

Hulen, J.B.; Sibbett, B.S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO2-EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO 2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO 2 -EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas -- W. Lynn Watney and Jason Rush Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting October 15-17, 2011 Pittsburgh, PA Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000441 Contract #FE0006821 $11,484,499 DOE $3.236 million cost share KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 12/2/2011 1 Outline * Background * The Participants * The Plan * Leveraging Current Research at Wellington Field * Inject, Monitor, Verification, and Accounting of CO 2 2 ORGANIZATION CHART Kansas Geological Survey Name Project Job Title Primary Responsibility Lynn Watney Project Leader, Joint Principal Investigator

257

DOE/EA-1482: Environmental Assessment for Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations (October 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82 82 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT EXPERIMENT FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN SALINE AQUIFER BRINE FORMATIONS FRIO FORMATION, LIBERTY COUNTY, TEXAS OCTOBER 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ii iii National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for a field test of the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin, under contract with DOE, has studied the potential for sequestration of CO 2 in geologic formations of the United States as part of a broader series of DOE-sponsored research projects to

258

Effect of irrigation water salinity and sodicity and water table position on water table chemistry beneath Atriplex lentiformis and Hordeum marinum  

SciTech Connect

Coal bed methane (CBM) extraction in Montana and Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) produces large quantities of modestly saline-sodic water. This study assessed effects of irrigation water quality and water table position on water chemistry of closed columns, simulating a perched or a shallow water table. The experiment assessed the potential salt loading in areas where shallow or perched water tables prevent leaching or where artificial drainage is not possible. Water tables were established in sand filled PVC columns at 0.38, 0.76, and1.14 m below the surface, after which columns were planted to one of three species, two halophytic Atriplex spp. and Hordeum marinum Huds. (maritime barley), a glycophyte. As results for the two Atriplex ssp. did not differ much, only results from Atriplex lentiformis (Torn) S. Wats. (big saltbush) and H. marinum are presented. Irrigation water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) (electrolytic conductivity (EC) = 0.19 Sm{sup -1}, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) = 3.5) or CBM water (EC = 0.35 Sm-1, SAR = 10.5). Continuous irrigation with CBM and PR water led to salt loading over time, the extent being proportional to the salinity and sodicity of applied water. Water in columns planted to A. lentiformis with water tables maintained at 0.38 m depth had greater EC and SAR values than those with 0.76 and 1.14 m water table positions. Elevated EC and SAR values most likely reflect the shallow rooted nature of A. lentiformis, which resulted in enhanced ET with the water table close to the soil surface.

Browning, L.S.; Bauder, J.W.; Phelps, S.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{sub 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.

Zhang, Wei; Li, Yilian; Xu, Tianfu; Cheng, Huilin; Zheng, Yan; Xiong, Peng

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

The effects of Biozyme on the germination and emergence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds under suboptimal temperatures, pesticide overdose, and salinity stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of Biozyme-, a commercial germination stimulant, on the germination and emergence of bean and sweet corn seeds, treated with four levels of Carbofuran and Chlorothalonil, and grown under suboptimal temperatures, was evaluated. Field experiments consisted of two plantings that provided suboptimal temperatures during emergence. Pesticide overdoses caused significant detrimental effects to all emerging seedlings. These effects were magnified under the low temperatures of the first planting. BiozymeTm improved the performance of sweet corn in both plantings. In beans, however, BiozymeTm had negative effects in the first planting, while proving beneficial in the second planting. Growth chamber experiments included, additionally, four levels of salinity. Increasing salinity levels caused decreases in most of the parameters evaluated. Low temperature decreased most growth parameters and in combination with salinity acted synergistically to cause a greater detrimental effect. Pesticide treatment decreased most growth parameters, with the exception of root growth. Sweet corn had a greater tolerance to low temperatures and salinity than beans; however, it proved to be more sensitive to pesticide overdoses. These factors in combination had greater detrimental effects on sweet corn percent germination than each factor alone. Suboptimal temperatures reduced percent germination and germination rate, and increased the time to 50% germination. Mgh salinity levels combined with low temperatures acted synergystically on rate and percent germination. Biozyme increased percent germination, but did not hasten germination rate or days to 50% germination. Biozyme treatment of bean seeds helped them overcome pesticide overdose stress. Aerobic respiration was measured 48 h after imbibition. Respiration rate of bean and sweet corn seeds was reduced by pesticide overdose and decreasing temperatures. Respiratory quotient decreased as temperature decreased and increased as pesticide levels increased. Biozyme-decreased bean respiratory quotient and increased sweet corn respiratory quotient. The increase in the respiratory quotient of bean and sweet corn seeds with increasing levels of pesticide suggests an increase in C02 evolution through a pathway that does not increase O2 uptake.

Campos Cruz, Armando

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Role of crude-oil components in surfactant interaction. [Effect of acids, bases and heavy ends hydrocarbons (alkanes) on the solubilization, optimal salinity and interfacial tension of surfactant systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three crude oils from Bell Creek, Bradford, and Delaware-Childers fields were separated into distillates, acids, bases and heavy ends hydrocarbon. The effect of these components on the solubilization, optimal salinity, and bases shifted the optimal salinity significantly; their effects on the solubilization and interfacial tension are smaller. The bases appear to interact with the sulfonates, causing desorption from the interface, phase separation, and higher interfacial tension. The hydrocarbons, as expected have the strongest influence on the properties studied, due to their high concentration. The importance of the chemical nature and molecular weights of these components was also apparent. Even though the product sigma*/sup 2/..gamma.. is not constant, it was found that there is a definite relation between the solubilization (sigma*) and the interfacial tension (..gamma..). This is true even for such complex compounds as acids and bases. 41 references, 6 figures, 14 tables.

Tham, M.K.; Lorenz, P.B.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation  

SciTech Connect

The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

Doughty, C.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geochemistry and petrology of surface samples, six boreholes and brines from the Salton Sea geothermal field: A natural analog of a nuclear waste repository in salt: Report No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cuttings from six wells in the Salton Sea geothermal field, and rocks at outcrop that are correlative in age with those encountered at depth in the wells were analyzed in detail. Mineralogy, petrography, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, instrumental neutron activation analysis, fission track radiography, oxygen and stable carbon isotopic, uranium-thorium series disequilibrium, and fluid inclusion analyses are reported. Where fluids were being produced from wells, brine chemistry as well as stable isotope and uranium-thorium series analyses are reported. Particular attention has been paid to defining zones of fluid-rock interaction in which analyses of coexisting geothermal reservoir brine and hydrothermally altered sediments could be acquired. A wide span of temperatures, from surficial to greater than 300/degree/C, and salinities ranging from relatively dilute ground waters up to brines of 25 wt% total dissolved solids, span a range of environments that might be encountered in a waste repository in salt. Progressive hydrothermal alteration, mineral formation and element mobility are documented in the data presented. 52 refs., 25 figs., 49 tabs.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

SHIP3QARD ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY JOIDES RESOLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Site 681, 601b-602b Trujillo Basin, 601b-602b steroidal, Pisco Basin W, 541b-542b Aleutian margin, vein

265

Gas geochemistry of the Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in gas concentrations in Central and Southeast Geysers steam are related to the decreases in pressure caused by heavy exploitation in the 1980s. When reservoir pressures in the central parts of the field decreased, high-gas steam from undrilled reservoir margins (and possibly from underlying high-temperature zones) flowed into exploited central areas. The Northwest Geysers reservoir probably lacks high-gas marginal steam and a decline in pressure may not cause a significant increase of gas concentrations in produced steam.

Truesdell, A.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geochemistry of Aluminum in High Temperature Brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

geothermal industry to predict the chemistry ofthe reservoirs; these calculations will be tested for reliability against our laboratory results and field observations. Moreover, based on the success of the experimental methods developed in this program, we intend to use our unique high temperature pH easurement capabilities to make kinetic and equilibrium studies of pH-dependent aluminosilicate transformation reactions and other pH-dependent heterogeneous reactions.

Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

267

Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

Patrick Longmire

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Characterization Well R-7 Geochemistry Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for four groundwater-sampling rounds conducted at characterization well R-7. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine if contaminants from Technical Area (TA)-2 and TA-21 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Figure 1.0-1 shows the well's location in the narrow upper part of Los Alamos Canyon, between the inactive Omega West reactor and the mouth of DP Canyon. Well R-7 is in an excellent location to characterize the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in both perched groundwater and the regional aquifer near sites of known Laboratory effluent release, including radionuclides and inorganic chemicals (Stone et al. 2002, 72717). The Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship-Remediation (RRES-R) Program (formerly the Environmental Restoration [ER] Project) installed well R-7 as part of groundwater investigations to satisfy requirements of the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599) and to support the Laboratory's ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (LANL 1996, 70215). Well R-7 was designed primarily to provide geochemical or water quality and hydrogeologic data for the regional aquifer within the Puye Formation. This report also presents a geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for well R-7 and provides hydrogeochemical interpretations using analytical results for groundwater samples collected at the well. Discussion of other hydrogeochemical data collected within the east-central portion of the Laboratory, however, is deferred until they can be evaluated in the context of sitewide information collected from other RRES and Hydrogeologic Workplan characterization wells (R-8A, R-9, and R-9i). Once all deep groundwater investigations in the east-central portion of the Laboratory are completed, geochemical and hydrogeologic conceptual models for the Los Alamos Canyon watershed may be included in a groundwater risk analysis. These models will include an evaluation of potential contaminant transport pathways. Well R-7 was completed on March 9, 2001, with three screens (363.2 to 379.2 ft, 730.4 to 746.4 ft, and 895.5 to 937.4 ft). Screen No.2 was dry during characterization sampling. Four rounds of groundwater characterization samples, collected from a perched zone and the regional aquifer from depths of 378.0 ft (screen No.1) and 915.0 ft (screen No.3), were chemically characterized for radionuclides, metals and trace elements, major ions, high-explosive (HE) compounds, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, organic compounds, and stable isotopes (H, N, and O). Although well R-7 is primarily a characterization well, its design and construction also meet the requirements of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant monitoring well as described in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document ''RCRA Groundwater Monitoring: Draft Technical Guidance,'' November 1992, EPA 530-R-93- 001. Incorporation of this well into a Laboratory-wide groundwater-monitoring program will be considered, and more specifically evaluated (e.g., sampling frequency, analytes, etc.), when the results of the well R-7 characterization activities are comprehensively evaluated in conjunction with other groundwater investigations in the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599).

P.Longmire; F.Goff

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

GELISOLS GEOCHEMISTRY OF SNOW AND ICE ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and poses a serious risk to dam stability (Richardson and Reynolds, 2000b). Average rates of subsidence due to melting of buried ice in the moraine dam at Imja.

270

Geochemistry of Hydrofluoric Acid in Kaolinitic Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document explores the geochemical reactions likely to occur when hydrofluoric acid is spilled on Savannah River Site (SRS) soil. In particular, we evaluate the potential of environmental damage from a one-time release of concentrated hydrofluoric acid into a trench. According to interviews with personnel involved, sometime between 1955 and 1960 drums of 50-60 per cent hydrofluoric acid were disposed in a trench in the Central Shops area. The method of disposal suggests that most of the acid would have been released at the time of burial. No evidence of drum disposal or acidic pH values was found. Therefore, the Soil and Groundwater Closure Projects group requested that we evaluate potential risk by examining the major geochemical interactions expected between hydrofluoric acid and soil. The geochemical calculations in this report were done with The Geochemist's Workbench (Registered). This program uses an extended Debye-Huckel method for calculating activity coefficients. The conclusions of this report are accurate, but some of the intermediate steps may have higher uncertainty. Hydrofluoric acid disposed in a trench in the area would have reacted with soil kaolinite to neutralize the pH to a value of about 4.2. Based on conservative assumptions, this would have occurred within the top 500 cm of soil. This analysis considers only the reaction of the acid with kaolinite. Other processes such as dilution, dispersion, and clogging of permeability would contribute to neutralization of the acid within a shorter distance. When the acid solution reached the water table, dilution would have driven the solution to saturation with gibbsite. A resulting layer enriched in aluminum may be the only remnant of the acid disposal identifiable today. However, any such layer would be difficult to identify because of the normally high aluminum concentrations in the soil. Subtle textural evidence of shallow soil dissolution may be present, but 40 years of rainfall infiltration may well have erased such evidence.

DENHAM, MILES

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

MARK E. CONRAD Center for Isotope Geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gold property in the Mother Lode of California. Exploration Geologist (Anaconda Minerals Company; 6

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

272

Petroleum geochemistry of the Zala basin, Hungary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Zala basin is a subbasin within the Pannonian basis on Hungary. Oil and smaller amounts of gas are produced from Upper Triassic through Miocene reservoirs. Our geochemical study of oils and rocks in the basin indicate that two, and possibly three, genetic oil types are present in the basin. Miocene source rocks, previously believed by explorationists to be the predominant source rock, have expelled minor amounts of hydrocarbons. The main source rock is the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian) Koessen Marl Formation or its stratigraphic equivalent. Oils derived from the Triassic source rock are recognizable by their isotopic and biological marker composition, and high content of metals. In other areas of Europe, Upper Triassic source rocks have been correlated with large oil accumulations (e.g., Molassa and Villafortuna fields, Po basin, and other fields in Italy) or are postulated to be good potential source rocks (e.g., Bristol channel Trough). Knowledge of the geochemical characteristics of oils derived from these Upper Triassic source rocks and understanding of the source rock distribution and maturation history are important for recognizing Triassic oil-source bed relationships and for further exploration in other basins in Hungary and other parts of Europe where Triassic source rocks are present.

Clayton, J.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Koncz, I. (Hungarian Oil and Gas Corp., Nagykanizsa (Hungary))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

EMSL Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactions at Complex Environmental Interfaces ... 8 5.1 Electron transfer mechanisms through microbial cellular membranes ......

