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Sample records for lithology geochemistry salinity

  1. Hydrology, Salinity, and Salinity Control Possibilities of the Middle Pecos River: A Reconnaissance Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.; Anand, Shilpa; Hatler, Will

    2008-01-01

    , and upwards of 12,000 mg L-1 at Girvin. These high levels of streamflow salinity not only reduce the economic uses of the water, but also limit the biodiversity of aquatic and riparian species along the river. This report outlines the hydrology, geochemistry...

  2. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State...

  3. Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State...

  4. Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 1, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core...

  5. Sandia Energy - Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologiesEnergy ConversionEngineGeochemistry Home

  6. Sandia Energy - Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologiesEnergy ConversionEngineGeochemistry

  7. Overview of fundamental geochemistry basic research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anovitz, L.M.; Benezeth, P.; Blencoe, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers in ORNL`s Geochemistry and High Temperature Aqueous Chemistry groups are conducting detailed experimental studies of physicochemical properties of the granite-melt-brine system; sorption of water on rocks from steam-dominated reservoirs; partitioning of salts and acid volatiles between brines and steam; effects of salinity on H and O isotope partitioning between brines, minerals, and steam; and aqueous geochemistry of Al. These studies contribute in many ways to cost reductions and improved efficiency in the discovery, characterization, and production of energy from geothermal resources.

  8. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  9. Salinity Management Desalination Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    Salinity Management and Desalination Technology for Brackish Water Resources in the Arid West.S. Bureau of Reclamation August, 2008 #12;Salinity Management and Desalination Technology for Brackish Water a practical roadmap forward for achieving sustainable, viable desalination of inland, moderate salinity waters

  10. Managing Soil Salinity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2001-07-13

    oceans and lakes. Fertilizers and organic amendments also add salts to the soil. Effects of salts on plants As soils become more saline, plants become unable to draw as much water from the soil. This is because the plant roots contain varying... and die, no matter how much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil?s salinity levels and suggest measures you can take to correct the specific salinity problem in your soil. Salinity and salt The terms salt and salinity are often used...

  11. Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Jump to: navigation, search...

  12. Recent advances in coal geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chyi, L.L. (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Akron, Akron, OH (US)); Chou, C.-L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL (US))

    1990-01-01

    Chapters in this collection reflect the recent emphasis both on basic research in coal geochemistry and on applied aspects related to coal utilization. Geochemical research on peat and coal generates compositional data that are required for the following reasons. First, many studies in coal geology require chemical data to aid in interpretation for better understanding of the origin and evolution of peat and coal. Second, coal quality assessment is based largely on composition data, and these data generate useful insights into the geologic factors that control the quality of coal. Third, compositional data are needed for effective utilization of coal resources and to reflect the recent emphasis on both basic research in coal geochemistry and environmental aspects related to coal utilization.

  13. ISTerre Geochemistry 3rd Terms of use of laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ISTerre Geochemistry 3rd 1 Terms of use of laboratory Geochemistry of the third floor · Rules Geochemistry 3rd 2 PREAMBLE This chart includes a description of the basic principles of procedures;ISTerre Geochemistry 3rd 3 General Rules of Use of the clean room 1. Overview of laboratories The labs

  14. Lithology and well log study of Campbell E-2 geothermal test...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lithology and well log study of Campbell E-2 geothermal test well, Humboldt House geothermal prospect, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  15. Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities NuclearlongGeneral Tables TheNatural Magmas

  16. Lithological influence of aggregate in the alkali-carbonate reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. . E-mail: angel.lopez@aidico.es; Climent, V. . E-mail: vcliment@grupogla.com; Verdu, P.

    2006-08-15

    The reactivity of carbonate rock with the alkali content of cement, commonly called alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR), has been investigated. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) can also contribute in the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in carbonate rock, mainly due to micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz or clay content in carbonate aggregate. Both ACR and ASR can occur in the same system, as has been also evidenced on this paper. Carbonate aggregate samples were selected using lithological reactivity criteria, taking into account the presence of dedolomitization, partial dolomitization, micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz. Selected rocks include calcitic dolostone with chert (CDX), calcitic dolostone with dedolomitization (CDD), limestone with chert (LX), marly calcitic dolostone with partial dolomitization (CD), high-porosity ferric dolostone with clays (FD). To evaluate the reactivity, aggregates were studied using expansion tests following RILEM AAR-2, AAR-5, a modification using LiOH AAR-5Li was also tested. A complementary study was done using petrographic monitoring with polarised light microscopy on aggregates immersed in NaOH and LiOH solutions after different ages. SEM-EDAX has been used to identify the presence of brucite as a product of dedolomitization. An ACR reaction showed shrinkage of the mortar bars in alkaline solutions explained by induced dedolomitization, while an ASR process typically displayed expansion. Neither shrinkage nor expansion was observed when mortar bars were immersed in solutions of lithium hydroxide. Carbonate aggregate classification with AAR pathology risk has been elaborated based on mechanical behaviours by expansion and shrinkage. It is proposed to be used as a petrographic method for AAR diagnosis to complement the RILEM AAR1 specifically for carbonate aggregate. Aggregate materials can be classified as I (non-reactive), II (potentially reactive), and III (probably reactive), considering induced dedolomitization ACR (dedolomitization degree) and ASR.

  17. Comparison of Caprock Mineral Characteristics at Field Demonstration Sites for Saline Aquifer Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, C.A.; Lowry, G. (Carnegie Mellon University); Dzombak, D. (Carnegie Mellon University); Soong, Yee; Hedges, S.W.

    2008-10-01

    In 2003 the U.S Department of Energy initiated regional partnership programs to address the concern for rising atmospheric CO2. These partnerships were formed to explore regional and economical means for geologically sequestering CO2 across the United States and to set the stage for future commercial applications. Several options exist for geological sequestration and among these sequestering CO2 into deep saline aquifers is one of the most promising. This is due, in part, to the possibility of stabilized permanent storage through mineral precipitation from chemical interactions of the injected carbon dioxide with the brine and reservoir rock. There are nine field demonstration sites for saline sequestration among the regional partnerships in Phase II development to validate the overall commercial feasibility for CO2 geological sequestration. Of the nine sites considered for Phase II saline sequestration demonstration, seven are profiled in this study for their caprock lithologic and mineral characteristics.

  18. Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic: Fieldstone, natural stone, diagenesis, microscopy with a great interest in sedimentation processes and diagenesis, in petrology and Flemish stratigraphy

  19. Earth and Space Sciences Geochemistry 111

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    Earth and Space Sciences #12;Geochemistry 111 5 Earth and Space Sciences Research in the realm of Earth and Space Sci- ences focusses on the observation and qualitative and quantitative description of natural phenom- ena on Earth and in the Universe, on the detailed study and experimental and computational

  20. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, David H. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

  1. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  2. Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  3. Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  4. Geochemistry of slow-growing corals : reconstructing sea surface temperature, salinity and the North Atlantic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodkin, Nathalie Fairbank

    2007-01-01

    A 225-year old coral from the south shore of Bermuda (64°W, 320N) provides a record of decadal-to-centennial scale climate variability. The coral was collected live, and sub-annual density bands seen in x-radiographs ...

  5. Compiled Multi-Lab Geochemistry Synoptic Survey (LANL, ORNL, LBNL), Barrow, Alaska; 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Brent Newman; Heather Throckmorton

    2012-07-18

    To assess the effects of microtopography and depth on ground water geochemistry in arctic polygonal terrain.

  6. Compiled Multi-Lab Geochemistry Synoptic Survey (LANL, ORNL, LBNL), Barrow, Alaska; 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Brent Newman; Heather Throckmorton

    To assess the effects of microtopography and depth on ground water geochemistry in arctic polygonal terrain.

  7. AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data for the spatial delineation of lithology and fluid units of deepwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    of lithology and fluid units of deepwater hydrocarbon reservoirs in the central Gulf of Mexico Arturo Contreras and delineate deepwater hydrocarbon reservoirs in the central Gulf of Mexico. Detailed AVA fluid/ lithology to fluid substitution. AVA reflectivity and angle-gather modeling indicate that the shale/sand interfaces

  8. Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation,...

  9. FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the fluid geochemistry in the field is spatially variable and complex, with two distinct deep geothermal fluid types (high vs. low K, Na, Cl, Ca, Li, F concentrations) and two...

  10. Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  11. 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Frederick

    The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases ...

  12. Groundwater use and salinization with grassland afforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Groundwater use and salinization with grassland afforestation E S T E B A N G . J O B B A´ G Y *w salinization of groundwater and soils in afforested plots was associated with increased evapotranspiration and groundwater consumption by trees, with maximum salinization occurring on intermediately textured soils

  13. Catalog of borehole lithologic logs from the 600 Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fecht, K R; Lillie, J T

    1982-03-01

    Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) geoscientists are studying the Hanford Site subsurface environment to assure safe management operations, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. As part of this effort, geoscientists have collected geotechnical data from about 3000 boreholes drilled on the Hanford Site since the early 1900s. These boreholes have been used for subsurface geologic, hydrologic, and engineering investigation, water supply, ground-water monitoring, and natural gas production. This report is a catalog of all obtainable (about 800) lithologic logs from boreholes in a portion of the Hanford Site known as the 600 Area.

  14. Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii | Open EnergyLithology,

  15. RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

    2013-05-16

    Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this latter point is that the iodine desorption process would be appreciably slower than the (ad)sorption process, and as such would control the rate (and the PA K{sub d} value) that iodine sorbed to and therefore migrated through the subsurface sediment. High desorption K{sub d} values would result in the “effective K{sub d}” for a reactive transport model being closer to the desorption K{sub d} value (the rate limiting value) than the (ad)sorption K{sub d} value. In summary, our understanding of {sup 129}I geochemistry has greatly improved, reducing the uncertainty associated with the PA’s conceptual model, thereby permitting us to reduce the conservatism presently incorporated in PA input values to describe {sup 129}I fate and transport in the SRS subsurface environment.

  16. DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries.

  17. Thursday, March 16, 2006 MARS: SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thursday, March 16, 2006 MARS: SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY 8:30 a.m. Crystal Ballroom A Chairs: N. J of the Proposed Hypotheses for the Origin of Sediments at the Opportunity Landing Site on Mars [#1869] The MER Athena Team interpretation that sediments at the Opportunity Landing Site on Mars are altered eolian

  18. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  19. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  20. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  1. Paleoecology and Geochemistry of the Upper Kellwasser Black Shale and Extinction Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Emily Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Comparative taphonomy and paleoecology of Middle DevonianC.W. , 1974. Marine paleoecology in the Upper Devonian ofOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Paleoecology and Geochemistry of the

  2. DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor -Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor - Geophysics, Sedimentology position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry. The appointment is probationary tenure

  3. Sedimentology and geochemistry of Archean silica granules Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 1XX, no. XX/XX 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Sedimentology and geochemistry of Archean silica granules Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 1XX, no. XX/XX 1 Sedimentology and geochemistry of Archean silica granules Elizabeth J.T. Stefurak1

  4. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  5. Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-08-23

    This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

  6. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  7. A post-Caledonian dolerite dyke from Magery, North Norway: age and geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    A post-Caledonian dolerite dyke from Magerøy, North Norway: age and geochemistry DAVID ROBERTS-Caledonian dolerite dyke from Magerøy, North Norway: age and geochemistry. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol. 71, pp, Geological Survey of Norway, Post Box 3006-Lade, N-7(}()2 Trondheim, Norway; John G. Mitchell, Department

  8. Naturally Saline Boreal Communities as Models for Reclamation of Saline Oil Sand Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Naturally Saline Boreal Communities as Models for Reclamation of Saline Oil Sand Tailings Brett G. Purdy,1,2 S. Ellen Macdonald,1 and Victor J. Lieffers1 Abstract Reclaimed landscapes after oil sands found on the predisturbance land- scape can be established on all reclaimed landscapes after oil sands

  9. Q AS A LITHOLOGICAL/HYDROCARBON INDICATOR: FROM FULL WAVEFORM SONIC TO 3D SURFACE SEISMIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge O. Parra; C.L. Hackert; L. Wilson; H.A. Collier; J. Todd Thomas

    2006-03-31

    The goal of this project was to develop a method to exploit viscoelastic rock and fluid properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic measurements to the presence of hydrocarbon saturation. To reach the objective, Southwest Research Institute scientists used well log, lithology, production, and 3D seismic data from an oil reservoir located on the Waggoner Ranch in north central Texas. The project was organized in three phases. In the first phase, we applied modeling techniques to investigate seismic- and acoustic-frequency wave attenuation and its effect on observable wave attributes. We also gathered existing data and acquired new data from the Waggoner Ranch field, so that all needed information was in place for the second phase. During the second phase, we developed methods to extract attenuation from borehole acoustic and surface seismic data. These methods were tested on synthetic data constructed from realistic models and real data. In the third and final phase of the project, we applied this technology to a full data set from the Waggoner site. The results presented in this Final Report show that geological conditions at the site did not allow us to obtain interpretable results from the Q processing algorithm for 3D seismic data. However, the Q-log processing algorithm was successfully applied to full waveform sonic data from the Waggoner site. A significant part of this project was technology transfer. We have published several papers and conducted presentations at professional conferences. In particular, we presented the Q-log algorithm and applications at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Development and Production Forum in Austin, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest from the attendees and, at the request of the SEG delegates, it was placed on the Southwest Research Institute Internet site. The presentation can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/Algorithm.pps In addition, we presented a second application of the Q algorithm at the SEG International Conference in Houston, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest there as well, and it can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/attenuation.pps.

  10. Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd congressionalNearshoreNilamGeochemistry In Thermal

  11. Saline-water withdrawals, 2005. New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire Florida Idaho Washington Oregon Nevada California New Mexico Texas Utah Arizona Nebraska NorthSaline-water withdrawals, 2005. North Carolina Puerto Rico U.S. Virgin Islands Louisiana New Ohio West Virginia Virginia Massachusetts Maine New York Pennsylvania Connecticut Rhode Island Vermont

  12. Revista Geolgica de Amrica Central, 30: 127-135, 2004 GEOCHEMISTRY AND MAGMATIC EVOLUTION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revista Geológica de América Central, 30: 127-135, 2004 GEOCHEMISTRY AND MAGMATIC EVOLUTION;128 REVISTA GEOLÓGICA DE AMÉRICA CENTRAL INTRODUCTION Arenal is a small stratovolcano located in northwestern

  13. GEOC: Division of Geochemistry 208 -Copper sequestration by black carbon in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    GEOC: Division of Geochemistry 208 - Copper sequestration by black carbon in contaminated soil the quality of agricultural products and underground water and impacts the stability of soil organic carbon

  14. Detrital geochronology and geochemistry of CretaceousEarly Miocene strata of Nepal: implications for timing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najman, Yani

    Detrital geochronology and geochemistry of Cretaceous­Early Miocene strata of Nepal: implications terranes vary considerably in age and contain rocks that may yield geochronologic information, isotopic grains has proven valuable in geochronologic provenance studies because zircons are chemically stable

  15. Bentonite geochronology, marine geochemistry, and the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kah, Linda

    Bentonite geochronology, marine geochemistry, and the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event 2012 Keywords: Middle Ordovician Argentina K-bentonite Geochronology Environmental change Attribution diachronous units ­ to define the timeframe of carbon-isotope chemostratigraphy. New geochronological data

  16. Workshop on fundamental geochemistry needs for nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

    1985-09-01

    In their deliberations, workshop participants did not attempt to incorporate the constraints that the 1982 National Nuclear Waste Management Policy Act placed upon the site-specific investigations. In particular, there was no attempt to (1) identify the research areas that apply most strongly to a particular potential repository site, (2) identify the chronological time when the necessary data or knowledge could be available, or (3) include a sensitivity analysis to prioritize and limit data needs. The workshop participants felt these are the purview of the site-specific investigations; the purpose of the workshop was to discuss the generic geochemistry research needs for a nuclear waste repository among as broad spectrum of individual scientists as possible and to develop a consensus of what geochemical information is important and why.

  17. Gas Geochemistry of the Dogger Geothermal Aquifer (Paris Basin, France)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C.; Marty, B.; Brach, M.; Wei, H.F.

    1987-01-20

    The low enthalpy program developed in the Paris Basin provides the opportunity for studying the gas geochemistry of the calcareous aquifer of the Dogger. Hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} are mainly biogenic, He displays high concentrations. He, Ar and N{sub 2} have multiple origins (radioactive decay, atmospheric migration, biochemical processes). The distribution of the gases in the zones of the basin varies in relation to the general chemistry, sedimentology and hydrodynamics. The gas geothermometers do not apply to this environment but useful estimations of the redox potential of the fluid can be derived from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratios. H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are involved in corrosion processes and scaling in the pipes. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Summary report on the geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and environs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, W.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Rundberg, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    This report gives a detailed description of work at Los Alamos that will help resolve geochemical issues pertinent to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. It is necessary to understand the properties and setting of the host tuff because this rock provides the first natural barrier to migration of waste elements from a repository. The geochemistry of tuff is being investigated with particular emphasis on retardation processes. This report addresses the various aspects of sorption by tuff, physical and chemical makeup of tuff, diffusion processes, tuff/groundwater chemistry, waste element chemistry under expected repository conditions, transport processes involved in porous and fracture flow, and geochemical and transport modeling.

  19. On the Geochemistry of Venice Lagoon Sediments. Scripps Institution of Oceanography SEDiment Research Program – SIOSED. A Background Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    profiles of wet marine sediments. Geochemistry, Geophysics,2006). New techniques in sediment core analysis. Geol.Soc.1997). Metal fluxes to the sediments of the northern Venice

  20. Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Salinity in the San Francisco Estuary: An Evaluation of Model Accuracy, X2, and the Low–Salinity Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacWilliams, Michael L.; Bever, Aaron J.; Gross, Edward S.; Ketefian, Gerard S.; Kimmerer, Wim J.

    2015-01-01

    of Model Accuracy, X2, and the Low-Salinity Zone Michael L.habitat and extent of the low- salinity zone with freshwaterand temporal extent of the low-salinity zone (LSZ), defined

  2. Use of outcrop analogues to predict lithology influence on the seismic signature Kathleen Baker* and Mike Batzle, Colorado School of Mines, Richard Gibson, Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with outcrop studies, well log and seismic interpretation of deep-water sediments, forward and inverse modeling the interpretation of subsurface information such as well logs, seismic data and regional geologic models. Here we the influence of lithology on the seismic signature. Method To better interpret seismic DHIs it is essential

  3. Evaporation Driven Soil Salinization Vishal Jambhekar, Karen Schmid, Rainer Helmig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    vertical heterogeneity interface Outlook Following issues need to be addressed in detail: Extension of chemical equilibrium at the interface Effects of turbulence and solar radiation on salinization Literature

  4. Postdoctoral fellowship in ore-deposit geology/igneous geochemistry Marie-Curie Initial Training Network ABYSS (ER1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Postdoctoral fellowship in ore-deposit geology/igneous geochemistry Marie-Curie Initial Training Network ABYSS (ER1) Training network on reactive geological systems from the mantle to the abyssal sub-Cu-PGE deposits Requirements: Candidates must hold PhD in geology/geochemistry This fellowship is for a period

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Implication of nutrient and salinity interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Treatments consisted of four nutrient concentrations and four non-lethal salinity levels; plant response freshwater inflow. We propose salinity should remain a primary concern in restora- tion plans targeted wastewater effluent is the source (Alexander and Dunton 2006). Predicting the size and magnitude of effected

  6. A Mechanism of Improved Oil Recovery by Low-Salinity Waterflooding in Sandstone Rock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasralla, Ramez

    2013-05-02

    Injection of low-salinity water showed high potentials in improving oil recovery when compared to high-salinity water. However, the optimum water salinity and conditions are uncertain, due to the lack of understanding the ...

  7. Environmental and Transport Effects on Core Measurements of Water Saturation, Salinity, Wettability, and Hydrocarbon Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPE 166154 Environmental and Transport Effects on Core Measurements of Water Saturation, Salinity and core surfacing operations can significantly alter the water saturation, salinity, hydrocarbon lapse variations of multiphase fluid saturation, water salinity, phase composition, and wettability

  8. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T

    2010-01-01

    water and salinity load management within the Hunter Rivermandated for pollutant load management in the US. 5.load regulation in the Hunter River Basin Salinity management

  9. Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) was exam- ined to characterize carbon sources and speciation in oceanic. The speciation of carbon de- pends on the chemical and physical conditions prevailing in the reservoir, and itsCarbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade

  10. Capillary geochemistry in non-saturated zone of soils. Water content and geochemical signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Capillary geochemistry in non-saturated zone of soils. Water content and geochemical signatures change. The volumetric capillary water content of the soil at high suction can be calculated corresponds to a decreasing internal pressure of the water, which modifies its thermodynamic properties

  11. A new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    acquired a wide set of data of molecular and isotopic composition of gas sampled in several Lusi vents, in the surrounding mud volcanoes, in the closest natural gas field (Wunut), and in the hydrothermal ventsA new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

  12. Mantle upwellings and convective instabilities revealed by seismic tomography and helium isotope geochemistry beneath eastern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montagner, Jean-Paul

    geochemistry beneath eastern Africa Jean-Paul Montagner,1 Bernard Marty,2 Ele´onore Stutzmann,1 De for North and East Africa using a high resolution three-dimensional anisotropic tomographic model derived from seismic data of a French experiment ``Horn of Africa'' and existing broadband data. The joint

  13. Ion microprobe survey of the grain-scale oxygen isotope geochemistry of minerals in metamorphic rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    Ion microprobe survey of the grain-scale oxygen isotope geochemistry of minerals in metamorphic standards) were made of 73 minerals in 23 samples. Both intercrystalline and intracrystalline variability in d18 O is greater in contact than in regional metamorphic rocks. Of 27 minerals analyzed in contact

  14. Migration of saline solutions in variably saturated porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    more than 4 million liters of highly saline solutions have leaked from radioactive waste storage tanks environments; it is uncommon for concentrations resulting from agrochemicals and other contaminants to 0169

  15. Migration and trapping of CO? in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, Christopher William

    2012-01-01

    Mitigation of climate change requires a reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C0 2) emissions. One promising tool for achieving this is the large-scale injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers. After injection, upward ...

  16. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non-uniform ambient noise on1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. T. Nissen-Meyer, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. Olaf Schenk, Institute of Computational

  17. Large-Scale Utilization of Saline Groundwater for Irrigation of Pistachios Interplanted with Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanden, Blake; Ferguson, Louise; Kallsen, Craig E.; Marsh, Brian; Hutmacher, Robert B.; Corwin, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    by contamination from oilfield leachate water. Severalaquifer by oil field leachate water, the average salinity of

  18. Ground-penetrating-radar response to fracture-fluid salinity: Why lower frequencies are favorable for resolving salinity changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Becker, Matthew W.

    2008-08-26

    Time-lapse ground-penetrating-radar (GPR) surveys exploit signal-amplitude changes to monitor saline tracers in fractures and to identify groundwater flow paths. However, the relationships between GPR signal amplitude, phase, and frequency...

  19. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Geochemistry data from 55-29 and 46-16 wells at Newberry 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Geochemistry data from 55-29 and 46-16 wells at Newberry 2012

  20. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Geochemistry data from 55-29 and 46-16 wells at Newberry 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Geochemistry data from 55-29 and 46-16 wells at Newberry 2012

  1. Salinity tolerance in plants: attempts to manipulate ion transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim Volkov

    2014-11-06

    Ion transport is the major determining factor of salinity tolerance in plants. A simple scheme of a plant cell with ion fluxes provides basic understanding of ion transport and the corresponding changes of ion concentrations under salinity. The review describes in detail basic principles of ion transport for a plant cell, introduces set of transporters essential for sodium and potassium uptake and efflux, analyses driving forces of ion transport and compares ion fluxes measured by several techniques. Study of differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes offers knowledge for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion transport. Several attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance are described. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to potential candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. The potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters is discussed and questioned. An alternative approach from synthetic biology is to modify the existing membrane transport proteins or create new ones with desired properties for transforming agricultural crops. The approach had not been widely used earlier and leads also to theoretical and pure scientific aspects of protein chemistry, structure-function relations of membrane proteins, systems biology and physiology of stress and ion homeostasis.

