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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

geochemistry | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

geochemistry geochemistry Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

2

EMSL - geochemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

geochemistry en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrolytes...

3

Lithologically Controlled | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007)isLithologically Controlled Jump to:

4

Managing Soil Salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains soil salinity, factors that contribute to it, and methods of correcting saline soils....

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

LITHOLOGY-FLUID INVERSION FROM PRESTACK SEISMIC DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITHOLOGY-FLUID INVERSION FROM PRESTACK SEISMIC DATA MARIT ULVMOEN Department of Mathematical of the study is on lithology-fluid inversion from prestack seismic data in a 3D reservoir. The inversion relates the lithology-fluid classes to elastic variables and the seismic data, and it follows the lines

Eidsvik, Jo

6

Lithology-Fluid Inversion based on Prestack Seismic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithology-Fluid Inversion based on Prestack Seismic Data Marit Ulvmoen Summary The focus of the study is on lithology-fluid inversion from prestack seismic data. The target zone is a 3D reservoir model. The likelihood model relates the lithology-fluid classes to elastic variables and the seismic

Eidsvik, Jo

7

Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

8

Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

9

Overview of fundamental geochemistry basic research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers in ORNL`s Geochemistry and High Temperature Aqueous Chemistry groups are conducting detailed experimental studies of physicochemical properties of the granite-melt-brine system; sorption of water on rocks from steam-dominated reservoirs; partitioning of salts and acid volatiles between brines and steam; effects of salinity on H and O isotope partitioning between brines, minerals, and steam; and aqueous geochemistry of Al. These studies contribute in many ways to cost reductions and improved efficiency in the discovery, characterization, and production of energy from geothermal resources.

Anovitz, L.M.; Benezeth, P.; Blencoe, J.G. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Water Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Groundwater salinization in a coastal multilayer aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

social and environmental changes. This paper focuses on the groundwater geochemistry in a costal the last decades. These evolutions gave rise to numerous environmental consequences, such as a dramatic decline of the piezometric levels, groundwater salinization and contamination. This degradation of natural

Boyer, Edmond

11

WHAT IS MEDICAL MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHAT IS MEDICAL MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY? The connection between human health of medical mineralogy and geochemistry (MMG) focuses on understanding the equilibria and reaction pathways phases with naturally occurring, inorganic solid phases within the human body. Medical mineralogy

Sahai, Nita

12

Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

13

Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant Behavior in EGS Reservoirs The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant...

15

An International Journal of MINERALOGY, CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, GEOCHEMISTRY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, developed from the weathering of alumosilicate-rich parent rocks. These residual deposits are mainly formedAn International Journal of MINERALOGY, CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, GEOCHEMISTRY, ORE DEPOSITS, PETROLOGY

Boni, Maria

16

Author's Copy 2Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's Copy 2Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 71 pp. 19-37, 2010 Copyright © Mineralogical Society of America 1529-6466/10/0071-0002$05.00 DOI: 10.2138/rmg.2010.71.2 The Minnesota Density Functionals and their Applications to Problems in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Yan Zhao Commercial Print Engine

Truhlar, Donald G

17

Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,InformationInformation PelletsParticipant JumpCapRockLithology Jump

18

LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiéro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER of the Nhecolândia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland in Brazil, is the presence of both saline and freshwater manuscript, published in "Wetlands 22, 3 (2002) 528-540" DOI : 10.1672/0277-5212(2002)022[0528:GOWAGW]2.0.CO

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

19

Sandia National Laboratories: Molecular Geochemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowaLosSandiaManagementMolecular Geochemistry Molecular

20

Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

Johnson, D.H.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

CONTROL ID: 1469463 TITLE: In Situ Techniques for Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Small Bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTROL ID: 1469463 TITLE: In Situ Techniques for Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Small Bodies information about their formation histories and evolution. Combined geochemistry and mineralogy measurements measurement techniques that could provide microscopic mineralogy and isotope geochemistry. We will discuss

Rossman. George R.

22

Earth and Space Sciences Geochemistry 111  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth and Space Sciences #12;Geochemistry 111 5 Earth and Space Sciences Research in the realm of Earth and Space Sci- ences focusses on the observation and qualitative and quantitative description of natural phenom- ena on Earth and in the Universe, on the detailed study and experimental and computational

Henkel, Werner

23

SHIP3QARD ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY JOIDES RESOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: DepartmentSHIP3QARD ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY ON JOIDES RESOLUTION Kay-Christian Bneis Ocean Drilling Program 345 Middlefield Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&MUNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE

24

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California....

25

Geochemistry and Isotopes of Fluids from Sulphur Springs, Valles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Isotopes of Fluids from Sulphur Springs, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geochemistry and...

26

The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant Behavior in EGS Reservoirs Principal Investigator (Joseph Moore) Presenter Name (John McLennan)...

27

Geochemistry of slow-growing corals : reconstructing sea surface temperature, salinity and the North Atlantic Oscillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 225-year old coral from the south shore of Bermuda (64°W, 320N) provides a record of decadal-to-centennial scale climate variability. The coral was collected live, and sub-annual density bands seen in x-radiographs ...

Goodkin, Nathalie Fairbank

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Compiled Multi-Lab Geochemistry Synoptic Survey (LANL, ORNL, LBNL), Barrow, Alaska; 2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

To assess the effects of microtopography and depth on ground water geochemistry in arctic polygonal terrain.

Brent Newman; Heather Throckmorton

29

Lithology and well log study of Campbell E-2 geothermal test well, Humboldt  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007)isLithologically Controlled Jump to:House

30

12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases ...

Frey, Frederick

31

12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focuses on element distribution in rocks and minerals using data obtained from natural and experimental systems. Emphasizes models describing trace-element partitioning and applications of trace-element geochemistry to ...

Frey, Frederick August

32

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

33

Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At...

34

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The...