274

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Hydraulic Fracture Optimization with a Pseudo-3D Model in Multi-layered Lithology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing is a technique to accelerate production and enhance ultimate recovery of oil and gas while fracture geometry is an important aspect in hydraulic fracturing design and optimization. Systematic design procedures are available based on the so-called two-dimensional models (2D) focus on the optimization of fracture length and width, assuming one can estimate a value for fracture height, while so-called pseudo three dimensional (p-3D) models suitable for multi-layered reservoirs aim to maximize well production by optimizing fracture geometry, including fracture height, half-length and width at the end of the stimulation treatment. The proposed p-3D approach to design integrates four parts: 1) containment layers discretization to allow for a range of plausible fracture heights, 2) the Unified Fracture Design (UFD) model to calculate the fracture half-length and width, 3) the PKN or KGD models to predict hydraulic fracture geometry and the associated net pressure and other treatment parameters, and, finally, 4) Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) to calculate fracture height. The aim is to find convergence of fracture height and net pressure. Net pressure distribution plays an important role when the fracture is propagating in the reservoir. In multi-layered reservoirs, the net pressure of each layer varies as a result of different rock properties. This study considers the contributions of all layers to the stress intensity factor at the fracture tips to find the final equilibrium height defined by the condition where the fracture toughness equals the calculated stress intensity factor based on LEFM. Other than maximizing production, another obvious application of this research is to prevent the fracture from propagating into unintended layers (i.e. gas cap and/or aquifer). Therefore, this study can aid fracture design by pointing out: (1) Treating pressure needed to optimize fracture geometry, (2) The containment top and bottom layers of a multi-layered reservoir, (3) The upwards and downwards growth of the fracture tip from the crack center.

Yang, Mei

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Hybrid optimization for lithologic inversion and time-lapse monitoring using a binary formulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problems (Green 1975; Last & Kubik 1983; Guillen & Menichetti 1984; Oldenburg et al. 1998). The interface

277

Bayesian Lithology/Fluid Inversion Constrained by Rock Physics Depth Trends and a Markov Random Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are mixtures of clay and quartz, and the fluids are gas and brine. Let tx {SandGas, SandBrine, Shale1, Shale2}. Shale1 and Shale2 have different clay volume. Estimation of the global likelihood parameters is also

Eidsvik, Jo

278

Bayesian Seismic Lithology/Fluid Prediction Kjartan Rimstad, Henning Omre, & Per Avseth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-wave (m/s) 2000 2500 Density (kg/m3 ) SandGas SandOil SandBrine Shale #12;North Sea Global parameters-gas sand-oil sand-brine shale Well 6 obs. Well 1 obs. Time(ms) 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 2020 2040 2060 2080 pred. Well 5 pred. Well 2 pred. Well 4 pred. sand-gas sand-oil sand-brine shale Well 6 obs. Well 1 obs

Eidsvik, Jo

279

Lithologic descriptions and temperature profiles of five wells in the southwestern Valles caldera region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have been well constrained with the use of data from the VC-1, AET-4, WC 23-4, PC-1 and PC-2 wells. Data from these wells indicate that thermal gradients west of the caldera margin are between 110 and 140)degrees)C/km, with a maximum gradient occurring in the bottom of PC-1 equal to 240)degrees)C/km as a result of thermal fluid flow. Gradients within the caldera reach a maximum of 350)degrees)C/km, while the maximum thermal gradient measured southwest of the caldera in the thermal outflow plume is 140)degrees)C/km. The five wells exhibit high thermal gradients (>60)deghrees)C/km) resulting from high conductive heat flow associated with the Rio Grande rift and volcanism in the Valles caldera, as well as high convective heat flow associated with circulating geothermal fluids. Gamma logs run in four of the five wells appear to be of limited use for stratigraphic correlations in the caldera region. However, stratigraphic and temperature data from the five wells provide information about the structure and thermal regime of the southern and western Valles caldera region. 29 refs., 9 figs. 2 tabs.

Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Miles, D.; Waibel, A.; Swanberg, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Lithology and hydrothermal alteration determination from well logs for the Cerro Prieto Wells, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to examine the characteristics of geophysical well logs against the sand-shale series of the sedimentary column of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico. The study shows that the changes in mineralogy of the rocks because of hydrothermal alteration are not easily detectable on the existing logs. However, if the behavior of clay minerals alone is monitored, the onset of the hydrothermally altered zones may be estimated from the well logs. The effective concentration of clay-exchange cations, Q/sub v/, is computed using the data available from conventional well logs. Zones indicating the disappearance of low-temperature clays are considered hydrothermally altered formations with moderate to high-permeability and temperature, and suitable for completion purposes.

Ershaghi, I.; Ghaemian, S.; Abdassah, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Modeling CO2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial,

282

Isotope GeochemistryIsotope Geochemistry Isotopes do not fractionate during partial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, due to U and Th decay The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb #12;The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb µ = 238U/204Pb Primeval lead (Isotope ratios of Pb tT t eea Pb Pb -µ+= 30.90 204 206 == a Pb Pb i 29.100 204 207 == b Pb Pb i #12;The isotope geology

Siebel, Wolfgang

283

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water  

SciTech Connect

At its most basic level, the injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites involves a system comprising the wellbore and the target reservoir. The wellbore is the only conduit available to emplace CO{sub 2} into reservoirs for long-term storage. At the same time, wellbores in general have been identified as the most likely conduit for CO{sub 2} and brine leakage from geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites, especially those in sedimentary basins with historical hydrocarbon production. We have developed a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO{sub 2} injection and leakage through wellbores. The model describes the following processes: (1) upward or downward wellbore flow of CO{sub 2} and variable salinity water with transition from supercritical to gaseous CO{sub 2} including Joule-Thomson cooling, (2) exsolution of CO{sub 2} from the aqueous phase as pressure drops, and (3) cross flow into or interaction with layers of surrounding rock (reservoirs). We use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO{sub 2}-water mixtures under different flow regimes and interacting with surrounding rock. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme. This manual provides instructions for compilation and use of the new model, and presents some example problems to demonstrate its use.

Pan, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

USDA SALINITY CONTROL ENVI RONMENTAL ASSESSMENT .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality samples. Their assistance in interpreting laboratory test results and reviewing results/ Alternative 2 - Improve canal. pipeline and lateral system onfarm irrigation systems and install erosion Physiography and Geology The Moapa Valley Subevaluation Unit ;s in the Basin and Range Province and elevations

286

Geochemical and Petrological Investigations into Mantle Minerals from Experiments and Natural Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in stable isotope geochemistry. Geochimica et Cosmochimicafor high-temperature geochemistry if relevant fractionationstatistical method to geochemistry. International Geology

Macris, Catherine Amy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data for the spatial delineation of lithology and fluid units of deepwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manuscript received December 22, 2005; published onlineAugust 7, 2006. 1 Chevron Energy Technology Company 77002. E-mail: auturocontreras@chevron.com. 2 University of Texas at Austin, Department of Petroleum

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

289

Mechanical properties and modeling of seal-forming lithologies. Technical progress report No. 3, March 15, 1992--June 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Specific goals and accomplishments of this research include: (1) The evaluation of models of salt diaper ascent that involve either power law, dislocation creep as determined experimentally by Horseman et al. (1993) or linear, fluid-assisted creep as reported by Spiers et al. (1988, 1990, 1992). We have compared models assuming these two, experimentally evaluated flow laws and examined the predictions they make regarding diaper incubation periods, ascent velocities, deviatoric stresses and strain rates. (2) The evaluation of the effects of differential loading on the initiation an of salt structures. (3) Examination of the role of basement faults on the initiation and morphologic evolution of salt structures. (4) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of shale as a function of pressure and determination of the nature of its brittle-ductile transition. (5) Evaluation of the mechanical anisotropies of shales with varying concentrations, distributions and preferred orientations of clay. (6) The determination of temperature and ratedependencies of strength for a shale constitutive model that can be used in numerical models that depend on viscous formulations. (7) Determination of the mechanisms of deformation for argillaceous rocks over awide range of conditions. (8) Evaluation of the effects of H{sub 2}O within clay interlayers, as adsorbed surface layers.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.; Mazariegos, R.; Ibanez, W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

291

Hydroprobe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroprobe Hydroprobe Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Hydroprobe Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Collection of ground water samples for geochemistry and geothermometry Thermal: Temperature measurements down to 50 m Dictionary.png Hydroprobe: An exploratory drilling technique focused on collecting geothermal fluid samples from shallow depths at relatively inexpensive costs and low environmental impact. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction A hydroprobe is a relitively inexpensive and easily portable truck mounted

292

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Stratigraphy, Mineralogy, Geochemistry, and Genesis of the Au-Rich ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Stefanie M. Brueckner, Stephen J. Piercey, Paul J. Sylvester, Larry Pilgrim, Stephanie Maloney, Darrell Hyde, George Ogilvie. On-Site Speaker ...

294

Geochemistry of clathrate-derived methane in Arctic Ocean waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

venting in the eastern Aleutian subduction zone, J. Geophys.Pacific North Pacific Aleutians Bear Island Hakon Mosby

Elliott, S.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Geochemistry of a volcanic hydrothermal system at Mount Spurr, Alaska.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mount Spurr is an ice and snow-covered andesitic volcano located at the northern extent of the Aleutian arc in south central Alaska. Previous workers have… (more)

Garchar, Laura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

THE ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF ANCIENT SEDIMENTS PART II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Nonesuch Shale Branched-Cyclic Alkane Fraction GasIII Gas Chromatograms of Surface Soudan Shale Sample (I)XLIII Gas Chromatogram of Colorado Green River Shale 11""'

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research continues to be the understanding of the complex processes of fossil fuel formation and migration. DOE funded research to date has focused on case histories'' of down-hole well profiles of light hydrocarbons, pyrograms, pyrolysis-GC and -GCMS parameters, and biomarker data from wells in the Louisiana and Texas Gulf Coasts the Alaskan North Slope. In the case of the Alaskan North Slope, geological data and one-dimensional maturation modeling have been integrated in order to better constrain possible source rocks, timing, and migration routes for oil and gas generation and expulsion processes.This period, biomarker analyses and organic petrographic analyses were completed for the Ikpikpuk well. In the case of the Gulf Coast, we have obtained a one-dimensional maturation model of the Cost B-1 well in E. Cameron field of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. The completed E. Cameron data set adds to the enigma of the Gulf Coast oils found on the continental shelf of Louisiana. If significant quantities of the oil are coming from relatively organic lean Tertiary rocks, then non-conventional'' expulsion and migration mechanisms, such as gas dissolved in oil must be invoked to explain the Gulf Coast oils reservoired on the Louisiana continental shelf. We are designing and starting to assemble a hydrous pyrolysis apparatus to follow, the laboratory, rates of generation and expulsion of sediment gases. Initiation of some new research to examine {delta}{sup 13}C of individual compounds from pyrolysis is also described. We are beginning to examine both the laboratory and field data from the Gulf Coast in the context of a Global Basin Research Network (GBRN). The purpose is to better understand subsurface fluid flow processes over geologic time in sedimentary basins and their relation to resource accumulation (i.e., petroleum and metal ores). 58 refs.

Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Eglinton, T.; Dickinson, P.; Johnson, C.; Buxton, L.; Tarafa, M.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Problem Set 1 Geochemistry 400-500, Fall 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by this reaction (per mole). Neglect electron masses. b. You've invented a cold fusion reactor that produces 4 He of significant figures. 1. Assume that all the sun's power comes from the fusion reaction combining four 1 H gas occupies 22.414 liters at STP. 2. Assume that all the sun's radiant power comes from the fusion

Holliday, Vance T.

299

Geochemistry of the Yutangba Se deposit in western Hubei, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Se ores and abandoned stone coal pile at the Yutangba Se deposit there ... of Se minerals due to secondary enrichment of selenium in the stone coal ...

300

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal springs of the appalachians  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal springs in nine areas in the Appalachians from Georgia to New York were studied in 1975 and 1976 using satellite imagery, local well and spring data, and results of current and early studies by other investigators. All the springs investigated discharge from folded and faulted sandstone or carbonate rocks in valley areas. Where geologic structure is relatively uncomplicated, ground water discharging from thermal springs probably has circulated to great depths roughly parallel to the strike of the bedding and has moved upward rapidly where a fault or faults cross the bedding. Hydrologic and chemical data suggest that most of the water discharging from warm springs in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone is derived from recharge entering and circulating through that formation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates very little is primarily water from deep circulation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates widely is warm water mixed with variable proportions of shallow-circulating cool water. Observed temperatures of the warm springs range from 18/sup 0/ to 41/sup 0/C; the highest chemical thermometer temperature is 84/sup 0/C. Agreement among observed, chalcedony, and cation temperatures of the warmest springs suggests reservoir temperatures of 30/sup 0/ to 50/sup 0/C. Dissolved helium, arsenic, potassium, and delta/sup 18/O are considered as geothermal indicators. Tritium analyses are used to calculate fractions of old and modern components of mixed waters. Computer calculations of carbonate saturation indices show (1) considerable undersaturation in silica-rock warm spring waters and (2) carbonate equilibrium in the limestone and dolomite thermal waters. Better values of saturation indices are obtained when analyzed carbon dioxide rather than field pH is used in the computer input data. A method is described for adjusting delta/sup 13/C to correct for carbon dioxide outgassing from water samples.

Hobba, W.A. Jr.; Fisher, D.W.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Chemerys, J.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measure- 15 ments. An array of conductive heat flow, conductive heat flow data indicate a general crossvalley fluid flow, where 18 seawater enters the shallow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive 23 heat flow data

Johnson, H. Paul

302

The marine geochemistry of iron and iron isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addressed questions about the Fe cycle by measuring detailed profiles and transects of Fe species in the ocean and also by exploring the use of a new tracer of Fe, Fe isotopic fractionation. In the subtropical ...