  2. Mean stream coordinates structure of the Subantarctic Front: Temperature, salinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    . The cross-stream structure of along-stream velocity is very nearly symmetric about the jet axisMean stream coordinates structure of the Subantarctic Front: Temperature, salinity, and absolute southwest of Tasmania, at the Subantarctic Front (SAF), is estimated by a stream coordinates analysis

  3. The budgets of heat and salinity in NEMO M. Hieronymus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nycander, Jonas

    of the ocean is seen to be dominated by penetrative shortwave radiation, which is so influ- ential that we Keywords: Heat budget Salinity budget NEMO Isoneutral diffusion Shortwave penetration a b s t r a c in the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) model. It is seen that the heat fluxes in NEMO

  4. The influence of salinity on the mechanical behavior of high plasticity soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahy, Brian Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates the influence of salinity on the mechanical behavior of smectitic rich high plasticity soils resedimented with pore fluid salinities ranging from 0 to 256 g/L. An extensive laboratory testing program ...

  5. Addressing agricultural salinity in the American West : harnessing behavioral diversity to institutional design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kock, Beaudry E. (Beaudry Evan)

    2010-01-01

    Salinity accumulation in the Lower Arkansas Basin (LAB) of Colorado threatens environmental quality, the agricultural economy and the potential for efficient reuse of water. Salinity is a threat to "hydraulic sustainability", ...

  6. Variation in hydraulic conductivity of mangroves: influence of species, salinity, and nitrogen and phosphorus availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Sharon Ewe Mei

    is well established (Givnish 1986), but the hydraulic architecture and hydraulic conductiv- ity of xylemVariation in hydraulic conductivity of mangroves: influence of species, salinity, and nitrogen identity and variation in salinity and nutrient availability influence the hydraulic conductivity

  7. Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 meteorite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksimova, Alevtina A.; Petrova, Evgeniya V.; Grokhovsky, Victor I.; Oshtrakh, Michael I. Semionkin, Vladimir A.

    2014-10-27

    Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 ordinary chondrite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust, fallen on February 15, 2013, in Russian Federation, was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. The Mössbauer spectra of the internal matter and fusion crust were fitted and all components were related to iron-bearing phases such as olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and chromite in the internal matter and olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and magnesioferrite in the fusion crust. A comparison of the content of different phases in the internal matter and in the fusion crust of this fragment showed that ferric compounds resulted from olivine, pyroxene, and troilite combustion in the atmosphere.

  8. A Day in the Life of the Hudson River 2009: Salinity October 8th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance, Veronica P.

    the Brooklyn Bridge on the East River, students found the salinity to be much higher at 25 parts per thousand

  9. Effect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    ) in deep saline aquifers is considered one of the most effective methods for carbon sequestration., 48, W09539, doi:10.1029/2012WR011939.* 1. Introduction [2] Carbon sequestration in deep salineEffect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

  10. Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice of interior properties, and habitability. The electrical properties of saline H2O are controlled by the binary

  11. Effects of correcting salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Leeuwen, Peter Jan

    Effects of correcting salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model in a tropical Pacific ocean model run for the period 1993­1997. Salinity and temperature corrections salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C12), 8001

  12. Lithologic and Structural Constraints on TBM Tunneling in New York City p. 704-724 in Hutton, John D. and Rogstad, W. Dave, eds., Rapid Excavation and Tunneling Conference, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Lithologic and Structural Constraints on TBM Tunneling in New York City p. 704-724 in Hutton, John York City (NYC), rock mass texture and mineralogy are important factors in predicting TBM penetration 11590 charlesm@dukelabs.com ABSTRACT In medium- to high-grade metamorphic terrains such as found in New

  13. Vp-Vs ratio sensitivity to pressure, fluid, and lithology changes in tight gas sandstones Eugenia Rojas*, Thomas L. Davis, Michael Batzle, Manika Prasad, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in prospect identification in tight gas sandstone reservoirs, because they are related to good quality rocks and permeability, possible presence of natural fractures, uncertainty in gas/water contact and high possibilityVp-Vs ratio sensitivity to pressure, fluid, and lithology changes in tight gas sandstones Eugenia

  14. Diagnosis and Management of Salinity Problems In Irrigated Pecan Productions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    2007-01-01

    Research Center at El Paso Introduction Pecans, along with Almonds and Walnuts, are among the salt sensitive tree crops currently grown under irrigation. Yet, many growers are not convinced that salts are affecting yields, probably because... symptoms of salt-affected trees are difficult to differentiate from those of water-stressed trees. Salt problems usually appear when salinity of water used for irrigation exceeds about 500 mg L -1 , and the orchard consists of clayey soils or has a...

  15. Temporal trends of pollution Pb and other metals in east-central Baf n Island inferred from lake sediment geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    Temporal trends of pollution Pb and other metals in east-central Baf n Island inferred from lake pollution Lead stable isotopes Paleolimnology Arctic lakes Sediment geochemistry Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic Pb pollution in the Clyde River region of Baf n Island, Arctic Canada. Surface sediments from

  16. Temporal trends of pollution Pb and other metals in east-central Baffin Island inferred from lake sediment geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    Temporal trends of pollution Pb and other metals in east-central Baffin Island inferred from lake pollution Lead stable isotopes Paleolimnology Arctic lakes Sediment geochemistry Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic Pb pollution in the Clyde River region of Baffin Island, Arctic Canada. Surface sediments from

  17. OCN-GG 644 syllabus only.xls Sediment Geochemistry (OCN/GG 644) Course Outline --Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCN-GG 644 syllabus only.xls Sediment Geochemistry (OCN/GG 644) Course Outline -- Spring 2015 Date to be covered 14-Jan W 2 Components and Distribution of Marine Sediment Types 19-Jan M -- Holiday: MLK Day 21-Jan W 3 Physical Properties of Sediments, Sediment Accumulation Rates and Sediment Transport Processes

  18. Geochronology and geochemistry of high-pressure granulites of the Arthur River Complex, Fiordland, New Zealand: Cretaceous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daczko, Nathan

    Geochronology and geochemistry of high-pressure granulites of the Arthur River Complex, Fiordland margin. Key words: Arthur River Complex; Fiordland; geochronology; Median Tectonic Zone; Western geochronological examinations of the rocks of the MTZ indicate two distinct phases of magmatic activity, at 345

  19. Influence of Tributaries on Salinity of Amistad International Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.; Yuan, Fasong; Anand, Shilpa

    2006-01-01

    in the reservoir was computed as the difference between salt loading and unloading. The unloading components considered were outflow from the Reservoir, seepage losses, and salt storage in the stored water as well as in the bank of the Reservoir. Seepage losses... were estimated by multiplying the mean salinity of the Reservoir to the seepage losses estimated as a sum of the spring flow below the Reservoir. The salt storage in the reservoir bank was estimated as the evapotranspiration losses from the bank when...

  20. Agricultural Losses from Salinity in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Howitt, Richard E.; Hanak, Ellen; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Envisioning futures for the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta.4, Reference guide. Sacramento (CA): California Departmentand control of Salinity in Sacramento San Joaquin Delta and

  1. Lithologically Controlled | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: Energy ResourcesGrove, Iowa:Lisle,Trough LLC

  2. THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

    2003-08-01

    This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

  3. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and petrology, mineralogy, geochemistry, of surface rocksamples. 2) Describe borehole geology by creating lithologic logs for each of the 10 CHSgeothermal wells...

  4. Convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers Jerome A. Neufeld,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers Jerome A. Neufeld,1 Marc A. Hesse,2 of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L22404, doi:10.1029/2010GL044728. [2] The storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological formations has been proposed as a technological means

  5. Soil and groundwater characteristics of saline sites supporting boreal mixedwood forests in northern Alberta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Soil and groundwater characteristics of saline sites supporting boreal mixedwood forests September 2009. Lilles, E. B., Purdy, B. G., Chang, S. X. and Macdonald, S. E. 2010. Soil and groundwater characteristics of saline sites supporting boreal mixedwood forests in northern Alberta. Can. J. Soil Sci. 90: 1Á

  6. Seasonal mixed layer salinity balance of the tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), seasonal variations of precipitation are more significant and drive a pronounced seasonal cycle of mixed; published 15 February 2008. [1] In this study the causes of the seasonal cycle of mixed layer salinity cycle in sea surface salinity (SSS) with significant spatial inhomogeneity. For example, horizontal

  7. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  8. The mechanical behavior of normally consolidated soils as a function of pore fluid salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horan, Aiden James

    2012-01-01

    Pore fluid salinities in the Gulf of Mexico area can reach levels of 250 grams of salt per liter of pore fluid (g/1). It is now necessary to determine the effect that this salinity level can play on the mechanical behaviors ...

  9. Study on the properties of saline HLLW in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, J.F.; Liu, X.G.; Song, C.L.; Jiao, R.Z.

    2008-07-01

    The properties and the components of HLLW (High-level Liquid Waste) were studied. The genuine saline HLLW is a blue-green liquid with 1.399 g/mL density. The activities of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and total {alpha}/{beta}/{gamma} were determined. The extractive properties of actinide s in the HLLW were examined in a five-stage cross-extraction test. More than 98% of the Pu in HLLW is Pu{sup 4+}, and more than 70% of the Np is Np{sup 4+}. It was shown that >99.97% of the {alpha}-nuclides were extracted by 30% TRPO-kerosene from the HLLW. The separation performance of actinides is excellent. (authors)

  10. Isotopic Evolution of Saline Lakes in the Low-Latitude and Polar Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horita, Juske [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic fractionations associated with two primary processes (evaporation and freezing of water) are discussed, which are responsible for the formation and evolution of saline lakes in deserts from both low-latitude and the Polar regions. In an evaporative system, atmospheric parameters (humidity and isotopic composition of water vapor) have strong influence on the isotopic behavior of saline lakes, and in a freezing system, salinity build-up largely controls the extent of freezing and associated isotope fractionation. In both systems, salinity has a direct impact on the isotopic evolution of saline lakes. It is proposed that a steady-state 'terminal lake' model with short-term hydrologic and environmental perturbations can serve as a useful framework for investigating both evaporative and freezing processes of perennial saline lakes. Through re-assessment of own work and literature data for saline lakes, it was demonstrated that effective uses of the isotope activity compositions of brines and salinity-chemistry data could reveal dynamic changes and evolution in the isotopic compositions of saline lakes in response to hydrologic and environmental changes. The residence time of isotopic water molecules in lakes determines the nature of responses in the isotopic compositions following perturbations in the water and isotope balances (e.g., dilution by inflow, water deficit by increased evaporation, and/or reduction in inflow). The isotopic profiles of some saline lakes from the Polar regions show that they switched the two contrasting modes of operation between evaporative and freezing systems, in response to climate and hydrological changes in the past.

  11. ELSEVIER Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 150 (1999) 223246 Marine saline ponds as sedimentary archives of late Holocene climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    ELSEVIER Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 150 (1999) 223­246 Marine saline ponds sedimentation is preserved in shallow ponds on Lee Stocking Island, Exuma Cays, Bahamas. Details throughout the remaining history of saline pond development. Foraminiferal isotope stratigraphy is compatible

  12. Routine metabolism and critical oxygen concentration for juvenile red drum Sciaenops ocellatus as functions of water hardness and salinity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlechte, John Warren

    1989-01-01

    : Dr. William H. Neill Routine metabolic rate (RMR) and cr itical oxygen concentr ation (COCR) were determined for juvenile red drum Sciaenops ocel latus acclimated to var ious combinations of water hardness (expressed as concentr ation of calcium... ion) and salinity. Treatments comprised fifteen salinity/hard- ness regimes (8, 5, 18, 28, or 35 ppt salinity by 18, 188, or 488 ppm calcium) . Three treatments had 188 / mortality during acclimation; these were 28 ppt salinity x 18 ppm calcium...

  13. The redox and iron-sulfide geochemistry of Salt Pond and the thermodynamic constraints on native magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canovas, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    Salt pond is a meromictic system with an outlet to the sea allowing denser seawater to occupy the monimolimnion while the mixolimnion has relatively low salinity and is the site of greater mixing and microbial activity. ...

  14. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

    2011-12-17

    The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

  15. Environmental geochemistry for surface and subsurface waters in the Pajarito Plateau and outlying areas, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, W.D.; Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Counce, D.

    1995-05-01

    This report provides background information on waters in the Los Alamos and Santa Fe regions of northern New Mexico. Specifically, the presented data include major element, trace element, and isotope analyses of 130 water samples from 94 different springs, wells, and water bodies in the area. The region considered in this study extends from the western edge of the Valles Caldera to as far east as Santa Fe Lake. For each sample, the presented analysis includes fourteen different major elements, twenty-six trace elements, up to five stable isotopes, and tritium. In addition, this data base contains certain characteristics of the water that are calculated from the aforementioned raw data, including the water`s maximum and minimum residence times, as found from tritium levels assuming no contamination, the water`s recharge elevation, as found from stable isotopes, and the charge balance of the water. The data in this report are meant to provide background information for investigations in groundwater hydrology and geochemistry, and for environmental projects. For the latter projects, the presented information would be useful for determining the presence of contamination it any one location by enabling one to compare potential contaminant levels to the background levels presented here. Likely locations of interest are those possibly effected by anthropogenic activities, including locations in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory, White Rock Canyon, and developed areas in the Rio Grande Valley.

  16. Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

  17. Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

    1990-10-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

  18. Mesoporous Carbon for Capacitive Deionization of Saline Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Sharma, Ms. Ketki [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled mesoporous carbon (MC) materials have been synthesized and tested for application in capacitive deionization (CDI) of saline water. MC was prepared by self-assembly of a triblock copolymer with hydrogen-bonded chains via a phenolic resin, such as resorcinol or phloroglucinol in acidic conditions, followed by carbonization and, in some cases, activation by KOH. Carbon synthesized in this way was ground into powder, from which activated MC sheets were produced. In a variation of this process, after the reaction of triblock copolymer with resorcinol or phloroglucinol, the gel that was formed was used to coat a graphite plate and then carbonized. The coated graphite plate in this case was not activated and was tested to serve as current collector during the CDI process. The performance of these MC materials was compared to that of carbon aerogel for salt concentrations ranging between 1000 ppm and 35,000 ppm. Resorcinol-based MC removed up to 15.2 mg salt per gram of carbon, while carbon aerogel removed 5.8 mg salt per gram of carbon. Phloroglucinol-based MC-coated graphite exhibited the highest ion removal capacity at 21 mg of salt per gram of carbon for 35,000 ppm salt concentration.

  19. Enhanced Oil Recovery in High Salinity High Temperature Reservoir by Chemical Flooding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bataweel, Mohammed Abdullah

    2012-02-14

    that contain high concentrations of divalent cations without the need to recondition the reservoir by flooding it with less saline/ less hardness brines. This strategy was found ineffective in preparing the reservoir for chemical flooding. Surfactants used...

  20. The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

  1. Physical and chemical effects of CO2 storage in saline aquifers of the southern North Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Niklas

    2013-07-01

    One of the most promising mitigation strategies for greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere is carbon capture and storage (CCS). Deep saline aquifers are seen as the most efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites, ...

  2. Excessive Hyperthermic Necrosis of a Pulmonary Lobe after Hypertonic Saline-Enhanced Monopolar Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Tae Sung, E-mail: tskim@smc.samsung.co.kr; Lim, Hyo K. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hojoong [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, The Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Although there has been a feasibility study of saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of the lung in rabbits, there has been no report on hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of human pulmonary tumors or its complication. We report a case in which a large necrotic cavity was produced in the lung after hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of recurrent metastatic tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma. Although hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation is powerful and efficient in local ablation, it is difficult to predict the exact extent of ablation, especially in the lungs. This can be dangerous, as there is a high chance of producing an ablation area much larger than expected and, hence, major complications. Special attention is required not to overablate while using this technique.

  3. Large-Scale Utilization of Saline Groundwater for Irrigation of Pistachios Interplanted with Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanden, Blake; Ferguson, Louise; Kallsen, Craig E.; Marsh, Brian; Hutmacher, Robert B.; Corwin, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    other cultural/harvest costs and water cost of $120/ac-ft ofand water salinity: Replicated soil samples are taken at germination and post harvestharvest. GIS survey with EM38 and aerial imagery. Plant data: leaf water

  4. Maps of Salinity, Nitrate and Chlorophyll over the Gulf of Alaska Continental Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to enhanced salinity (inner shelf) and thermal (outer shelf) stratification. SeaWiFS and shipboard chlorophyll Point density section shows reduced, but not vanishing stratification, due to tidal mixing over Portlock

  5. The influence of geothermal sources on deep ocean temperature, salinity, and flow fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speer, Kevin G. (Kevin George)

    1988-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the effect of geothermal sources on the deep circulation, temperature and salinity fields. In Chapter 1 background material is given on the strength and distribution of geothermal heating. In ...

  6. The response of New Guinea impatiens to varying salinity levels in a subirrigation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Nancy Morgan

    1996-01-01

    Subirrigation is an alternative irrigation method for greenhouse crops. Lack of leaching poses the problem of high salt buildup in the root zone. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of saline irrigation water on a greenhouse...

  7. Effects of Salinity and Specific Ions on Seedling Emergence and Growth of Onions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.; Martinez, I.; Niu, G.

    2008-01-01

    of salinity: 1.0, 1.8, 3.7 and 5.2 dS m-1 (or 630, 1200, 2500 and 3700 ppm) at a constant ionic ratio of 1:1 for Na: Ca + Mg, and Cl: SO4, and other solutions had three levels of ionic concentration ratios; 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 at fixed levels of salinity, either...

  8. Supplement to Diagnosis and Management of Salinity Problems in Irrigated Pecan Production: Salt Leaching 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    2010-01-01

    .pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-387A 2010 Supplement to Diagnosis and Management of Salinity Problems in Irrigated Pecan Production: Salt Leaching By: S...-2118 July 2010 TWRI TR-287-A July 2010 Supplement to Diagnosis and Management of Salinity Problems in Irrigated Pecan Production: Salt Leaching S. Miyamoto Professor and Soil...

  9. Physical and Economic Potential of Geological CO2 Storage in Saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    received November 10, 2008. Accepted January 5, 2009. Carbon sequestration in sandstone saline reservoirsPhysical and Economic Potential of Geological CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers J O R D A N K . E C C L E S , * , L I N C O L N P R A T S O N , R I C H A R D G . N E W E L L , A N D R O B E R T B . J

  10. Sediment Geochemistry (OCN/GG 644) Course Outline --Fall 2015 Introduction and Fundamentals: General Diagenesis, Organic Matter Diagenesis, Mineral Precipitation & Dissolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment Geochemistry (OCN/GG 644) Course Outline -- Fall 2015 Date Day Lectu re # Topic Components and Distribution of Marine Sediment Types 1-Sep Tu 3 Physical Properties of Sediments, Sediment Accumulation Rates and Sediment Transport Processes 3-Sep Th 4 Physical Properties of Sediments, Sediment

  11. 13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakhmouradian, Anton

    13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of rare metals in natural fluids 551 13.21.2.2.2 Aqueous complexation and mineral solubility 552 13 Acknowledgments 564 References 564 13.21.1 Introduction Rare-element mineral deposits, also called rare-metal

  12. Low-Salinity Waterflooding to Improve Oil Recovery - Historical Field Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2007-11-01

    Waterflooding is by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of wa-terfloods. Laboratory water-flood tests and single-well tracer tests have shown that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery, but work designed to test the method on a field scale has not yet been undertaken. Historical waterflood records could unintentionally provide some evidence of improved recovery from waterflooding with lower salinity brine. Nu-merous fields in the Powder River basin of Wyoming have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) obtained from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Three Minnelusa formation fields in the basin were identified as potential candidates for waterflood comparisons based on the salinity of the connate and injection water. Historical pro-duction and injection data for these fields were obtained from the public record. Field waterflood data were manipulated to be displayed in the same format as laboratory coreflood re-sults. Recovery from fields using lower salinity injection wa-ter was greater than that using higher salinity injection wa-ter—matching recovery trends for laboratory and single-well tests.

  13. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    of active pumping, water extraction wells can also bescenarios in which water extraction wells operate as passivemanagement via extraction of native saline water has been

  14. Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from the Hawaiian Islands: Final Technical Report, Year 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Microalgae were collected from 48 locations in the Hawaiian Islands in 1985. The sites were an aquaculture tank; a coral reef; bays; a geothermal steam vent; Hawaiian fish ponds; a Hawaiian salt punawai (well); the ocean; river mouths; saline lakes; saline pools; saline ponds; a saline swamp; and the ponds, drainage ditches and sumps of commercial shrimp farms. From 4,800 isolations, 100 of the most productive clones were selected to be maintained by periodic transfer to sterile medium. Five clones were tested for growth rate and production in a full-spectrum-transmitting solarium.

  15. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

    2010-01-01

    Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

  16. A method for quick assessment of CO2 storage capacity in closed and semi-closed saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    the fraction of total pore space available for CO2 storage, limited by heterogeneity, buoyancy effectsA method for quick assessment of CO2 storage capacity in closed and semi-closed saline formations, USA 1. Introduction Geological carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep forma- tions (e.g., saline

  17. Uncertainty Analysis of Capacity Estimates and Leakage Potential for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers by Yamama Raza Submitted to the Engineering Systems DivisionUncertainty Analysis of Capacity Estimates and Leakage Potential for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers by Yamama Raza S.B., Engineering Science, Smith College, 2006 Submitted

  18. f your soil has a high salinity content, the plants growing there will not be as vigorous as they would

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I f your soil has a high salinity content, the plants growing there will not be as vigorous as they would be in normal soils. Seeds will germinate poorly, if at all, and the plants will grow slowly much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil's salinity levels and suggest measures

  19. Origin of groundwater salinity and hydrogeochemical processes in the confined Quaternary aquifer of the Pearl River Delta, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Origin of groundwater salinity and hydrogeochemical processes in the confined Quaternary aquifer of groundwater salinity and the major hydrogeochemical processes controlling the groundwater evolution­2009, and groundwater samples were collected for major ion (Ca2þ ; Mg2þ ; Naþ ; Kþ ; NHþ 4 ; Cl À ; SO2À 4 and HCOÀ 3

  20. Petrology and geochemistry of Alto Peak, a vapor-cored hydrothermal system, Leyte Province, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, A.G.; Giggenbach, W.F.; Saleras, J.R.M.; Salonga, N.D.; Vergara, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    Based on detailed petrological information on secondary mineral assemblages and the composition of fluids trapped in inclusions and discharged from five wells, the Alto Peak geothermal field was found to represent a combined vapor and liquid-dominated system. A central core or chimney, with a diameter of about 1 km, a height of some 3 km and occupied by a high gas vapor (1.1 to 5.6 molal CO{sub 2}), is surrounded by an envelope of intermediate salinity water (7,000 mg/kg Cl) with temperatures between 250 and 350 C. The transition from purely vapor-dominated to liquid-dominated zones takes place via two-phase zones occupied by fluid mixtures of highly variable compositions. Much of the lower temperature, mature neutral pH Cl water is likely to have formed during an earlier stage in the evolution of the system. High temperatures of > 300 C, and associated alteration, are limited to wells AP-1D and the lower parts of AP-2D and are ascribed to re-heating by recent magmatic intrusions. The isotopic composition of the well discharges suggests that they contain some 40 to 50% of magmatic water. Alto Peak is considered a typical example of hydrothermal systems associated with many dormant volcanoes.

  1. Towards a more saline North Atlantic and a fresher Arctic under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    Towards a more saline North Atlantic and a fresher Arctic under global warming I. Bethke,1,2,3 T global warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21712, doi:10.1029/ 2006GL027264. 1. Introduction [2.g., Cubasch et al., 2001; Ra¨isa¨nen, 2002]. At the high northern latitudes, a combination of warming

  2. Using Trends and Geochemical Analysis to Assess Salinity Sources along the Pecos River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, Aaron

    2012-07-16

    in the reservoir rose as much as 10 mg/L per year and often approached the drinking water standard for potable water (1000 mg/L). Since this time, control efforts have focused on reducing the river's salinity, requiring the identification of salt sources...