35

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE USE OF ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY FOR THE ANALYSES OF LEAD IN SALINE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brines, and volcanic outgassing (Handbook of Geochemistry, 1974, p.82-I-l): (c) industrial contamination

Case, Charles W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Can seismic character identify lithologies associated with Bluell and Sherwood shorelines and shoals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several new oil fields have been discovered in the Bluell and Sherwood members of the Mission Canyon Formation, reviving the Mississippian shoreline play in the eastern Williston basin. During periodic regressions, carbonates and evaporites were deposited along the shoreline of a shallow sea. Embayments in the shoreline created traps that contain 3 - 8 million bbl of oil. Carbonate shoals developed offshore. Surrounded by impermeable carbonate mud, they trap 1 - 3 million bbl of oil. The ability of seismic character to distinguish lithologies associated with shorelines and shoals was investigated using sonic logs, models, and seismic data. Shorelines: The gross thickness of the Bluell zone can range between 40 and 70 ft, the Sherwood zone between 35 and 80 ft. Changing thicknesses on geologic models had a distinct effect on seismic character. Also, seismic character varied in response to changing stratigraphy above, within, and below the Bluell and Sherwood zones. Carbonate and anhydrite bulk densities and velocities differ by about 10%. Modeling this difference demonstrated a minimal change in seismic character. Seismic character cannot delineate the shoreline transition from carbonate to anhydrite. Other stratigraphic variations alter seismic character more than this lithologic change. Shoals: Velocity and density variations between shoal carbonates and intershoal mud can differ by 30%. Sonic log seismograms and seismic data show a distinct character change between these lithologies. Seismic character can be used to delineate carbonate shoals and mud. However, the shoal/mud character change can be modified by the seismic response to other stratigraphic variations. Calibration with nearby wells can reduce interpretational uncertainty.

Johnson, E.H. (Balcron Oil, Billings, MT (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Catalog of borehole lithologic logs from the 600 Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) geoscientists are studying the Hanford Site subsurface environment to assure safe management operations, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. As part of this effort, geoscientists have collected geotechnical data from about 3000 boreholes drilled on the Hanford Site since the early 1900s. These boreholes have been used for subsurface geologic, hydrologic, and engineering investigation, water supply, ground-water monitoring, and natural gas production. This report is a catalog of all obtainable (about 800) lithologic logs from boreholes in a portion of the Hanford Site known as the 600 Area.

Fecht, K R; Lillie, J T

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Bedrock structure, lithology and ground water: influences on slope failure initiation in Davis County, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variability in k for gneiss (()1), amphibolite (()2), and pegmatite (83) 29 Variability in alpha95 for the three lithologies 65 30 Variability in k for regions 1 through 8. 31 32 33 Variability in alpha95 for regions 1 through 8. A plot of ellipsoid... (scan line technique). . . 80 37 Fracture spacing and half-length for an amphibolite outcrop (scan line technique) . 81 38 Fracture spacing and half-length for a pegmatite outcrop (scan line technique) 82 Xv1 LIST OF FIGURES, CONTINUED Figure Page...

Ala, Souren Nariman

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Is Salinity Variability a Benthic Disturbance?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are sieved on 0.5 mm mesh screens. Biota are then sorted, counted, and identified to the lowest taxonomic level for abundance measures (species distribution data for Lavaca-Coloardo and Guadalupe estuaries are found in Appendix 2, species distribution... similarity. A With stations as labels and B with overall average salinity as label and salinity trajectory (i.e. seriation from lowest to highest salinity). Estuary abbreviations same as Fig. 1. 2 0 Table 4 Dominant species in each...

Van Diggelen, Amanda

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydrology, Salinity, and Salinity Control Possibilities of the Middle Pecos River: A Reconnaissance Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the lower reaches. If the connection is weak, salt sources below Pecos should be evaluated for control as a part of the salinity control plan for Amistad International Reservoir. Streamflow salinity below Coyanosa can be lowered simply by reducing...

Miyamoto, S.; Anand, Shilpa; Hatler, Will

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this latter point is that the iodine desorption process would be appreciably slower than the (ad)sorption process, and as such would control the rate (and the PA K{sub d} value) that iodine sorbed to and therefore migrated through the subsurface sediment. High desorption K{sub d} values would result in the “effective K{sub d}” for a reactive transport model being closer to the desorption K{sub d} value (the rate limiting value) than the (ad)sorption K{sub d} value. In summary, our understanding of {sup 129}I geochemistry has greatly improved, reducing the uncertainty associated with the PA’s conceptual model, thereby permitting us to reduce the conservatism presently incorporated in PA input values to describe {sup 129}I fate and transport in the SRS subsurface environment.

Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Exploration geochemistry: The Los Alamos experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory became actively involved in geochemical exploration in 1975 by conducting a reconnaissance-scale exploration program for uranium as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Initially, only uranium and thorium were analyzed. By 1979 Los Alamos was analyzing a multielement suite. The data were presented in histograms and as black and white concentration plots for uranium and thorium only. Data for the remaining elements were presented as hard copy data listings in an appendix to the report. In 1983 Los Alamos began using exploration geochemistry for the purpose of finding economic mineral deposits to help stimulate the economies of underdeveloped countries. Stream-sediment samples were collected on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia and a geochemical atlas of that island was produced. The data were statistically smoothed and presented as computer-generated color plots of each element of the multielement suite. Studies for the US Bureau of Land Management in 1984 consisted of development of techniques for the integration of several large data sets, which could then be used for computer-assisted mineral resource assessments. A supervised classification technique was developed which compares the attributes of grid cells containing mines or mineral occurrences with attributes of unclassified cells not known to contain mines or occurrences. Color maps indicate how closely unclassified cells match in attributes the cells with mines or occurrences. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Maassen, L.W.; Bolivar, S.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management (http://espm.berkeley.edu), invites applications for a tenure, molecular scale organic-mineral interactions, and reaction/transport modeling of soil processes course in Environmental or Soil Geochemistry, as well as contribute to other Department teaching needs

Silver, Whendee

46

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

47

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

48

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

49

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor -Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor - Geophysics, Sedimentology position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry. The appointment is probationary tenure

Brownstone, Rob

51

2Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 64, pp. 5-57, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 64, pp. 5-57, 2006 Copyright © Mineralogical Society with health scientists to contribute expertise in mineralogy, materials characterization, fluid

Ahmad, Sajjad

52

Salinity Budget and WRAP Salinity Simulation Studies of the Brazos River/Reservoir System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................... 3 Dataset from USACE/USGS Natural Salt Pollution Studies ..................................................... 3 Salinity Concentrations in the Brazos River Basin .................................................................... 7 TDS... .................................................................................................... 96 WRAP Simulation Input Dataset for Validating and Calibrating Salinity Routing Methods ... 97 vi Initial Simulation Results ......................................................????????????.. 113 Simulation Studies to Explore Reservoir...

Wurbs, Ralph; Lee, Chihun

53

Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Summary of lithologic logging of new and existing boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, August 1993 to February 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being investigated as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. This report summarizes the lithologic logging of new and existing boreholes at Yucca Mountain that was done from August 1993 to February 1994 by the Rock Characteristics Section, Yucca Mountain Project Branch, US Geological Survey (USGS). Units encountered during logging include Quaternary-Tertiary alluvium/colluvium, Tertiary Rainier Mesa Tuff, all units in the Tertiary Paintbrush Group, Tertiary Calico Hills Formation and Tertiary Prow Pass Tuff. We present criteria used for recognition of stratigraphic contacts, logging results as tables of contact depths for core from neutron (UZN) boreholes and graphical lithologic logs for core from non-UZN boreholes, and descriptions of several distinctive nonwelded tuffs recognized in the PTn hydrogeologic unit of the Paintbrush Group.