Bergquist, Bridget A., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Applications of geochemistry to problems in geothermal injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional reservoir engineering studies have, in the past, dealt mainly with interpretation of pressure transient effects in a reservoir. Present-day techniques can be used in many reservoirs to forecast with some reliability the probability, magnitude and timing of pressure interference among wells. However, forecasting fluid breakthrough from an injection well to a production well in geologically complex geothermal reservoirs is not presently possible with any reliability, and forecasting thermal breakthrough is even more difficult. In addition, the chemical effects of injection are poorly understood at present, and it is not possible to predict beforehand the full range of scaling and aquifer plugging problems that may be encountered. This report discusses development of chemical tracers specifically designed for geothermal applications so that breakthrough of injectate can be detected early, and field and laboratory studies on the chemical interactions among reservoir fluids, reservoir rocks and injected fluids so that these interactions can be quantified and models developed for predicting any degradation (or enhancement) of permeability.

Wright, P.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a plume of degassed reservoir liquid that flows southward to emerge at Growler and Morgan Hot Springs. The second cell originates SSE to SE of Lassen Peak and flows southeastward...

305

Spreadsheets for Geothermal Water and Gas Geochemistry | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and plots four common ternaries, three3 "YT" gas geothermometer grids and two gas ratio geothermometer grids, mainly derived from the work of Werner Giggenbach. Typical...

306

THE ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF ANCIENT SEDIMENTS PART II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1965) Change in Green River Oil Shale Paraffins with Depth.in the Green Hiver' Oil-Shale, as a ftmction of depth (

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Geochemistry of Sediments from the Rock Analysis Storage System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Email Unique Identifier DOI-26 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary included in metadata Data Download URL http:tin.er.usgs.govplutosoil...

308

Organic geochemistry and stable isotope constraints on Precambrian biogeochemical processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Details of the biogeochemical cycles and the dominant mechanisms present in Precambrian remain heavily debated topics. The events of the Late Proterozoic onset to glaciations and what types of early life existed in the ...

Thomas, Katherine S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

URANIUM RECOVERY, URANIUM GEOCHEMISTRY, THERMOLUMINESCENCE AND RELATED STUDIES. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of urantum at the mine with portable equipment was shown to be feasible, using a process which involves grinding the ore, leaching with nitric acid, extracting with tributyl phosphate and kerosene, and precipitation with ammonia gas. The system is more expensive than a stationary plant but couid be used in an emergency or in difficulty accessible locations. The distribution of uranium was studied in various geographical locations and in several different materials including limestones, granites, clays, rivers and underground water, lignites, and volcanic ash and lavas. Geochemical studies, based on thermoluminescence, including stratigraphy, age determinations of limestones, and aragonite-calcite relations in calcium csrbonate are presented along with thermoluminescence studies of lithium fluoride, alkali halides, aluminum oxides, sulfates, and other inorganic salts and minerals. Radiation damage to lithium fluoride and metamixed minerals was studied, and apparatus was developed for measuring thermoluminescence of crystals exposed to gamma radiation, scintillameters for measuring alpha particle activity in materials containing a trace of uranium, and an analytical method for determining less than 1 part per million uranium. (J.R.D.)

Daniels, F.

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Revised version Organic Geochemistry 22, 1023-1027, 1994.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Abstract- A Pliocene oil shale (Pula, Hungary), a C3 plant Triticum aestivum and a C4 plant Zea mays were-alkane, n-alkene, Pula oil shale, Botryococcus braunii, alga, plant, waxes, sediment. INTRODUCTION n-rich, Pliocene deposit from Pula (Hungary). The bulk carbon isotope ratio of this oil shale was also determined

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

311

Geochemistry of clathrate-derived methane in Arctic Ocean waters  

SciTech Connect

Alterations to the composition of seawater are estimated for microbial oxidation of methane from large polar clathrate destabilizations, which may arise in the coming century. Gas fluxes are taken from porous flow models of warming Arctic sediment. Plume spread parameters are then used to bracket the volume of dilution. Consumption stoichiometries for the marine methanotrophs are based on growth efficiency and elemental/enzyme composition data. The nutritional demand implied by extra CH{sub 4} removal is compared with supply in various high latitude water masses. For emissions sized to fit the shelf break, reaction potential begins at one hundred micromolar and falls to order ten a thousand kilometers downstream. Oxygen loss and carbon dioxide production are sufficient respectively to hypoxify and acidify poorly ventilated basins. Nitrogen and the monooxygenase transition metals may be depleted in some locations as well. Deprivation is implied relative to existing ecosystems, along with dispersal of the excess dissolved gas. Physical uncertainties are inherent in the clathrate abundance, patch size, outflow buoyancy and mixing rate. Microbial ecology is even less defined but may involve nutrient recycling and anaerobic oxidizers.

Elliott, S.M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article:...

313

The Tiwi geothermal reservoir: Geology, geochemistry, and response to production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tiwi geothermal field is located on the Bicol Peninsula of Southern Luzon in the Philippines. The field is associated with the extinct Quaternary stratovolcano Mt. Malinao, one of a chain of volcanos formed as a result of crustal subduction along the Philippine Trench to the east. The geothermal reservoir is contained within a sequence of interlayered andesite flows and pyroclastic deposits that unconformably overlie a basement complex of marine sediments, metamorphic, and intrusive rocks. In its initial state, the Tiwi reservoir was an overpressured liquid-filled system containing near-neutral sodium chloride water at temperatures exceeding 260{degree}C. The reservoir is partially sealed at its top and sides by hydrothermal argillic alteration products and calcite deposition. Isolated portions of the reservoir contain a corrosive acid chloride-sulfate water associated with a distinctive advanced argillic mineral assemblage. Withdrawal of fluid for electricity generation has caused widespread boiling in the reservoir and the formation of steam zones. The resultant solids deposition in wellbores and near-wellbore formation has been mitigated by a combination of mechanical and chemical well stimulation. Mass withdrawal from the reservoir has also caused invasion of cold groundwater into the reservoir through former fluid outflow channels. During 1983-1987, several wells were flooded with cold water and ceased flowing. In response, PGI moved development drilling west to largely unaffected areas and undertook recompletion and stimulation programs. These programs effectively halted the decline in generation by 1988.

Hoagland, J.R.; Bodell, J.M. (Unocal Geothermal Div., Santa Rosa, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Terrestrial planetary dynamics: a view from U, Th geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The migration of U and Th inside a planet is controlled by its oxidation state imposed by the volatile composition. In the deep interior of a planet, an absence of oxidative volatiles will cause U and Th to stay in a state of metal or low valance compounds with a big density. Consequently, they migrate to the bottom of its mantle first, and then are gradually sequestered to its liquid metal core. Earth is rich in oxidative volatiles including water, therefore, U and Th in the core can be moved up by an internal circulation system consisting of the outer core, hot super plumes, asthenosphere and subduction zone (or cold super plumes). This internal circulation system is the key for the formation of plate tectonics, the geodynamo and the consequent geomagnetic field. Moreover, plentiful oxidative volatiles and water within Earth is the precondition to form such a circulation system. In the early stage (> 4 Ga), Mars developed an Earth-like internal circulation system due to relatively large amount of oxidative volatile compositions coming from its building material. This would have produced a dynamo and correspondingly an Earth-like magnetic field. However, this internal circulation system was destroyed by one or several giant impact events in the early stage, which drove off these volatile compositions. These events also shaped the striking hemispheric dichotomy structure on the Martian surface. The other result is that its dynamo and geomagnetic field have also disappeared. Since then, Mars has been the same as Mercury and Venus in that the heat release from the U and Th in their cores can not be moved by an internal circulation system gently, but by sporadically catastrophic resurfacing events (Venus), or super plumes (Mars) or gradual heat conduction (Mercury).

Xuezhao Bao

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

Terrestrial planetary dynamics: a view from U, Th geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The migration of U and Th inside a planet is controlled by its oxidation state imposed by the volatile composition. In the deep interior of a planet, an absence of oxidative volatiles will cause U and Th to stay in a state of metal or low valance compounds with a big density. Consequently, they migrate to the bottom of its mantle first, and then are gradually sequestered to its metal core. Earth is rich in oxidative volatiles including water, therefore, U and Th in the core can be moved up by an internal circulation system consisting of the outer core, hot super plumes, asthenosphere and subduction zone (or cold super plumes). This internal circulation system is the key for the formation of plate tectonics, the geodynamo and the consequent geomagnetic field. Moreover, plentiful oxidative volatiles and water within Earth is the precondition to form such a circulation system. In the early stage (> 4 Ga), Mars developed an Earth-like internal circulation system due to relatively large amount of oxidative volatil...

Bao, X

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Water geochemistry of hydrothermal systems, Wood River District, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems of the Wood River District, central Idaho, have been studied by geologic mapping of thermal spring areas and geochemical investigations of thermal and non-thermal waters. This report summarizes the new geochemical data gathered during the study. Integration of the results of geological and geochemical studies has led to development of a target model for hydrothermal resources on the margin of the Idaho Batholith. Warfield Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 58/sup 0/C, flow from a major shear zone along the margin of an apophysis of the batholith. Hailey Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C, occur in an area of multiple thrust faults and newly recognized, closely spaced normal faults in the Paleozoic Milligen and Wood River Formations, 2.5 km from a highly brecciated batholith contact. Other Wood River district hydrothermal systems also occur along the margins of batholith apophyses or in adjacent highly fractured Paleozoic rocks, where there are indications of batholith rocks at shallow depths (100 to 300 m) in water wells.

Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.; Blackett, R.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

THE ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF ANCIENT SEDIMENTS PART II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

old (Lindem.mn) and the source rocks (Lindem~). are thoughtsamples of frothy, siliceous Source Rock from Lake county in1961). The siliceous Source Rock (49 gm) yielded, after pul-

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organic geochemistry, petroleum source rock, pollution,biological markers, petroleum, geochemistry, source rocks,

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

Greg N. Boitnott

2003-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

Exploring the Texture of Ocean-Atmosphere Redox Evolution on the Early Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Klein C, Beukes NJ (1989) Geochemistry and sedimentology ofReviews of Mineralogy and Geochemistry 31, 1-22. 52. LengkeAqueous Environmental Geochemistry, Prentice Hall, Inc. ,

Reinhard, Christopher Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Biogeochemical Signatures in Precambrian Black Shales: Window Into the Co-Evolution of Ocean Chemistry and Life on Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. , Borchers, S. L. , 2004. Geochemistry of Peruvian near-S. , 1978. Handbook of Geochemistry II. Section 42. B-O.ridge-flank alteration. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems

Scott, Clinton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemistry Program On-Board Uncle John From: Miriam Kastner, University of California at San Diego On-Board Geochemistry Analyses The objectives of the geochemistry program are...

323

Kinetics of Pyrrhotite Oxidation in Seawater: Implications for Mining Seafloor Hotsprings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solutions, Applied Geochemistry, No. 23, 121-135 Millero,Activity and the Geochemistry of Metalliferous Sediment,”Introduction to Geochemistry: Principles and Applications,

Romano, Gina Yolanda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Saline County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -92.539603° °, -92.539603° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5708215,"lon":-92.539603,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral content in the water before and after injection, or from the change in well injectivity during CO2 injection. It may affect the permeability positively due to rock dissolution, or negatively due to precipitation. Several physical and chemical processes cover the CO2 injection operations; multiphase flow in porous media is represented by the flow of the brine and CO2, solute transportation is represented by CO2 dissolution in the brine forming weak carbonic acid, dissolution-deposition kinetics can be seen in the rock dissolution by the carbonic acid and the deposition of the reaction products, hydrodynamic instabilities due to displacement of less viscous brine with more viscous CO2 (viscous fingering), capillary effects and upward movement of CO2 due to gravity effect. The objective of the proposed work is to correlate the formation damage to the other variables, i.e. pressure, temperature, formation rock type, rock porosity, water composition, sulfates concentration in the water, CO2 volume injected, water volume injected, CO2 to water volumetric ratio, CO2 injection rate, and water injection rate. In order to achieve the proposed objective, lab experiments will be conducted on different rock types (carbonates, limestone and dolomite, and sandstone) under pressure and temperature that simulate the field conditions. CO2 will be used at the supercritical phase and different CO2-water-rock chemical interactions will be addressed. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results using a geochemical simulator (CMG-GEM) will also be performed. The results showed that for carbonate cores, maintaining the CO2/brine volumetric ratio above 1.0 reduced bicarbonate formation in the formation brine and helped in minimizing precipitation of calcium carbonate. Additionally, increasing cycle volume in WAG injection reduced the damage introduced to the core. Sulfate precipitation during CO2 sequestration was primarily controlled by temperature. For formation brine with high total dissolved solids (TDS), calcium sulfate precipitation occurs, even at a low sulfate concentration. For dolomite rock, temperature, injection flow rate, and injection scheme don't have a clear impact on the core permeability, the main factor that affects the change in core permeability is the initial core permeability. Sandstone cores showed significant damage; between 35% and 55% loss in core permeability was observed after CO2 injection. For shorter WAG injection the damage was higher; decreasing the brine volume injected per cycle, decreased the damage. At higher temperatures, 200 and 250 degrees F, more damage was noted than at 70 degrees F.

Mohamed, Ibrahim 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Saline County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

179026° 179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4930367,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

Saline County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -93.1779659° °, -93.1779659° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1943564,"lon":-93.1779659,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

328

Saline County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8.8174853°, -97.6982272° 8.8174853°, -97.6982272° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8174853,"lon":-97.6982272,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

329

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. (2002). Multiphase ?ow in homogeneous porous media within hydrogeology and multiphase ?ow in porous media. I amimplementa- tion of multiphase ?ow in porous media. •

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Multiple Equilibrium States in Combined Thermal and Saline Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structure and stability of the multiple equilibria of the thermohaline circulation am studied using 2 × 2 and 3 × 2 box models. Thermohaline catastrophe is a shallow phenomenon and its time evolution consists of three stages: the search stage, ...