  3. COUPLED HYDROMECHANICAL MODELING OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN DEEP SALINE AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    1 COUPLED HYDROMECHANICAL MODELING OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN DEEP SALINE AQUIFERS VICTOR VILARRASA1,2 , DIOGO BOLSTER1 , SEBASTIA OLIVELLA1 , JESUS CARRERA2 1 Departmen of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Civil Engineering School, Technical University of Catalonia, GHS, UPC, 08034 Barcelona, Spain. 2

  4. Estimating Salinity between 25 and 45S in the Atlantic Ocean Using Local Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimating Salinity between 25° and 45°S in the Atlantic Ocean Using Local Regression W. C. THACKER and temperature in the South Atlantic is quantified with the aid of local regression. To capture the spatial fitting regression models to the profile data is considerably more work than using published clima

  5. Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline modifying the leak hydraulic properties (e.g. permeability) may be unfeasible. An appealing option.e. by creating a hydraulic barrier. The present article presents and discusses the operational and strategic

  6. SALINE LAKES ON QINGHAI-TIBET PLATEAU AND SALTS ON MARS1 M. P. Zheng1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SALINE LAKES ON QINGHAI-TIBET PLATEAU AND SALTS ON MARS1 M. P. Zheng1 , A. Wang2 , F. J. Kong1 , N of tectonically active belts of plateaus on the Earth [3]. The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau accounts for 1

  7. Seasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their metabolic activities, microbial populations mediate the impact of high gradient regions on ecologicalSeasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in nitrogen and carbon metabolism in the CRCM. Initial experiments with the environmental microarrays were

  8. Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge at a seasonally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge the behaviour of the hydrocarbon plume at the groundwater/surface water transition zone to be strongly B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Ground water; Surface water; Hydrocarbons; Discharge; Tides

  9. Adaptive Fluid Electrical Conductivity Logging to Determine the Salinity Profiles in Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    quality data ­ existing production wells mostly used for emergency water supply · High cost of groundwater packers #12;Down-hole tool in difference flow logging (DIFF) #12;Flowing electrical conductivity logging water of constant salinity distinctly different from that of formation water). 2. Shut in well and lower

  10. Surface chemistry of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron and electrochemistry study in gas-flow physiological saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Surface chemistry of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron and electrochemistry study in gas greatly than that of MC-Fe. A further comparative study of corrosion and electrochemistry per- formance of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron and electrochemistry study in gas-flow physiological saline. J Biomed

  11. Capacitive Mixing Power Production from Salinity Gradient Energy Enhanced through ExoelectrogenGenerated Ionic Currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capacitive Mixing Power Production from Salinity Gradient Energy Enhanced through Exoelectrogen for an external power supply, the voltage window remains limited by the #12;3 3 membrane potential which used. #12;5 5 Fig. 2s: Steady state whole cell power density for three chamber microbial fuel

  12. Ammonium Bicarbonate Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes for Salinity Gradient Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to address global energy needs, such as reverse electro- dialysis1-4 (RED), capacitive energy extraction are the predominant ions in many natural water sources.12 Thermolytic salts, such as aqueous ammonium bicarbonate (AmB), are being considered for salinity gradient energy production because these solutions permit closed

  13. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake on Earth. We report on new studies of Don Juan Pond (DJP), which exists at the upper limit of ephemeral on Juan Pond (DJP), found at the lowest point in the South Fork of Upper Wright Valley, Antarctica (Figure

  14. Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity pond sizes (diameter 750 m=large), and two habitat types (pond, adjacent marsh) in the Barataria Bay Estuary, Louisiana. Nekton assemblages of ponds and the adjacent marsh

  15. CO[subscript 2] migration in saline aquifers: Regimes in migration with dissolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, C.W.

    We incorporate CO[subscript 2] dissolution due to convective mixing into a sharp-interface mathematical model for the post-injection migration of a plume of CO[subscript 2] in a saline aquifer. The model captures CO[subscript ...

  16. Low-salinity pools at Barbados, West Indies: Their origin, frequency, and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Low-salinity pools at Barbados, West Indies: Their origin, frequency, and variability Peter S-temperature recorders moored off the west coast of Barbados, West Indies, from May 1996 to November 1997 revealed radium 228/226 activity ratios of ~1, consistent with previous measurements in Barbados of water

  17. Using tracer experiments to determine deep saline aquifers caprocks transport characteristics for carbon dioxide storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for carbon dioxide storage P. Bachaud1,2 , Ph. Berne1 , P. Boulin1,3,4 , F. Renard5,6 , M. Sardin2 , J caprocks from a deep saline aquifer in the Paris basin. Introduction Storage of carbon dioxide in deep. This technique is applied to measure the transport properties of a carbonate caprock with permeability lower than

  18. Using microbial desalination cells to reduce water salinity prior to reverse Maha Mehanna,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using microbial desalination cells to reduce water salinity prior to reverse osmosis Maha Mehannand February 2010, Accepted 16th June 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c002307h A microbial desalination cell (MDC the energy efficiency of a downstream reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system. We investigated here the use

  19. Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil S Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil b Soil & Water Sciences Program, Department São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 August

  20. Soil morphological control on saline and freshwater lake hydrogeochemistry in the Pantanal of Nhecolndia, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    morphological control on saline and freshwater lake hydrogeochemistry in the Pantanal of Nhecolândia, Brazil L-MS, Brazil 4 ­ Laboratório de Pedologia, Departamento de Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo C.P. 8105, 05508-900, São Paulo, Brazil 5 - UFMS, Departamento de Geografia, Campus de Três Lagoas, Av. Ranulfo

  1. The onset of the Messinian salinity crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean (Pissouri Basin, Cyprus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    The onset of the Messinian salinity crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean (Pissouri Basin, Cyprus) W'Histoire Naturelle, 43 rue Bu¡on, Paris, France c Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing¡on, 75005 Paris, France g Universite¨ Paris-Sud (Orsay), De¨partement des Sciences de la Terre, Paris

  2. Surface salinity in the Atlantic Ocean (30S50N) G. Reverdin a,*, E. Kestenare b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ´riques, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Universite´ Pierre et Marie Curie, case 100, 4 pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris outside the equatorial region. The spatial scales of the seasonal anom- alies are regional, but not basin of the period in some parts of the basin (usually towards increasing salinities, at least between 20°N and 45°N

  3. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Lung Ablation Combined with Transbronchial Saline Injection: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawai, T., E-mail: t-kawai@hosp.yoka.hyogo.jp; Kaminou, T., E-mail: kaminout@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Fujioka, S.; Ito, H. [Tottori University, Division of Organ Pathology, Department of Microbiology and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Nakamura, K. [Hakuai Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ihaya, T. [Sanin Rosai Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ogawa, T. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency lung ablation with transbronchial saline injection. The bilateral lungs of eight living swine were used. A 13-gauge bone biopsy needle was inserted percutaneously into the lung, and 1 ml of muscle paste was injected to create a tumor mimic. In total, 21 nodules were ablated. In the saline injection group (group A), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed for 11 nodules after transbronchial saline injection under balloon occlusion with a 2-cm active single internally cooled electrode. In the control group (group B), conventional RFA was performed for 10 nodules as a control. The infused saline liquid showed a wedge-shaped and homogeneous distribution surrounding a tumor mimic. All 21 RFAs were successfully completed. The total ablation time was significantly longer (13.4 {+-} 2.8 min vs. 8.9 {+-} 3.5 min; P = 0.0061) and the tissue impedance was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (73.1 {+-} 8.8 {Omega} vs. 100.6 {+-} 16.6 {Omega}; P = 0.0002). The temperature of the ablated area was not significantly different (69.4 {+-} 9.1{sup o}C vs. 66.0 {+-} 7.9{sup o}C; P = 0.4038). There was no significant difference of tumor mimic volume (769 {+-} 343 mm{sup 3} vs. 625 {+-} 191 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.2783). The volume of the coagulated area was significantly larger in group A than in group B (3886 {+-} 1247 mm{sup 3} vs. 2375 {+-} 1395 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.0221). Percutaneous radiofrequency lung ablation combined with transbronchial saline injection can create an extended area of ablation.

  4. Effects of Increased Upward Flux of Saline Water Caused by CO2 Storage or Other Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murdoch, Lawrence; Xie, Shuang; Falta, Ronald W.; Yonkofski, Catherine MR

    2015-08-01

    Injection of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is being considered to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and this process is expected to increase the pressure in these deep aquifers. One potential consequence of pressurization is an increase in the upward flux of saline water. Saline groundwater occurs naturally at shallow depths in many sedimentary basins, so an upward flux of solutes could degrade the quality of freshwater aquifers and threaten aquatic ecosystems. One problem could occur where saline water flowed upward along preferential paths, like faults or improperly abandoned wells. Diffuse upward flow through the natural stratigraphy could also occur in response to basin pressurization. This process would be slower, but diffuse upward flow could affect larger areas than flow through preferential paths, and this motivated us to evaluate this process. We analyzed idealized 2D and 3D geometries representing the essential details of a shallow, freshwater aquifer underlain by saline ground water in a sedimentary basin. The analysis was conducted in two stages, one that simulated the development of a freshwater aquifer by flushing out saline water, and another that simulated the effect of a pulse-like increase in the upward flux from the basin. The results showed that increasing the upward flux from a basin increased the salt concentration and mass loading of salt to streams, and decrease the depth to the fresh/salt transition. The magnitude of these effects varied widely, however, from a small, slow process that would be challenging to detect, to a large, rapid response that could be an environmental catastrophe. The magnitude of the increased flux, and the initial depth to the fresh/salt transition in groundwater controlled the severity of the response. We identified risk categories for salt concentration, mass loading, and freshwater aquifer thickness, and we used these categories to characterize the severity of the response. This showed that risks would likely be minor if the upward flux was smaller than a few tenths of the magnitude of recharge, according to the 2D analyses. The 3D analyses also show that upward flux could occur without a significant increase in the risk categories. The major contribution of this work is that it shows how a large increase in diffuse upward flux from a basin could cause significant problems, but a small increase in upward flux may occur without significantly affecting risks to the shallow freshwater flow system. This heightens the importance of understanding interactions between shallow and deep hydrologic systems when characterizing CO2 storage projects.

  5. Potential Impacts of Desalination Concentrate on Salinity of Irrigation Water: A Case Study in the El Paso Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info TR-314 Potential Impacts of Desalination concentrate on salinity of Irrigation Water.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 88666 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name TR-314 Potential Impacts... of Desalination concentrate on salinity of Irrigation Water.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 TR-2008-314 Potential Impacts of Desalination Concentrate on Salinity of Irrigation Water: A Case Study...

  6. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

  7. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70.degree. C. to 90.degree. C., at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%.

  8. Water Balance, Salt Loading, and Salinity Control Options of Red Bluff Reservoir, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.; Yuan, Fasong; Anand, Shilpa

    2007-01-01

    stream_source_info tr298.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 85293 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name tr298.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 TR- 298 2007 Water Balance, Salt Loading... Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University WATER BALANCE, SALT LOADING, AND SALINITY CONTROL OPTIONS OF RED BLUFF RESERVOIR, TEXAS S. Miyamoto, Fasong Yuan, and Shilpa Anand...

  9. Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-09-01

    Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

  10. Comparison of methods for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in saline formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, Angela L. [U.S. DOE; Bromhal, Grant S. [U.S. DOE; Strazisar, Brian [U.S. DOE; Rodosta, Traci D. [U.S. DOE; Guthrie, William J. [U.S. DOE; Allen, Douglas E. [ORISE; Guthrie, George D. [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary estimates of CO{sub 2} storage potential in geologic formations provide critical information related to Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) technologies to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. Currently multiple methods to estimate CO{sub 2} storage and multiple storage estimates for saline formations have been published, leading to potential uncertainty when comparing estimates from different studies. In this work, carbon dioxide storage estimates are compared by applying several commonly used methods to general saline formation data sets to assess the impact that the choice of method has on the results. Specifically, six CO{sub 2} storage methods were applied to thirteen saline formation data sets which were based on formations across the United States with adaptations to provide the geologic inputs required by each method. Methods applied include those by (1) international efforts – the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (Bachu et al., 2007); (2) United States government agencies – U.S. Department of Energy – National Energy Technology Laboratory (US-DOE-NETL, 2012) and United States Geological Survey (Brennan et al., 2010); and (3) the peer-reviewed scientific community – Szulczewski et al. (2012) and Zhou et al. (2008). A statistical analysis of the estimates generated by multiple methods revealed that assessments of CO{sub 2} storage potential made at the prospective level were often statistically indistinguishable from each other, implying that the differences in methodologies are small with respect to the uncertainties in the geologic properties of storage rock in the absence of detailed site-specific characterization.

  11. The interactive influence of temperature and salinity on larval and juvenile growth in the gastropod Crepidula fornicata (L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and glacial melting caused by climate change. Many marine organisms that are adapted to the present conditions the rate of glacial melting, causing salinity to decrease in high latitude waters since the 1950s (IPCC

  12. Storage capacity and injection rate estimates for CO? sequestration in deep saline aquifers in the conterminous United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A promising method to mitigate global warming is injecting CO? into deep saline aquifers. In order to ensure the safety of this method, it is necessary to understand how much CO? can be injected into an aquifer and at what ...

  13. Community Metabolism Along Nutrient and Salinity Gradients of the Potomac River Estuary: An Application from Continuous Monitoring Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Community Metabolism Along Nutrient and Salinity Gradients of the Potomac River Estuary to make metabolism estimates. We used data from 14 of these locations from March through October 2007

  14. High Resolution Simulation and Characterization of Density-Driven Flow in CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are routinely used to study the process of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers. In this paper TOUGH2-MP. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration involves injecting CO2

  15. Laboratory and field studies on the effects of salinity on survival and distribution of the hooked mussel Brachidontes recurvus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bains, Margaret Lewis

    1967-01-01

    during 1~th test period . . ~. . . . . . 10 Daily observation? ef eaeised gill tissue ?aposed te eaters vitb saliaity values rnllg in& f res 0 to 40' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o 5 1 Deaths (by keehs) and por Cent survival ia laboratory teste on eaall... aussels (5 te li a)-SO ausaels/salinity. . . . . . . . . SS Deaths (by veehs) sad per sent survival ia laberatory tmts oa aediua nussels (15 to 50 ~) 10 aussele/salinity. . . . . . . . . SS Deaths (by veehs) and per sent survival in laboratory tests...

  16. Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T.; Drozhko, E.G.; Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N.

    1994-06-01

    The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

  17. Property:LithologyInfo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, searchContDiv JumpTechDsc JumpLab Test Jump(m)

  18. Cumulative soil chemistry changes from land application of saline-sodic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganjegunte, G.K.; King, L.A.; Vance, G.F. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department for Renewable Resources

    2008-09-15

    Management of large volumes (60,000 ha-m) of co-production water associated with coal bed natural gas (CBNG) water extraction is a potential concern in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana due to elevated water salinity and sodicity levels. Land application of saline-sodic CBNG water is a common water management method being practiced in the PRB, which can result in deterioration in soil quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects from 1 to 4 yr of land application with CBNG water on soil chemical properties at six study sites (fine to loamy, mixed to smectitic, mesic, Ustic Ardisols and Entisols) in the Wyoming PRB region. Changes in chemistry of soils collected from six depths irrigated with CBNG water were compared with representative non-irrigated soils. Applications of CBNG water significantly increased soil EC, SAR, and ESP values (up to 21, 74, and 24 times, respectively) compared with non-irrigated soils. Differences in soil chemical properties between an irrigated and non-irrigated coarse-textured soil were less than that of fine-textured soils, emphasizing texture as an important factor for salinity buildup. Pretreatment of CBNG water using a sulfur burner and application of gypsum and elemental S soil amendments reduced soil pH but did not prevent the build-up of salts and sodium. Study results suggest that current CBNG water management strategies are not as effective as projected. Additional research is needed to develop management strategies appropriate for mitigating adverse effects of CBNG water irrigation.

  19. The detrimental effects of salinity on rooting of coleus cuttings and their alleviation with gypsum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Antonius Hendrick

    1981-01-01

    concen- trations 2 Electrical conductivities (E. C. ) and osmolalities of 5 increasing salt solutions containing a 1/10- strength Hoagland's solution . 3 Electrical conductivities (E. C. ) of 4 NaCl solutions with increasing CaSO4 concentrations 4... of NaCl was due to a Na+ and/or Cl 1nhibition, a general 1on1c effect and/or osmot1c stresses of the salt solutions. 3. To determine if CaS04 reduces the adverse effects of increasing salinity in nutrient solutions and a peat-styra- foam propagation...

  20. The influence of irrigation water salinity on optimal nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium liquid fertilizer rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos Nu?n?ez, Ricardo

    1990-01-01

    of nitrogen fertilizer to compensate for leaching losses (Miyamoto, 1984). The effect of salt stress on mineral status of plants has been studied extensively for many agronomic and horticultural crops (Al-Saidi and Alawi, 1984; Al-Saidi et al. , 1985... cultivars (Al-Saidi and Alawi, 1984; Al- Saidi et al. , 1985). Ten flowering annuals were grown in saline water with electrical conductivities of 0. 8, 1. 5, 3. 0, or 4. 5 dS m from a 2:1 equivalent weight basis of CaCI2 and NaCI in tap water (Devitt...

  1. Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapaka, Saikiran

    2011-01-01

    While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

  2. Evaluating the Potential of Biochars and Composts as Organic Amendments to Remediate a Saline-Sodic Soil Leached with Reclaimed Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaganti, Vijayasatya Nagendra

    2014-01-01

    Effects of drainage on water quality in arid and semiaridR. , Westcot, D. , 1985. Water quality for agriculture. FAOIrrigation with saline water: benefits and environmental

  3. Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt BACKUS, Ethan L.1, GAGNON, Kelli E.1, EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.1, and KHALIL, Khalil Isaac2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt University, Egypt Sponsored by NSF-OISE-1004021 Session 92:T3. Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research over 30,000 km2 in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The deposits most resemble Algoma-type iron

  4. Monitoring of saline tracer movement with vertically distributed self-potential measurements at the HOBE agricultural test site, Voulund, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jougnot, Damien; Haarder, Eline B; Looms, Majken C

    2015-01-01

    The self-potential (SP) method is sensitive to water fluxes in saturated and partially saturated porous media, such as those associated with rainwater infiltration and groundwater recharge. We present a field-based study at the Voulund agricultural test site, Denmark, that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to focus on the vertical self-potential distribution prior to and during a saline tracer test. A coupled hydrogeophysical modeling framework is used to simulate the SP response to precipitation and saline tracer infiltration. A layered hydrological model is first obtained by inverting dielectric and matric potential data. The resulting model that compares favorably with electrical resistance tomography models is subsequently used to predict the SP response. The electrokinetic contribution (caused by water fluxes in a charged porous soil) is modeled by an effective excess charge approach that considers both water saturation and pore water salinity. Our results suggest that the effective excess char...

  5. Geochemistry of FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The three tasks conducted in this research project were related to understanding the geochemistry and mineralogy of the co-disposal of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) wastes with coal slurry solid (CSS) from a coal preparation plant. During coal cleaning, pyrite, other heavy minerals and rock fragments are separated from the coal and discharged in an aqueous slurry to an impoundment. After dewatering and closure of the impoundment, the pyrite can oxidize and produce acid that can migrate into the underlying groundwater system. The addition of FBC residue to the CSS will buffer the pore water pH to approximately 7.8. In Task 1, soluble components and acid-base react ion products from mixtures of FBC waste and CSS were extracted for 3 to 180 days in aqueous batch experiments. The results of these extractions showed that, eventually, the extracts would attain a pH between 7 and 8. That pH range is characteristic of an aqueous system in equilibrium with calcite, gypsum, and atmospheric carbon dioxide. After 180 days, the mean calcium concentration in all of the extracts was 566{+-}18 mg/L and sulfate concentrations averaged 2420{+-}70 mg/L. In Task 2, three extracts from CSS/FBC residue mixtures were prepared for use in experiments to determine the adsorption/desorption reactions that occur between solutes in the extracts and two common Illinois soils. Time constraints allowed the use of only two of the extracts for adsorption studies. The concentrations of most solutes were not significantly lowered by adsorption at the pH of the extract-soil suspension, nor over a wide range of pH. The results suggest that the type of solutes that were released by the CSS/FBC residue mixture would not be attenuated by adsorption. In a modified Task 3, the literature on the kinetics of pyrite oxidation in near-neutral to alkaline pH was reviewed in preparation for future development of a computer model of pyrite oxidation in CSS/FBC residue codisposal.

  6. Well injectivity during CO2 storage operations in deep saline aquifers6 1: Experimental investigation of drying effects, salt precipitation and7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technique than can potentially limit the accumulation29-17Jan2014 #12;3 1. Introduction51 52 Geological sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers studied54 much less than mature oil & gas reservoirs. Injection of carbon dioxide into saline aquifers55

  7. Core Analysis For The Development And Constraint Of Physical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all...

  8. Quality Control of Temperature and Salinity from CTD based on Anomaly Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelão, Guilherme P

    2015-01-01

    The CTD is a set of sensors used by oceanographers to measure fundamental hydrographic properties of the oceans. It is characterized by a high precision product, only achieved if a quality control procedure identifies and removes the bad samples. Such procedure has been traditionally done by a sequence of independent tests that minimize false negatives. It is here proposed a novel approach to identify the bad samples as anomalies in respect to the typical behavior of good data. Several tests are combined into a single multidimensional evaluation to provide a more flexible classification criterion. The traditional approach is reproduced with an error of 0.04%, otherwise, the Anomaly Detection technique surpasses the reference if calibrated by visual inspection. CoTeDe is a Python package developed to apply the traditional and the Anomaly Detection quality control of temperature and salinity data from CTD, and can be extended to XBT, ARGO and other sensors.

  9. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, “Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species,” we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task “Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes,” We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

  10. Salinity: effect on germination of native plants and leaching in clay soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neighbors, James Olen

    1974-01-01

    studies. NaC1 Solutions Osmotic Tension (bars) NaC1 g/1 CaC12 g/1 Conductivity (mmhos/cm) 3. 0 7. 0 10. 0 4. 0 10. 1 13. 5 6. 6 16. 0 NaC1 and CaC1 Mixed Salt Solutions 3. 00 7. 00 10. 00 2. 80 6. 44 9. 00 1. 40 3, 22 4. 50 6...-disulfide) to control pathogens. Treated seeds of each species were distributed evenly over 2 sheets of No. 3 [&hetman filter paper moistened with 5. 5 ml of the appropriate salinity solution in closed 9. 0 cm diameter Petri dishes. Germination tests were conducted...

  11. Feasibility of Geophysical Monitoring of Carbon-Sequestrated Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallick, Subhashis; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2013-09-30

    As carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is sequestered from the bottom of a brine reservoir and allowed to migrate upward, the effects of the relative permeability hysteresis due to capillary trapping and buoyancy driven migration tend to make the reservoir patchy saturated with different fluid phases over time. Seismically, such a patchy saturated reservoir induces an effective anisotropic behavior whose properties are primarily dictated by the nature of the saturation of different fluid phases in the pores and the elastic properties of the rock matrix. By combining reservoir flow simulation and modeling with seismic modeling, it is possible to derive these effective anisotropic properties, which, in turn, could be related to the saturation of CO{sub 2} within the reservoir volume any time during the post-injection scenario. Therefore, if time-lapse seismic data are available and could be inverted for the effective anisotropic properties of the reservoir, they, in combination with reservoir simulation could potentially predict the CO{sub 2} saturation directly from the time-lapse seismic data. It is therefore concluded that the time-lapse seismic data could be used to monitor the carbon sequestrated saline reservoirs. But for its successful implementation, seismic modeling and inversion methods must be integrated with the reservoir simulations. In addition, because CO{sub 2} sequestration induces an effective anisotropy in the sequestered reservoir and anisotropy is best detected using multicomponent seismic data compared to single component (P-wave) data, acquisition, processing, and analysis is multicomponent seismic data is recommended for these time-lapse studies. Finally, a successful implementation of using time-lapse seismic data for monitoring the carbon sequestrated saline reservoirs will require development of a robust methodology for inverting multicomponent seismic data for subsurface anisotropic properties.

  12. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES, CHRISTMAS ISLAND, 1954-69 GUNTHER It SECKEL' AND MARIAN Y. Y. YONG' ABSTRACT Harmonic functions, with daily sampling, are on average 0.07° C. Harmonic analysis spanning the entire sampling duration shows

  13. The blue crab Callinectes sapidus inhabits estuarine environments that range in salinity from full-strength sea water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsey, Stephen

    The blue crab Callinectes sapidus inhabits estuarine environments that range in salinity from full euryhaline organisms, blue crabs have evolved compensatory mechanisms to minimize perturbations to the intracellular environment during osmotic stress. While the hemolymph of blue crabs fluctuates iso- osmotically

  14. Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

    2010-01-05

    This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

  15. Boosting the voltage of a salinity-gradient-power electrochemical cell by means of complex-forming solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carati, Andrea

    Boosting the voltage of a salinity-gradient-power electrochemical cell by means of complex to the formation of complexes. We present the results of a cell for power produc- tion, which has excellent-based light-emitting electrochemical cells J. Appl. Phys. 116, 104504 (2014); 10.1063/1.4895060 Decoupled

  16. Changes in the resistance to water movement through the soil/plant pathway in salinized sunflower (Helianthus giganteus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balint, Donna Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    . This was accompanied by an increase in stomatal resistance to water vapor. These results suggest that moderate increases in salt level markedly affect the water relations of sunflower. The ability of calcium to ameliorate the effect of salinity stress on sunflowers...