Geslin, J.K.; Moyer, T.C.; Buesch, D.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Reconnaissance soil geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont County.....................................................................................................................................................link Figures Figure 1. Location of 19 soil samples collected from the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial

Fleskes, Joe

57

A post-Caledonian dolerite dyke from Magery, North Norway: age and geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A post-Caledonian dolerite dyke from Magerøy, North Norway: age and geochemistry DAVID ROBERTS-Caledonian dolerite dyke from Magerøy, North Norway: age and geochemistry. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol. 71, pp, Geological Survey of Norway, Post Box 3006-Lade, N-7(}()2 Trondheim, Norway; John G. Mitchell, Department

Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

58

Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade May 2008 Abstract The carbon geochemistry of serpentinized peridotites and gabbroic rocks recovered at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) and drilled at IODP Hole 1309D at the central dome of the Atlantis

Gilli, Adrian

59

A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PNNL-17031 A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site J. Zachara C. Liu C Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 3 U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo of River Protection (ORP) #12;#12;PNNL-17031 A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford

60

Q AS A LITHOLOGICAL/HYDROCARBON INDICATOR: FROM FULL WAVEFORM SONIC TO 3D SURFACE SEISMIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop a method to exploit viscoelastic rock and fluid properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic measurements to the presence of hydrocarbon saturation. To reach the objective, Southwest Research Institute scientists used well log, lithology, production, and 3D seismic data from an oil reservoir located on the Waggoner Ranch in north central Texas. The project was organized in three phases. In the first phase, we applied modeling techniques to investigate seismic- and acoustic-frequency wave attenuation and its effect on observable wave attributes. We also gathered existing data and acquired new data from the Waggoner Ranch field, so that all needed information was in place for the second phase. During the second phase, we developed methods to extract attenuation from borehole acoustic and surface seismic data. These methods were tested on synthetic data constructed from realistic models and real data. In the third and final phase of the project, we applied this technology to a full data set from the Waggoner site. The results presented in this Final Report show that geological conditions at the site did not allow us to obtain interpretable results from the Q processing algorithm for 3D seismic data. However, the Q-log processing algorithm was successfully applied to full waveform sonic data from the Waggoner site. A significant part of this project was technology transfer. We have published several papers and conducted presentations at professional conferences. In particular, we presented the Q-log algorithm and applications at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Development and Production Forum in Austin, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest from the attendees and, at the request of the SEG delegates, it was placed on the Southwest Research Institute Internet site. The presentation can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/Algorithm.pps In addition, we presented a second application of the Q algorithm at the SEG International Conference in Houston, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest there as well, and it can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/attenuation.pps.

Jorge O. Parra; C.L. Hackert; L. Wilson; H.A. Collier; J. Todd Thomas

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Salinity tolerance and avoidance in juvenile paddlefish, Polyodon spathula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tank was used to obtain data on salinity avoidance behavior. Bioassays of high-salinity tolerance indicated 24-h and 96-h lethal limits near 10 and 8 ppt, respectively, whether the fish had been acclimated to freshwater or water with 5-ppt salinity...

Vignali, Carl R

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

Stolper, Edward

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

White, A.F.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Project Work Plan Chromium Vadose Zone Characterization and Geochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of the proposed study are to 1) determine the leaching characteristics of Cr(VI) from contaminated sediments collected from 100 area spill sites, 2) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford site 100 areas through the use of i) macroscopic solubility studies and ii) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments, and 3) from these data construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 area vadose zone. These objectives are based on locating and obtaining contaminated sediment with depth and at varying Cr(VI) concentrations as we hypothesize that mineral/chemical-Cr(VI) associations should be related to the total Cr concentration and other master geochemical variables (e.g., pH, counter-cation type and concentration, and water content). In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued will be (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and 2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 area corridor cleanup by developing remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry.

Ainsworth, Calvin C.

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Neutral carbohydrate geochemistry of particulate material (trap and core sediments) in an eutrophic lake (Aydat,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutral carbohydrate geochemistry of particulate material (trap and core sediments) in an eutrophic Carbohydrate compositions were determined on sinking particles and core samples from eutrophic lake Aydat; Eutrophic lake; Aydat lake 1. Introduction Polysaccharides are common structural and storage polymers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. Italy). In Isotope Hydrology, IAEA Symposium. Sm-129/53,isotopic variations in hydrology. At. Energy Rev. 14: 621-70 GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geochemistry and arsenic mobilisation in groundwaters of the Pannonian Basin (Hungary and Romania).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, calin.baciu@enviro.ubbcluj.ro, +40 (0) 264 307030 Hug, S.J.,1 , Stephan.hug@eawag.ch, +41 (0) 44 823 and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Switzerland * Corresponding author. The geochemistry of groundwaters from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

14Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 78 pp. 543-603, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 78 pp. 543-603, 2014 Copyright © Mineralogical Society Earth materials, relevant to construct a mineralogical model of the interior of our planet

Duffy, Thomas S.

69

Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin, Algerian. The chemical and mineralogical specificity of this hyperarid ecosystem has been compared to other areas under

Ahmad, Sajjad

70

1Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 72 pp. 1-4, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 72 pp. 1-4, 2010 Copyright © Mineralogical Society and Kinetics." The other was a Reviews of Mineralogy volume edited by Lasaga and Kirkpatrick (1981) titled

Zhang, Youxue

71

Property:SalinityAverage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProceduresFYID6/OrganizationID8/WebsiteSalinityAverage Jump

72

Property:SalinityHIgh | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProceduresFYID6/OrganizationID8/WebsiteSalinityAverage

73

Saline, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI Solaris a city in Utah County,County is aSaline,

74

Ground-water hydrogeology and geochemistry of a reclaimed lignite surface mine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROUND-WATER HYDROGEOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF A RECLAIMED LIGNITE SURFACE MINE A Thesis by CLIFFORD RALPH POLLOCK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Geology GROUND-WATER HYDROGEOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF A RECLAIMED LIGNITE SURFACE MINE A Thesis by CLIFFORD RALPH POLLOCK Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ember) (Member (Member) F...