Rui Xin Huang; James R. Luyten; Henry M. Stommel

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Processing of high salinity brines for subsurface injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Different chemical pretreatments and filtration methods were evaluated as a possible means of clarifying and improving the injectivity of hypersaline brines. Six different downflow media combinations were evaluated over three geopressurized sites, using test data from 4 inch diameter filters. Also, tests were conducted with one hollow fiber ultrafilter unit and two types of disposable cartridge filters. The test procedures are mentioned briefly. (MHR)

Thompson, R.E.; Raber, E.

1979-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

then passed through a steam turbine, generating electricity.passed through a steam turbine, generating more electricity.steam in a gasi?er to produce a fuel gas that is burned to generate power in a gas turbine

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Surfactant loss: Effects of temperature, salinity, and wettability  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption of sodium dodecylsulfate, Triton X-100, decyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants onto silica gel and Berea sandstone mineral surfaces has been studied as a function of temperature, solution salt concentration, and mineral surface wettability. Adsorption studies using a flow calorimeter were conducted using pure surfactants and minerals. The studies were then extended to the adsorption of one type of commercial surfactant onto both consolidated and crushed Berea sandstone using column techniques. This has allowed the comparison of different methods to evaluate surfactant losses from flowing rather than static surfactant solutions. 20 refs., 15 figs., 37 tabs.

Noll, L.A.; Gall, B.L.; Crocker, M.E.; Olsen, D.K.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. (1990). Natural Gas Engineering: Production and Storage.experience with natural gas ?a, storage in aquifers in the

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Effects of recent increases in salinity and nutrient concentrations on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

cellular organization and photosynthesis (Carr &. Whitton, 1973). Today, the occurrence of modern examples of these structures is restricted worldwide to.

336

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factorcarbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Subsurface Salinity Balance in the South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South China Sea (SCS) is often treated as a semienclosed water body, with the Luzon Strait as its only connection to the Pacific Ocean. A branch of the Kuroshio flows northwestward across the Luzon Strait to enter the SCS, carrying North ...

Zuojun Yu; Julian P. McCreary Jr.; Max Yaremchuk; Ryo Furue

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Saline County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -88.556531° °, -88.556531° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7149675,"lon":-88.556531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

339

Lithologic characteristics, depositional environments and geometries of reservoir and nonreservoir facies in the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) of Moose and Virey Fields, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Queen Formation is a member of the Artesia Group, which is a sequence of intermingling carbonates, classics and evaporates that were deposited during Guadalupian (Permian) time across the Northwest Shelf, Central Basin Platform, and Midland Basin of the Permian Basin, west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. In Moose and Virey Fields, the Queen is the main producing formation and consists entirely of intercepted back-reef shelf elastics and evaporates which were deposited in a variety of continental desert and marginal marine settings. The Queen desert was a broad and generally low-relief surface transected by warm temperatures, semi-arid climate, scarce vegetation, and alternating periods of dryness and intense storm-induced flashflooding. Sedimentation within the Queen desert took place in six separate depositional environments. The elastics of Moose and Virey Fields were deposited in proximal fluvial sandflat and fluvial-dominated sabra environments, and along the edge of a shallow hypersaline lagoon. The anhydrides (formerly gypsum) were precipitated subaqueously on the floor of and in the subsurface beneath a broad and shallow, hypersaline lagoon which was characterized by poor circulation and restriction from the normal marine environment. Some halides formed subaqueously in a large, but very shallow, isolated inland saliva situated in the topographic lows of the desert sabkha. Other halides formed in an ephemeral and sometimes desiccated salt-pan environment which was subjected to alternating 'wet' and 'dry' conditions. It is believed that the progression of depositional environments across the study area was in part controlled by fourth- and fifth-order relative sea level fluctuations during a major third-order marine regression. Two large subsurface structural collapse features with at least 200 feet of vertical relief are located in the central portions of Moose and Virey Fields. The collapse of the Queen Formation in these areas was induced by the post-depositional and post-burial dissolution of the halides primarily of the underlying Grayburg Formation, and to a lesser extent of the Queen Formation. It apparently occurred as a series of minor collapse events which first began in Post-oueen Guadalupian time, during deposition of the lower Seven Rivers Formation, and finally ended in the Ochoan during deposition of the Rustler Anhydrite.

Aller, Gregory Shane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Amplitude and frequency experimental field measurements of a rotating?imbalance seismic source associated with changes in lithology surrounding a borehole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field measurements of the vibration amplitude of a rotating?imbalance seismic source in a liquid?filled borehole are described. The borehole was a cased oil well that had been characterized by gamma?ray cement bond and compensated neutron litho?density/gamma?ray logs. The well logs indicated an abrupt transition from shale to limestone at a depth of 2638 ft. The vibration amplitude and frequency of a rotating?imbalance seismic source was measured versus applied voltage as the source was raised from 2654 to 2618 ft through the shale–limestone transition. It was observed that the vibration amplitude changed by approximately 10% in magnitude and the frequency changed approximately 15% as the source passed the shale–limestone transition. The measurements were compared to predictions provided by a two?dimensional analytical model of a rotating?imbalance source located in a liquid?filled bore hole. It was observed that the sensitivity of the experimentally measured vibration amplitude of the seismic source to the properties of the surrounding geologic media was an order of magnitude greater than that predicted by the two?dimensional analytical model.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Appendix B to Attachment 3, Lithologic logs  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of well logging information gathered during work on the Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization program.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

BNL |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Martin Schoonen Martin Schoonen Department Chair Schoonen's research areas include environmental molecular chemistry, geocatalysis, medical geology, astrobiology, and hydrogeochemistry. An expert in synthesis, surface chemistry, and geochemistry of metal sulfides, in particular iron sulfides, his applied research efforts have included geologic sequestration of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide (CO2), development of mineral-based photocatalysts, and development of acid mine drainage abatement technology. His current research projects focus on the role of iron minerals in subsurface CO2 sequestration, the use of metal sulfides as catalysts to degrade organic pollutants, and surface chemistry and reactivity of minerals under highly-saline conditions found at some DOE legacy waste sites.

343

Core Analysis For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Core Analysis For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of Geothermal Reservoirs Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting

344

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

samples of local uranium enrichments in fractures and/or therather significant uranium enrichments. The 222Rn activityextent. Local enrichments in uranium minerals (0. Brotzen,

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository for spent fuel and high-level nuclear wastes, leads to the generation and accumulation of hydrogen gas in the backfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-term repository safety. Previous studies used H{sub 2} generation rates based on the volume of the waste or canister material and the stoichiometry of the corrosion reaction. However, iron corrosion and H{sub 2} generation rates vary with time, depending on factors such as amount of iron, water availability, water contact area, and aqueous and solid chemistry. To account for these factors and feedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to iron corrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena that are driven by gas-pressure buildup associated with H{sub 2} generation and water consumption. Results indicate that by dynamically calculating H{sub 2} generation rates based on a simple model of corrosion chemistry, and by coupling this corrosion reaction with two-phase flow processes, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup could be much smaller compared to a model that neglects the coupling between flow and reactive transport mechanisms. By considering the feedback of corrosion chemistry, the gas pressure increases initially at the canister, but later decreases and eventually returns to a stabilized pressure that is slightly higher than the background pressure. The current study focuses on corrosion under anaerobic conditions for which the coupled hydrogeochemical model was used to examine the role of selected physical parameters on the H{sub 2} gas generation and corresponding pressure buildup in a nuclear waste repository. The developed model can be applied to evaluate the effect of water and mineral chemistry of the buffer and host rock on the corrosion reaction for future site-specific studies.

Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Instructions for use Kerogen morphology and geochemistry at the Permian-Triassic transition in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.R., Schwindt, D.M., 2003. Fungal abundance spike and the Permian­Triassic boundary in the Karoo Supergroup

Tsunogai, Urumu

348

WSRC.RD-91-21 -CHARACTERIZATION OF THE GEOLOGY, GEOCHEMISTRY, HYDROLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management of wastewater treatment plant effluent using percolation ponds, injection wells, or controlled capacity of percolation ponds (infiltration rate/day x area x days/month) and of injection wells (gpm are explained next. Details of the DAU assignments are provided in the file "Daulist.xls" (Software and Data

Hazen, Terry

349

Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and fracturing'' of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

Jenne, E.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Andersson, O. (VBB VIAK AB, Malmo (Sweden)); Willemsen, A. (IF Technology, Arnhem, (Netherlands))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and ``fracturing`` of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

Jenne, E.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Andersson, O. [VBB VIAK AB, Malmo (Sweden); Willemsen, A. [IF Technology, Arnhem, (Netherlands)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Geochemistry of the Dakota Formation of Northwestern New Mexico: Relevance to Radioactive Waste Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Backfill as an Engineered Barrier for Radioactive Waste Management / Radioactive Waste Management

Douglas G. Brookins

352

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a greater number were thought to be related to faulting. Measured water temperatures at the 124 wells and springs inventoried ranged from 12/sup 0/ to 93/sup 0/C (degrees Celsius) and averaged 50/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures, calculated using the silica and the sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, range from 5/sup 0/ to 370/sup 0/C and averaged 110/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures in excess of 140/sup 0/C were found at 42 sites. No areal patterns to the distribution of temperatures either at the surface or subsurface were found. Generally, the quality of the waters sampled was good. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 14 to 13,700 mg/l (milligrams per liter) and averaged 812 mg/l, with higher values occurring in the southeastern part of the State. Twenty-five areas were selected for future study. Of these areas, 23 were selected on the basis of estimated aquifer temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher and two on the basis of geologic considerations.

Young, H.W.; Mitchell, J.C.

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Geochemistry of Extremely Alkaline (pH[ 12) Ground Water in Slag-Fill Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an alkaline sodium metasilicate/sodium carbonate (Na2SiO3/Na2CO3) solution and deoxidized in a nitric acid in alkaline Li salt solution involves two simultaneous processes: dissolution of aluminum and deposition effect. When the oxidizing species were used in the hydrotalcite coating bath, the aluminum dissolution

Bethke, Craig

354

Mineralogy, geochemistry and expansion testing of an alkali-reactive basalt from western Anatolia, Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the alkali-silica reaction performance of a basalt rock from western Anatolia, Turkey is reported. It is observed that the rock causes severe gel formation in the concrete microbar test. It appears that the main source of expansion is the reactive glassy phase of the basalt matrix having approximately 70% of SiO{sub 2}. The study presents the microstructural characteristics of unreacted and reacted basalt aggregate by optical and electron microscopy and discusses the possible reaction mechanism. Microstructural analysis revealed that the dissolution of silica is overwhelming in the matrix of the basalt and it eventually generates four consequences: (1) Formation of alkali-silica reaction gel at the aggregate perimeter, (2) increased porosity and permeability of the basalt matrix, (3) reduction of mechanical properties of the aggregate and (4) additional gel formation within the aggregate. It is concluded that the basalt rock is highly prone to alkali-silica reaction. As an aggregate, this rock is not suitable for concrete production.

Copuroglu, Oguzhan, E-mail: O.Copuroglu@CiTG.TUDelft.NL [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of CiTG, Materials and Environment, Stevinweg 1, 2628CN, Delft (Netherlands); Andic-Cakir, Ozge [Ege University, Civil Engineering Dept., 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M. [Geological Survey of Norway, Dept. of Mineral Characterization, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kuehnel, Radko [Burgemeester Merkusstraat 5, 2645 NJ, Delfgauw (Netherlands)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

The biostratigraphy, palaeoecology and geochemistry of a long lacustrine sequence from NW Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-print of his paper on Greek soils; Charles Turner (Open University), for introducing me to the sights and sites of Epirus; Phil Gibbard (GIQR, University of Cambridge) and Jamie Woodward (University of Leeds), for discussion and the retrieval of bedrock... -print of his paper on Greek soils; Charles Turner (Open University), for introducing me to the sights and sites of Epirus; Phil Gibbard (GIQR, University of Cambridge) and Jamie Woodward (University of Leeds), for discussion and the retrieval of bedrock...

Frogley, Michael Reginald

356

Inorganic geochemistry of Devonian shales in southern West Virginia: geographic and stratigraphic trends  

SciTech Connect

Samples of cuttings from twenty-one wells and a core from a single well in southern West Virginia were analyzed for major and minor elements: silicon, aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, titanium, phosphorus, manganese, sulfur, zinc, and strontium. Stratigraphic and geographic controls on elemental abundances were studied through canonical correlations, factor analyses, and trend surface analyses. The most abundant elements, silicon and aluminum, show gradual trends through the stratigraphic column of most wells, with silicon increasing and aluminum decreasing up-section. Other elements such as calcium, sulfur, and titanium change abruptly in abundance at certain stratigraphic boundaries. Important geographic trends run east-west: for instance, one can see an increase in sulfur and a decrease in titanium to the west; and a decrease in silicon from the east to the central part of the study area, then an increase further west. Although observed vertical trends in detrital minerals and geographic patterns in elemental abundances agree with the accepted view of a prograding delta complex during Late Devonian time, geographically-local, time restricted depositional processes influenced elemental percentages in subsets of the wells and the stratigraphic intervals studied. The black shales of lower Huron age do not represent simply a return of depositional conditions present in the earlier Rhinestreet time; nor do the gray shales of the Ohio Shale represent the same environmental conditions as the Big White Slate.