  17. Impact of porous medium desiccation during anhydrous CO2 injection in deep saline aquifers: up scaling from experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    flow rate and capillary properties on the desiccation mechanisms. Keywords: supercritical CO2, dryingImpact of porous medium desiccation during anhydrous CO2 injection in deep saline aquifers: up - France Abstract Injection of CO2 in geological reservoirs or deep aquifers is nowadays studied

  18. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management and salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management: impoundments, marsh sediments, ponds, salinity Abstract Physical characteristics of sediments in coastal marsh compositions of waterbird communities. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain potentially

  19. Using batch experiments to quantify the potential of North Sea saline aquifers to leach contaminants upon injection of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminants upon injection of CO2 Kit Carruthers MSc, Dr. Mark Wilkinson, Dr. Katriona Edlmann · Saline aquifer CO2 storage limited by water and pore compressibilities · Pressure relief via water production · CO2 acidifies water upon dissolution, promoting leaching of heavy metals into solution

  20. Total thermoelectric-power withdrawals Freshwater thermoelectric-power withdrawals Saline-water thermoelectric-power withdrawals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Total thermoelectric-power withdrawals Freshwater thermoelectric-power withdrawals Saline-water thermoelectric-power withdrawals Louisiana New Hampshire Florida Idaho Washington Oregon Nevada California New,000 9,000 to 13,000 Thermoelectric-power withdrawals by water quality and State, 2005. Estimated Use

  1. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-01-01

    In this reporting period, we extended the fault study to include more faults and developed new techniques to visualize the faults. We now have used data from the Dundee Formation to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin and are in the process of reviewing data from other horizons. These faults appear to control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review has been set for March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer.

  2. The Delta Farmers Institute is initiating a project to evaluate salinity in the Fraser River Estuary. They are likely to receive some funds from the province as well as other interested parties. What they would

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Fraser River. Specifically they would like to run a salinity model to provide some analysis on howThe Delta Farmers Institute is initiating a project to evaluate salinity in the Fraser River salinity will be affected by: Change to the Fraser River hydrology in a drought year The impacts

  3. Environmental Inorganic Geochemistry Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    of Mines (WASM), Curtin University. AUSTRALIAN CENTRE FOR GEOMECHANICS Ph: +61 8 6488 3300 Fax: +61 8 6488

  4. GEOCHEMISTRY AND AR GEOCHRONOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    committee members ­ Tim Swindle, David Kring, Mike Drake, Bill Boynton, and Sue Baldwin ­ contributed officemates Mike, Bill, and Kim showed me how it was done, and Andy, Jen, Betty, Doug, Chris, David, and Nancy- tors there ­ Dan Davis and Don Lindsley ­ started me on my PhD pursuit, and indeed my career. Even

  5. Sandia Energy - Molecular Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science, F. Bergaya and B.K.G. Theng, Eds., Elsevier, in press. J.A. Greathouse, D.B. Hart, M.E. Ochs (2012) Alcohol and Thiol Adsorption on (Oxy)hydroxide and Carbon Surfaces:...

  6. Comments on: Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode ClusterProteinReactions | Argonne

  7. Sandia Energy - Molecular Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power&Grid ActionModelingMolecular

  8. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. Anmore »analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.« less

  9. Influence of geothermal sources on deep ocean temperature, salinity, and flow fields. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, K.G.

    1988-06-01

    The thesis studies the effect of geothermal sources on the deep circulation, temperature and salinity fields. In Chapter 1 background material is given on the strength and distribution of geothermal heating. In Chapter 2 evidence for the influence of a hydrothermal system in the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge on nearby property fields and a model of the flow around such a heat source are presented, with an analysis of a larger-scale effect. Results of an analytical model for a heat source on a Beta-plane in Chapter 3 show how the response far from the source can have a structure different from the forcing because of its dependence on two parameters: a Peclet number (the ratio of horizontal advection and vertical diffusion), and a Froude-number-like parameter (the ratio of long wave phase speed to background flow speed) which control the relative amount of damping and advection of different vertical scales. The solutions emphasize the different behavior of a dynamical field like temperature compared to tracers introduced at the source. These ideas are useful for interpreting more-complicated solutions from a numerical model presented in the final chapter.

  10. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. An analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.

  11. Increasing gas hydrate formation temperature for desalination of high salinity produced water with secondary guests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, Jong-Ho [ORISE; Seol, Yongkoo [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01

    We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from ?2 °C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 °C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydrate turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN APPLICATIONS FOR MODELING AND ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN SALINE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, John

    2014-08-31

    This project was a computer modeling effort to couple reservoir simulation and ED/RSM using Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Analysis, and Optimization Methods, to assess geologic, geochemical, geomechanical, and rock-fluid effects and factors on CO2 injectivity, capacity, and plume migration. The project objective was to develop proxy models to simplify the highly complex coupled geochemical and geomechanical models in the utilization and storage of CO2 in the subsurface. The goals were to investigate and prove the feasibility of the ED/RSM processes and engineering development, and bridge the gaps regarding the uncertainty and unknowns of the many geochemical and geomechanical interacting parameters in the development and operation of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration and storage sites. The bottleneck in this workflow is the high computational effort of reactive transport simulation models and large number of input variables to optimize with ED/RSM techniques. The project was not to develop the reactive transport, geomechanical, or ED/RSM software, but was to use what was commercially and/or publically available as a proof of concept to generate proxy or surrogate models. A detailed geologic and petrographic mineral assemblage and geologic structure of the doubly plunging anticline was defined using the USDOE RMOTC formations of interest data (e.g., Lower Sundance, Crow Mountain, Alcova Limestone, and Red Peak). The assemblage of 23 minerals was primarily developed from literature data and petrophysical (well log) analysis. The assemblage and structure was input into a commercial reactive transport simulator to predict the effects of CO2 injection and complex reactions with the reservoir rock. Significant impediments were encountered during the execution phase of the project. The only known commercial reactive transport simulator was incapable of simulating complex geochemistry modeled in this project. Significant effort and project funding was expended to determine the limitations of both the commercial simulator and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) R&D simulator, TOUGHREACT available to the project. A simplified layer cake model approximating the volume of the RMOTC targeted reservoirs was defined with 1-3 minerals eventually modeled with limited success. Modeling reactive transport in porous media requires significant computational power. In this project, up to 24 processors were used to model a limited mineral set of 1-3 minerals. In addition, geomechanical aspects of injecting CO2 into closed, semi-open, and open systems in various well completion methods was simulated. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) as a storage method was not modeled. A robust and stable simulation dataset or base case was developed and used to create a master dataset with embedded instructions for input to the ED/RSM software. Little success was achieved toward the objective of the project using the commercial simulator or the LBNL simulator versions available during the time of this project. Several hundred realizations were run with the commercial simulator and ED/RSM software, most having convergence problems and terminating prematurely. A proxy model for full field CO2 injection sequestration utilization and storage was not capable of being developed with software available for this project. Though the chemistry is reasonably known and understood, based on the amount of effort and huge computational time required, predicting CO2 sequestration storage capacity in geologic formations to within the program goals of ±30% proved unsuccessful.

  13. Diuretic Agent and Normal Saline Infusion Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomies in Nondilated Pelvicaliceal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yagci, Cemil Ustuner, Evren Atman, Ebru Dusunceli; Baltaci, Sumer; Uzun, Caglar Akyar, Serdar

    2013-04-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in a nondilated pelvicaliceal system is technically challenging. We describe an effective method to achieve transient dilatation of the pelvicaliceal system via induction of diuresis using infusion of a diuretic agent in normal saline, therefore allowing easier access to the pelvicaliceal system. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, the technique had been tested in 22 nephrostomies with nondilated system (a total of 20 patients with 2 patients having bilateral nephrostomies) during a 5-year period. Patients were given 40 mg of furosemide in 250 ml of normal saline solution intravenously by rapid infusion. As soon as maximum calyceal dilatation of more than 5 mm was observed, which is usually 15 min later after the end of rapid infusion, patients were positioned obliquely, and PCN procedure under ultrasound guidance was performed. The procedure was successful in 19 of the nephrostomies in 17 patients with a success rate of 86.36 % per procedure and 85 % per patient in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems. No major nephrostomy-, drug-, or technique-related complications were encountered. The technique failed to work in three patients due to the presence of double J catheters and preexisting calyceal perforation which avoided transient dilation of the pelvicaliceal system with diuresis. Diuretic infusion in saline is a feasible and effective method for PCN in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems.

  14. Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization of the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer, a Potential CO2 Storage Reservoir; Implications for Hydraulic Separation and Caprock Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Aimee

    2012-12-31

    goals, implementation of GCS is almost certainly necessary. As a result, the Department of Energy has funded the examination of the Arbuckle saline aquifer, as well as other aquifers around the United States, to assess their potential as carbon storage...

  15. The Footprint of the CO[subscript 2] Plume during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers: Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at the Basin Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juanes, Ruben

    We study a sharp-interface mathematical model of CO[subscript 2] migration in deep saline aquifers, which accounts for gravity override, capillary trapping, natural groundwater flow, and the shape of the plume during the ...

  16. Heterotrophic microbial activities and nutritional status of microbial communities in tropical marsh sediments of different salinities: the effects of phosphorus addition and plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pivni?ková, Barbora; Rejmánková, Eliška; Snyder, Jenise M.; Šantr??ková, Hana

    2010-01-01

    deal of energy is needed to support microbial growth andenergy demand under salinity stress. In conclusion, we found that nutrient in microbialenergy) availability (Kieft et al. 1997). Since the quantity of microbial

  17. Site Suitability Assessment for Irrigating Urban Landscapes with Water of Elevated Salinity in the Southwest. Consolidated Final Report. Part 1. Water Quality and Plant Tolerance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    With increasing population and the demand for potable water, water with elevated salinity and reclaimed water are now commonly used for irrigating urban landscape in many communities in the arid Southwest. It not only saves potable water, but also...

  18. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  19. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-01-01

    Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Vernon Field demonstration project in Isabella County, Michigan. This new case history and well summary format organizes and presents the technical and historical details of the Vernon Field demonstration, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion. Planning for the annual project meeting in Tampa, Florida has begun. This meeting will be held March 7-9, 2003 at the same site as the last three meetings. The goals of this project were to: (1) test the use of multi-lateral wells to recover bypassed hydrocarbons and (2) to access the potential of using surface geochemistry to reduce drilling risk. Two new demonstration wells, the State-Smock and the Bowers 4-25, were drilled to test the Dundee Formation at Vernon Field for bypassed oil. Neither well was commercial, although both produced hydrocarbon shows. An extensive geochemical survey in the vicinity of Vernon Field, covering much of Isabella County, has produced a base map for interpretation of anomalies in Michigan. Several potential new anomalies were discovered that could be further investigated.

  20. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-04-01

    The principal objective of the study was to test a new analytical technique, Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME), for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. This involved measuring the effectiveness of SPME to extract hydrocarbons under controlled conditions in the laboratory. As part of the study, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the laboratory results. Presented in this quarterly report is the condensed version of the Case History and Well Summary for the Bear Lake area in Manistee County, Michigan. The full version will be in the annual report. The condensed case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and horizontal lateral for Bear Lake, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  1. Characterization of the geology, geochemistry, hydrology and microbiology of the in-situ air stripping demonstration site at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, C.A.; Looney, B.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Kaback, D.S.

    1991-05-01

    The Savannah River Site is the location of an Integrated Demonstration Project designed to evaluate innovative remediation technologies for environmental restoration at sites contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. This demonstration utilizes directionally drilled horizontal wells to deliver gases and extract contaminants from the subsurface. Phase I of the Integrated Demonstration focused on the application and development of in-situ air stripping technologies to remediate soils and sediments above and below the water table as well as groundwater contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. The objective of this report is to provide baseline information on the geology, geochemistry, hydrology, and microbiology of the demonstration site prior to the test. The distribution of contaminants in soils and sediments in the saturated zone and groundwater is emphasized. These data will be combined with data collected after the demonstration in order to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping. New technologies for environmental characterization that were evaluated include depth discrete groundwater sampling (HydroPunch) and three-dimensional modeling of contaminant data.

  2. Subtask 2.17 - CO{sub 2} Storage Efficiency in Deep Saline Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorecki, Charles; Liu, Guoxiang; Braunberger, Jason; Klenner, Robert; Ayash, Scott; Dotzenrod, Neil; Steadman, Edward; Harju, John

    2014-02-01

    As the field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) continues to advance, and large-scale implementation of geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage progresses, it will be important to understand the potential of geologic formations to store meaningful amounts of CO{sub 2}. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage in deep saline formations (DSFs) has been suggested as one of the best potential methods for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere, and as such, updated storage resource estimation methods will continue to be an important component for the widespread deployment of CCS around the world. While there have been several methodologies suggested in the literature, most of these methods are based on a volumetric calculation of the pore volume of the DSF multiplied by a storage efficiency term and do not consider the effect of site-specific dynamic factors such as injection rate, injection pattern, timing of injection, pressure interference between injection locations, and overall formation pressure buildup. These volumetric methods may be excellent for comparing the potential between particular formations or basins, but they have not been validated through real-world experience or full-formation injection simulations. Several studies have also suggested that the dynamic components of geologic storage may play the most important role in storing CO{sub 2} in DSFs but until now have not directly compared CO{sub 2} storage resource estimates made with volumetric methodologies to estimates made using dynamic CO{sub 2} storage methodologies. In this study, two DSFs, in geographically separate areas with geologically diverse properties, were evaluated with both volumetric and dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource estimation methodologies to compare the results and determine the applicability of both approaches. In the end, it was determined that the dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource potential is timedependent and it asymptotically approaches the volumetric CO{sub 2} storage resource potential over very long periods of time in the two systems that were evaluated. These results indicate that the volumetric assessments can be used as long as the appropriate storage efficiency terms are used and it is understood that it will take many wells over very long periods of time to fully realize the storage potential of a target formation. This subtask was funded through the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)– U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme.

  3. Changes in Hepatic Blood Flow During Transcatheter Arterial Infusion with Heated Saline in Hepatic VX2 Tumor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Wei; Li Jing; Wu Zhiqun; Zhou Changxi; Liu Xi; Wan Yi; Duan Yunyou

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study evaluates the influence of transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline on hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to tumor and normal hepatic tissues in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods. All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Twenty rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into the following two groups: (a) the treated group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL transarterial injection of 60 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery; (b) the control group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL injection of 37 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery. Using ultrasonography, the blood flows in both the portal vein and hepatic artery were measured, and the changes in the hemodynamic indices were recorded before and immediately after the injection. The changes in the tumor and normal liver tissues of the two groups were histopathologically examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining after the injection. Results. After the transcatheter arterial heated infusion, there was a decrease in the hepatic arterial blood flow to the tumor tissue, a significant decrease in the hepatic artery mean velocity (P < 0.05), and a significant increase in the resistance index (P < 0.05). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in the normal liver tissue or the tumor tissue after heated perfusion, and coagulated blood plasma was observed in the cavities of intratumoral blood vessels in the treated group. Conclusions. The changes in tumor blood flow in the rabbit VX2 tumor model were presumably caused by microthrombi in the tumor vessels, and the portal vein likely mediated the heat loss in normal liver tissue during the transarterial heated infusion.

  4. Centennial-Scale Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity Variability in the Florida Straits During the Early Holocene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinlein, William

    2012-10-19

    Change from ?18Oseawater Changes in continental ice volume also affect global ?18OSW on glacial- interglacial time scales. If this can effect can be accounted for, the resulting ice volume 9 free ?18OSW record can be used to estimate regional... salinity change. Sea level has risen by ~25 m over the last 10 kyr due to the melting of polar ice sheets [Bard et al., 1990; Cutler et al. 2003; Edwards et al., 1993]. Because continental ice is isotopically depleted in ?18O, addition...

  5. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  6. Glaciation and saline-freshwater mixing as a possible cause of cave formation in the eastern midcontinent region of the United States: A conceptual model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panno, S.V. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Bourcier, W.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We present a hypothesis for the formation of caves and associated karst features near the southern margins of the Illinois, Michigan, and Appalachian basins. Spatial and temporal relations among intracratonic basins, karstic terrain, and continental glaciation suggest that Pleistocene glaciation may have initiated the discharge of saline waters from the margins of these basins. Glaciation-induced discharge of saline waters could result from the consolidation of sediments due to the overlying pressure of glacial ice, and flushing of underlying aquifers as a result of bottom melting in recharge areas of basic aquifers. The upward migration of basin-derived saline waters into near-surface aquifers would result in the mixing of saline waters with infiltrating glacial meltwater and meteoric water. The development of a vertically restricted zone of mixing of saline and fresh water in limestone aquifers would result in the dissolution of limestone; this mechanism could be responsible for the formation, or at least the initiation of, some caves and associated karst features in the midcontinent region.

  7. Coupled measurements of ?^18O and ?D of hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions in gypsum from the Messinian Yesares Member, Sorbas Basin (SE Spain)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Nicholas P.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Gázquez, Fernando; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Chapman, Hazel J.; Hodell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    . The ?1818O and ?D of gypsum hydration water (CaSO4•2H2O) and salinity of fluid inclusions were measured in the same samples to test if they record the composition of the mother fluid from which gypsum was precipitated. Water isotopes are highly...

  8. The Next-Generation Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Code PFLOTRAN: Application to CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers P. Lichtner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Richard

    aquifers as a possible solution to reduce green house gas emissions. Dissolution of supercritical CO2-term fate of a supercritical CO2 plume will be resolved with high-resolution numerical simulations into a relatively deep saline aquifer above the critical point where CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (Tcrit =31

  9. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

  10. Training Students to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO{sub 2} Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, Brenda

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this project was to expose and train multiple students in geological tools that are essential to reservoir characterization and geologic sequestration including but not limited to advanced petrological methods, mineralogical methods, and geochemical methods; core analysis, and geophysical well-log interpretation. These efforts have included training of multiple students through geologically based curriculum and research using advanced petrological, mineralogical, and geochemical methods. In whole, over the last 3+ years, this award has supported 5,828 hours of student research, supporting the work of several graduate and undergraduate students. They have all received training directly related to ongoing CO{sub 2} sequestration demonstrations. The students have all conducted original scientific research on topics related to understanding the importance of lithological, textural, and compositional variability in formations that are being targeted as CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs and seals. This research was linked to the Mount Simon Sandstone reservoir and overlying Eau Claire Formation seal in the Illinois Basin- a system where over one million tons of CO{sub 2} are actively being injected with the first large-scale demonstration of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage in the U.S. Student projects focused specifically on 1) reservoir porosity characterization and evaluation, 2) petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical evidence of fluid-related diagenesis in the caprock, 3) textural changes in reservoir samples exposed to experimental CO{sub 2} + brine conditions, 4) controls on spatial heterogeneity in composition and texture in both the reservoir and seal, 5) the implications of small-scale fractures within the reservoir, and 6) petrographic and stable isotope analyses of carbonates in the seal to understand the burial history of the system. The student-led research associated with this project provided real-time and hands-on experience with a relevant CO{sub 2} system, provided relevant information to the regional partnerships who are working within these formations, and provides more broadly applicable understanding and method development for other carbon capture and storage systems.

  11. Mechanical properties and modeling of seal-forming lithologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.; Mazariegos, R.; Ibanez, W.

    1993-01-01

    Specific goals and accomplishments of this research include: (1) The evaluation of models of salt diaper ascent that involve either power law, dislocation creep as determined experimentally by Horseman et al. (1993) or linear, fluid-assisted creep as reported by Spiers et al. (1988, 1990, 1992). We have compared models assuming these two, experimentally evaluated flow laws and examined the predictions they make regarding diaper incubation periods, ascent velocities, deviatoric stresses and strain rates. (2) The evaluation of the effects of differential loading on the initiation an of salt structures. (3) Examination of the role of basement faults on the initiation and morphologic evolution of salt structures. (4) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of shale as a function of pressure and determination of the nature of its brittle-ductile transition. (5) Evaluation of the mechanical anisotropies of shales with varying concentrations, distributions and preferred orientations of clay. (6) The determination of temperature and ratedependencies of strength for a shale constitutive model that can be used in numerical models that depend on viscous formulations. (7) Determination of the mechanisms of deformation for argillaceous rocks over awide range of conditions. (8) Evaluation of the effects of H[sub 2]O within clay interlayers, as adsorbed surface layers.

  12. Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the overlying metamorphic rock acts as a cap to the productive zone and inhibits vertical movement of the geothermal fluids above the main upwelling zone. The upwelling...

  13. Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the overlying metamorphic rock acts as a cap to the productive zone and inhibits vertical movement of the geothermal fluids above the main upwelling zone. The upwelling...

  14. Stratigraphic Relations and Lithologic Variations in the Jemez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preliminary analysis of hydrothermal alteration in the context of the volcanic stratigraphy suggests at least three distinct hydrothermal events have occurred in the volcanic...

  15. Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wells in the Southwestern Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico Abstract The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have...

  16. Quantitative tools for seismic stratigraphy and lithology characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Felix

    2001-01-01

    Seismological images represent maps of the earth's structure. Apparent bandwidth limitation of seismic data prevents successful estimation of transition sharpness by the multiscale wavelet transform. We discuss the application ...

  17. Stratigraphic Relations and Lithologic Variations in the Jemez Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNewCreek Formation Grabens, Southwest

  18. Appendix A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' ,ALASKAAlternate3 ThroughA

  19. Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells in the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: Energy ResourcesGrove, Iowa:Lisle,Trough LLC Jump

  20. Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,PropertyPartner7Website JumpHeatSource Jump to:

  1. Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:

  2. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii | Open Energy

  3. Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedList ofBalance Jump to:TechnologyArea

  4. Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedList ofBalance Jump

  5. Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergyReportNumber Jump to: navigation, searchCapRockAge Jump

  6. Performances of the Electrical Spectroscopy employing a RESPER Probe for measuring the Salinity and Water Content of Concretes and Terrestrial Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settimi, A; Zirizzotti, A; Marchetti, M; Sapia, V

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes to discuss the performances of the electrical spectroscopy employing a RESPER probe to measure the salinity s and volumetric content {\\theta}W of water in concretes and terrestrial soils. The RESPER probe is an induction device for spectroscopy which performs simultaneous and non invasive measurements on the electrical RESistivity 1/{\\sigma} and relative dielectric PERmittivity {\\epsilon}r of a subjacent medium. The RESPER measures {\\sigma} and {\\epsilon} with inaccuracies below a prefixed limit (10%) in the band of middle and high frequencies (MF-HF). The conductivity is related to salinity and the dielectric permittivity to volumetric water content by suitable refined theoretical models which are consistent with the predictions of two empirical laws, respectively Archie's and Topp's. The better agreement, the lower the hygroscopic water content and the higher s; so a better agreement occurs for concretes, containing almost no bound water molecules, provided that are characterized by an h...

  7. A study of some macro-faunal associates of oysters, Crassostrea virginica Gmelin in an area of low salinity and artificially elevated temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Philip Ernest

    1974-01-01

    not cause the immediate death of oysters, and therefore the damage they cause is more diffi- cult to quantify. lbring Sponges Korringa (1951) notes that, according to fishermen, entire oys- ter beds along the French coast have been rendered worthless...STUDY OF SOME MACRO ? FAUNAL ASSOCIATES OF OYSTERS, Cra sostrea virginica GMELIN IN AN AREA OF LOW SALINITY AND ARTIFICIALLY ELEVATED TEMPERATURES A Thesis by PHILIP ERNEST TURK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

  8. Frontiers in Geochemistry Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information, and acid-base protonation reactions can be explored in situ on a molecular basis. Applications

  9. Modeling of fate and transport of co-injection of H2S with CO2 in deep saline formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, W.; Xu, T.; Li, Y.