Pollock, Clifford Ralph

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

On the Geochemistry of Venice Lagoon Sediments. Scripps Institution of Oceanography SEDiment Research Program – SIOSED. A Background Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

profiles of wet marine sediments. Geochemistry, Geophysics,2006). New techniques in sediment core analysis. Geol.Soc.1997). Metal fluxes to the sediments of the northern Venice

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Zehner, Richard E.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Diagnosis and Management of Salinity Problems In Irrigated Pecan Productions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acid for the treatment of ammoniated irrigation water: Reducing Ca precipitation and sodium hazards. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 40:305-309. Miyamoto, S., T. Riley, G. Gobran and J. Petticrew, 1986. Effects of saline water irrigation on soil salinity...

Miyamoto, S.

78

Original article Effects of sodium chloride salinity on root growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

either 50 or 250 mM NaCl. Both moderate and high salinity treatment strongly altered root elongation. In contrast, specific respiration of roots was unaffected by the moderate salinity treatment while ecosystems [11].The effects of snow melt have been documented for wetland ecosystems [14] but

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

79

Postdoctoral fellowship in ore-deposit geology/igneous geochemistry Marie-Curie Initial Training Network ABYSS (ER1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postdoctoral fellowship in ore-deposit geology/igneous geochemistry Marie-Curie Initial Training Network ABYSS (ER1) Training network on reactive geological systems from the mantle to the abyssal sub-Cu-PGE deposits Requirements: Candidates must hold PhD in geology/geochemistry This fellowship is for a period

Demouchy, Sylvie

80

A Mechanism of Improved Oil Recovery by Low-Salinity Waterflooding in Sandstone Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Injection of low-salinity water showed high potentials in improving oil recovery when compared to high-salinity water. However, the optimum water salinity and conditions are uncertain, due to the lack of understanding the mechanisms of fluid...

Nasralla, Ramez

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Migration and trapping of CO? in saline aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitigation of climate change requires a reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C0 2) emissions. One promising tool for achieving this is the large-scale injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers. After injection, upward ...

MacMinn, Christopher William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Migration of saline solutions in variably saturated porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more than 4 million liters of highly saline solutions have leaked from radioactive waste storage tanks environments; it is uncommon for concentrations resulting from agrochemicals and other contaminants to 0169

Selker, John

83

Geosynthetics in a salinity-gradient solar pond environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the latest in salinity-gradient solar pond lining systems. The high-temperature, high-salinity environment unique to a salinity-gradient solar pond resulted in failure of the geomembrane liner at the El Paso Solar Pond Test Facility after only eight years of operation. Research involved in pond reconstruction led to the selection of a lining system consisting of a flexible polypropylene (PP) geomembrane for the sidewalls and a specially formulated geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) on the bottom of the pond. The two liners have been installed and a comprehensive test program is being conducted to measure their performance. The environment encountered in a salinity-gradient solar pond will be discussed as well as material selection criteria and the design of the two liners. Preliminary results of the GCL performance monitoring will also be presented.

Lichwardt, M.A.; Comer, A.I.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Author's personal copy Tungsten geochemistry and implications for understanding the Earth's interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Tungsten geochemistry and implications for understanding the Earth Keywords: tungsten uranium basalt core mantle concentration ratio The concentration of tungsten (W of tungsten (W) was sequestered into the core (Jagoutz et al., 1979; Sun, 1982; Newsom and Palme, 1984

Mcdonough, William F.

85

SPATIAL FACTOR ANALYSIS OF STREAM SEDIMENT GEOCHEMISTRY DATA FROM SOUTH GREENLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPATIAL FACTOR ANALYSIS OF STREAM SEDIMENT GEOCHEMISTRY DATA FROM SOUTH GREENLAND Allan A. Nielsen1 and Greenland, Thoravej 8, DK-2400 Křbenhavn NV, Denmark. ast@geus.dk SUMMARY This paper describes from South Greenland. Kriged MAF images are compared with kriged images based on varimax rotated

86

Organic Geochemistry of the CenomanianTuronian Bahloul Formation Petroleum Source Rock, Central and Northern Tunisia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Organic Geochemistry of the Cenomanian­Turonian Bahloul Formation Petroleum Source Rock, Central and around diapirs of the Triassic salt. Key words: Organic matter, Petroleum Source Rock, Cenomanian (TOC) determination, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, extractable organic matter content (EOM) fractionation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Geochemistry, toxicity, and sorption properties of contaminated sediments and pore waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waters have neutralized on mixing with neutral-pH lake water, producing fine-grained, metal- richGeochemistry, toxicity, and sorption properties of contaminated sediments and pore waters from two Acid mine waters from the Iron Mountain Superfund Site, Shasta County, California, flow through Spring

88

ELSEVIER Sedimentary Geology 124 (1999) 131147 UPb ages and geochemistry of granite pebbles from the Devonian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELSEVIER Sedimentary Geology 124 (1999) 131­147 U­Pb ages and geochemistry of granite pebbles from 1998 Abstract The geochemical composition of some garnet-bearing biotite granite pebbles within from two samples. The granites have suffered low-grade metamorphism as shown by the development

Dörr, Wolfgang

89

Linking Hydrothermal Geochemistry to Organismal Physiology: Physiological Versatility in Riftia pachyptila  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linking Hydrothermal Geochemistry to Organismal Physiology: Physiological Versatility in Riftia and oxygen to generate energy for carbon fixation, and the symbiont's nitrate reduction to ammonia for energy in the EPR and the Guaymas basin, a sedimented, hydrothermal vent field. We observed marked differences

Girguis, Peter R.

90

Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 Peat groundwater as a medium for surficial geochemical exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 1 Peat groundwater as a medium-mail: stew.hamilton@ontario.ca) ABSTRACT: Kimberlite-specific chemical responses are visible in shallow peat and migrated through the Tyrell Sea sediment into shallow peat groundwater. The presence of elevated values

91

Geochemistry of peat over kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area, James Bay Lowlands, northern Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemistry of peat over kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area, James Bay Lowlands, northern Canada by peatlands. Peat samples were examined in the Attawapiskat area, a region of discontinuous permafrost, where more than 19 kimberlite pipes have been found beneath a cover of peat (2­4 m thick) and Quaternary

92

Detrital geochronology and geochemistry of CretaceousEarly Miocene strata of Nepal: implications for timing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detrital geochronology and geochemistry of Cretaceous­Early Miocene strata of Nepal: implications of the southern Lesser Himalayan zone of central Nepal. The Cretaceous­ Paleocene(?) Amile Formation is dominated documented by the U­Pb zircon ages. The fact that middle Eocene strata in Nepal were derived from

Najman, Yani

93

11Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 68, pp. XXX-XXX, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 68, pp. XXX-XXX, 2007 Copyright © Mineralogical Society, mineralogy, and isotopic distributions of oxygen in cometary materials can provide unique insights have been linked to short-period comets by their unequilibrated mineralogy, fragile structure, fine

94

Thursday, March 15, 2007 POSTER SESSION II: MARS SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY: ANALOGS AND MINERALOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thursday, March 15, 2007 POSTER SESSION II: MARS SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY: ANALOGS AND MINERALOGY D. L. Geochemical and Mineralogical Analysis of a "Simple" Evaporite with Organic Carbon and Colorado provides a setting with chemical and mineralogical characteristics relevant to what may be found

Rathbun, Julie A.