Hohn, M.E.; Neal, D.W.; Renton, J.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 in time-scale room Drilling fluid in time-scale room 410-reduced. When drilling fluids are for some time. used~still polluted, possibly with drilling fluid. Discus ion The

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

Graham, David W. (David William)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Mineralogy and geochemistry of Mariano Lake uranium deposit, Smith Lake district  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mariano Lake uranium deposit is located on the west side of the Smith Lake district in the Grants mineral belt. Mineralization is restricted to a basal arkosic sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jrassic). This sandstone is equivalent to the Poison Canyon sandstone of the Ambrosia Lake district and contains a series of paleochannels that have been mineralized. The ore displays a roll-type geometry and is located at an iron-sulfur redox interface. The deposit is chemically different from other deposits of the grants mineral belt. It is characterized by low total carbon dioxide, calcium, molybdenum, and selenium, whereas sulfur and vanadium are enriched. Arsenic and zinc exhibit regular zoning patterns across the deposit. The deposit contains an ubiquitous assemblage of pyrite, kaolinite, chlorite, illite, and illite-montmorillonite associated with vanadiferous ore mixed with organic carbon. No primary uranium minerals have been identified. Gypsum (variety selenite) is present, but calcite is absent. The age of mineralization is unknown. The ore has been remobilized, perhaps more than once, and mineralization may have occurred during mid-Cretaceous, Laramide, or post-Laramide time. Based on existing data, polygenetic models are as reasonable as a single stage of remobilization.

Place, J. (Gulf Oil Corp., Casper, WY); Della Valle, R.S.; Brookins, D.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Recent Developments in Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics Applied to Hydrothermal Reservoir Mapping and Monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in research and development of four of UURI's projects are reviewed in this paper. First, the development of chemical tracers has evolved to a field test in the Dixie Valley geothermal system in Nevada. Second, the measurement of in situ stress continues to demonstrate changes with location in the orientation of stress within active geothermal systems. Third, we continue to develop hydrologic models of geothermal systems based upon fluid inclusion measurements. Fourth, we are developing equipment that will allow testing of borehole to borehole and borehole to surface electrical resistivity techniques for locating fluid-filled fractures.

Moore, Joseph N.; Nielson, Dennis L.; Wright, Phillip M.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Solid-sample geochemistry study of western Dixie Valley, Churchill County, Nevada. Part I. Petrochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous thermal springs present in northern Dixie Valley, Nevada, are the surface expression of a deep-seated geothermal system. The structural setting, a complex asymmetric graben possibly bifurcating to the north, controls the location of surface springs and migration of thermal fluids to the surface. A large-scale surface soil geochemical survey for mercury and arsenic and petrochemical analysis for selected trace elements in subsurface samples from two deep exploratory wells allowed for identification of steam and hot water entries and delineation of associated geochemical zonations. Data thus far indicate the Dixie Valley geothermal system is dynamic, with temperatures greater than 200/sup 0/C at depths of 2500 m to 3000 m and access to thermal fluids controlled by structural and temporal parameters.

Bell, E.J. (Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV); Juncal, R.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of cold and warm springs from the Tuscarora, Nevada thermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen cold and warm spring water samples from the Tuscarora, Nevada KGRA have been analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition and fluid chemistry. Warm springs have deltaD values (-128 to -137 permil) significantly lower than those of cold springs to the north and east of the area, but similar to the deltaD values of cold springs to the west and south (-131 to -135 permil). The recharge area for the warm springs is unlikely to be to the immediate north, which is the local topographic highland in the area. The hydrogen isotope data would permit recharge from areas to the southwest or from high elevations to the southeast (Independence Mountains), a sector consistent with electrical resistivity evidence of fluid flow. Warm springs are HCO/sub 3//sup -/-rich waters, enriched by a factor of 3 to 10 in Na, HCO{sub 3}/{sup -} and SiO{sub 2} relative to local cold springs. Average quartz (no steam loss) and Na/K/Ca geothermometer estimates suggest subsurface temperatures of 145{sup 0} and 196{sup 0}C, respectively. The warm springs exhibit poor correlations between either hydrogen or oxygen isotope composition and water temperature or chemistry. The absence of such correlations suggests that there is no single coherent pattern of cold water mixing or evaporation in the thermal spring system.

Bowman, J.R.; Cole, D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oxygen-isotope geochemistry of quaternary rhyolite from the Mineral Mountains, Utah, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen isotope analyses were made of phenocryst and glass separates from four Quaternary rhyolite flows and domes in the Mineral Mountains, southwest Utah. With the exception of biotite in all samples and alkali feldspar in the rhyolite domes, all minerals appear to be in close oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium. The geothermometry equations proposed by Bottinga and Javoy (1973) and Javoy (1977) for quartz, alkali feldspar and magnetite produce the best agreement with temperature results fom two-feldspar and iron-titanium oxide geothermometry for these rhyolites. If the rhyolites were generated by partial melting in the crust, their whole-rock (glass) delta/sup 18/O values (6.3 to 6.9 permil) are consistent with generation from I-type (Chappell and White, 1974, O'Neil and Chappell, 1977; O'Neil et. al., 1977) sources.

Bowman, J.R.; Evans, S.H. Jr.; Nash, W.P.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of cold and warm springs from the Tuscarora, Nevada Thermal Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen cold and warm spring water samples from the Tuscarora, Nevada KGRA have been analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition and fluid chemistry. Warm springs have deltaD values (128 to -137 permil) significantly lower than those of cold springs to the north and east of the area, but similar to the deltaD values of cold springs to the west and south (-131 to -135 permil). The recharge area for the warm springs is unlikely to be to the immediate north, which is the local topographic highland in the area. The hydrogen isotope data would permit recharge from areas to the southwest or from high elevations to the southeast (Independence Mountains), a sector consistent with electrical resistivity evidence of fluid flow. Warm springs are HCO/sub 3//sup -/-rich waters, enriched by a factor of 3 to 10 in Na, HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and SiO/sub 2/ relative to local cold springs. Average quartz (no steam loss) and Na/K/Ca geothermometer estimates suggest subsurface temperatures of 145/sup 0/ and 196/sup 0/C, respectively. The warm springs exhibit poor correlations between either hydrogen or oxygen isotope composition and water temperature or chemistry. The absence of such correlations suggests that there is no single coherent pattern of cold water mixing or evaporation in the thermal spring system.

Bowman, J.R.; Cole, D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Palynology and organic/isotope geochemistry of the Mae Moh Basin, Northern Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The Mae Moh basin is one of several Tertiary intermontane basins in northern Thailand, whose evolution has been linked to the collision of the Indian plate with the Eurasian plate since the early Eocene. As in most of these basins, lacustrine/swamp sedimentation in the Mae Moh basin can be broadly divided into an Oligocene to Miocene synrift sequence and a Miocene to Quarternary postrift sequence. The dominance of swamp flora recognized from spore and pollen assemblages (e.g., Polypodiidites usmensis, Verrucatosporites, Cyrtostachys), as well as the abundance of macrophytes and woody debris, indicate overwhelming hot and humid swamp conditions, with lake development restricted to relatively small areas. The distribution of alkanes and their compound-specific carbon isotope compositions are used to further show climatic variations affecting the lake/swamp ecology during the deposition of the synrift sequence.

Minh, L.V.; Abrajano, T.; Burden, E.; Winsor, L. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s (Canada)); Ratanasthien, B. (Chaing Mai Univ. (Thailand))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Geochemistry of the HGP-A Geothermal Well: A Review and an Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The HGP-A geothermal well, located on the lower east rift system of Kilauea volcano, has provided steam and hot water to a 3 MWe wellhead generator facility on a continuous basis since December 1981.

Thomas, Donald M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry  

SciTech Connect

The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

Dole, LR

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

The use of fluid geochemistry to indicate reservoir processes at Cerro Prieto, MX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regular chemical sampling and analysis of fluids produced from the hot-water geothermal system of Cerro Prieto, Mexico has provided early warning of reservoir processes. The changes in chloride concentration, sodium to potassium ratio and measured fluid enthalpy are shown in the figures for wells M-5, M-26, M-21A, and M-11 of the Cerro Prieto field. The concentration of chloride, a ''conservative'' constituent, is characteristic of different water masses and is affected by a change of water source, by mixing of waters and by boiling and steam loss but not by reaction with rock minerals. The ratio of sodium to potassium is a temperature-sensitive geothermal index resulting from rock-water reaction and is not affected by boiling and steam loss or by mixing of water masses provided these processes occur at constant temperature. The enthalpy is related to the fluid temperature and to boiling in the aquifer with ''excess'' steam entering the well. These indices provide a reasonably complete picture of major reservoir processes occurring in hot water system. Silica analyses have not been reliable from Cerro Prieto but should be used in addition to Na/K as a temperature indicator. Analysis of fluids from a producing geothermal field must of course include other constituents for study of environmental effects, scaling, corrosion, etc.

Truesdell, Alfred H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Petrology and Geochemistry of Neoproterozoic Arc Plutons Beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain, SRS, SC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report is presented first a brief review of the regional geologic setting of the Savannah River Site, descriptions of the plutonic rock units sampled here, whole rock geochemical data on the plutonic igneous rocks, and finally, a discussion of how the crystalline basement rocks of the Savannah River Site formed and how they may correlate with other terranes exposed in the Piedmont of the Carolinas, Georgia, and Virginia.

Maryak, M.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

Organic Geochemistry Data of Alaska DDS-59 Version 1.0 | Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Download URL http:pubs.usgs.govddsdds-059dbtables.htm Format TXT License Spatial State of Alaska Temporal 1974-1982 Download Information XML Used by automated programs...

372

Petroleum geochemistry of oils and rocks in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen oil seeps or oil-stained outcrops in or adjacent to the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska indicate that commercial quantities of hydrocarbons may be present in the subsurface. The area is flanked by two important petroleum provinces: the Prudhoe Bay area on the west and the Mackenzie delta on the east. Organic carbon content (wt. %), organic matter type, and pyrolysis hydrocarbon yield show that rock units such as the Kingak Shale (average 1.3 wt. %), pebble shale unit (2.1 wt. %), and Canning Formation (1.9 wt. %) contain predominantly type III organic matter. The exception is the Hue Shale (5.9 wt. %), which contains type II organic matter. Pre-Cretaceous rocks that crop out in the Brooks Range could not be adequately evaluated because of high thermal maturity. Thermal maturity thresholds for oil, condensate, and gas calculated from vitrinite reflectance gradients in the Point Thomson area are 4000, 7300, and 9330 m, respectively (12,000, 22,500, and 28,000 ft). Time-temperature index (TTI) calculations for the Beli-1 and Point Thomson-1 wells immediately west of ANWR indicate that maturity first occurred in the south and progressed north. The Cretaceous Hue Shale matured in the Beli-1 well during the Eocene and in the Point Thomson-1 well in the late Miocene to early Pliocene. In the Point Thomson area, the condensate and gas recovered from the Thomson sandstone and basement complex based on API gravity and gas/oil ratio (GOR) probably originated from the pebble shale unit, and on the same basis, the oil recovered from the Canning Formation probably originated from the Hue Shale. The gas recovered from the three wells in the Kavik area is probably thermal gas from overmature source rocks in the immediate area.

Magoon, L.B.; Anders, D.E.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale water O2interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in ourfield study.

Jin, Lixin [University of Texas at El Paso; Ryan, Mathur [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University; Alex, Carone [Pennsylvania State University; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale-water-O2 interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in our field study.

Jin, Lixin [ORNL; Mathur, Ryan [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University; Carone, Alex [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Brantley, Susan L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Preliminary Gas and Isotope Geochemistry in the Rehai Geothermal Field, P.R. China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on gas and sulphur isotopic composition, two types of steam in Rehai geothermal field are identified. One is with higher CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentration, the {delta}{sup 34}S of H{sub 2}S is in the range 2.49{per_thousand} to -1.04{per_thousand} (vs CDT), from which the H{sub 2}S-temperature is over than 250 C. The other is with lower CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentration, the {delta}{sup 34}S of H{sub 2}S is in the range -4.0{per_thousand} to -8.36{per_thousand}, from which the H{sub 2}S- and H{sub 2}-temperatures are 180 C-210 C, in good agreement with quartz temperature. The thermal water in the Rehai field is of local meteoric origin. Maximum {delta}{sup 18}O-value shift is less than 2.0{per_thousand} (vs SMOW). Mixing is widespread and could be identified on isotope and solute chemistry.

P., Zhao; Z., Liao

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Petrology and geochemistry of pyroxenites in the Lanzo ultramafic massif, Northwestern Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined field, microtextural, and geochemical observations are presented for pyroxenites in the Lanzo ultramafic massif in order to place chemical and petrological constraints both locally on the geologic history of the ...

Pesce, Kathryn A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

378

Experimental development of a chemical flood and the geochemistry of novel alkalis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Surfactant-Polymer (SP) and Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP) floods are tertiary oil recovery processes that mobilize residual oil to waterflood. These Chemical EOR processes are most valuable when… (more)

Winters, Matthew Howard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

APPLICATIONS OF HIGH RESOLUTION NMR TO GEOCHEMISTRY: CRYSTALLINE, GLASS, AND MOLTEN SILICATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sa~pling rate is',fl0.4,'usec. ',/) ',/)go to 950 type 810phise (deg)',2x,'deliY (usec)',II) do 30 i-1,npul print

Schneider, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Multielement geochemistry of three geothermal wells, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from three geothermal wells, Utah State 42-7, Utah State 31-33 and Forminco No. 1, in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Utah, demonstrates that the distributions of different elements are the result of different chemical processes operating throughout the geologic history of the area. Statistical analysis of geochemical-data distributions confirm the presence of several distinct element associations. Of the 36 elements determined on the samples, 12 (V, Mo, Cd, Ag, Au, Sb, Bi, U, Te, Sn, B and Th) were present in concentrations at or below detection levels. Of the remaining 24 elements, only 3 (Ni, Co and Zr) are lognormally distributed. Distributions for the remaining elements are of aggregate populations which represent background, mineralization or other processes.