    2010-12-15

    The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. However, costs of capture and compression of CO{sub 2} from industrial waste streams containing small quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds such as SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} are very expensive. Therefore, studies on the co-injection of CO{sub 2} containing other acid gases from industrial emissions are very important. In this paper, numerical simulations were performed to study the co-injection of H{sub 2}S with CO{sub 2} in sandstone and carbonate formations. Results indicate that the preferential dissolution of H{sub 2}S gas (compared with CO{sub 2} gas) into formation water results in the delayed breakthrough of H{sub 2}S gas. Co-injection of H{sub 2}S results in the precipitation of pyrite through interactions between the dissolved H{sub 2}S and Fe{sup 2+} from the dissolution of Fe-bearing minerals. Additional injection of H{sub 2}S reduces the capabilities for solubility and mineral trappings of CO{sub 2} compared to the CO{sub 2} only case. In comparison to the sandstone (siliciclastic) formation, the carbonate formation is less favorable to the mineral sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Different from CO{sub 2} mineral trapping, the presence of Fe-bearing siliciclastic and/or carbonate is more favorable to the H{sub 2}S mineral trapping.

  10. A method for quick assessment of CO2 storage capacity in closedand semi-closed saline formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Tsang, C.F.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-02-10

    Saline aquifers of high permeability bounded by overlying/underlying seals may be surrounded laterally by low-permeability zones, possibly caused by natural heterogeneity and/or faulting. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into and storage in such 'closed' systems with impervious seals, or 'semi-closed' systems with nonideal (low-permeability) seals, is different from that in 'open' systems, from which the displaced brine can easily escape laterally. In closed or semi-closed systems, the pressure buildup caused by continuous industrial-scale CO{sub 2} injection may have a limiting effect on CO{sub 2} storage capacity, because geomechanical damage caused by overpressure needs to be avoided. In this research, a simple analytical method was developed for the quick assessment of the CO{sub 2} storage capacity in such closed and semi-closed systems. This quick-assessment method is based on the fact that native brine (of an equivalent volume) displaced by the cumulative injected CO{sub 2} occupies additional pore volume within the storage formation and the seals, provided by pore and brine compressibility in response to pressure buildup. With nonideal seals, brine may also leak through the seals into overlying/underlying formations. The quick-assessment method calculates these brine displacement contributions in response to an estimated average pressure buildup in the storage reservoir. The CO{sub 2} storage capacity and the transient domain-averaged pressure buildup estimated through the quick-assessment method were compared with the 'true' values obtained using detailed numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} and brine transport in a two-dimensional radial system. The good agreement indicates that the proposed method can produce reasonable approximations for storage-formation-seal systems of various geometric and hydrogeological properties.

  11. Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection ProcessDuring CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten; Zhang, Keni

    2008-11-17

    For purposes of geologic storage, CO2 would be injected into saline formations at supercritical temperature and pressure conditions, and would form a separate phase that is immiscible with the aqueous phase (brine). At typical subsurface temperature and pressure conditions, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) has lower density than the aqueous phase and would experience an upward buoyancy force. Accordingly, the CO2 is expected to accumulate beneath the caprock at the top of the permeable interval, and could escape from the storage formation wherever (sub-)vertical pathways are available, such as fractures or faults through the caprock, or improperly abandoned wells. Over time, an increasing fraction of CO2 may dissolve in the aqueous phase, and eventually some of the aqueous CO2 may react with rock minerals to form poorly soluble carbonates. Dissolution into the aqueous phase and eventual sequestration as carbonates are highly desirable processes as they would increase permanence and security of storage. Dissolution of CO2 will establish phase equilibrium locally between the overlying CO2 plume and the aqueous phase beneath. If the aqueous phase were immobile, CO2 dissolution would be limited by the rate at which molecular diffusion can remove dissolved CO2 from the interface between CO2-rich and aqueous phases. This is a slow process. However, dissolution of CO2 is accompanied by a small increase in the density of the aqueous phase, creating a negative buoyancy force that can give rise to downward convection of CO2-rich brine, which in turn can greatly accelerate CO2 dissolution. This study explores the process of dissolution-diffusion-convection (DDC), using high-resolution numerical simulation. We find that geometric features of convection patterns are very sensitive to small changes in problem specifications, reflecting self-enhancing feedbacks and the chaotic nature of the process. Total CO2 dissolution rates on the other hand are found to be quite robust against modest changes in problem parameters, and are essentially constant as long as no dissolved CO2 reaches the lower boundary of the system.

  12. Predictive modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep saline sandstone reservoirs: Impacts of geochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balashov, Victor N.; Guthrie, George D.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Lopano, Christina L. J.; Rimstidt, Donald; Brantley, Susan L.

    2013-03-01

    One idea for mitigating the increase in fossil-fuel generated CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is to inject CO{sub 2} into subsurface saline sandstone reservoirs. To decide whether to try such sequestration at a globally significant scale will require the ability to predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2}. Thus, models are needed to predict the rates and extents of subsurface rock-water-gas interactions. Several reactive transport models for CO{sub 2} sequestration created in the last decade predicted sequestration in sandstone reservoirs of ~17 to ~90 kg CO{sub 2} m{sup -3|. To build confidence in such models, a baseline problem including rock + water chemistry is proposed as the basis for future modeling so that both the models and the parameterizations can be compared systematically. In addition, a reactive diffusion model is used to investigate the fate of injected supercritical CO{sub 2} fluid in the proposed baseline reservoir + brine system. In the baseline problem, injected CO{sub 2} is redistributed from the supercritical (SC) free phase by dissolution into pore brine and by formation of carbonates in the sandstone. The numerical transport model incorporates a full kinetic description of mineral-water reactions under the assumption that transport is by diffusion only. Sensitivity tests were also run to understand which mineral kinetics reactions are important for CO{sub 2} trapping. The diffusion transport model shows that for the first ~20 years after CO{sub 2} diffusion initiates, CO{sub 2} is mostly consumed by dissolution into the brine to form CO{sub 2,aq} (solubility trapping). From 20-200 years, both solubility and mineral trapping are important as calcite precipitation is driven by dissolution of oligoclase. From 200 to 1000 years, mineral trapping is the most important sequestration mechanism, as smectite dissolves and calcite precipitates. Beyond 2000 years, most trapping is due to formation of aqueous HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Ninety-seven percent of the maximum CO{sub 2} sequestration, 34.5 kg CO{sub 2} per m{sup 3} of sandstone, is attained by 4000 years even though the system does not achieve chemical equilibrium until ~25,000 years. This maximum represents about 20% CO{sub 2} dissolved as CO{sub 2},aq, 50% dissolved as HCO{sub 3}{sup -}{sub ,aq}, and 30% precipitated as calcite. The extent of sequestration as HCO{sub 3}{sup -} at equilibrium can be calculated from equilibrium thermodynamics and is roughly equivalent to the amount of Na+ in the initial sandstone in a soluble mineral (here, oligoclase). Similarly, the extent of trapping in calcite is determined by the amount of Ca2+ in the initial oligoclase and smectite. Sensitivity analyses show that the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration is sensitive to the mineral-water reaction kinetic constants between approximately 10 and 4000 years. The sensitivity of CO{sub 2} sequestration to the rate constants decreases in magnitude respectively from oligoclase to albite to smectite.

  13. Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

    2009-10-01

    Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

  14. Predictions of long-term behavior of a large-volume pilot test for CO2 geological storage in a saline formation in the Central Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, Christine; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-11-01

    The long-term behavior of a CO{sub 2} plume injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on mechanisms that lead to plume stabilization. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of CO{sub 2} phase-partitioning, which are examined by developing a numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture in the San Joaquin Valley, California, where a large-volume pilot test of CO{sub 2} injection will be conducted. The numerical model simulates a four-year CO{sub 2} injection period and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume until it stabilizes. Sensitivity studies are carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual gas saturation.

  15. Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yilian; Xu, Tianfu; Cheng, Huilin; Zheng, Yan; Xiong, Peng

    2008-06-10

    The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{sub 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.

  16. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  17. Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

  18. Biomass production, forage quality, and cation uptake of Quail bush, four-wing saltbush, and seaside barley irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauder, J.W.; Browning, L.S.; Phelps, S.D.; Kirkpatrick, A.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The study reported here investigated capacity of Atriplex lentiformis (Torr.) S. Wats. (Quail bush), Atriplex X aptera A. Nels. (pro sp.) (Wytana four-wing saltbush), and Hordeum marinum Huds. (seaside barley) to produce biomass and crude protein and take up cations when irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water, in the presence of a shallow water table. Water tables were established at 0.38, 0.76, and 1.14m below the surface in sand-filled columns. The columns were then planted to the study species. Study plants were irrigated for 224 days; irrigation water was supplied every 7 days equal to water lost to evapotranspiration (ET) plus 100mL (the volume of water removed in the most previous soil solution sampling). Water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) or coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wastewater. Biomass production did not differ significantly between water quality treatments but did differ significantly among species and water table depth within species. Averaged across water quality treatments, Hordeum marinum produced 79% more biomass than A. lentiformis and 122% more biomass than Atriplex X aptera, but contained only 11% crude protein compared to 16% crude protein in A. lentiformis and 14% crude protein in Atriplex X aptera. Atriplex spp. grown in columns with the water table at 0.38m depth produced more biomass, took up less calcium on a percentage basis, and took up more sodium on a percentage basis than when grown with the water table at a deeper depth. Uptake of cations by Atriplex lentiformis was approximately twice the uptake of cations by Atriplex X aptera and three times that of H. marinum. After 224 days of irrigation, crop growth, and cation uptake, followed by biomass harvest, EC and SAR of shallow groundwater in columns planted to A. lentiformis were less than EC and SAR of shallow ground water in columns planted to either of the other species.

  19. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyerly, Paul J.; Longenecker, Donald E.

    1962-01-01

    these analyses as a basis for planning management prac- tices . TEST-DON'T GUESS . Apply water uniformly by using a properly de- signed irrigation system and by leveling where necessary . Apply enough water for the crop plus enough to keep salt leached to a... tolerant to your salt conditions . Plant good seed under optimum moisture and temperature conditions . Fertilize to replace nutrients lost by leaching and to maintain adequate fertility . Use soil-improving grasses or legumes to main- tain good soil...

  20. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

    1962-01-01

    -tolerant tolerant salt salt tolerant tolerant FIELD CROPS Field bean Cowpea White clover" Alsike clover Red clover Ladino clwer Crimson clover Rose clover Burnet clover Lima bean Green bean Celery Pear Apple Orange Grapefruit Plum Apricot... Ryegrass Sour clover Rye (hay) Birdsfoot Wheat (hay) trefoil Oats (hay) VEGETABLECROPS Tomato Garden beet Broccoli Kale Cabbage Spinach Pepper Okra Lettuce Sweet corn Onion Pea Watermelon Cantaloupe Squash FRUIT CROPS Olive Pomegranate...

  1. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

    1957-01-01

    Barley (grain) Cowpeas (grain) Rye (grain) Sugar beet Corn (field) Wheat Rape Castorbean (grain) Soybean Oats (grain) Rice FORAGE CROPS White clover8 TaIl fesque Wheat- Alkali sacaton Alsike clover Meadow grasses Bermudagrass Red clover fesque... Sudangrass Barley (hay) Ladino clover Orchard- Sweetclover Rhodesgrass Crimson grass Alfalfa Blue clover Millet Ryegrass Panicgrass Rose clover Sour clover Rye (hay) Burnet clover Birdsfoot Wheat (hay) trefoil Oats (hay) VEGETABLE CROPS Lima bean...

  2. Irrigation Water Quality Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and industrial waste water can impact water quality. In most irrigation situations, the primary water qual- ity

  3. Noble gas geochemistry in thermal springs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, B.M.; Reynolds, J.H. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA)); Smith, S.P. (Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    The composition of noble gases in both gas and water samples collected from Horseshoe Spring, Yellowstone National Park, was found to be depth dependent. The deeper the sample collection within the spring, the greater the enrichment in Kr, Xe, radiogenic {sup 4}He, and {sup 40}Ar and the greater the depletion in Ne relative to {sup 36}Ar. The compositional variations are consistent with multi-component mixing. The dominant component consists of dissolved atmospheric gases acquired by the pool at the surface in contact with air. This component is mixed in varying degree with two other components, one each for gas and water entering the bottom of the pool. The two bottom components are not in equilibrium. In Horseshoe Spring, the bubbles entering at the bottom strip the atmospheric-derived pool gases from the surrounding water while en route to the surface. If the original bottom bubbles are noble gas, as in the case of Horseshoe, the acquired pool gases can then quickly obliterate the original bubble composition. These results are used to demonstrate that Yellowstone spring surface gas samples, and perhaps similarity sampled thermal springs from other hydrothermal systems, have gas abundances that depend more on spring morphology than processes occurring deeper in the hydrothermal system.

  4. SHIP3QARD ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY JOIDES RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the modern analytical and data handling standards. The following Technical Note is one of a series of three 345 Middlefield Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&MUNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE, College Station, Texas 77843-3469, as well as appropriate acknowledgement of this source. Technical Note

  5. Mineralogy and geochemistry of recent carbonate sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommer, Sheldon E

    1964-01-01

    a graph cf CayMg vs. %%d high Mg-calcite as given by Taft (1964) with a Figure 5. Graphic relaticnship between Sr/Ca and per cent Sr and Mg/Ca and per cent Mg. 20 40 O ~IO 30 gf pi. O 0 x20 10 0 O. I 0. 2 0 3 0. 4 0. 5 0. 6 0. 7 0. 8 0. 9... 3. 0 57. 1 1. 4 4. 0 60. 0 1. 5 4. 0 50. 0 l. 9 7. 5 7. 5 Z. 5 6. 7 3. 8 7. 5 7. 4 3. 0 8. 0 7. 1 2. 5 5. 8 Table 6 (continued) Core No Sr/Ca x 103 Mg/Ca x 103 Mn/Al x 102 Fe/Al Cu/Al Ti/Al Cu/Fe Mn/Fp x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 2 2...

  6. GEOL 715: STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY (Spring, 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , nomenclature, standards -kinetic and equilibrium fractionation processes -mass and isotope budgets -Rayleigh in terrestrial plants and plankton -applications: carbon budgets, tracking anthropogenic CO2, carbon export rates sources, trophic levels, terrestrial vs marine sources 3. Recent advances: -mass independent fractionation

  7. Geochemistry of Surface-Atmosphere Interactions on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    , T, and atmospheric composition ¥ ...Kinetics ¥ What are the major minerals? ¥ What is the oxidation of terrestrial alkaline igneous rocks #12;Oxidation State of the Surface ¥ 2CO + O2 = 2CO2 controls O2 ¥ Lack. ¥ S in lower atmosphere is kinetically controlled ¥ CaCO3 + SO2 = CaSO4 + CO removes SO2 , deposits CaSO4 ¥ Fe

  8. Environmental Geochemistry of Rads | Environmental Radiation Protection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th, 2010Environment, Health,Environmental

  9. Property:Geochemistry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property EditMimeType

  10. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIAL TECHNICAL8-02DepartmentInterconnection1705

  11. Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

    2006-06-30

    Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

  12. Spectroscopic study of the Moses Lake dune field, Washington: Determination of compositional distributions and source lithologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandfield, Joshua L.

    Spectroscopic study of the Moses Lake dune field, Washington: Determination of compositional Coulee, dune samples, and clast deposits. Factor analysis, target transformation, and end-member recovery techniques were applied to the set of dune samples as well as a set of grain size fractions. The dune sample

  13. The effects of lithology and initial fault angle in physical models of fault-propagation folds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLain, Christopher Thomas

    2001-01-01

    with a weak brittle layer that deforms by faulting and fracturing (dried pottery clay simulates an interbedded siliciclastic unit). The models were deformed in a triaxial deformation rig at confining pressure of 50 Mpa at room temperature. Each model...

  14. Hydraulic Fracture Optimization with a Pseudo-3D Model in Multi-layered Lithology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Mei

    2011-10-21

    Hydraulic Fracturing is a technique to accelerate production and enhance ultimate recovery of oil and gas while fracture geometry is an important aspect in hydraulic fracturing design and optimization. Systematic design procedures are available...

  15. Lithologic descriptions and temperature profiles of five wells in the southwestern Valles caldera region, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Miles, D.; Waibel, A.; Swanberg, C.

    1988-01-01

    The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have been well constrained with the use of data from the VC-1, AET-4, WC 23-4, PC-1 and PC-2 wells. Data from these wells indicate that thermal gradients west of the caldera margin are between 110 and 140)degrees)C/km, with a maximum gradient occurring in the bottom of PC-1 equal to 240)degrees)C/km as a result of thermal fluid flow. Gradients within the caldera reach a maximum of 350)degrees)C/km, while the maximum thermal gradient measured southwest of the caldera in the thermal outflow plume is 140)degrees)C/km. The five wells exhibit high thermal gradients (>60)deghrees)C/km) resulting from high conductive heat flow associated with the Rio Grande rift and volcanism in the Valles caldera, as well as high convective heat flow associated with circulating geothermal fluids. Gamma logs run in four of the five wells appear to be of limited use for stratigraphic correlations in the caldera region. However, stratigraphic and temperature data from the five wells provide information about the structure and thermal regime of the southern and western Valles caldera region. 29 refs., 9 figs. 2 tabs.

  16. Lithology and well log study of Campbell E-2 geothermal test well, Humboldt

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: Energy ResourcesGrove, Iowa:Lisle,Trough LLCHouse

  17. Dataset: Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections | DOE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractorEnergy,DEC03t933Characterization(JournalData

  18. Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 1,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon: EnergyInformationOpen1988)|Holes

  19. T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

    2011-02-14

    At its most basic level, the injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites involves a system comprising the wellbore and the target reservoir. The wellbore is the only conduit available to emplace CO{sub 2} into reservoirs for long-term storage. At the same time, wellbores in general have been identified as the most likely conduit for CO{sub 2} and brine leakage from geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites, especially those in sedimentary basins with historical hydrocarbon production. We have developed a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO{sub 2} injection and leakage through wellbores. The model describes the following processes: (1) upward or downward wellbore flow of CO{sub 2} and variable salinity water with transition from supercritical to gaseous CO{sub 2} including Joule-Thomson cooling, (2) exsolution of CO{sub 2} from the aqueous phase as pressure drops, and (3) cross flow into or interaction with layers of surrounding rock (reservoirs). We use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO{sub 2}-water mixtures under different flow regimes and interacting with surrounding rock. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme. This manual provides instructions for compilation and use of the new model, and presents some example problems to demonstrate its use.

  20. Along channel distance [km] Salinity [psu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at estuaries that have already seen the effects of tectonically induced sea level rise, scientists have been -- that is the upper intertidal mudflats and salt marsh edge -- while the decreased drag on the channel bed leads

  1. Salinity routing in reservoir system modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Mi Ae

    2007-04-25

    This research evaluates and improves capabilities incorporated in the Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) modeling system for tracking salt loads, particularly for applications dealing with natural salt pollution problems ...

  2. Calcite Reaction Kinetics in Saline Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finneran, David

    2012-02-14

    The effect of ionic strength (I), pCO2, and temperature on the reaction kinetics of calcite was investigated in magnesium-free, phosphate-free, low calcium (mCa^2 ? 0.01 – 0.02 molal) simple KCl and NaCl solutions from both undersaturated...

  3. Characterizing Salinity Tolerance in Greenhouse Roses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solis Perez, Alma R.

    2011-08-08

    .e. their counter ions). Sodium sulfate and CaCl2 were the least harmful salts; NaCl had intermediate effects, while NaNO3 and KCl were the most deleterious. Among the most distinguishable effects caused by the more toxic Na+ and Cl- counter ions were lower osmotic...

  4. Incorporating salinity considerations in water availability modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh

    2006-08-16

    -SALT Simulation........................................ 42 Figure 5.1 Location of the Selected Control Points........................................... 53 Figure 5.2 Concentration-Duration Curves for Seymour .................................. 63 Figure 5....3 TDS Concentration-Duration Curves for Seymour (with dams)...... 64 Figure 6.1 Regulated Concentration-Frequency Curves at Seymour ................ 74 Figure 6.2 Regulated TDS Frequency Curves at Seymour (with dams)............ 77 Figure 6...

  5. Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Ryan

    2012-10-19

    In September 2008 Hurricane Ike hit the Texas Gulf Coast with a force stronger than the category 2 storm at which it was rated. With a 3.8 m (12.5 ft) storm surge, the agricultural industry in the area was devastated. The goal of this research...

  6. Saline, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources Jump to:Ohio: EnergyNebraska: Energy

  7. Property:SalinityAverage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url Jump to:ProgrammableYear Jump to: navigation,

  8. Mechanical properties and modeling of seal-forming lithologies. Technical progress report No. 3, March 15, 1992--June 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.; Mazariegos, R.; Ibanez, W.

    1993-06-01

    Specific goals and accomplishments of this research include: (1) The evaluation of models of salt diaper ascent that involve either power law, dislocation creep as determined experimentally by Horseman et al. (1993) or linear, fluid-assisted creep as reported by Spiers et al. (1988, 1990, 1992). We have compared models assuming these two, experimentally evaluated flow laws and examined the predictions they make regarding diaper incubation periods, ascent velocities, deviatoric stresses and strain rates. (2) The evaluation of the effects of differential loading on the initiation an of salt structures. (3) Examination of the role of basement faults on the initiation and morphologic evolution of salt structures. (4) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of shale as a function of pressure and determination of the nature of its brittle-ductile transition. (5) Evaluation of the mechanical anisotropies of shales with varying concentrations, distributions and preferred orientations of clay. (6) The determination of temperature and ratedependencies of strength for a shale constitutive model that can be used in numerical models that depend on viscous formulations. (7) Determination of the mechanisms of deformation for argillaceous rocks over awide range of conditions. (8) Evaluation of the effects of H{sub 2}O within clay interlayers, as adsorbed surface layers.

  9. International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition, 26-29 February 2012 -Brisbane, Australia 1 Structurally constrained lithology characterization using magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through drill data and 3D property distributions obtained by inversion of magnetic and gravity data the surface. The high-grade ore typically contains an average of 66% Fe with the intermediate grade ores

  10. Active Tectonics and Seafloor Mapping Laboratory Publication 02-01 Interim Seafloor Lithology Maps for Oregon And Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    for Oregon And Washington Version 1.0 Chris Goldfinger Chris Romsos Rondi Robison Randall Milstein Beth Myers for the Oregon and Washington continental margin. The project expands on one recently completed for the Oregon and Washington continental shelves and margins, incorporating many important new datasets collected since

  11. Foraminiferal and lithologic characteristics through the zone of the Midway-Wilcox contact in Bastrop, Williamson, and Milam counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David Irving

    1962-01-01

    which were later desigaated eLigaitice ead "llidway". Safford (1056, p. 160) gave the first feraal aeae to be4s of Paleoceae-Lower Eoseae age whee he referre4 to thea as the "ligaite Oroap". Rilgard (1060, p. 100) dsfiaed "gorthera Ligaitic" fer sedi... of the Wilcox, stated that Crider ead Johasca iatea4e4 that the Wilcox be nane4 fran Wilcox, klabna& snd not Wilcox Coeaty, Lichens. Eowe farther state4 that he had aot boca able to fied s tewa called Wilcox ca the Alabaas state nsp. Wibsarth (1%38, p. 8333...

  12. An AVO method toward direct detection of lithologies combining P-P and P-S reflection data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carcuz Jerez, Juan Ramon de Jesus

    2004-09-30

    of the intercepts and gradients [APP : RPP in- tercept; BPP : RPP gradient; APS: R0PS intercept; and BPS: R0PS gradient]. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 18 2.3 Estimated and actual values of ¢VP =VP ;¢VS=VS;¢½=½, and VP =VS... chapter II [VP : P¡wave velocity; VS : S¡wave veloc- ity; and ½ : density]. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 37 3.2 Intercepts and gradients [APP : RPP intercept; BPP : RPP gradi- ent; APS: R0PS intercept; and BPS: R0PS gradient...

  13. GERG Selected Petroleum Geochemistry Programs (1985-2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 GOM Oil Correlation Study 1 G G G G G G G G G G 2 G G G G G G G G Integration Study (SIS) Q Q Q G G G Q Q Applied Gas Hydrate Research Program (AGHRP)** G G G G G G G G G Central & Eastern Gulf Biomarker & Isotope Study (CEGBIS) G G G G G G G G G G N. California Oil

  14. The geochemistry of uranium in the Orca Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Frederick Fewell

    1979-01-01

    in each sample was also measur. ed to gain insight concerning the origin and nature of Urea Basin deposits. For comparison, cores from the brine- filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Ores Basin sediments show... Deep where no uranium enrichment was also observed. The Atlantis II Deep, however, contains sediments significantly enriched in uranium. This basin differs from the other two in that its brin. e temperature is close to 40'C warmer. than average Red...