95

2Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 75 pp. 7-46, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 75 pp. 7-46, 2013 Copyright © Mineralogical Society of America 1529-6466/13/0075-0002$00.00 DOI: 10.2138/rmg.2013.75.2 Carbon Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry and thus is unique in the diversity of its mineralogical roles. Carbon has the ability to bond to itself

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

96

4Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 75 pp. 79-107, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 75 pp. 79-107, 2013 Copyright © Mineralogical Society of silicate minerals in igneous rocks (Bowen 1915, 1928), implies that Earth's crustal mineralogy has changed of the mineralogical record has led to a growing realization that varied physical, chemical, and biological processes

Downs, Robert T.

97

RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy and geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy with Boston University undergraduates to analyze the mineralogy and unravel the unique story that each rock into modern scientific methods of geochemistry and mineralogy and to unlock for them the exciting

Baxter, Ethan F.

98

Environmental Geochemistry Research Program Dr. Bruce E. Herbert, Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Geochemistry Research Program Dr. Bruce E. Herbert, Texas A&M University Geology, South Tx. Recent Funded Research Projects Nonpoint Source Contaminants from South Texas Uranium Mines): Watershed-Scale bioavailability of arsenic released from South Texas uranium mines · Chris Markley, Ph

Herbert, Bruce

99

Rare sulfur and triple oxygen isotope geochemistry of volcanogenic sulfate aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rare sulfur and triple oxygen isotope geochemistry of volcanogenic sulfate aerosols I.N. Bindeman a of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA c Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Que., Canada d Department of Geology and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland

Bindeman, Ilya N.

100

Agricultural Losses from Salinity in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrodynamic and salinity transport modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquinhydrodynamic and salinity transport modeling to provide irriga- tion water salinity levels for various locations in California’s Sacramento–San Joaquinhydrodynamic, water salinity, and eco- nomic models can provide insights into controversial management issues. KEY WORDS Sacramento–San Joaquin

Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Howitt, Richard E.; Hanak, Ellen; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Convective stability analysis of the long-term storage of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formations, such as unmineable coal beds, depleting oil reservoirs, depleting gas reservoirs, and deep saline

Zhang, Dongxiao

102

Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Appendix B to Attachment 3, Lithologic logs and monitor well construction information. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains lithology logs and monitor well construction information for: NC processing site; UC processing site; and Burro Canyon disposal site. This information pertains to the ground water hydrology investigations which is attachment 3 of this series of reports.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Salinity tolerance in plants: attempts to manipulate ion transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion transport is the major determining factor of salinity tolerance in plants. A simple scheme of a plant cell with ion fluxes provides basic understanding of ion transport and the corresponding changes of ion concentrations under salinity. The review describes in detail basic principles of ion transport for a plant cell, introduces set of transporters essential for sodium and potassium uptake and efflux, analyses driving forces of ion transport and compares ion fluxes measured by several techniques. Study of differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes offers knowledge for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion transport. Several attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance are described. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to potential candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. The potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters is discussed and questioned. An alternative approach from synthetic biology is to modify the existing membrane transport proteins or create new ones with desired properties for transforming agricultural crops. The approach had not been widely used earlier and leads also to theoretical and pure scientific aspects of protein chemistry, structure-function relations of membrane proteins, systems biology and physiology of stress and ion homeostasis.

Vadim Volkov

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

104

Elemental mixing systematics and SrNd isotope geochemistry of mlange formation: Obstacles to identification of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to identification of fluid sources to arc volcanics Robert L. King a,b,, Gray E. Bebout a,b , Takuya Moriguti b protoliths to form hybridized bulk compositions not typical of seafloor "input" lithologies. In general, all by the evolution of bulk composition within mélange zones are probably the most important control of solid, liquid

Bebout, Gray E.

105

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Geochemistry data from 55-29 and 46-16 wells at Newberry 2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Geochemistry data from 55-29 and 46-16 wells at Newberry 2012

Jaffe, Todd

106

Carbon-14 geochemistry at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon-14 is among the key radionuclides driving risk at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Much of this calculated risk is believed to be the result of having to make conservative assumptions in risk calculations because of the lack of site-specific data. The original geochemical data package (Kaplan 2006) recommended that performance assessments and composite analyses for the SRS assume that {sup 14}C did not sorbed to sediments or cementitious materials, i.e., that C-14 K{sub d} value (solid:liquid concentration ratio) be set to 0 mL/g (Kaplan 2006). This recommendation was based primarily on the fact that no site-specific experimental work was available and the assumption that the interaction of anionic {sup 14}C as CO{sub 2}{sup 2-}) with similarly charged sediments or cementitious materials would be minimal. When used in reactive transport equations, the 0 mL/g Kd value results in {sup 14}C not interacting with the solid phase and moving quickly through the porous media at the same rate as water. The objective of this study was to quantify and understand how aqueous {sup 14}C, as dissolved carbonate, sorbs to and desorbs from SRS sediments and cementitious materials. Laboratory studies measuring the sorption of {sup 14}C, added as a carbonate, showed unequivocally that {sup 14}C-carbonate K{sub d} values were not equal to 0 mL/g for any of the solid phases tested, but they required several months to come to steady state. After six months of contact, the apparent K{sub d} values for a clayey sediment was 3,000 mL/g, for a sandy sediment was 10 mL/g, for a 36-year-old concrete was 30,000 mL/g, and for a reducing grout was 40 mL/g. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that (ad)sorption rates were appreciably faster than desorption rates, indicating that a kinetic sorption model, as opposed to the steady-state K{sub d} model, may be a more accurate description of the {sup 14}C-carbonate sorption process. A second study demonstrated that the {sup 14}C-carbonate sorbed very strongly onto the various materials and could not be desorbed by anion exchanged with high concentrations of carbonate or nitrate. High phosphate concentrations were able to desorb {sup 14}C-carbonate from the 36-year-old concrete sample, but not the clayey sediment sample. Together these geochemistry studies support the use of non-zero K{sub d} values in risk calculations on the SRS. For performance assessment (PA) calculations, {sup 14}C would be moving with the groundwater, remaining in contact with sediment for days, not months. Therefore for purposes of SRS risk calculations, it is appropriate to select sorption values after a couple days of contact, departing from the traditional definition that states K{sub d} values reflect the system under steady state conditions. Such an “apparent K{sub d} value,” would be expected to provide a better (and more conservative) estimate of what to expect under SRS PA conditions. Based on these results, recommended apparent K{sub d} values for use in the PA are 1 mL/g for sandy sediments and 30 mL/g for clayey sediments.