Christensen, O.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study area occupies about 14,500 square miles in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada. Thermal ground water occurs under artesian conditions, in discontinuous or compartmented zones, in igneous or sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age. Ground-water movement is generally northward. Temperatures of the ground water range from about 30/sup 0/ to more than 80/sup 0/C. Chemical analyses of water from 12 wells and 9 springs indicate that nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate type; thermal waters are a sodium bicarbonate type. Chemical geothermometers indicate probable maximum reservoir temperatures are near 100/sup 0/C. Concentration of tritium in the thermal water water is near zero.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Geochemistry of hydrothermal vent fluids from the northern Juan De Fuca Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of aqueous organic compounds derived from sedimentary organic matter has the potential to influence a range of chemical processes in hydrothermal vent environments. For example, hydrothermal alteration experiments ...

Cruse, Anna M. (Anna Marie)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Sulfur geochemistry of thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment from the Texas-Louisiana continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment were recovered from the northern Gulf of Mexico east of the Mississippi Canyon to investigate the interactions between gas hydrate and sedimentary sulfides. Sediment solid phase analyses included total reduced sulfide (TRS), acid volatile sulfide, and citrate-dithionate and HCl extractable iron. Pore-fluid measurements included []H?S, chloride, sulfate, ammonia and total dissolved inorganic carbon. Gas hydrate hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide content were measured using a new wet chemical technique. The []ł?S relative to Vienna Canyon Diablo troilite was determined for TRS and hydrate H?S. Extensive (>95%) reduction of pore-fluid sulfate occurred, resulting in exceptionally high []H?S concentrations (up to ~10 mM) and TRS concentrations (271 ± 50 []mole/g). However, the mole fraction of H?S within the gas hydrate was too low (~0.3%) to significantly influence hydrate stability. This appears related to high reactive iron concentrations which average 256 ± 66 []mol/g (pyrite iron + HCl extractable iron). These iron-rich sediments are thus capable of sequestering much of the generated sulfide in the form of TRS minerals, thereby making it unavailable for incorporation by gas hydrate. The TRS concentrations are about an order of magnitude greater than expected for sites at similar water depths in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Steep dissolved []H?S concentration gradients were observed both above and below the gas hydrate indicating diffusion of sulfide from the surrounding system into the gas hydrate. The gradients were used to estimate an incorporation rate of ~1 []mol H?S/yr-cm˛ assuming molecular diffusion. TRS in close proximity to the hydrate was depleted in ł?S by ~10[0/00] relative to TRS remote to the hydrate. The precise mechanism responsible for this relative depletion in ł?S is not clear, but may prove an important geochemical indicator of sediments in which gas hydrate is or has been present. Studies at other sites will be necessary to confirm the generality of these observations.

Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Pb, Zn and Ag Mine Tailings Originating From Carbonate-Rich Deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mining for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico has been ongoing since 1576. Unsecured tailings heaps and associated acid mine drainage have presented problems related to soil quality, water quality, and dust emission control in the Zimapan area. Objectives of the study of the mine tailings are (1) to determine mineralogy of the tailings in order to identify acid-producing minerals and heavy metals at risk for release in acidic conditions, and (2) to quantify carbonate minerals and (3) to determine heavy metal content that may be released by the products of sulfide mineral weathering. Representative mine tailings have been sampled from a site located north of Zimapan. Mineralogical characterization has been conducted with X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM and TEM). Total carbonates have been determined the Chittick procedure. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) has been utilized to determine total elemental composition. XRD and SEM analyses have confirmed the presence of pyrite and arsenopyrite indicating a potential for acid mine drainage. Calcite has been confirmed to have a significant presence in the unweathered samples by XRD and the Chittick procedure, with some samples containing an average of 19.4% calcite. NAA and XRF have revealed significant concentrations of toxic elements such as As, Pb and Zn in both the oxidized and unoxidized samples.

McClure, Roberta 1981-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Isotopic Geochemistry and Hydrology of Geothermal Waters in the Ethiopian Rift Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evidence subsurface water-rock source for a reaction in thissuch source water undergoes isotopic exchange with rocks totype source waters are modified by interaction with rocks to

Isotope Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States) Evans (Charles) and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Storage - Geological Storage - Modeling Long-term simulations of CO 2 storage in saline aquifer Y. Le Gallo, L. Trenty, A. Michel May 8-11, 2006 * Hilton Alexandria Mark Center * Alexandria, Virginia CO 2 trapping mechanisms in saline aquifers * Several trapping processes of CO 2 can exist with different characteristic times: - structural trapping: CO 2 is trapped as a dense phase according to the structural lithology of the storage - capillary trapping: CO 2 is trapped at residual gas saturation in the wake of the dense phase plume - solution trapping: CO 2 is dissolved in the liquid phase (oil or brine) - mineral trapping: CO 2 is incorporated into minerals due to chemical precipitation Coupled processes in CO 2 geological storage * multiphase fluid flow model in porous media:

388

Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

Starr, R.C.; Green, T.S.; Hull, L.C.

2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drain   Solar  Panels  with  12-­?volt  batteries   EcoNet  South   Solar  Panels  with  12-­?volt  batteries   EcoNet  drain   Solar  Panels  with  12-­?volt  batteries   EcoNet  

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Uranium 238U/235U isotope ratios as indicators of reduction: Results from an in situ biostimulation experiment at Rifle, Colorado, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Series Geochemistry; In Uranium-Series Geochemistry; BernardIsotopic Fractionation of Uranium. Earth and Planetaryand precipitation of uranium and vanadium at low

Bopp IV, C.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Vp-Vs ratio sensitivity to pressure, fluid, and lithology changes in tight gas sandstones Eugenia Rojas*, Thomas L. Davis, Michael Batzle, Manika Prasad, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(apparent) fluid properties. Similarly, sand-face transient pressure measurements are affected by OBM and apparent fluid properties at the sand-face against observed field measurements. A history matching approach of sand-face pressure and fluid contamination function. Our observation is that transient pressure, GOR

393

Lithology, fault displacement, and origin of secondary calcium carbonate and opaline silica at Trenches 14 and 14D on the Bow Ridge Fault at Exile Hill, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, a proposed site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository, is located in southern Nevada, 20 km east of Beatty, and adjacent to the southwest comer of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (fig. 1). Yucca Mountain is located within the Basin and Range province of the western United States. The climate is semiarid, and the flora is transitional between that of the Mojave Desert to the south and the Great Basin Desert to the north. As part of the evaluation, hydrologic conditions, especially water levels, of Yucca Mountain and vicinity during the Quaternary, and especially the past 20,000 years, are being characterized. In 1982, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (under interagency agreement DE-A104-78ET44802), excavated twenty-six bulldozer and backhoe trenches in the Yucca Mountain region to evaluate the nature and frequency of Quaternary faulting (Swadley and others, 1984). The trenches were oriented perpendicular to traces of suspected Quaternary faults and across projections of known bedrock faults into Quaternary deposits. Trench 14 exposes the Bow Ridge Fault on the west side of Exile Hill. Although the original purpose of the excavation of trench 14 was to evaluate the nature and frequency of Quaternary faulting on the Bow Ridge Fault, concern arose as to whether or not the nearly vertical calcium carbonate (the term ``carbonate`` in this study refers to calcium carbonate) and opaline silica veins in the fault zone were deposited by ascending waters (ground water). These veins resemble in gross morphology veins commonly formed by hydrothermal processes.

Taylor, E.M.; Huckins, H.E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Annual report, September 15, 1993--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The principal focus of this project is to evaluate the importance of relative permeability anisotropy with respect to other known geologic and engineering production concepts. This research is to provide improved strategies for enhanced oil recovery from the Tensleep Sandstone oil reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. The Tensleep Sandstone contains the largest potential reserves within reservoirs which are candidates for EOR processes in the State of Wyoming. Although this formation has produced billions of barrels of oil, in some fields, as little as one in seven barrels of discovered oil is recoverable by current primary and secondary techniques. Because of the great range of {degree}API gravities of the oils produced from the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs, the proposed study concentrates on establishing an understanding of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability within the Tensleep Sandstone. This research is to associate those spatial distributions and anisotropies with the depositional subfacies and zones of diagenetic alteration found within the Tensleep Sandstone. In addition, these studies are being coupled with geochemical modeling and coreflood experiments to investigate the potential for wellbore scaling and formation damage anticipated during EOR processes (e.g., C0{sub 2} flooding). This multidisciplinary project will provide a regional basis for EOR strategies which can be clearly mapped and efficiently applied to the largest potential target reservoir in the State of Wyoming. Additionally, the results of this study have application to all eolian reservoirs through the correlations of relative permeability variation and anisotropy with eolian depositional lithofacies.

Dunn, T.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming. Annual report, October 1, 1994-- September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This research is to provide improved strategies for enhanced oil recovery from the Tensleep Sandstone oil reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Because of the great range of API gravities of the oils produced from these reservoirs, the proposed study concentrates on understanding the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability within the Tensleep Sandstone. This research will associate those spatial distributions and anisotropies with the depositional subfacies and zones of diagenetic alteration found within the sandstone. The associations of the above with pore geometry will link relative permeability with the dimensions of lithofacies and authigenic mineral facies. Hence, the study is to provide criteria for scaling this parameter on a range of scales, from the laboratory to the basin-wide scale of subfacies distribution. Effects of depositional processes and burial diagenesis will be investigated. Image analysis of pore systems will be done to produce algorithms for estimating relative permeability from petrographic analyses of core and well cuttings. In addition, these studies are being coupled with geochemical modeling and coreflood experiments to investigate the potential for wellbore scaling and formation damage anticipated during EOR, eg., CO{sub 2} flooding. This will provide a regional basis for EOR strategies for the largest potential target reservoir in Wyoming; results will have application to all eolian reservoirs through correlations of relative permeability variation and anisotropy with eolian depositional lithofacies.

Dunn, T.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasfeasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gass WESTCARB, Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The

Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field and laboratory investigations of naturally occurring CO{sub 2}-reservoirs are being conducted to determine the characteristics of potential seal and reservoir units and the extent of the interactions that occur between the host rocks and the CO{sub 2} charged fluids. Efforts have focused on the Farnham Dome field, located in central Utah, the Springerville-St. Johns field in Arizona and New Mexico, and most recently, the Crystal Geyser-Salt Wash graben areas with their CO{sub 2}-charged geysers and springs in central Utah. At both the Springerville-St. Johns field and the central Utah CO{sub 2} spring area, there is evidence of extensive travertine deposits that document release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. At Farnham Dome, calcite debris fields appear to be remnants of vein calcite and an earlier period of fluid leakage. The main achievements during this quarter are (1): preparation for a soil gas flux survey in October at the Crystal Geyser --Little Grand Wash fault zone, and the Salt Wash graben; (2) submission of an abstract to the upcoming Measurement, Monitoring and Verification session at the Fall AGU meeting; (3) submission of an invited abstract to the Gordon Conference on Hydrocarbon Resources; and (4) receipt of initial radiocarbon dates of travertine from the Springerville-St Johns field. Analytical results and interpretations of both the travertine deposition and the soil gas surveys are still in progress, and will be included in future quarterly reports.

R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge at a seasonally  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the transport of point-source contaminant plumes across the estuarine transition zone. This paper presents at the site is impacted with dissolved-phase petroleum hydrocarbons, including the BTEX (benzene, toluene approximately 80 m from the river's edge. The plume follows an easterly flow path from the UST source

Clement, Prabhakar

400

A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the middle Capay Shale (depleted gas) and McCormick Sand (depleted gas reservoir located within the Middle Capay shaleCO 2 gas will occur in the 2-3 m thick Capay Shale interval

Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Solutions of test problems for disposal of CO2 in saline aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the large gas saturations beneath the shales, and from thelarger gas saturation beneath the top shale (elevation 151gas saturations of approximately 60 % occur beneath the shale

Pruess, Karsten; Garcia, Julio

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Feasibility of Geophysical Monitoring of Carbon-Sequestrated Deep Saline Aquifers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Projec t Fac ts Carbon Sequestration ContaCtS Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov William W. Aljoe Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6569 william.aljoe@netl.doe.gov Subhashis Mallick

403

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. Final technical report. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer program GEOCHEM was developed and applied to calculate the speciation of trace elements, such as Li, B, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As, in mixtures of geothermal brines with soil waters. A typical speciation calculation involved the simultaneous consideration of about 350 inorganic and organic complexes and about 80 possible solid phases that could form among the macro- and microconstituents in the mixtures. The four geothermal brines chosen for study were from the East Mesa, Heber, and Salton Sea KGRA's. Two examples of East Mesa brine were employed in order to illustrate the effect of brine variability within a given KGRA. The soil waters chosen for study were the Holtville, Rosita, and Vint soil solutions and the Vail 4 drain water. These waters were mixed with the four brines to produce 1%, 5%, and 10% brine combinations. The combinations then were analyzed with the help of GEOCHEM and were interpreted in the context of two proposed general contamination scenarios. The results of the speciation calculations pointed to the great importance, in brine, of sulfide as a precipitating agent for trace metals and of borate as a trace metal-complexing ligand. In general, precipitation and/or exchange adsorption in soil were found to reduce the levels of trace metals well below harmful concentrations. The principal exceptions were Li and B, which did not precipitate and which were at or very hear harmful levels in the soil water-brine mixtures.