  15. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  16. COURSE SYLLABUS GG425 --ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY -Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    groundwater composition. Natural radioactivity; Radioactive waste composition, storage and disposal. Grading natural processes of Earth's surface and the impacts of human activities on environments. Both global more about the chemistry of phenomena in the environment around them plan to pursue the new GG MGeo

  17. Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    high-angle normal faults of Tertiary to Holocene age appear to be the dominant structural control of spring activity. Surface spring-water temperatures average 14C except for a...

  18. www.emsl.pnl.gov GEOCHEMISTRY/BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the role MtrC and OmcA play in electron exchange, which may lead to enhanced bioremediation methods of a common catalyst like titanium oxide. Their discovery could help them tailor molecular delivery systems, leading to the development of new, clean energy sources and the design of technologies that use titanium

  19. Organic geochemistry and stable isotope constraints on Precambrian biogeochemical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Katherine S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Details of the biogeochemical cycles and the dominant mechanisms present in Precambrian remain heavily debated topics. The events of the Late Proterozoic onset to glaciations and what types of early life existed in the ...

  20. Isotope Geochemistry of Thermal and Nonthermal Waters in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Canyon. Isotopic evidence shows that these springs consist of three components: (1) deep geothermal fluid, (2) surficial andor near-surface groundwater, and (3) relatively old,...

  1. Revised version Organic Geochemistry 21, 517-523, 1994.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and extracted with dichloromethane-methanol (99/1 v/v). The extract is filtered and concentrated under reduced pressure to yield bitumen which is separated into saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon and polar

  2. Revised version Organic Geochemistry 22, 1023-1027, 1994.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Abstract- A Pliocene oil shale (Pula, Hungary), a C3 plant Triticum aestivum and a C4 plant Zea mays were-alkane, n-alkene, Pula oil shale, Botryococcus braunii, alga, plant, waxes, sediment. INTRODUCTION n-rich, Pliocene deposit from Pula (Hungary). The bulk carbon isotope ratio of this oil shale was also determined

  3. THE ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF ANCIENT SEDIMENTS PART II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1966-01-01

    1965) Change in Green River Oil Shale Paraffins with Depth.in the Green Hiver' Oil-Shale, as a ftmction of depth (

  4. 3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    from beneath 3 the eastern Snake River Plain 4 Huaiyu Yuan 5 Department of Earth Science, University­37 km) resides in the Montana Basin and Range province. The eastern Snake River Plain 15 (ESRP) crust for lower crustal outflow from beneath the eastern Snake River Plain, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 11, XXXXXX

  5. The marine geochemistry of iron and iron isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergquist, Bridget A., 1973-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis addressed questions about the Fe cycle by measuring detailed profiles and transects of Fe species in the ocean and also by exploring the use of a new tracer of Fe, Fe isotopic fractionation. In the subtropical ...

  6. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Hydrogeology and geochemistry of near-shore submarine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rates based on tidal signal and hydraulic gradient analysis indicate a fresh submarine groundwater by Elsevier Ltd. doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2007.07.020 ARTICLE IN PRESS Please cite this article in press as: June A

  7. A Summary of the Geology, Geochemistry, and Geophysics of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area, Utah Authors S. H. Ward, W. T. Parry, W. P. Nash, W. R. Sill, K. L. Cook, R. B. Smith, D. S. Chapman, F. H. Brown, J. A. Whelan and J. R. Bowman Published Journal...

  8. Geochemistry of arsenic and antimony in Galveston Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripp, Anthony Roy

    1988-01-01

    as no concentration change in dissolved arsenic or antimony was measured due to adsorption or desorption when river water high in SPM and sea water were mixed over a time period of 72 hours. Though the bulk chemical character of the bayous of Galveston Island.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dissolved arsenic profile for mixing experiment using Brazos River Water. . Data for dissolved arsenic and antimony from mixing experiments using Atchafalaya River Water. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 57 58 59 29. Results of adsorption...

  9. Evaluating mantle and crustal processes using isotope geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saal, Alberto Edgardo

    2000-01-01

    Geochemical studies are fundamental for understanding how the dynamic Earth works and evolves. These studies place constraints on the composition, formation, age, distribution, evolution and scales of geochemically distinct ...

  10. The geochemistry of phosphate in the Mississippi River delta 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thyne, Geoffrey Dickerson

    1980-01-01

    product of diagenesis may be the result of a slow mineral equilibria, but the short term control of interstitial con- centrations in early diagenetic reactions may be adsorption reactions. CHEN et al. (1973), HARTER (1968), HINGSTON et al. (1967... concentrations wi 1 1 depend on flux out of the sediments and mineral equilibria, rather than control by adsorption on clay minerals. The remaining adsorbed phosphate will move from the solid to dissolved phase as interstitial concentrations are reduced...

  11. Geochemistry of basalt from the Ayu Trough, equatorial western Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -long divergent margin between the Philippine Sea and Caroline plates located in the western Pacific near interaction among major plates, the Pacific, Indo- Australian and Philippine Sea plates, and the less well- known Caroline plate. The Ayu Trough forms the southeastern boundary of the Philippine Sea plate

  12. GEOC: Division of Geochemistry 163 -Ternary complexation of dissolved organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    -Fe(III)-organic acid systems: An EXAFS spectroscopic study Author Block: Jianjun Yang1 , Donald Sparks2 , Nanthi Bolan3 of aqueous Fe(III). In this study, two common soil containing dissolved organic acids (DOA, malic and citric acids) were selected to represent DOM, and synchrotron-based Fe K-edge EXAFS was applied to characterize

  13. Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Abstract Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate...

  14. Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    using non-condensible gas species); analysis tools that enable fluid inclusion stratigraphy; ground surface CO2 flux measurement; integration of geochemical reaction models...

  15. Geochemistry and Isotopes of Fluids from Sulphur Springs, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    water are practically identical even though 18O contents range through 4, thus, precipitation on the resurgent dome of the caldera could recharge the hydrothermal system by...

  16. EAS 41300/A1300/EES79903 Environmental Geochemistry Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    pollution and water treatment. Objectives: At the completion of this course, students should have: (1 Recess Apr. 24 Water pollution and wastewater treatment Ch. 22, handout Apr. 29, May 1 Biogeochemical and main controls on the chemistry of pristine and polluted soil, surface, and ground water environments

  17. Geochemistry and Isotopes of Fluids from Sulphur Springs, Valles Caldera,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpenTechniques Jump to:New Mexico | Open

  18. Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway1997) | OpenRaft riverArea, Canon De San

  19. Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore TechnologiesAssessment Insetting of selected thermal

  20. Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,SageScheucoSedco Hills, California:

  1. Isotope Geochemistry of Thermal and Nonthermal Waters in the Valles

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13RenewableIrem GeothermalIslip Terrace,

  2. CMI Education Course Inventory: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6Materials Institute Course Inventory:

  3. Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar Energy LLCAdemaInformation Vehicle ResearchResource

  4. Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXAGemini SolarMichigan:Region,Reservoir Region,

  5. Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXAGemini SolarMichigan:Region,Reservoir

  6. Geochemistry of Thermal Waters in Long Valley, Mono County, California |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXAGemini SolarMichigan:Region,Reservoir| OpenOpen

  7. Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllGunnery

  8. Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on OpeneiAlbanianStudy)savings time. | OpenEIOpen Energy

  9. Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation EU-UNDPCross-LaminatedCruising

  10. Salinity Budget and WRAP Salinity Simulation Studies of the Brazos River/Reservoir System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph; Lee, Chihun

    2009-01-01

    Reservoirs on the Brazos River .......................... 16 1.5 Reservoir Storage Capacity ....................................................................................................... 16 1.6 Watershed Drainage Area and Lake Surface...-of-Anlaysis Covered by USGS Observed Data ...................... 45 3.8 Observed Storage and Outflow Concentrations for Lake Whitney ........................................ 66 4.1 Comparison of Means for Upstream Reach...

  11. Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg N. Boitnott

    2003-12-14

    Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

  12. The lithology, environment of deposition, and reservoir properties of sandstones in the Upper Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Concho Bluff Queen Field, Crane County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsom, Douglas Floyd

    1989-01-01

    bones. A coefficient of correlation of 0. 82 was calculated with a 99. 9% confidence intervaL ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author wishes to exlness his gratitude to cotnittee members Dr. Gerald Schlapper, Dr. John Poston Sr. , and Dr. Dan Hightower... of interest, ctdcium. Another technique, neutxon activation analysis (NAA), can quantify actual calcium content in bone. Neutron activation analysis is discussed in further detail in the literature review and methods sections. Bone is composed of two types...

  13. Use of outcrop analogues to predict lithology influence on the seismic signature Kathleen Baker* and Mike Batzle, Colorado School of Mines, Richard Gibson, Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mexico sediments are mud rich and form in confined settings due to the salt tectonics in the region

  14. Merguerian, Charles, 1995a, The Taconic problem -alive and well in New York City The Taconic problem in NYC, focuses on ductile-fault imbrication of three lithologically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Merguerian, Charles, 1995a, The Taconic problem - alive and well in New York City (NYC, 1995a, The Taconic problem - alive and well in New York City (NYC) (abs.): Geological Society

  15. Geophysical inversion using petrophysical constraints with application to lithology differentiation Jiajia Sun and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiajia Sun and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines

  16. Lithologic characteristics, depositional environments and geometries of reservoir and nonreservoir facies in the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) of Moose and Virey Fields, Midland County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aller, Gregory Shane

    1999-01-01

    The Queen Formation is a member of the Artesia Group, which is a sequence of intermingling carbonates, classics and evaporates that were deposited during Guadalupian (Permian) time across the Northwest Shelf, Central Basin Platform, and Midland...

  17. Scale-up characteristics of salinity gradient power technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinberg, Benjamin Jacob

    2014-01-01

    dilution desalination and established seawater desalinationfor low energy seawater desalination and brine management,economics of RO seawater desalination, Desalination, 105 (

  18. CO2 Saline Storage Demonstration in Colorado Sedimentary Basins...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that the fossil energy infrastructure occupies is orders of magnitude smaller than renewable energy facilities with equivalent energy capacity. Finally, inexpensive natural gas...

  19. co2-saline-storage | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 2-D seismic, 3-D seismic, vertical seismic profiling, crosswell seismic and microseismic technologies. Which Reservoir for Low Cost Capture, Transportation, and Storage? -...

  20. Scale-up characteristics of salinity gradient power technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinberg, Benjamin Jacob

    2014-01-01

    gradient power,” Energy and Environmental Science, 4 (2011)gradient power,” Energy and Environmental Science, 4 (2011)to reverse osmosis, Energy & Environmental Science, 3 (2010)

  1. Scale-up characteristics of salinity gradient power technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinberg, Benjamin Jacob

    2014-01-01

    conditions, and hydraulic energy recovery (HER) technology.vessels, and hydraulic energy recovery capital costs accounthydroturbine, pump and, hydraulic energy recovery device,

  2. Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed 1984-

    2012-10-25

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce...

  3. Saline absorption in calcium silicate brick observed by NMR scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    and structural damages, and the corrosion of steel in concrete structures, which can cause structural damages will have a direct in uence on the capillary action, viscosity, and permeability and therefore

  4. Author's personal copy Enhanced hydrogen generation using a saline catholyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cl) produced the highest current density of 131 Æ 12 A/m3 , hydrogen yield of 3.2 Æ 0.3 mol H2/mol acetateH control. Copyright ª 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights cathode generating hydrogen gas on the cathode as long as additional energy is applied to the circuit

  5. Irrigation Water Quality Standards and Salinity Management Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fipps, Guy

    2003-04-30

    Barleyhay a 6.0 7.4 9.5 13.0 20 Bermudagrass 6.9 8.5 10.8 14.7 23 Clover,Berseem 1.5 3.2 5.9 10.3 19 Corn(forage) 1.8 3.2 5.2 8.6 16 Hardinggrass 4.6 5.9 7.9 11.1 18 Orchardgrass 1.5 3.1 5.5 9.6 18 Perennialrye 5.6 6.9 8.9 12.2 19 Sudangrass 2.8 5.1 8.6 14....2 9.8 Clover,Berseem 1.0 2.1 3.9 6.8 Corn(forage) 1.2 2.1 3.5 5.7 Hardinggrass 3.1 3.9 5.3 7.4 Orchardgrass 1.0 2.1 3.7 6.4 Perennialrye 3.7 4.6 5.9 8.1 Sudangrass 1.9 3.4 5.7 9.6 Tallfescue 2.6 3.9 5.7 8.9 Tallwheatgrass 5.0 6.6 9.0 13.0 Trefoil,big 1...

  6. Saline County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources Jump to:Ohio: Energy ResourcesArkansas: Energy

  7. Saline County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources Jump to:Ohio: Energy ResourcesArkansas:

  8. Saline County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources Jump to:Ohio: Energy ResourcesArkansas:Kansas:

  9. Saline County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources Jump to:Ohio: Energy

  10. Saline County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources Jump to:Ohio: EnergyNebraska: Energy Resources

  11. USD 307 Ell-Saline Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP)BioGen LLC JumpForestry ConflictUSD 307

  12. CO2 Saline Storage Demonstration in Colorado Sedimentary Basins. Applied

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission, Distribution and--HUBBLE CONSTANTReport) |Studies in

  13. CO2 Saline Storage Demonstration in Colorado Sedimentary Basins. Applied

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission, Distribution and--HUBBLE CONSTANTReport) |Studies

  14. Table of Contents Home ...................................................................................................... 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Statistics ............................................ 45 Civil & Environmental Engineering .................................... 135 Chemistry and Geochemistry ...............

  15. egi.utah.edu | EGI ... the science to find energy EGIDirector@egi.utah.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    & Image Analysis · Geochemistry · Biostratigraphy, Chrono & Sequence Stratigraphy · Geomechanics · Shale

  16. Laura A. Hempel Oregon State University 287 Forestry Sciences Lab, Corvallis OR 97330 (850) 491-4583

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Fluvial Geomorphology, Stable Isotope Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Geomechanics, Structural Geology, Physics

  17. GG 710 Sec. 2: Using the Cameca ims 1280 Ion Microprobe Tentative meeting time: T-Th 3:00 -3:50 pm (2 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    petrology, sedimentology, isotope geochemistry, cosmochemistry, radiochronology, experimental petrology

  18. E L I Z A B E T H M . G R I F F I T H Permanent address: 3526 Oxford Blvd. St. Louis, Missouri 63143 E-mail: egriffit@ucsc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    : sedimentology, geochemistry, origins, distribution and applications, International Association of Sedimentology

  19. Fees are subject to change. See studyguide.au.dk *PLACE OF STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geology, sedimentology, climate and palaeoenvironments, hydrogeology, and geochemistry. Teaching focuses

  20. An Appraisal of Underground Radioactive Waste Disposal in Argillaceous and Crystalline Rocks: Some Geochemical, Geomechanical, and Hydrogeological Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    fields of geochemistry, geomechanics, and hydrogeology toinvolving geochemistry, geomechanics, and hydrogeology mustto identify those areas in geomechanics, hydrogeo­ logy, and

  1. Geology major requirements Jan. 1st,2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    ; Paleobiology; Biogeochemistry; Fluid Earth; Sedimentology and Stratigraphy; Geochemistry; Geochemistry; Geophysics; Sedimentation and Stratigraphy; Petrology) ­ 3-4 credits 2

  2. Integrated Geochronologic, Geochemical, and Sedimentological Investigation of Proterozoic-Early Paleozoic Strata: From Northern India to Global Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Neil Ryan

    2012-01-01

    U-­?Pb  zircon  geochronology,  and  tectonic  evolution  E. ,  2004.  Detrital   geochronology  and  geochemistry  E. ,  2004.  Detrital   geochronology  and  geochemistry  

  3. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  4. Friday, March 16, 2007 MARS SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY: ATMOSPHERE, SOILS, BRINES, AND MINERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    explains the existence of ancient glacial melt morphology. 10:00 a.m. Zolotov M. Yu. * Origin of Acid. S. * McGill G. E. Martian Glacial Morphology, Geomorphology, and Atmospheric Methane [#1161] Methane clathrate hydrate in martian glacial ice is the major reservoir for modern atmospheric methane, and also

  5. The Geochemistry of the HGP-A Geothermal Well: A Review and an Update |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |Information 5th

  6. Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. . Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. ); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA )

    1992-01-01

    A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

  7. The Geochemistry of the HGP-A Geothermal Well: A Review and an Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Donald M.

    1988-01-01

    The HGP-A geothermal well, located on the lower east rift system of Kilauea volcano, has provided steam and hot water to a 3 MWe wellhead generator facility on a continuous basis since December 1981.

  8. 12Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 71 pp. 253-269, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stixrude, Lars

    segregation, the thermal conductivity of the lower mantle regulated the heat ux from the core and thus had a signi cant in uence on thermal evolution, in particular on the rate of growth of the solid inner core in thermal conductivity, have been shown to in uence magnetic eld generation (Gubbins et al. 2007; Willis et

  9. Assessing the Impact of Animal Waste Lagoon Seepage on the Geochemistry of an Underlying Shallow Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNab, W W; Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K

    2006-03-07

    Dairy facilities and similar confined animal operation settings pose a significant nitrate contamination threat via oxidation of animal wastes and subsequent transport to shallow groundwater. While nitrate contamination resulting from application of animal manure as fertilizer to fields is well recognized, the impact of manure lagoon leakage on groundwater quality is less well characterized. In this study, a dairy facility located in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California has been instrumented with monitoring wells as part of a two-year multidisciplinary study to evaluate nitrate loading and denitrification associated with facility operations. Among multiple types of data collected from the site, groundwater and surface water samples have been analyzed for major cations, anions, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, dissolved organic carbon, and selected dissolved gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, Ar, Ne). Modeling of putative geochemical processes occurring within the dairy site manure lagoons shows substantial off-gassing of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in response to mineralization of organic matter. The gas ebullition appears to strip dissolved gases, including Ar and Ne, from the lagoon water leaving concentrations that are undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere. The resulting fractionated dissolved gas signature serves as an effective tracer for the lagoon water in the underlying shallow groundwater and can be used to constrain inverse geochemical models that assess mixing fractions of lagoon water and local groundwater water. Together with ion exchange and mineral equilibria reactions, identification of lagoon seepage helps explain key attributes of the local groundwater chemistry, including input and cycling of nitrogen, across the site.

  10. Paleoecology and Geochemistry of the Upper Kellwasser Black Shale and Extinction Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Emily Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A.D. , 2009. When do black shales tell molybdenum isotopeand redox facies in core shales of Upper PennsylvanianB.B. , 1994. Marine black shales: depositional mechanisms

  11. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Pb, Zn and Ag Mine Tailings Originating From Carbonate-Rich Deposits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, Roberta 1981-

    2012-11-29

    Mining for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico has been ongoing since 1576. Unsecured tailings heaps and associated acid mine drainage have presented problems related to soil quality, water quality, and dust emission...

  12. 39WWW.CEN-ONLINE.ORG APRIL 5, 2010 YOU MIGHT SAY that geochemistry can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.

    and their interactions with aqueous solutions ulti- mately explain some of the planet's largest-scale phenomena Francisco saw the deployment of computational geo- chemistry forces that have been advancing for several how water interacts with the surface of a mineral, tobermorite. (Red is oxygen, white is hydrogen

  13. Effects of pore-scale physics on uranium geochemistry in Hanford sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.

    2013-11-25

    Overall, this work examines a key scientific issue, mass transfer limitations at the pore-scale, using both new instruments with high spatial resolution, and new conceptual and modeling paradigms. The complementary laboratory and numerical approaches connect pore-scale physics to macroscopic measurements, providing a previously elusive scale integration. This Exploratory research project produced five peer-reviewed journal publications and eleven scientific presentations. This work provides new scientific understanding, allowing the DOE to better incorporate coupled physical and chemical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship.

  14. Geochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids from the Mid-Cayman Rise, Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Jill Marie

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines the controls on organic, inorganic, and volatile species distributions in hydrothermal fluids venting at Von Damm and Piccard, two recently discovered vent fields at the ultra slow spreading Mid-Cayman ...

  15. Ground-water hydrogeology and geochemistry of a reclaimed lignite surface mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Clifford Ralph

    1982-01-01

    is removed by a walking dragline and cast in con- ical piles to form rows of spoil ridges in the mined-out portion of the preceding mine cut. The lignite is removed by smaller pieces of earth- moving equipment, such as crawler-mounted power shovels, front...

  16. Wednesday, March 14, 2007 MARS SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY: THE MAP VIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    the type of material. 2:30 p.m. Dromart G. * Quantin C. Broucke O. Stratigraphic Architectures in Southern Melas Basin, Valles Marineris, Mars [#1089] We report an identification of stratigraphic architectures the northern plains. 3:45 p.m. Pearce G. P. * Veillette D. Soare R. J. Ground Ice in Utopia Planitia: A Late

  17. Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 Investigation of physical, chemical and microbiological processes in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Gordon Southam2 1 University of Ottawa, 140 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON, Canada, K1N 6N5 (e-mail: kbrau049@uottawa.ca) 2 University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St.,London, ON, Canada, N6A 5B7 (e accumulations of bitumen, coal and dissolved hydrogen sulphide (Hamilton & Hattori, 2008). The reducing source

  18. Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-21

    This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

  19. Sulfur geochemistry of thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment from the Texas-Louisiana continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

    2001-01-01

    content were measured using a new wet chemical technique. The []³?S relative to Vienna Canyon Diablo troilite was determined for TRS and hydrate H?S. Extensive (>95%) reduction of pore-fluid sulfate occurred, resulting in exceptionally high []H?S...

  20. Cathodoluminescence petrography and isotope geochemistry of KT impact ejecta deposited 360 km from the Chicxulub crater,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    ** and ALFRED G. FISCHER *Department of Geology, University of Illinois, 245 Natural History Building, 1301 W Barton Creek Formation dolomitized marine limestone overlain by 16 m of dolomitized Albion Formation impact ejecta. The Albion Formation consists of a lower fine- grained »1-m-thick spheroid bed

  1. APPLICATIONS OF HIGH RESOLUTION NMR TO GEOCHEMISTRY: CRYSTALLINE, GLASS, AND MOLTEN SILICATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, E.

    2010-01-01

    Ilnlllysls of sample. (HIl20'0'4(SI~'ls 42.41 wtS H1l20.K2SI.0g Is 27.80 wtS 1wtS Ha20. V.3.lv. Population

  2. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01

    of geochemical samples. Origin Tailings pond 3 next to SBH-2410- and 360~m level Tailings pond 3 next to SBH-2 Stream (

  3. Fe isotope and trace element geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic syn-glacial Rapitan iron formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    pattern likely records a steep isotopic gradient across the iron chemocline in Rapitan seawater. © 2011 metabolism, and function as a micronu- trient (Anbar, 2004; Beard et al., 2003a; Johnson et al., 2008a). Iron

  4. Organic geochemistry of the early Toarcian oceanic anoxic event in Hawsker Bottoms, Yorkshire, England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trabucho-Alexandre, J.

    A comprehensive organic geochemical investigation of the Hawsker Bottoms outcrop section in Yorkshire, England has provided new insights about environmental conditions leading into and during the Toarcian oceanic anoxic ...

  5. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. CENTRAL AMERICA: GEOLOGY, RESOURCES AND HAZARDS; BUNDSCHUH & ALVARADO (EDS) 1 Petrology and geochemistry of lavas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of their petrology and petrography are then reviewed. In 1969, McBirney [2] recognized a few regional variations

  7. When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    Petroleum Research, Oslo Research Park, 0349 Oslo, Norway c Geology Institute Azerbaijan, Husein Avenue 29A, and petroleum. However, the source of the fluids and the fluid­rock interactions within the mud volcano conduit and Indonesia (e.g. Jakubov et al.,1971; Barber et al.,1986; Cita et al.,1996; Dia et al., 1999; Isaksen et al

  8. When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Petroleum Research, Oslo Research Park, 0349 Oslo, Norway c Geology Institute Azerbaijan, Husein Avenue 29A, gas, and petroleum. However, the source of the fluids and the fluid­rock interactions within the mud and Indonesia (e.g. Jakubov et al.,1971; Barber et al.,1986; Cita et al.,1996; Dia et al., 1999; Isaksen et al

  9. An investigation of the geology and geochemistry of radon in shear zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, R.R.; Stanton, M.R.; Gundersen, L.C.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Gates, A.E. [Rutgers--the State Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geology; Schultz, A.P. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Speer, J.A. [North Carolina Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    1991-12-31

    In this study we will characterize the four principal geologic terrains that cause the highest and most extensive indoor radon problems in the United States, we will predict their national distribution, and we will define the climatic and chemical processes that affect uranium and radium siting in rocks and soils, and ultimately their emanation and radon potential. We have chosen nine sheared granite plutons from different climatic areas across the United States, two faulted carbonate terrains from an and area and a humid area, and three sites within the fractured Pierre shale and the glacial deposits derived from it in the northern Great Plains. The results of our studies for the last four years have established that in order to understand and accurately predict radon transport and availability in rocks, soils, and ground water, the factors affecting radon emanation must be quantitatively described and basic models developed to understand the processes involved. Three phases of the project were worked on this (1) Preliminary assessment of the Alleghenian granites and compilation of data for establishing the relation between heat flow and radon production and availability, (2) development of a field emanation protocol, and (3) ongoing geochemical examination of shear zone processes.