Roberts, Kimberly A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Delta Hydrodynamics and Water Salinity with Future Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Comparing Futures for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, prepared by a team of researchers from the CenterDelta Hydrodynamics and Water Salinity with Future Conditions Technical Appendix C William E of California All rights reserved San Francisco, CA Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may

Pasternack, Gregory B.

108

Saline absorption in calcium silicate brick observed by NMR scanning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saline absorption in calcium silicate brick observed by NMR scanning L. Pel #3; , K. Kopinga #3 in calcium-silicate brick was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance scanning. This method hasCl solution in a calcium silicate brick will be discussed. 2 Theory If gravity is neglected, the isothermal

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

109

Environmental Concerns High nutrient, bacterial and salinity levels--along  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of best management practices are critical to implementing these efforts. Through more than 130Environmental Concerns High nutrient, bacterial and salinity levels--along with low dissolved and participation vital to developing and implementing watershed-protection plans. Economic and Environmental

110

Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline. The geochemistry of the thermal waters of three active hot springs, Big Spring, White Sulfur Spring, and Teepee Fountain, is similar in composition; the geochemistry is characteristic of carbonate or carbonate-bearing siliciclastic aquifers. Previous studies of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system postulate that the thermal waters are a mixture of waters from Paleozoic formations. Major element geochemical analyses available for waters from these formations is not of sufficient quality to determine whether the thermal waters are a mixture of the Paleozoic aquifers. In the time frame of this study (1 year), the geochemistry of all three springs was constant through all four seasons, spanning spring snowmelt and recharge as well as late summer and fall dryness. This relationship is consistent with a deep source not influenced by shallow, local hydrogeology. Anomalies are evident in the historic dataset for the geochemistry of Big Spring. We speculate that anomalies occurring between 1906 and 1926 suggest mixing of source waters of Big Spring with waters from a siliciclastic formation, and that anomalies occurring between 1926 and 1933 suggest mixing with waters from a formation containing gypsum or anhydrite. Decreased concentrations measured in our study, relative to concentrations measured between 1933 and 1976, may reflect mixing of thermal waters with more dilute waters. Current data is not sufficient to rigorously test these suggestions, and events of sufficient scale taking place in these timeframes have not been identified.

Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Plant Water Use and Growth in Response to Soil Salinity in Irrigated Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, 27(1): 5-50. Feng, G. ,Salinity in Irrigated Agriculture by Benjamin Reade KrepsSalinity in Irrigated Agriculture by Benjamin Reade Kreps

Runkle, Benjamin Reade

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The influence of salinity on the mechanical behavior of high plasticity soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the influence of salinity on the mechanical behavior of smectitic rich high plasticity soils resedimented with pore fluid salinities ranging from 0 to 256 g/L. An extensive laboratory testing program ...

Fahy, Brian Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity Tim P. Boyer and Sydney Levitus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity Tim P. Boyer and Sydney Levitus Ocean: Boyer, T. P., and S. Levitus, Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity, J. Geophys. Res

114

Addressing agricultural salinity in the American West : harnessing behavioral diversity to institutional design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salinity accumulation in the Lower Arkansas Basin (LAB) of Colorado threatens environmental quality, the agricultural economy and the potential for efficient reuse of water. Salinity is a threat to "hydraulic sustainability", ...

Kock, Beaudry E. (Beaudry Evan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Agricultural Losses from Salinity in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrodynamic and salinity transport modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: sea level rise and water diversion effects.

Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Howitt, Richard E.; Hanak, Ellen; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - algorithm predicting salinity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oceanography Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 2 Improving Soil Salinity Prediction with High...

117

Strontium isotope geochemistry of alluvial groundwater: a tracer for groundwater resources characterisation Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 959972 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strontium isotope geochemistry of alluvial groundwater: a tracer for groundwater resources characterisation 959 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 959972 (2004) © EGU Strontium isotope geochemistry for corresponding author : p.negrel@brgm.fr Abstract This study presents strontium isotope and major ion data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

118

Curriculum Vitae Professional http://geochemistry.usask.ca/bill/Curriculum%20Vitae%2010-24.htm[2/11/2009 7:14:51 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum Vitae Professional http://geochemistry.usask.ca/bill/Curriculum%20Vitae%2010-24.htm[2/11/2009 7:14:51 PM] CURRICULUM VITAE- last updated 12/14/07 Dr. WILLIAM P. PATTERSON Professor and Director, Missouri Highway and Trans. Dept., 1986-89. #12;Curriculum Vitae Professional http://geochemistry.usask.ca/bill/Curriculum

Patterson, William P.

119

Effects of correcting salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of correcting salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model in a tropical Pacific ocean model run for the period 1993­1997. Salinity and temperature corrections salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C12), 8001

van Leeuwen, Peter Jan

120

Effect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in deep saline aquifers is considered one of the most effective methods for carbon sequestration., 48, W09539, doi:10.1029/2012WR011939.* 1. Introduction [2] Carbon sequestration in deep salineEffect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

Firoozabadi, Abbas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 meteorite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 ordinary chondrite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust, fallen on February 15, 2013, in Russian Federation, was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. The Mössbauer spectra of the internal matter and fusion crust were fitted and all components were related to iron-bearing phases such as olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and chromite in the internal matter and olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and magnesioferrite in the fusion crust. A comparison of the content of different phases in the internal matter and in the fusion crust of this fragment showed that ferric compounds resulted from olivine, pyroxene, and troilite combustion in the atmosphere.