Sposito, G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO{sub 2} IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soil gas surveys have been carried out on the Colorado Plateau over areas with natural occurrences of CO{sub 2}. At Farnham Dome, Utah, and Springerville-St. Johns, Arizona, proven CO{sub 2} reservoirs occur at 600-800 m depth, but no anomalous soil gas CO{sub 2} flux was detected. Background CO{sub 2} fluxes of up to about 5 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} were common in arid, poorly vegetated areas, and fluxes up to about 20 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} were found at Springerville-St. Johns in heavily vegetated, wet ground adjacent to springs. These elevated fluxes are attributed to shallow root zone activity rather than to a deep upflow of CO{sub 2}. Localized areas of anomalously high CO{sub 2} gas flux ({approx} 100 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) were documented along the Little Grand Wash Fault Zone near Crystal Geyser, Utah and nearby in Ten Mile Graben, but those in Ten Mile Graben are not directly associated with the major faults. In both areas, features with a visible gas flux are present. Isotopic measurements on the CO{sub 2} gas confirm that it originated at depth. Evidence of widespread vein calcite at the surface at Farnham Dome and travertine deposits in the other areas suggests that there has been an outflow of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids in the past. 14C ages of pollen trapped in the travertine at Springerville-St. Johns record a period of CO{sub 2} leakage to the atmosphere between 887 {+-} 35 and 3219 {+-} 30 years BP. No travertine deposits appear to be currently forming. At Springerville-St. Johns, Crystal Geyser and Ten Mile Graben, there are significant outflows of high-bicarbonate water. Movement of CO{sub 2}-rich groundwaters may be the dominant mechanism controlling the mobility of CO{sub 2} today. The very localized nature of the soil gas anomalies, evidence of large scale discharge of CO{sub 2} over a very short period of time and the outflow of ground water containing dissolved CO{sub 2} will present challenges for effective, long term monitoring of CO{sub 2} leakage.

R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

405

Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1996. A Botanical Glossary. (http://www.flytrap.demon.co.uk/section is a short glossary defining technical terminologyinstances are noted in the glossary next to the appropriate

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Experimental investigation of carbon dioxide trapping due to capillary retention in deep saline aquifers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon dioxide (CO2) is by far the most significant greenhouse gas released by human activities through fossil fuel combustion. In order to minimize CO2 emissions… (more)

Li, Xinqian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Matched boundary extrapolation solutions for CO2 well injection into a saline aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interface solution for carbon dioxide injection  into Interface  Solutionfor  Carbon  Dioxide  Injection  into IPCC  Special  Report  on  Carbon  Dioxide  Capture  and 

Houseworth, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE USE OF ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY FOR THE ANALYSES OF LEAD IN SALINE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrodes Corning Tube Gas Dispersion Cylinder (frit) ModelFrit A Corning Tube Gas Dispersion Cylinder (frit) Model #

Case, Charles W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

System Design and Optimization of CO2 Storage in Deep Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of waterflooding sweep efficiency has been widely applied in reservoir engineering to improve hydrocarbon recovery while delaying water breakthrough and minimizing the bypassed oil in reservoirs. We develop a new framework to optimize flooding sweep efficiency in geologic formations with heterogeneous properties and demonstrate its application to waterflooding and geological CO2 sequestration problems. The new method focuses on equalizing and delaying (under constant total injected volume) the breakthrough time of the injected fluid at production wells. For application to CO2 sequestration where producers may not be present, we introduce the concept of pseudo production wells that have insignificant production rates (with negligible effect on the overall flow regime) for quantification of hypothetical breakthrough curves that can be used for optimization purpose. We apply the new method to waterflooding and CO2 sequestration optimization using two heterogeneous reservoir models. We show that in water flooding experiments, the proposed method improves the sweep efficiency by delaying the field breakthrough and equalizing breakthrough times in all production wells. In this case, the optimization results in increased oil recovery and decreased water production. We apply a modified version of the proposed algorithm to geologic CO2 sequestration problems to maximize the storage capacity of aquifers by enhancing the residual and dissolution trapping. The results from applying the proposed approach to optimization of geologic CO2 storage problems illustrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in improving residual and solubility trapping by increasing the contact between available fresh brine and the injected CO2 plume through a more uniform distribution of CO2 in the aquifer.

Shamshiri, Hossein

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Salinity, Heat, and Buoyancy Budgets of a Coastal Current in a Marginal Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atlantic overturning circulation has conventionally been pictured in the meridional–vertical plane, but a significant densification of the water masses involved also occurs as the surface branch of the circulation flows in boundary currents ...

A. K. Wĺhlin; H. L. Johnson

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The six coal-fired power plants located in the Colorado Plateau and southern Rocky Mountain region of the U.S. produce 100 million tons of CO{sub 2} per year. Thick sequences of collocated sedimentary rocks represent potential sites for sequestration of the CO{sub 2}. Field and laboratory investigations of naturally occurring CO{sub 2}-reservoirs are being conducted to determine the characteristics of potential seal and reservoir units and the extent of the interactions that occur between the host rocks and the CO{sub 2} charged fluids. The results are being incorporated into a series of two-dimensional numerical models that represent the major chemical and physical processes induced by injection. During reporting period covered here (March 30 to June 30, 2003), the main achievements were: Presentation of three papers at the Second Annual Conference on Carbon Sequestration (May 5-8, Alexandria, Virginia); Presentation of a poster at the American Association of Petroleum Geologists meeting; Co-PI organized and chaired a special session on Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration at the American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual convention in Salt Lake City (May 12-15).

R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nouvelles problematiques posees par le cyclage thermo-mecanique en cavites salines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage of natural gas in salt caverns had been developed mainly for seasonal storage, resulting in a small number of yearly pressure cycles and moderate gas-production rates. The needs of energy traders are changing towards more aggressive operational modes. The "high-frequency cycling" operation of salt caverns raises questions concerning the effects of frequently repeated and intense mechanical and thermal loading. These questions concern the constitutive creep laws for salt, laboratory test procedures, criteria to be used at the design stage to provide operability, and the long-term integrity of the underground salt caverns.

Pellizzaro, Cyrille; Brouard, Benoît; Karimi-Jafari, Mehdi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Improving the injectability of high-salinity brines for disposal or waterflooding operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is part of a study conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to improve the performance of brine injection wells at Gulf Coast Strategic Petroleum Reserve Sites. Our involvement established that granular media filtration, when used with proper chemical pretreatments, provides an effective and economical method for removing particulates from hypersaline brines. This treatment allows for the injection of 200,000 B/D with significantly increased well half-lives of 30 years.

Raber, E.; Thompson, R.E.; Smith, F.H.

1981-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

Effect of Saline Waste Solution Infiltration Rates on Uranium Retention and Spatial Distribution in Hanford Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EM/GJ1302-2006, Stoller Hanford Office, Richland, WA. 2006.BY tank farms. CH2M Hill, Hanford Group. Inc. : Richland, WAT. E. ; Kincaid, C. T. Hanford soil inventory model (SIM)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE USE OF ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY FOR THE ANALYSES OF LEAD IN SALINE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activity is -0.126 volts. value for the~ By substitutingTABLE 6-2 (Continued) Chemical Form E 1 cell (volts) E~ cellEk = Etotal (volts) I Pb(OH)~ Pb(OH)~ Pb(OH)~ 0.0296 log [

Case, Charles W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Collection and Characterization of Saline Microalgae From South Florida: Final Report, May 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1983, SERI initiated a microalgal species acquisition program to provide strains to be used in the development of microalgal culture technology for the production of fuels (Raymond 1984). From previous collection efforts (Barclay 1984, Tadros 1984) it was determined that desirous species should grow rapidly under fluctuating culture conditions and be capable of producing large concentrations of lipid.

Carlson, R. D.; Ryther, J. H.; Pendoley, P. D.; Jensen, P. R.; Blakeslee, M.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Effect of Increased Salinity on Diversity and Abundance of Diatoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to acid mine drainage from abandoned coal mines leaking into the system but there has not been a bloom dissipata as compared to low conductivity treatments. This experiment resembles what occurs when acid mine of the waste water and determined radium-226 (derivative of uranium) was present, thereby making the water

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

418

Soil nitrifying enrichments as biofilter starters in intensive recirculating saline water aquaculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, he has worked on projects dealing with hydrologic, ground-water supply, geothermal, and environmental studies to provide superior performance. In particular, as previously recommended by the Board, opening

Gross, Amit

419

Heat extraction from salinity-gradient solar ponds using heat pipe heat exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical analysis on the heat extraction process from solar pond by using the heat pipe heat exchanger. In order to conduct research work, a small scale experimental solar pond with an area of 7.0 m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.5 m was built at Khon Kaen in North-Eastern Thailand (16 27'N102 E). Heat was successfully extracted from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond by using a heat pipe heat exchanger made from 60 copper tubes with 21 mm inside diameter and 22 mm outside diameter. The length of the evaporator and condenser section was 800 mm and 200 mm respectively. R134a was used as the heat transfer fluid in the experiment. The theoretical model was formulated for the solar pond heat extraction on the basis of the energy conservation equations and by using the solar radiation data for the above location. Numerical methods were used to solve the modeling equations. In the analysis, the performance of heat exchanger is investigated by varying the velocity of inlet air used to extract heat from the condenser end of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE). Air velocity was found to have a significant influence on the effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger. In the present investigation, there was an increase in effectiveness by 43% as the air velocity was decreased from 5 m/s to 1 m/s. The results obtained from the theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

Tundee, Sura; Terdtoon, Pradit; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singh, Randeep; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar [Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Group, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Bundoora East Campus, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Transient adsorption experiment: Salinity and noncondensible gas effects. Quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to analyze the adsorption and desorption of steam in geothermal reservoirs, considering the effects of dissolved salts and of noncondensible gases. This report details activities during the gases. This report details activities during the reporting period of July through September 1993.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Large-Scale Utilization of Saline Groundwater for Irrigation of Pistachios Interplanted with Cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the better areas. The Belridge Water District in westernof drip tape SDI with typical Belridge Water District cottonlarge-scale grower in the Belridge Water District of NW Kern

Sanden, Blake; Ferguson, Louise; Kallsen, Craig E.; Marsh, Brian; Hutmacher, Robert B.; Corwin, Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil CO{sub 2} flux surveys have been conducted over known CO{sub 2} reservoirs at Farnham Dome, Utah, Crystal Geyser-Ten Mile Graben in Utah and Springerville-St. Johns, Arizona. No anomalous CO{sub 2} flux was detected at the Farnham Dome and Springerville-St. Johns. At Crystal Geyser-Ten Mile Graben, localized areas of anomalously high CO{sub 2} flux ({approx}100 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) occur along a fault zone near visibly degassing features. Isotopic measurements on CO{sub 2} collected from nearby springs indicate that it originated at depth. Evidence of widespread vein calcite at the surface (Farnham Dome) and travertine deposits at the other two areas suggests that discharge of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids has occurred in the past. Despite the lack of evidence for significant present day leakage of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere at Springerville-St. Johns and Crystal Geyser-Ten Mile Graben, there are significant outflows of high-bicarbonate water in both areas suggesting continuous migration of CO{sub 2} in the aqueous phase from depth. The very localized nature of the CO{sub 2} flux anomalies, and the outflow of ground water containing dissolved CO{sub 2} present challenges for effective, long term monitoring of CO{sub 2} leakage.

R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

Salinity and hydrodynamics of the Holocene and upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands from electrical measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual hydrodynamic model in the Holocene and upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands is described in terms of safety distributions. Porewater safety is calculated from electrical measurements, including resistivity soundings, electric logs, and electromagnetic profiling. Electrical measurements support the primary, basin-wide groundwater flow model; however, the data also indicate secondary contributions from expulsion of fluids under geopressure along active growth faults and from original waters of deposition. Expulsion of water from growth faults has been described previously for deeper sections of the Pleistocene, but has not been reported for the Holocene or upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands. Porewater chemistry variations beneath the coastal wetlands are a consequence of the following (in order of importance): (1) environment of deposition; (2) a basin-wide, regional flow system; (3) expulsion from deep-seated growth faults; and (4) pore water extrusion due to compaction. Water chemistry in Holocene clays and muds is influenced primarily by the deposition environment In Pleistocene sands, the chemistry is a function of the other three factors.

McGinnis, L.D.; Thompson, M.D.; Kuecher, G.J.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Effect of Saline Waste Solution Infiltration Rates on Uranium Retention and Spatial Distribution in Hanford Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B-BX-BY waste management area. PNNL-14083; Pacific Northwestat the Hanford Site. PNNL-13763; Pacific Northwest NationalFate of Fission Products. PNNL-14120, Pacific Northwest

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Inventory of Sources of Available Saline Waters for Microalgae Mass Culture in the State of Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) is conducting research on the development of microalgae biomass systems for the production of liquid fuels. Particularly appealing at this time, is the idea of using indigenous resources of the Southwest for large-scale production of microalgae.

Wilson, L. G.; Olson, K. L.; Wallace, M. G.; Osborn, M. D.

1986-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

426

Analysis Methods for Characterizing Salinity Variability from Multivariate Time Series Applied to the Apalachicola Bay Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical analysis methods are developed to quantify the impacts of multiple forcing variables on the hydrographic variability within an estuary instrumented with an enduring observational system. The methods are applied to characterize the ...

Steven L. Morey; Dmitry S. Dukhovskoy

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

Lindquist, W Brent

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

428

Surface Water Temperatures and Salinities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1991  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off tlw rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen- erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generators. The plant's water intake structure, which isoff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory, andat the aquarium's water system intake located in a deep

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen­ erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1993  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternating layers of sands and shales deposited in deltaiclens in the overlying Capay Shale (Figure 3). Figure 1. Gas-in the middle Capay Shale (depleted gas) and McCormick

Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the chemical equilibrium computer program GEOCHEM, which has been developed to calculate trace element speciation in soil, irrigation, drainage, or Salton Sea waters affected by geothermal brine. GEOCHEM is applied to irrigation water-brine mixtures and to Salton Sea water-brine mixtures in order to compute the chemical speciation of the elements Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn, along with the oxyanions of As and B. The results suggest that the computer simulation can have an important effect on a program for managing brine spills. Appendices include published papers on related research.