  10. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01

    in the aquifer rocks, and helium production from uranium andwhere U:Th tal rocks. Helium production rates are Pu uraniumhelium and sometimes argon can alter the noble gas ratios, notably in geothermal areas. If the production

  11. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John P. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). School of Energy Resources; Pluda, Allison R. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Wyoming High-Precision Isotope Lab.

    2014-03-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  12. Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Silvana S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

    2014-12-11

    in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. These results challenge our view of carbon sequestration...

  13. The biostratigraphy, palaeoecology and geochemistry of a long lacustrine sequence from NW Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frogley, Michael Reginald

    excursion 92 504.11 Big Lost excursion 92 5.5 Amino Acid Epimerization Data 93 5.6 Uranium-Series Dating 95 5.7 Tephra 97 5.8 Summary and Proposed Age Model 99 FAUNAL BIOSTRATIGRAPHY AND MODERN ASSEMBLAGES 6.1 Introduction 6 .2 Aquatic Molluscan... 1980s, the Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploration (IGME) investigated the Ioannina basin for commercially exploitable lignite deposits. Other basins in the Pindus had previously yielded economically viable deposits and the Ioannina basin...

  14. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P.; Sims, Kenneth W.W.; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-06-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  15. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research we intend to collect cores of unconsolidation material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The data gathered will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The conceptual model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions has been revised. The model is being built around the method of Morel and Hering (1993) and Westall (1986).

  16. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1993-12-31

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research we intend to collect cores of unconsolidated material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The data gathered will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. A conceptual model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions is being developed. This report includes our first approximation of the model. The model is subject to change.

  17. Radiocarbon and stable isotope geochemistry of organic matter in the Amazon headwaters, Peruvian Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Michael

    (such as resuspension or photosynthesis) may control riverine POM composition as opposed to terrestrial consistency in the geochemical composition of organic matter (OM) in the Amazon, leading to the conclusion

  18. 12Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 70 pp. 533-569, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    issues for which chemical reaction kinetics play a significant role; these include carbon sequestration contamination. Let's take carbon sequestration as an example. Geological carbon sequestration--the injection to geological carbon sequestration involves the accurate prediction of reaction kinetics among CO2, brine

  19. Research paper Chemical element imaging for speleothem geochemistry: Application to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moisture that had condensed underground. Polished sections of the sample revealed alternating laminas

  20. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Tertiary igneous rocks of the Eagle Mountains, Van Horn, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Ronald Alan

    1972-01-01

    , 0 1, 9 4h 18 IR 1. 8 1. 5 '1. 4 5p 0 p Sd 8101214 Ca 'ro Fig12re 13. Hb/Sr vs. Cap plot for the rocks of the Eagle Mountains. 39 2. 1 2. 0 ~ VI' 1. 9 1. 7 ep sd O ~ Na/ K Figure l4. Rb/Sr vs. Ma/K plot for the rooks... Page 3 ~ 5. 6. 7 ~ 8. Map of a portion of West Texas showing the location of' the Eagle Mountains. . . 4 The Cretaceous section of the Eagle Mountains after Underwood. (1962) . . . . 8 Distribution of igneous rock and sample locations...

  1. The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant Behavior in EGS Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Develop Improved Methods For Maintaining Permeable Fracture Volumes In EGS Reservoirs.

  2. Organic geochemistry and correlation of Paleozoic source rocks and Trenton crude oils, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J. )

    1989-08-01

    Shale samples from four cores of the New Albany and Antrim Shales (Devonian) and from six cores of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician), representing a broad geographic area of Indiana, have been analyzed for total organic carbon, total sulfur, pyrolysis yield (Rock-Eval), bitumen content, and illite crystallinity data. These data indicate that the New Albany, Antrim, and Maquoketa shales contain a sufficient quantity and quality of organic matter to be good petroleum source rocks. Bitumen ratios, Rock-Eval yields, gas chromatography of saturated hydrocarbons, and illite crystallinity data show that the Maquoketa shales have reached a higher level of thermal maturity than the New Albany and Antrim shales. The level of thermal maturity of the Maquoketa shales suggested a maximum burial depth considerably greater than the present depth.

  3. The distribution and geochemistry of iridium in river suspended material and marine sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, Frederick Donald

    1983-01-01

    suggest that Ni, Co and Ir enrichment mechanisms may be similar. Apparent Ir enrichments were found in a mid-Cretaceous shale and a Mediterranean Sea sapropel. It is possible that this Ir precipitated from seawater as a sulfide under reducing... Sapropels and Mid-Cretaceous Marine Black Shales Sources of Iridium The Argument for Iridium Enhancement in the Deep-Sea by Geochemical Processes: Ferromanganese Nodules SUMMARF AND CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C APPENDIX...

  4. Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dole, LR

    2004-12-17

    The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

  5. Geochemistry of the Yegua Aquifer system and its relation to microbial processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlichenmeyer, Jeannette Leone

    1996-01-01

    by dissolution of a carbonate with a 813C of less than 09o'o. NP-2 and NP-3 waters have been influenced by carbonate dissolution and organic matter oxidation. Microbial and geochemical data suggest that sulfide oxidation is occurring in NP-I and NP-2 waters...

  6. Geochemistry of Background Sediment Samples at Technical Area 39, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric V. McDonald; Katherine Campbell; Patrick A. Longmire; Steven L. Reneau

    1998-11-01

    This report presents results of chemical analyses of 24 analytes in 16 background sediment samples collected from Ancho Canyon and Indio Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 39, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Preliminary upper tolerance limits (UTLS) for sediments are calculated from this data set but, because of the small sample size, these UTLs exceed the maximum values in the data set by up to 50'ZO and will require revision as more background sediment data are obtained.

  7. Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Applied to the Monitoring, Verification of Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swart, Peter

    2013-11-30

    This award was a training grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this award was solely to provide training for two PhD graduate students for three years in the general area of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The training consisted of course work and conducting research in the area of CCS. Attendance at conferences was also encouraged as an activity and positive experience for students to learn the process of sharing research findings with the scientific community, and the peer review process. At the time of this report, both students have approximately two years remaining of their studies, so have not fully completed their scientific research projects.

  8. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01

    been introduced as drilling fluids, and tritium indicatescontamination by drilling fluids in some IIground- waters.3 in time-scale room Drilling fluid in time-scale room 410-

  9. Source rock geochemistry and liquid and solid petroleum occurrences of the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curiale, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Crude oils, solid bitumens and potential oil source rocks of the Frontal and Central Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma were examined. The purposes of this study are to characterize the organic matter in each of these materials, and to correlate oils to potential source rocks in the Ouachita Mountains. Four Ouachita Mountain oils and seven solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite were analyzed. The oils are paraffinic and range from 31.8 to 43.1 API gravity. Results indicate that the oils are thermally mature and generally unaltered. All four oils are commonly sourced, as suggested by n-alkane, sterane and hopane distributions, stable isotope ratios, infrared spectra and vanadium/nickel ratios. A common source for the solid bitumens is also suggested by isotope ratios and pyrolyzate characteristics. An origin due to crude oil biodegradation is suggested for these solids, based on carbon isotope ratios, elemental analyses, and sterane distributions of the solid bitumen pyrolyzates. Several stratigraphic intervals in the Ouachita Mountains possess adequate source potential for petroleum generation, based on contents of total organic carbon and extractable organic matter. Devonian rocks are oil-generative. The entire Paleozoic section examined is thermally mature enough to have generated oil, being located at about the middle of the oil window. In general, the best oil source potential is present in upper Ordovician (Polk Creek/Womble) rocks. Oil-source rock correlation techniques indicate that oils examined from the Frontal and Central Ouachita Mountains have a Siluro-Ordovician (Missouri Mountain-Polk Creek-Womble) source.

  10. 8Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 72 pp. 311-408, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    of diffusion, the effect of temperature, pressure, H2O content, fO2 , and more generally melt composition on diffusion in simple- system melts, of interests to glass and ceramic scientists, is not included covers literature diffusion data (except multicomponent diffusion matrix data, and those of H, C, O

  11. m)T7(T^/f^\\ \\ / Riso-R-430 The Geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -LEVEL HASTE 22 Uranium 31 Neptunium 35 Plutonium 38 Americium 41 CHEMISTRY OF TECHNETIUM 44 ADSORPTION, stability-diagrams for the transuranium elements from uranium to americium under diverse conditions have GROUNDWATER COMPOSITIONS 7 COMPLEX CHEMISTRY 12 CRITICAL ANION CONCENTRATION IN GROUND WATERS 17 THE CHEMISTRY

  12. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01

    the Ca++ and Ba++ chemistry, and uranium solution is redoxchemistry samples collect dissolved gas samples collect uraniumand Uranium-238 Helium-4 and other noble gases. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 3.1 Groundwater Chemistry

  13. Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 Imaging a Buried Diamondiferous Kimberlite Using Conventional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or vegetation, water/soil chemical properties, and by-product gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide. A new ranging from light sulphur species to organics with 18 carbon atoms, which reach the surface more easily light sulphur species to organics with 18 carbon atoms over kimberlites, which correlate well

  14. Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

  15. GEOCHEMISTRY OF PARTICULATE AND DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON IN THE CENTRAL NORTH PACIFIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    -carbonate system of the open ocean is still not completely understood today. This investigation incorporated both for 15 months at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series station, ALOHA, was predominantly controlled waters are a very small sink for anthropogenic CO2, this CO2 has penetrated to a depth of 700 m

  16. Petrology and Geochemistry of Neoproterozoic Arc Plutons Beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain, SRS, SC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryak, M.

    1998-10-21

    In this report is presented first a brief review of the regional geologic setting of the Savannah River Site, descriptions of the plutonic rock units sampled here, whole rock geochemical data on the plutonic igneous rocks, and finally, a discussion of how the crystalline basement rocks of the Savannah River Site formed and how they may correlate with other terranes exposed in the Piedmont of the Carolinas, Georgia, and Virginia.

  17. Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2009-01-01

    Lying Repositories for Nuclear Waste, NAGRA Technical Reporthost rock formation for nuclear waste storage. EngineeringGas Generation in a Nuclear Waste Repository: Reactive

  18. Geochemistry Sampling for Traditional and Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry in Southeast Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Cody; Wood, Thomas; Neupane, Ghanashyam; McLing, Travis; Mattson, Earl; Dobson, Patrick; Conrad, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) is an area of high regional heat flux due the movement of the North American Plate over the Yellowstone Hotspot beginning ca.16 Ma. Temperature gradients between 45-60 °C/km (up to double the global average) have been calculated from deep wells that penetrate the upper aquifer system (Blackwell 1989). Despite the high geothermal potential, thermal signatures from hot springs and wells are effectively masked by the rapid flow of cold groundwater through the highly permeable basalts of the Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer (ESRPA) (up to 500+ m thick). This preliminary study is part of an effort to more accurately predict temperatures of the ESRP deep thermal reservoir while accounting for the effects of the prolific cold water aquifer system above. This study combines the use of traditional geothermometry, mixing models, and a multicomponent equilibrium geothermometry (MEG) tool to investigate the geothermal potential of the ESRP. In March, 2014, a collaborative team including members of the University of Idaho, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory collected 14 thermal water samples from and adjacent to the Eastern Snake River Plain. The preliminary results of chemical analyses and geothermometry applied to these samples are presented herein.

  19. tice sites of calcium carbonate and affect Mars' soil geochemistry, and calcium carbonate can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    the mass of sample in the oven is not tightly constrained. We estimate that this error is on the order solar day has a mean period of 24 hours 39 min 35.244 s and is referred to as a sol to distinguish this from a ~3% shorter solar day on Earth. 21. W. L. Lindsay, Chemical Equilibria in Soils (Blackburn Press

  20. PART II, Tackling Grand Challenges in Geochemistry: Q&A with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    understanding of the dynamics of minerals underground. He earned his doctorate in geology from the University of Wyoming in 2002 and went on to become a postgraduate...

  1. Chondrule trace element geochemistry at the mineral scale Emmanuel JACQUET1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    .g., Pack et al. 2004). Regarding (2), olivine-rich lithic inclusions with 120° triple junctions, known an important astrophysical process in the early inner solar system, is still largely shrouded in mystery

  2. GEOC: Division of Geochemistry 162 -Organo-mineral associations in agricultural soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    practice to neutralize soil acidity after the conversion of land from forest to agriculture. However

  3. Wednesday, March 14, 2007 MARS SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY: VIEW FROM THE SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Golombek M. Parker T. Squyres S. W. Sullivan R. Structure and Sedimentology of the Western Margin of Erebus Crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars [#2235] The structure, stratigraphy and sedimentology of two outcrops

  4. GEOCHEMISTRY OF ROCK UNITS AT THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY LEVEL, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z.E. Peterman; P.L. Cloke

    2000-12-13

    The compositional variability of the phenocryst-poor member of the 12.8-million-year Topopah Spring Tuff at the potential repository level was assessed by duplicate analysis of 20 core samples from the cross drift at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Previous analyses of outcrop and core samples of the Topopah Spring Tuff showed that the phenocryst-poor rhyolite, which includes both lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones, is relatively uniform in composition. Analyses of rock samples from the cross drift, the first from the actual potential repository block, also indicate the chemical homogeneity of this unit excluding localized deposits of vapor-phase minerals and low-temperature calcite and opal in fractures, cavities, and faults, The possible influence of vapor-phase minerals and calcite and opal coatings on rock composition at a scale sufficiently large to incorporate these heterogeneously distributed deposits was evaluated and is considered to be relatively minor. Therefore, the composition of the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff is considered to be adequately represented by the analyses of samples from the cross drift. The mean composition as represented by the 10 most abundant oxides in weight percent or grams per hundred grams is: SiO{sub 2}, 76.29; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 12.55; FeO, 0.14; Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.97; MgO, 0.13; CaO, 0.50; Na{sub 2}O, 3.52; K{sub 2}O, 4.83; TiO{sub 2}, 0.11; and MnO, 0.07.

  5. 11Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 68, pp. XXX-XXX, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, 20771, U.S.A. 4 University of Bern, Physikalisches Institut, Bern Bern 3012

  6. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. The intent in this research was to collect cores of unconsolidated material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The gas composition data would provide background data for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Cores of coal slurry were collected on May 16--18, 1994 from four holes in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. There was no unsaturated zone in the coal, so no gas samples can be collected from that zone. The authors installed three samplers in one hole. Two of the samplers are in the saturated zone (in the coal) and the third one might be in the unsaturated zone, but in the soil cover above the coal particles. They plan to collect samples in about mid-June. The water and solids from the cores are being separated for chemical analysis. The computer model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions is being developed. The first portion of code, the calculation of thermodynamic equilibrium without consideration of ionic strength, has been written. The methods of Morel and Hering (1993) and Westall (1986) are the basis for the model, however, the model does not follow the matrix solution used by them. Rather, an algebraic solution is used. A matrix similar to the one reported last quarter was used to formulate mass balance and material balance equations.

  7. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Final technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1994-12-31

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal. slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research project we retrieved five drill cores from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment, and installed three samplers in one of the core holes. The solids were chemically and mineralogically analyzed. Display of the mineralogical data on a cross section showed that pyrite was randomly distributed through much of the length of the coal slurry impoundment. Trace concentrations of heavy metals were correlated with pyrite in the core solids. Water samples were collected and analyzed. The water analyses showed that nutrients are insufficient to support plant growth without supplemental fertilization. The analytical data will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the kinetics of pyrite oxidation at near-neutral pH conditions. Programming of a computerized model to simulate pyrite oxidation under near-neutral pH conditions was begun. The program includes ideas from Morel and Hering (1993) and species are calculated in terms of 7 components of known concentrations. The ionic strength of the solution, the species activity coefficients, and the activities are calculated iteratively.

  8. Light hydrocarbon geochemistry of brines and sediments of the red sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Roger Allen

    1979-01-01

    -induced hydzccarbon po!. lution in the oceans [Bi"oaks and Sockett, 1973]; "sniffing" of light hydrocarbons to evaluate the oil producing potential of an area !Sackett, 1977]; and determination of light hydrocarbons in anoxic. waters [Bunt, 1974; Vtesenbpnp, 1975...

  9. Linking Molecular Microbiology and Geochemistry to Better Understand Microbial Ecology in Coastal Marine Sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Brandi Kiel

    2012-02-14

    The overall objective of the research presented here was to combine multiple geochemical parameters and molecular characterizations to provide a novel view of active microbial community ecology of sediments in a large-river ...

  10. Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model for theSunLanSuperDrive IncCity,

  11. Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: Energy ResourcesMaui Area (DOE GTP)EnergyWith Gases At

  12. Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:Energy Information Area

  13. FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,Erosion FlumeEventFAOFB

  14. Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXAGemini SolarMichigan:Region,Reservoir| Open

  15. Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXAGemini SolarMichigan:Region,Reservoir|

  16. A Summary of the Geology, Geochemistry, and Geophysics of the Roosevelt Hot

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSprings Thermal Area, Utah

  17. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D. (USGS, Denver, CO); Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  18. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, Brian A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Sams, James I. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Smith, Bruce D. [U.S. Geological Survey. Denver, CO (United States); Harbert, William [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam's inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  19. GEOBULLETIN GeoBulletin is distributed weekly, by E-mail. Contributions are requested!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Anders

    /Geography at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt invites applications · Assistant Professor, Sedimentology for a faculty position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry · Post-doc in experimental petrology - U geochemistry, low-temperature geochemistry, mineralogy, paleoclimatology, sedimentology and stratigraphy

  20. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Salinity in the San Francisco Estuary: An Evaluation of Model Accuracy, X2, and the Low–Salinity Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacWilliams, Michael L.; Bever, Aaron J.; Gross, Edward S.; Ketefian, Gerard S.; Kimmerer, Wim J.

    2015-01-01

    to observations of water level, tidal flow, current speed,area, vol- ume, and depth of water within specific salinitythree-dimensional shallow water flow. Computers Mathematics

  1. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Salinity in the San Francisco Estuary: An Evaluation of Model Accuracy, X2, and the Low–Salinity Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacWilliams, Michael L.; Bever, Aaron J.; Gross, Edward S.; Ketefian, Gerard S.; Kimmerer, Wim J.

    2015-01-01

    142740 Feyrer F, Nobriga M, Sommer T. 2007. Multi-decadalsfews.2013v11iss2art1 Nobriga M, Sommer T, Feyrer F, Fleming

  2. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01

    to  a  common  drain   Solar  Panels  with  12-­?volt  by   10   Watt   solar   panels   fixed   to   the  Ducky  Strike  South   Solar  Panels  with  12-­?volt  

  3. index | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of engineered-natural systems. Research includes fluid-rock geochemistry, fluid-rock geophysics, and geochemical engineering, specifically: Fluid-Rock Geochemistry Pursuing...

  4. Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planavsky, Noah John

    2012-01-01

    Konhauser, K.O. , 2009. Petrography and geochemistry of theKonhauser, K.O. , 2009. Petrography and geochemistry of the

  5. Uranium 238U/235U isotope ratios as indicators of reduction: Results from an in situ biostimulation experiment at Rifle, Colorado, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bopp IV, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Series Geochemistry; In Uranium-Series Geochemistry; BernardIsotopic Fractionation of Uranium. Earth and Planetaryand precipitation of uranium and vanadium at low

  6. Lithology and cyclicity in the deposition of the Middle Ordovician McKee Sand member of the Tulip Creek Formation (Simpson Group) in the Tobosa Basin of Southeast New Mexico and West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosco, Michael John

    1999-01-01

    in quads sand grain size and percentage of clay and carbonate composition accompanied by sharp breaks and repetition in facies delineate this cyclicity. The McKee Sand is largely composed of sandstones, muddy sandstones, and sandy mudstones. The sandstones...

  7. CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

    2005-09-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  8. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-12-01

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

  9. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lithology: Lithologic diversity produces rheological contrasts which can enhance fracturing and fluid flow, and relatively young rocks have had fewer opportunities for...

  10. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, Lifting the cover of the cauldron: convection in hot planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de G´eologie de Lyon, ´Ecole Normale Sup´erieure de Lyon, Universit´e Lyon-1, Universit´e de Lyon, CNRS UMR5276, Lyon, F-69364 France. D R A F T November 11, 2014, 10:48am D R A F T #12;X - 2 RICARD ET

  11. Investigations on the Structure Tectonics, Geophysics, Geochemistry, and Hydrocarbon Potential of the Black Mesa Basin, Northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Colin; Carroll, Herbert; Erickson, Richard; George, Steve; Guo, Genliang; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, Michael; Volk, Len

    1999-04-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has instituted a basin-analysis study program to encourage drilling in underexplored and unexplored areas and increase discovery rates for hydrocarbons by independent oil companies within the continental United States. The work is being performed at the DOE's National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, by the Exploration and Drilling Group within BDM-Oklahoma (BDM), the manager of the facility for DOE. Several low-activity areas in the Mid-Continent, west, and southwest were considered for the initial study area (Reeves and Carroll 1994a). The Black Mesa region in northwestern Arizona is shown on the U.S. Geological Survey 1995 oil and gas map of the United States as an undrilled area, adapted from Takahashi and Gautier 1995. This basin was selected by DOE s the site for the initial NIPER-BDM survey to develop prospects within the Lower-48 states (Reeves and Carroll 1994b).

  12. An Assessment of the Natural and Anthropogenic Geochemistry of the Red Mountain Creek Watershed: Ironton Mining District, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litt, Joshua

    2014-04-29

    Red Mountain Creek is located in the rich mineralized San Juan Mountains of Southwestern Colorado, where mining from the mid 1800s through the late 1970s occurred. Sampling of the Uncompahgre River in the late 1970s, which is downstream of the five...

  13. Geochemistry of Sedimentary Pore Fluids in Venice Lagoon, Results of the SIOSED Program from 2005-2007, A Background Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    equatorial Atlantic: suboxic diagenesis. Geochim. Cosmochim.Jahnke (1990). Early diagenesis in differing depositionalprocess involving the diagenesis of organic matter is iron

  14. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park. 1: The origin of thiosulfate in hot spring waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W. [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.] [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1998-12-01

    Thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), polythionate (S{sub x}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), dissolved sulfide (H{sub 2}S), and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) concentrations in thirty-nine alkaline and acidic springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were determined. The analyses were conducted on site, using ion chromatography for thiosulfate, polythionate, and sulfate, and using colorimetry for dissolved sulfide. Thiosulfate was detected at concentrations typically less than 2 {micro}mol/L in neutral and alkaline chloride springs with low sulfate concentrations (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} > 25). The thiosulfate concentration levels are about one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentration of dissolved sulfide in these springs. In most acid sulfate and acid sulfate-chloride springs (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} < 10), thiosulfate concentrations were also typically lower than 2 {micro}mol/L. However, in some chloride springs enriched with sulfate (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} between 10 and 25), thiosulfate was found at concentrations ranging from 9 to 95 {micro}mol/L, higher than the concentrations of dissolved sulfide in these waters. Polythionate was detected only in Cinder Pool, Norris Geyser basin, at concentrations up to 8 {micro}mol/L, with an average S-chain-length from 4.1 to 4.9 sulfur atoms. The results indicate that no thiosulfate occurs in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system. Thiosulfate may form, however, from (1) hydrolysis of native sulfur by hydrothermal solutions in the shallower parts (<50 m) of the system, (2) oxidation of dissolved sulfide upon mixing of a deep hydrothermal water with aerated shallow groundwater, and (3) the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by dissolved oxygen upon discharge of the hot spring. Upon discharge of a sulfide-containing hydrothermal water, oxidation proceeds rapidly as atmospheric oxygen enters the water. The transfer of oxygen is particularly effective if the hydrothermal discharge is turbulent and has a large surface area.