Maksimova, Alevtina A.; Petrova, Evgeniya V.; Grokhovsky, Victor I. [Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Oshtrakh, Michael I., E-mail: oshtrakh@gmail.com; Semionkin, Vladimir A. [Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002, Russian Federation and Department of Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ura (Russian Federation)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

The ratios of dibenzothiophene to phenanthrene and pristane to phytane as indicators of depositional environment and lithology of petroleum source rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ratio of dibenzothiophene to phenanthrene and the ratio of pristane to phytane, when coupled together, provide a novel and convenient way to infer crude oil source rock depositional environments and lithologies. Such knowledge can significantly assist in identifying the source formation(s) in a basin thereby providing valuable guidance for further exploration. The ability to infer this information from analysis of a crude oil is especially valuable as frequently the earliest samples in a new area may be shows and/or drill stem test samples from exploratory wells which are characteristically drilled on structural highs stratigraphically remote from the source formation(s). A cross-plot of dibenzothiophene/phenanthrene versus the pristane/phytane ratios measured on seventy-five crude oils from forty-one known source rocks ranging in age from Ordovician to Miocene consistently classified the oils into the following environment/lithology groups: marine carbonate; marine carbonate/mixed and lacustrine sulfate-rich; lacustrine sulfate-poor; marine and lacustrine shale; and fluvial/deltaic carbonaceous shale and coal. The dibenzothiophene to phenanthrene and the pristane to phytane ratios can also be used to classify source rock paleodepositional environments. The classification scheme is based on the premise that these ratios reflect the different Eh-pH regimes resulting from the significant microbiological and chemical processes occurring during deposition and early diagenesis of sediments. The dibenzothiophene/phenanthrene ratio assesses the availability of reduced sulfur for incorporation into organic matter and the pristane/phytane ratio assesses the redox conditions within the depositional environment. Interpretation of these ratios has been aided by quantitative biomarker analysis and by carbon isotope data for pristane and phytane obtained by gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

Hughes, W.B. [ARCO International Oil and Gas Company, Plano, TX (United States)] [ARCO International Oil and Gas Company, Plano, TX (United States); Holba, A.G.; Dzou, L.I.P. [ARCO Exploration and Production Technology, Plano, TX (United States)] [ARCO Exploration and Production Technology, Plano, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

Deli, Martin, E-mail: martin.deli@web.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany); Fritz, Jan, E-mail: jfritz9@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Mateiescu, Serban, E-mail: mateiescu@microtherapy.de; Busch, Martin, E-mail: busch@microtherapy.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany); Carrino, John A., E-mail: jcarrin2@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Becker, Jan, E-mail: j.becker@microtherapy.de; Garmer, Marietta, E-mail: garmer@microtherapy.de; Groenemeyer, Dietrich, E-mail: dg@microtherapy.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Saline County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI Solaris a city in Utah County, Utah.ArkansasSaline

125

Geochemistry, geochronology, and cathodoluminescence imagery of the Salihli and Turgutlu granites (central Menderes Massif, western Turkey): Implications for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemistry, geochronology, and cathodoluminescence imagery of the Salihli and Turgutlu granites-type, peraluminous granites (Salihli and Turgutlu) that intrude the Alasehir detachment which bounds the northern Mediterranean floor along the Hellenic trench. In situ Th­Pb ion microprobe monazite ages from the granites

126

Temporal trends of pollution Pb and other metals in east-central Baf n Island inferred from lake sediment geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution Lead stable isotopes Paleolimnology Arctic lakes Sediment geochemistry Atmospheric deposition long-term histories of atmospheric Pb pollution (Brännvall et al., 2001). In addition, stable isotopesTemporal trends of pollution Pb and other metals in east-central Baf n Island inferred from lake

Wolfe, Alexander P.

127

Temporal trends of pollution Pb and other metals in east-central Baffin Island inferred from lake sediment geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution Lead stable isotopes Paleolimnology Arctic lakes Sediment geochemistry Atmospheric deposition long-term histories of atmospheric Pb pollution (Brännvall et al., 2001). In addition, stable isotopesTemporal trends of pollution Pb and other metals in east-central Baffin Island inferred from lake

Briner, Jason P.

128

A Simple Model for Estimating Water Balance and Salinity of Reservoirs and Outflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on flow and salinity of the stream and the floodplains. The first part deals with water and salt balance in reservoirs. The primary purpose of the model is to predict outflow salinity from the reservoir storage and inflow information in advance... management strategy, yet the method to predict outflow salinity has not been adequately examined. The study reported here examined the water and salt balance in a reservoir using a two-layer model. This model assumes that inflow blends with the storage...

Miyamoto, S; Yuan, F; Anand, Shilpa

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline saline lakes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Chemical and physical properties of some saline lakes in Alberta and Saskatchewan Jeff S Bowman* and Julian... and ephemeral athalassohaline lakes. These lakes...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude saline wetland Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: basins of the world contain numerous freshwater, brackish and saline...

131

THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Soil and groundwater characteristics of saline sites supporting boreal mixedwood forests in northern Alberta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil and groundwater characteristics of saline sites supporting boreal mixedwood forests September 2009. Lilles, E. B., Purdy, B. G., Chang, S. X. and Macdonald, S. E. 2010. Soil and groundwater characteristics of saline sites supporting boreal mixedwood forests in northern Alberta. Can. J. Soil Sci. 90: 1Á

Macdonald, Ellen

133

Variation in hydraulic conductivity of mangroves: influence of species, salinity, and nitrogen and phosphorus availability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variation in hydraulic conductivity of mangroves: influence of species, salinity, and nitrogen identity and variation in salinity and nutrient availability influence the hydraulic conductivity of mangroves. Using a fertilization study of two species in Florida, we found that stem hydraulic conductivity

Ling, Sharon Ewe Mei

134

Local and remote impacts of a tropical Atlantic salinity anomaly Juliette Mignot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local and remote impacts of a tropical Atlantic salinity anomaly Juliette Mignot and Claude, the salinity increase leads to a rapid deepening and cooling of the surface mixed layer. This induces a deepening of the equatorial undercurrent and an intensication of the south equatorial current. A remote

135

Root Growth and Yield of Differing Alfalfa Rooting Populations under Increasing Salinity and Zero Leaching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Root Growth and Yield of Differing Alfalfa Rooting Populations under Increasing Salinity and Zero of alfalfa under irrigation extended to 2.5 m (Dud- ley et al., 1994). It may be advantageous for deep-rootedAccumulation of salinity in the root zone can be detrimental to crops such as alfalfa to exploit the lower average

Smith, Steven E.

136

Short-term effects of salinity declines on juvenile hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be compounded or mitigated by other factors, such as other environmental conditions or handling effects. #12Short-term effects of salinity declines on juvenile hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria. Final report to Florida Sea Grant, for a Program Development Award Project title: Short-term effects of rapid salinity

Florida, University of

137

The mechanical behavior of normally consolidated soils as a function of pore fluid salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pore fluid salinities in the Gulf of Mexico area can reach levels of 250 grams of salt per liter of pore fluid (g/1). It is now necessary to determine the effect that this salinity level can play on the mechanical behaviors ...