Sposito, G.; Page, A.L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage. Energy & Fuels,storage because of the potential to use CO 2 to extract additional oil or natural gas.

Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Evaluation of CO2 sequestration potential in deep saline Ozark Plateau Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ·· Field owned by BEREXCOField owned by BEREXCO ­­ unitizedunitized ·· Excellent waterflood performance (noExcellent waterflood performance (no gas)gas) ­­ great COgreat CO22--EOR candidateEOR candidate ·· Arbuckle aquifer

Peterson, Blake R.

440

Modeling CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

successful waterfloods ­ Wellington field · CO2 sequestration potential of CO2-EOR ­ minor compared to deep active wells, 20.5 MM BO ­ Unitized and owned by BEREXCO ­ Excellent waterflood ­ ideal for CO2-EOR

Peterson, Blake R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Preconditioning concepts in polymer flooding in high-salinity reservoirs; Laboratory investigations and case histories  

SciTech Connect

In polymer-flood field projects with partially hydrolized polyacrylamide (PH PAA) solutions, the authors applied two methods of preconditioning: a preflush with fresh water and the use of a relatively small slug of a less-salt-sensitive polymer. Results of laboratory work that led to an improved preconditioning concept with polymer are described. Case histories of two projects with two different preconditioning processes are presented and discussed in detail.

Volz, H.; Maltin, B.K. (RWE-DEA AG (DE)); Sohn, W.O.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Impact of Sea Level Assimilation on Salinity Variability in the Western Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the primitive equation model for the tropical Pacific at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, subsurface temperature observations are assimilated. The addition of TOPEX/Poseidon sea level observations to the NCEP assimilation ...

Femke C. Vossepoel; David W. Behringer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Importance of the Salinity Barrier Layer for the Buildup of El Nińo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several studies using sea level observations and coupled models have shown that heat buildup in the western equatorial Pacific is a necessary condition for a major El Nińo to develop. However, none of these studies has considered the potential ...

Christophe Maes; Joël Picaut; Sophie Belamari

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Physics and Dynamics of Density-Compensated Temperature and Salinity Anomalies. Part I: Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subducted temperature anomalies have been invoked as a possible way for midlatitudes to alter the climate variability of equatorial regions through the so-called thermocline bridge, both in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. To have a significant ...

Rémi Tailleux; Alban Lazar; C. J. C. Reason

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Double-Diffusive Intrusions in a Stable Salinity Gradient “Heated from Below”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to investigate the growth and nonlinear equilibration of spatially periodic double-diffusive intrusion for negative vertical temperature Tz gradients, which are ...

Julian Simeonov; Melvin E. Stern

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Stratigraphy, petrology, and geochemistry of the Spurr Volcanic Complex, eastern Aleutian Arc, Alaska. [(Appendix for geothermal fluid chemistry)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spurr Volcanic Complex (SVC) is a calcalkaline, medium-K, sequence of andesites erupted over the last quarter of a million years by the easternmost currently active volcanic center in the Aleutian Arc. The ancestral Mt. Spurr was built mostly of andesites of uniform composition (58 to 60% SiO/sub 2/), although andesite production was episodically interrupted by the introduction of new batches of more mafic magma. Near the end of the Pleistocene the ancestral Mt. Spurr underwent Bezyianny-type avalanche caldera formation, resulting in the production of a volcanic debris avalanche with overlying ashflows. Immediately afterward, a large dome (the present Mt. Spurr) was emplaced in the caldera. Both the ashflows and dome are made of acid andesite more silicic than any analyzed lavas from the ancestral Mt. Spurr (60 to 63% SiO/sub 2/), yet contain olivine and amphibole xenocrysts derived from more mafic magma. The mafic magma (53 to 57% SiO/sub 2/) erupted during and after dome emplacement, forming proto-Crater Peak and Crater Peak. Hybrid pyroclastic flows and lavas were also produced. Proto-Crater Peak underwent glacial dissection prior to the formation of Crater Peak in approximately the same location. Appendices II through VIII contain a summary of mineral compositions; Appendix I contains geochemical data. Appendix IX by R.J. Motyka and C.J. Nye describes the chemistry of geothermal fluids. 78 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Nye, C.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Relationships between geochemistry and structure beneath a palaeo-spreading centre: a study of the mantle section in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Mineral/melt partition coe¤cients are the same as those selected by Bedini and Bodinier [57]. Numbers This work has bene¢ted from discussions with R. Bedini, F. Boudier, G. Ceuleneer, C. Dupuy, Ph. Gouze and A

Demouchy, Sylvie

449

Using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography to explore the geochemistry of the Santa Barbara oil seeps  

SciTech Connect

The development of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) has expanded the analytical window for studying complex mixtures like oil. Compared to traditional gas chromatography, this technology separates and resolves at least an order of magnitude more compounds, has a much larger signal to noise ratio, and sorts compounds based on their chemical class; hence, providing highly refined inventories of petroleum hydrocarbons in geochemical samples that was previously unattainable. In addition to the increased resolution afforded by GC x GC, the resulting chromatograms have been used to estimate the liquid vapor pressures, aqueous solubilities, octanol-water partition coefficients, and vaporization enthalpies of petroleum hydrocarbons. With these relationships, powerful and incisive analyses of phase-transfer processes affecting petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures in the environment are available. For example, GC x GC retention data has been used to quantitatively deconvolve the effects of phase transfer processes such as water washing and evaporation. In short, the positive attributes of GC x GC-analysis have led to a methodology that has revolutionized the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons. Overall, this research has opened numerous fields of study on the biogeochemical "?genetics"ť (referred to as petroleomics) of petroleum samples in both subsurface and surface environments. Furthermore, these new findings have already been applied to the behavior of oil at other seeps as well, for petroleum exploration and oil spill studies.

Reddy, Christopher; Nelson, Robert

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

450

On the Geochemistry of Venice Lagoon Sediments. Scripps Institution of Oceanography SEDiment Research Program – SIOSED. A Background Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods We report data obtained through different means: (1) whole core scanning with X-Ray fluorescence, (2) whole sediment dissolution

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Investigations on the Structure Tectonics, Geophysics, Geochemistry, and Hydrocarbon Potential of the Black Mesa Basin, Northeastern Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has instituted a basin-analysis study program to encourage drilling in underexplored and unexplored areas and increase discovery rates for hydrocarbons by independent oil companies within the continental United States. The work is being performed at the DOE's National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, by the Exploration and Drilling Group within BDM-Oklahoma (BDM), the manager of the facility for DOE. Several low-activity areas in the Mid-Continent, west, and southwest were considered for the initial study area (Reeves and Carroll 1994a). The Black Mesa region in northwestern Arizona is shown on the U.S. Geological Survey 1995 oil and gas map of the United States as an undrilled area, adapted from Takahashi and Gautier 1995. This basin was selected by DOE s the site for the initial NIPER-BDM survey to develop prospects within the Lower-48 states (Reeves and Carroll 1994b).

Barker, Colin; Carroll, Herbert; Erickson, Richard; George, Steve; Guo, Genliang; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, Michael; Volk, Len

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Implications of Carbonate Petrology and Geochemistry for the Origin of Coal Balls from the Kalo Formation (Moscovian, Pennsylvanian) of Iowa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal balls are carbonate concretions formed in peat during the Pennsylvanian and early Permian. Microprobe and microscope analysis reveal that polycrystals of high-Mg calcite (HMC), which are also high in Sr, are the earliest calcium carbonate to form in the Williamson No. 3 coal balls from the Kalo formation in Iowa. This HMC has early diagenetic rims of ferroan and non-ferroan low-Mg calcite (LMC) suggesting diagenesis in meteoric water. The combination of HMC followed by LMC suggests the earliest coal ball carbonate formed in a hydrologically dynamic environment, where saltwater influx into the mire was followed by a return to meteoric pore water. Subsequent generations of carbonate are ferroan and non-ferroan LMC and appear to result from diagenesis of the original HMC fabric with LMC rims. HMC polycrystals from coal balls are among the first abiotic HMC to be reported from the mid-Pennsylvanian; coal balls may be a good source of Pennsylvanian HMC. Coal balls that formed in porous peat (i.e. wood and surficial leaf mats) commonly have abundant radiating arrays of HMC polycrystals. Coal balls that formed in matrix-rich, low porosity peats consist primarily of permineralizing anhedral calcite, which is ferroan LMC. The link between the HMC and porous permeable peat is supported by the distribution of HMC and ferroan LMC in plant cells. Wood cells, which have porous walls, are filled with HMC; fiber cells, which have impermeable walls, are filled with ferroan LMC. This study demonstrates a link between pore volume, porosity, plant cell type, and carbonate fabric.

Jones, Courtney

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The Geochemistry of Technetium: A Summary of the Behavior of an Artificial Element in the Natural Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in the chemistry of technetium has only increased since its discovery in 1937, mainly because of the large and growing inventory of 99Tc generated during fission of 235U, its environmental mobility in oxidizing conditions, and its potential radiotoxicity. For every ton of enriched uranium fuel (3% 235U) that is consumed at a typical burn-up rate, nearly 1 kg of 99Tc is generated. Thus, the mass of 99Tc produced since 1993 has nearly quadrupled, and will likely to continue to increase if more emphasis is placed on nuclear power to slow the accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases. In order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of 99Tc and the natural environment, we review the sources of 99Tc in the nuclear fuel cycle, its chemical properties, radiochemistry, and biogeochemical behavior. We include an evaluation of the use of Re as a chemical analog of Tc, as well as a summary of the redox potential, thermodynamics, sorption, colloidal behavior, and interaction of humic substances with Tc, and the potential for re-oxidation and remobilization of Tc(IV). What emerges is a more complicated picture of Tc behavior than that of an easily tractable transition of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) with consequent immobilization. Reducing conditions (+200 to +100 mV Eh) are generally thought necessary to cause reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), but far more important are the presence of reducing agents, such as Fe(II) sorbed onto mineral grains. Catalysis of Tc(VII) by surface-mediated Fe(II) will bring the mobile Tc(VII) species to a lower oxidation state and will form the relatively insoluble Tc(IV)O2?nH2O, but even as a solid, equilibrium concentrations of aqueous Tc are nearly a factor of 20× above the EPA set drinking water standards. However, sequestration of Tc(IV) into Fe(III)-bearing phases, such as goethite or other hydrous oxyhydroxides of iron, may ameliorate concerns over the mobility of Tc. Further, the outcome of many studies on terrestrial and marine sediments that are oxidizing overall indicate that Tc is relatively immobile, due to formation of oxygen-depleted microenvironments that develop in response to bacteriological activities. The rate of re-mobilization of Tc from these microenvironments is just beginning to be assessed, but with no firm consensus. Reassessment of the simple models in which Tc is mobilized and immobilized is therefore urged.

Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Martin, Wayne J.; Zachara, John M.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Petroleum Geology and Geochemistry of Oils and Possible Source Rocks of the Southern East Coast Basin, New Zealand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The East Coast Basin of New Zealand contains up to 10,000 m of predominantly fine-grained marine sediments of Early Cretaceous to Pleistocene age, and widespread… (more)

Elgar, Nils Erik

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Geochemistry of sericite and chlorite in well 14-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system and in mineralized hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compositions of chlorite and sericite from one production well in the Roosevelt geothermal system have been determined by electron probe methods and compared with compositions of chlorite and sericite from porphyry copper deposits. Modern system sericite and chlorite occur over a depth interval of 2 km and a temperature interval of 250/sup 0/C.

Ballantyne, J.M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Molecular organic geochemistry of the oil and source rocks in Railroad Valley, eastern Great Basin, Nevada, United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive geochemical study of oils from Railroad Valley, Nevada and two candidate source rock intervals from the nearby Egan Range, was conducted in order… (more)

Ahdyar, LaOde

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Organic and isotopic geochemistry of source-rocks and crude oils from the East Sirte Basin (Libya).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Sirte Basin is a major oil producing area in Libya, but the understanding of the processes that have led to the petroleum accumulation is… (more)

Aboglila, Salem Abdulghni-O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Effect of a metallic core on transient geomagnetic induction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on transient geomagnetic induction J. Vel´imsk´y,1 , C. C. Finlay2 1 Department of Geophysics, Faculty, 2:01pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 VEL´IMSK ´Y AND FINLAY: EFFECT OF CORE ON GEOMAGNETIC INDUCTION Abstract be correctly taken into account when mod- elling the geomagnetic field using modern observatory and satellite

VelĂ­msky, Jakub

460

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Brighton 1&2 2:40 August 20, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in Saline A quifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau A quifer System, South-Central Kansas Co-Principal Investigators Co-Principal Investigators Kerry D. Newell -- stratigraphy, geochemistry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NETL-RUA October 2013 Enews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 VOLUME 3, ISSUE 11 A Discussion with Depth: NETL-RUA Researchers Invited to Write Chapter on CO 2 Injected Underground A team of National Energy Technology Laboratory-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) researchers has been invited to contribute a chapter to Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (RIMG), published by the Mineralogical Society of America and the Geochemical Society. The chapter considers the disposition of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) injected into deep, saline formations that are promising candidates for long-term CO 2 storage. It focuses on the role CO 2 dissolution into brine can play in reducing the volume required to store injected CO 2 as compared to storage of supercritical CO 2 by structural and stratigraphic trapping alone. Because CO

462

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 7740 of 29,416 results. 31 - 7740 of 29,416 results. Download CX-000433: Categorical Exclusion Determination Training Students to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Prediction, Simulation and Monitoring CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): West Lafayette, Indiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000433-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and