  15. Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry Office: 303-384-2389 Colorado School of Mines Fax: 303-273-3629

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the research of thermoelectrics and lithium ion batteries. · 2004~2007, Assisting in supervising four graduates. 31, 2011, "Charging Lithium Ion Batteries with New Cathode Materials of Iron Oxyfluoride Fe ­ Aug. 31, 2015, "Improving the Cyclability of Iron Pyrite (p-FeS2) Cathodes in Lithium Ion Batteries

  16. Geochemistry and magmatic history of eclogites and ultramafic rocks from the Chinese continental scientific drill hole: Subduction and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scientific drill hole: Subduction and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism of lower crustal cumulates Yongsheng Drill Hole were studied. The low Mg#s (=100molar Mg/(Mg+Fe)) (81­84%) and low Ni (1150­1220 ppm sequence of fractional crystallization of tholeiitic or picritic magmas at intermediate to high pressure

  17. The Geochemistry of Technetium: A Summary of the Behavior of an Artificial Element in the Natural Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Martin, Wayne J.; Zachara, John M.

    2008-12-01

    Interest in the chemistry of technetium has only increased since its discovery in 1937, mainly because of the large and growing inventory of 99Tc generated during fission of 235U, its environmental mobility in oxidizing conditions, and its potential radiotoxicity. For every ton of enriched uranium fuel (3% 235U) that is consumed at a typical burn-up rate, nearly 1 kg of 99Tc is generated. Thus, the mass of 99Tc produced since 1993 has nearly quadrupled, and will likely to continue to increase if more emphasis is placed on nuclear power to slow the accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases. In order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of 99Tc and the natural environment, we review the sources of 99Tc in the nuclear fuel cycle, its chemical properties, radiochemistry, and biogeochemical behavior. We include an evaluation of the use of Re as a chemical analog of Tc, as well as a summary of the redox potential, thermodynamics, sorption, colloidal behavior, and interaction of humic substances with Tc, and the potential for re-oxidation and remobilization of Tc(IV). What emerges is a more complicated picture of Tc behavior than that of an easily tractable transition of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) with consequent immobilization. Reducing conditions (+200 to +100 mV Eh) are generally thought necessary to cause reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), but far more important are the presence of reducing agents, such as Fe(II) sorbed onto mineral grains. Catalysis of Tc(VII) by surface-mediated Fe(II) will bring the mobile Tc(VII) species to a lower oxidation state and will form the relatively insoluble Tc(IV)O2?nH2O, but even as a solid, equilibrium concentrations of aqueous Tc are nearly a factor of 20× above the EPA set drinking water standards. However, sequestration of Tc(IV) into Fe(III)-bearing phases, such as goethite or other hydrous oxyhydroxides of iron, may ameliorate concerns over the mobility of Tc. Further, the outcome of many studies on terrestrial and marine sediments that are oxidizing overall indicate that Tc is relatively immobile, due to formation of oxygen-depleted microenvironments that develop in response to bacteriological activities. The rate of re-mobilization of Tc from these microenvironments is just beginning to be assessed, but with no firm consensus. Reassessment of the simple models in which Tc is mobilized and immobilized is therefore urged.

  18. Geochemistry of eclogites from Western Norway: implications from high-precision whole-rock and rutile analyses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Darren James

    2015-06-30

    The Western Gneiss Region (WGR) in Norway is home to some of the world’s most spectacular exposures of high pressure (HP) and ultrahigh pressure (UHP) eclogites. Despite extensive petrological studies into their pressure, ...

  19. Geochemistry of FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Three tasks are being conducted in this research project, all related to understanding the chemistry and mineralogy of the co-disposal of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) wastes with coal slurry solid (CSS) from a coal preparation plant. During coal cleaning, pyrite, other heavy minerals, and rock materials are rejected from the coal and discharged in an aqueous slurry to a slurry pond. After dewatering and abandonment of the pond, the pyrite may oxidize and produce acid that may migrate into the underlying groundwater system. If an alkaline product, such as FBC waste, is mixed with the CSS, then the acid will be effectively neutralized as it is produced. In Task 1, soluble components and acid-base reaction products from mixtures of FBC waste and CSS are being extracted for up to 180 days in a series of aqueous batch experiments. The final two sets of extractions, 90- and 180-days, were completed. The extracts and solids from these experiments were submitted for analysis of cations, anions, and mineralogy. In Task 2, 10 L of extracts from three mixtures of FBC waste and CSS were prepared for use in experiments to determine the adsorption/desorption reactions that occur between components of the extracts and three commonly occurring Illinois soils.

  20. Tephra stratigraphy and geochemistry from three Icelandic lake cores: a new method for determining source volcano of tepra layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagan, Anna

    2010-01-01

    At present there is no consistent method for the identification of source volcanoes for a tephra layer found in a stratigraphy. This has led to several studies misidentifying source volcanoes. Geochemical analysis of the ...

  1. Combining Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO2 in Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swart, Peter K.; Dixon, Tim

    2014-09-30

    A series of surface geophysical and geochemical techniques are tested in order to demonstrate and validate low cost approaches for Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) of the integrity of deep reservoirs for CO2 storage. These techniques are (i) surface deformation by GPS; ii) surface deformation by InSAR; iii) passive source seismology via broad band seismometers; and iv) soil gas monitoring with a cavity ring down spectrometer for measurement of CO2 concentration and carbon isotope ratio. The techniques were tested at an active EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) site in Texas. Each approach has demonstrated utility. Assuming Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) activities become operational in the future, these techniques can be used to augment more expensive down-hole techniques.

  2. Using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography to explore the geochemistry of the Santa Barbara oil seeps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Christopher; Nelson, Robert

    2013-03-27

    The development of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) has expanded the analytical window for studying complex mixtures like oil. Compared to traditional gas chromatography, this technology separates and resolves at least an order of magnitude more compounds, has a much larger signal to noise ratio, and sorts compounds based on their chemical class; hence, providing highly refined inventories of petroleum hydrocarbons in geochemical samples that was previously unattainable. In addition to the increased resolution afforded by GC x GC, the resulting chromatograms have been used to estimate the liquid vapor pressures, aqueous solubilities, octanol-water partition coefficients, and vaporization enthalpies of petroleum hydrocarbons. With these relationships, powerful and incisive analyses of phase-transfer processes affecting petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures in the environment are available. For example, GC x GC retention data has been used to quantitatively deconvolve the effects of phase transfer processes such as water washing and evaporation. In short, the positive attributes of GC x GC-analysis have led to a methodology that has revolutionized the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons. Overall, this research has opened numerous fields of study on the biogeochemical "?genetics" (referred to as petroleomics) of petroleum samples in both subsurface and surface environments. Furthermore, these new findings have already been applied to the behavior of oil at other seeps as well, for petroleum exploration and oil spill studies.

  3. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, In-situ re-deposition of trace metals mobilized by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    by CO2-charged brines is one concern relating to injection of CO2 as part of carbon capture and storage-enriched sam- ples shows that these metals are incorporated into secondary carbonate and oxide phases which. Introduction Geological CO2 sequestration is proposed as one method for mitigating the effects of fossil fuel

  4. THE CASE FOR REACTIVE SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE MOON. W. M. Farrell1,3 , R. M. Kil-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    includ- ing solar radiation, solar wind, and micro-meteoroid impacts provides a source of energy, the Moon per- colates with activity due to the inflow of solar energy and matter to the surface. The processes identified to date that create neutral gas emission in this environment are sputtering, photon

  5. Geochemistry of cold seepage-impacted sediments: Per-ascensum or per-descensum trace metal enrichment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundant (e.g., Peckmann and Thiel, 2004; Wankel et al., 2010; Regnier et al., 2011; Crémière et al., 2012

  6. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Soils of Ultramafic Origin from the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bangira, Courage

    2012-02-14

    ) and dithionite-citrate (DC). .... 89 5.3 X-ray diffraction patterns of the clay (< 2 ?m) fraction from a soil profile .???????????????????????? 92 5.4 Fourier transform infrared pattern of the oven-dry clay (< 2 ?m... (2-50 ?m) from the A1, Bt and Cr horizons.... .......................................................................... 99 5.8 SEM images of pure chlorite in the sand fraction of the A1 horizon (a and b), and coarse...

  7. Isotope Geochemistry of Calcite Coatings and the Thermal History of the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.D. Marshall; J.F. Whelan

    2000-07-27

    Calcite and opal coatings found on fracture footwalls and lithophysal cavity bottoms in the volcanic section at Yucca Mountain (exposed in a tunnel) contain a record of gradual chemical and isotopic changes that have occurred in the unsaturated zone. The thin (less than 6 cm) coatings are composed primarily of calcite, opal, chalcedony, and quartz. Fluid inclusions in calcite that homogenize at greater than ambient temperatures provide impetus for geochronologic studies in order to determine the thermal history. In the welded Topopah Spring Tuff (12.7 Ma), U-Pb ages of opal and chalcedony layers provide evidence of a long history of deposition throughout the past 10 m.y. However, these ages can constrain the ages of associated calcite layers only in samples with an easily interpretable microstratigraphy. Strontium isotope ratios in calcite increase with microstratigraphic position from the base up to the outermost surface of the coatings. The strontium incorporated in these coatings records the systematic change in pore-water isotopic composition due to water-rock interaction primarily in the overlying nonwelded tuffs. A one-dimensional advection-reaction model simulates strontium isotope ratios measured in pore water extracted from core in three vertical boreholes adjacent to the tunnel. By calculating the strontium isotope compositions of the rocks at various past times, the model predicts a history of the strontium isotope ratios in the water that matches the record in the calcite and therefore provides approximate ages. Oxygen isotope ratios measured in calcite gradually increase with decreasing model strontium age. Assuming that the oxygen isotope ratio of the percolating water was relatively constant, this trend indicates a gradual cooling of the rocks over millions of years, in agreement with thermal modeling of magma beneath the 12-Ma Timber Mountain caldera just north of Yucca Mountain. This model predicts that temperatures significantly exceeding current geotherm values occurred prior to 6 Ma. We find no evidence for Quaternary or recent thermal perturbations to the cooling rocks.

  8. Subduction zone processes and continental crust formation in the southern Central Andes: insights from geochemistry and geochronology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Rosemary Ellen

    2014-06-30

    Subduction zones, such as the Andean convergent margin, are the sites at which new continental crust is generated, and where subducting material is either recycled to the crust via arc magmatism or transferred to the ...

  9. Impact of sedimentary provenance and weathering on arsenic distribution in aquifers of the Datong basin, China: Constraints from elemental geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Ellis, Andre; Liu, Chongxuan; Duan, Mengyu; Li, Junxia

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic (As)-contaminated aquifer sediments from Datong basin, China have been analyzed to infer the provenance and depositional environment related to As distribution in the aquifer sediments. The As content in the sediments ranged from 2.45 to 27.38 mg/kg with an average value of 9.54 mg/kg, which is comparable to the average value in modern unconsolidated sediments. However, minor variation in As concentration with depth has been observed in the core. There was a significant correlation between Fe, and Al and As, which was attributed to the adsorption or co-precipitation of As onto/with Fe oxides/hydroxides and/or Fe-coated clay minerals. Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS)-normalized REEs patterns of sediment samples along the borehole were constant, and the sediments had a notably restricted range of La-N/Yb-N ratios from 0.7 to 1.0. These results suggested that the provenance of the Datong basin remained similar throughout the whole depositional period. The analysis of major geochemical compositions confirmed that all core sediments were from the same sedimentary source and experienced significant sedimentary recycling. The co-variation of As, V/Al, Ni/Al and chemical index of alteration (CIA) values in the sediments along the borehole suggested that As distribution in the sediments was primarily controlled by weathering processes. The calculated CIA values of the sediments along the borehole indicate that a relative strong chemical weathering occurred during the deposition of sediments at depths of similar to 35 to 88 m, which was corresponding to the depth at which high As groundwater was observed at the site. Strong chemical weathering favored the deposition of Fe-bearing minerals including poorly crystalline and crystalline Fe oxide mineral phases and concomitant co-precipitation of As with these minerals in the sediments. Subsequent reductive dissolution of As-bearing poorly crystalline and crystalline Fe oxides would result in the enrichment of As in groundwater. In general, the chemical weathering during the deposition of the sediments governed the co-accumulation of Fe oxides and As in the aquifer sediments. And then, the reductive dissolution of Fe oxides/hydroxides is the mechanism of As enrichment in the groundwater in the Datong basin

  10. Implications of Carbonate Petrology and Geochemistry for the Origin of Coal Balls from the Kalo Formation (Moscovian, Pennsylvanian) of Iowa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Courtney

    2012-10-19

    Coal balls are carbonate concretions formed in peat during the Pennsylvanian and early Permian. Microprobe and microscope analysis reveal that polycrystals of high-Mg calcite (HMC), which are also high in Sr, are the ...

  11. INVESTIGATIONS ON THE USE OF ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY FOR THE ANALYSES OF LEAD IN SALINE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    A - Lead Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Lead ..of Lead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 -2ce

  12. Conservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). In natural waters U is found mostly as dis- solved uranyl carbonates (UO2(CO3)3 4 - ) under oxidizing to (1) destabilization of uranyl carbonate complexes; (2) biological uptake; and/or (3) U adsorption

  13. Effect of Saline Waste Solution Infiltration Rates on Uranium Retention and Spatial Distribution in Hanford Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    S. M. ; Wang, Z. Dissolution of uranyl microprecipitates inV. ; Amayri, S. ; Nitsche, H. Uranyl(VI) carbonate complexof ternary complexes of uranyl and carbonate with alkaline

  14. Waterflood and Enhanced Oil Recovery Studies using Saline Water and Dilute Surfactants in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alotaibi, Mohammed

    2012-02-14

    . In addition to seawater and dilute seawater (50, 20, 10, and 1 vol%), formation brine, shallow aquifer water, deionized water and different crude oil samples were used throughout this study. The crude oil/water/carbonates interactions were also investigated...

  15. Water Infiltration and Permeability of Selected Urban Soils as Affected by Salinity and Sodicity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    2012-10-05

    into two alluvial soils (Torrifluvents), and two upland soils (Paleorthid and Calciorthid, Aridisols) placed in greenhouse pots. For the first experiment, irrigation solutions simulating the Rio Grande water, city potable water, and two sources of reclaimed...

  16. A Simple Model for Estimating Water Balance and Salinity of Reservoirs and Outflow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S; Yuan, F; Anand, Shilpa

    2010-08-23

    storage and inflow information in advance of the actual release. A simple two-layer model is used to describe the reservoir processes. The second part addresses water and salt transport through semi-arid river channels. A routing model referred... part concerns with water and salt storage in the riparian zones. The models are coded in FORTRAN and are available upon request. The models were applied to the middle reach of the Pecos River (Malaga, New Mexico, to Girvin, Texas) and, to a limited...

  17. Conditional Reliability, Sub-Monthly Time Step, Flood Control, and Salinity Features of WRAP 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, A.A.; Olmos, H.E.; Hoffpauir, R.J.; Wurbs, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    ....................................................................................................... 158 5.9 Beginning Reservoir Storage BRS File for the Example ................................................ 161 5.10 SALT Input SIN File for the Example ............................................................................. 162 5... record field 9 to provide beginning reservoir storage for program SALT and TABLES 5CR2 record routines root1.SUB SIMD sub-monthly time step simulation results root1.FFA SIMD flood frequency analysis file with annual series of peak flow and storage...

  18. Manual on Conditional Reliability, Daily Time Step, Flood Control, and Salinity Features of WRAP (Draft) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    ....................................................................................................... 158 5.9 Beginning Reservoir Storage BRS File for the Example ................................................ 161 5.10 SALT Input SIN File for the Example ............................................................................. 162 5... record field 9 to provide beginning reservoir storage for program SALT and TABLES 5CR2 record routines root1.SUB SIMD sub-monthly time step simulation results root1.FFA SIMD flood frequency analysis file with annual series of peak flow and storage...

  19. Evaluation of selected provenances of taxodium distichum for drought, alkalinity and salinity tolerance. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Geoffrey Carlile

    2009-05-15

    relatively sane. I owe special thanks to Lindsay Holmes for all her patience and support, as well as the pre-dawn harvests. I owe a debt of gratitude to my parents, Jerry and Peggy Denny, and my little sister Erin for their unflagging support and love... ...................................................................................................... 41 2 Pre-dawn xylem water potentials of 13 open-pollinated families of Taxodium distichum after 5, 6, and 7 d drought periods ........................................................................................................... 47...

  20. Ocean temperature and salinity components of the MaddenJulian oscillation observed by Argo floats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    , with its increase in downward surface shortwave radiation and reduction in evaporation and upward latent. Singhruck Department of Marine Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand 123 Clim Dyn (2010) 35

  1. Heat extraction from salinity-gradient solar ponds using heat pipe heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tundee, Sura; Terdtoon, Pradit; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut; Singh, Randeep; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical analysis on the heat extraction process from solar pond by using the heat pipe heat exchanger. In order to conduct research work, a small scale experimental solar pond with an area of 7.0 m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.5 m was built at Khon Kaen in North-Eastern Thailand (16 27'N102 E). Heat was successfully extracted from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond by using a heat pipe heat exchanger made from 60 copper tubes with 21 mm inside diameter and 22 mm outside diameter. The length of the evaporator and condenser section was 800 mm and 200 mm respectively. R134a was used as the heat transfer fluid in the experiment. The theoretical model was formulated for the solar pond heat extraction on the basis of the energy conservation equations and by using the solar radiation data for the above location. Numerical methods were used to solve the modeling equations. In the analysis, the performance of heat exchanger is investigated by varying the velocity of inlet air used to extract heat from the condenser end of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE). Air velocity was found to have a significant influence on the effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger. In the present investigation, there was an increase in effectiveness by 43% as the air velocity was decreased from 5 m/s to 1 m/s. The results obtained from the theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  2. INVESTIGATIONS ON THE USE OF ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY FOR THE ANALYSES OF LEAD IN SALINE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Kaplan, I.R. , 1972, Early Diagenesis in a Reducing Fjord,Kaplan, I.R. , 1972, Early Diagenesis in a ReducoingFjord,-

  3. Rise and fall of the Paratethys Sea during the Messinian Salinity Crisis W. Krijgsman a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    with elusive tectonic processes in the Gibraltar arc. A subsequent fall of Paratethyan water level closely isolated from the Atlantic Ocean, triggering widespread precipitation of gypsum (5.96­5.6 Ma), massive salt

  4. Efficient parallel simulation of CO2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Keni; Doughty, Christine; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    +6s, no salt, 3D CO2 Mass Fraction Z (m) Y(m) Figure 6. CO 2s), salt=12.5%, 3D CO2 mass fraction Z (m) X (m) Figure 7.25% with Large K, 3D CO2 mass fraction Z (m) Y (m) Figure 9.

  5. Effects of environmental salinity and dietary protein levels on digestibility in four species of penaeid shrimp 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coelho, Silvio Romero de C.

    1984-01-01

    , for their solicitude in furnishing some of the animals used in the present study. Dr. Ronald L. Richter from the Department of Food Science Technology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, who kindly permitted the use of the freeze-drier, The Empresa... experimental tanks. Initial average length and weight were 148. 93 + 8. 97 mm and 32. 24 + 5. 70 g, respectively. b) Penseus (Marsupenaeus) j aponicus Bate, 1888 The shrimp were received from the Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuaria do Rio Grande do Norte S. A...

  6. Cross-formational rising groundwater at an artesian karstic basin: the Ayalon Saline Anomaly, Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    27 October 2003; revised 6 June 2005; accepted 27 June 2005 Abstract It is proposed that a geothermal groundwater monitoring was carried out at 68 new shallow boreholes in the Ayalon region, accompanied permeable swarms of karstic shafts, serving as an outflow of the artesian geothermal system. The ASA area

  7. Irrigation Requirements for Salinity Management on Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) Turf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miehls, Alea

    2013-01-01

    responses to heat and stress alone or in combination withas a function of heat stress, contributed to the variabilityand increasing internal heat stress. These findings are in

  8. Impact of salinity on cathode catalyst performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    otherwise be used for seawater desalination. In Hong Kong, for example, seawater is used for toilet flushing performance will be improved at higher salt concentrations expected for wastewaters containing seawater to an increase in the use of seawater for domestic purposes. Seawater is used as an alternative water source

  9. Osmotic pressures and second virial coefficients for aqueous saline solutions of lysozyme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Y.U.

    2011-01-01

    AC03-76SF00098. ®,..;ycledpaper Osmotic Pressures and Second2SoC are reported for osmotic pressures of aqueous solutionsZ. and J. M. Prausnitz, "Osmotic Pressures of Aqueous Bovine

  10. A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

    2006-01-01

    the middle Capay Shale (depleted gas) and McCormick Sand (depleted gas reservoir located within the Middle Capay shaleCO 2 gas will occur in the 2-3 m thick Capay Shale interval

  11. Microwave Heating of Water, Ice and Saline Solution: Molecular Dynamics Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohiko Tanaka; Motoyasu Sato

    2006-09-24

    In order to study the heating process of water by the microwaves of 2.5-20GHz frequencies, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations by adopting a non-polarized water model that have fixed point charges on rigid-body molecules. All runs are started from the equilibrated states derived from the I$_{c}$ ice with given density and temperature. In the presence of microwaves, the molecules of liquid water exhibit rotational motion whose average phase is delayed from the microwave electric field. Microwave energy is transferred to the kinetic and inter-molecular energies of water, where one third of the absorbed microwave energy is stored as the latter energy. The water in ice phase is scarcely heated by microwaves because of the tight hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Addition of small amount of salt to pure water substantially increases the heating rate because of the weakening by defects in the water network due to sloshing large-size negative ions.

  12. Integrated salinity reduction and water recovery in an osmotic microbial desalination cell{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a drawback and results in high operating costs and water prices. The shortage of clean freshwater sources environmental, energy, and economical benefits. Desalination is an important approach to producing drinking, and vapor compression.1 Membrane technol- ogy driven by electric energy includes reverse osmosis, membrane

  13. Impact of Feedwater Salinity on Energy Requirements of a Small-Scale Membrane Filtration System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, B.S.; Masson, L.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Many remote communities in both developed and developing countries lack electricity and clean drinking water. One solution, for such communities that rely on brackish groundwater, is a photovoltaic (PV) powered hybrid ...

  14. ANALYSIS OF THE PHYSICAL FORCING MECHANISMS INFLUENCING SALINITY TRANSPORT FOR THE LOWER ST. JOHNS RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Florida, University of

    supported me to chase down my dream, whether it is a tornado or a hurricane, and to this I say thank you Ted are deserved of my gratitude for believing in me. In addition, through this period I have lost many significant

  15. The Effect of Increased Salinity on Diversity and Abundance of Diatoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    salt tolerances among species. Diatoms were obtained from an oligotrophic section of Spring Creek enormous amounts of road salts used for deicing purposes enter stream systems. #12;Introduction Diatoms ecosystem. The recent Marcellus Shale drilling for natural gas in regions of New York, Pennsylvania, West

  16. Retrieving marine inherent optical properties from satellites using temperature and salinity-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    . Boss, V. E. Brando, M. Dowell, T. Hirata, S. J. Lavender, Z.-P. Lee, H. Loisel, S. Maritorena, F. Mélin

  17. Salinity Trends, Variability, and Control in the Northern Reach of the San Francisco Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enright, Christopher; Culberson, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    of other investigators: • Tidal energy dissipation in theprocesses that absorbed tidal energy. Complex landscapethe delta by absorbing tidal energy. The importance of this

  18. AUV Observations of the Diurnal Surface Layer in the North Atlantic3 Salinity Maximum4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fratantoni, David

    stabilizing effect of the thermal stratification then inhibits convection and vertical mixing,39 allowing typically53 #12; 4 display little stratification in the upper meter, even under low-wind, high

  19. Dilute iota-and kappa-Carrageenan solutions with high viscosities in high salinity brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Power, Energy Environmental Research (PEER) Center, California Institute polyacrylamide solutions. Moreover, Carrageenans are renewable, nontoxic, green substances. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction To address the increasing energy needs of society in the face

  20. Physiological Effects of Saline Water on Two Economically Important Horticultural Crops in South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Catherine Ross

    2013-12-02

    decreased all measured growth and physiological parameters for all rootstocks implying that this scion-rootstock combination may not be ideal. In the second experiment, TAMU mini watermelons were grafted to four rootstocks to determine if any of these would...