Horan, Aiden James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters of the world's oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters, R. A. Feely, and R. M. Key (2006), Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity 35)2 + d (SST Ă? 20) + e (SST Ă? 20)2 fits surface total alkalinity (AT) data for each of five

139

Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice-silicate cutoff. In ice-silicate mixtures, brine channels are evident above the eutectic temperature only when

Stillman, David E.

140

Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands Nick C. Howesa,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands Nick C. Howesa,1 , Duncan M. FitzGeralda , Zoe J States Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Wetlands Environmental of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher

Kulp, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geochemistry and materials studies in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemistry and materials studies are being performed in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program. The scope of the studies is dictated by the sites under consideration and the designs of the drilling and energy extraction systems. The work has been largely restricted to characterizing magmatic environments at sites of interest and testing engineering materials in laboratory simulated rhyolite magmatic environments. The behavior of 17 commercially available materials has been examined at magmatic conditions. Analysis of reaction products reveal that oxidation, and not sulfidation, is the main corrosion problem for most alloys in rhyolite, and that reaction with other magmatic components is limited. Considerations of corrosion resistance, high-temperature strength, and cost indicate nickel-base superalloys offer the most promise as candidates for use in rhyolitic magma.

Westrich, H.R.; Weirick, L.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability. Preliminary simulation results show good agreement between classical instability solutions and numerical predictions of finger growth and spacing obtained using different gas/liquid viscosity ratios, relative permeability and capillary pressure models. Further studies are recommended to validate these results over a broader range of conditions.

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

143

Exploration Geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environmental constraints. eter Winterburn #12;M D R U Societal demands for mineral resources continue to spur and restrictive policy changes. The discovery of new mineral resources requires increasing risk, increasing costs ­ Global Exploration for Vale. His research interests centre on innovation of cost-effective, robust

Michelson, David G.

144

Mesoporous Carbon for Capacitive Deionization of Saline Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-assembled mesoporous carbon (MC) materials have been synthesized and tested for application in capacitive deionization (CDI) of saline water. MC was prepared by self-assembly of a triblock copolymer with hydrogen-bonded chains via a phenolic resin, such as resorcinol or phloroglucinol in acidic conditions, followed by carbonization and, in some cases, activation by KOH. Carbon synthesized in this way was ground into powder, from which activated MC sheets were produced. In a variation of this process, after the reaction of triblock copolymer with resorcinol or phloroglucinol, the gel that was formed was used to coat a graphite plate and then carbonized. The coated graphite plate in this case was not activated and was tested to serve as current collector during the CDI process. The performance of these MC materials was compared to that of carbon aerogel for salt concentrations ranging between 1000 ppm and 35,000 ppm. Resorcinol-based MC removed up to 15.2 mg salt per gram of carbon, while carbon aerogel removed 5.8 mg salt per gram of carbon. Phloroglucinol-based MC-coated graphite exhibited the highest ion removal capacity at 21 mg of salt per gram of carbon for 35,000 ppm salt concentration.

Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Sharma, Ms. Ketki [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquinhydrodynamic and salinity transport mod- eling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin

Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Chair Technical and Economic Committee, CVSALTS Central Valley Salinity Coalition, (2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2008 Berkeley Laboratory Delegate, White House Conference on Industrial Ecology Department of Energy, Water-Energy, Central Valley Salinity Coalition, CVSALTS SOCIAL/CIVIC Yolo Polo Club Sutter Buttes Polo Club Wine

Quinn, Nigel

148

Energy Recovery from Solutions with Different Salinities Based on Swelling and Shrinking of Hydrogels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), reverse electrodialysis (RED), and capacitive mixing (CapMix), are being developed to recover energy from salinity- gradient energy, including pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO),6-8 reverse electrodialysis (RED),9

149

Hybrid electrodialysis reverse osmosis system design and its optimization for treatment of highly saline brines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The demand is rising for desalination technologies to treat highly saline brines arising from hydraulic fracturing processes and inland desalination. Interest is growing in the use of electrical desalination technologies ...

McGovern, Ronan Killian

150

The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

151

EFFECT OF SALINITY ON THE DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF GEOLOGICAL MATERIALS : IMPLICATION FOR SOIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Dielectric mixing models were first calibrated by means of experimental measurements before being used of SAR data (AIRSAR, PALSAR). Keywords- Earth, evaporites, dielectric mixing model, IEM, Mars, polarimetry, radar backscattering, salinity, SAR, soil moisture. I. INTRODUCTION The measurement of soil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

Enhanced Oil Recovery in High Salinity High Temperature Reservoir by Chemical Flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in a high-temperature/high-salinity (HT/HS) reservoir will help expand the application of chemical EOR to more challenging environments. Until recently, chemical EOR was not recommended at reservoirs...

Bataweel, Mohammed Abdullah

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

The production of temperature and salinity variance and covariance : implications for mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale thermal forcing and freshwater fluxes play an essential role in setting temperature and salinity in the ocean. A number of recent estimates of the global oceanic freshwater balance as well as the global oceanic ...

Schanze, Julian J. (Julian Johannes)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

CO[subscript 2] migration in saline aquifers. Part 2. Capillary and solubility trapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large-scale injection of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing atmospheric CO[subscript 2] emissions to mitigate climate change. An accurate assessment of the post-injection ...

MacMinn, C. W.

155

The influence of geothermal sources on deep ocean temperature, salinity, and flow fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is a study of the effect of geothermal sources on the deep circulation, temperature and salinity fields. In Chapter 1 background material is given on the strength and distribution of geothermal heating. In ...

Speer, Kevin G. (Kevin George)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Physical and chemical effects of CO2 storage in saline aquifers of the southern North Sea   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most promising mitigation strategies for greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere is carbon capture and storage (CCS). Deep saline aquifers are seen as the most efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites, ...

Heinemann, Niklas

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Physiological Effects of Saline Water on Two Economically Important Horticultural Crops in South Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Citrus and watermelons are valuable economic crops worldwide, contributing approximately $120 million combined each year in Texas alone. Both citrus and watermelons are sensitive to saline conditions, which can be problematic in the Lower Rio...

Simpson, Catherine Ross

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

158

Large-Scale Utilization of Saline Groundwater for Irrigation of Pistachios Interplanted with Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of saline drainage in a tomato-cotton rotation. J. Environ.of Pistachios Interplanted with Cotton 2007-08 TechnicalHutmacher – UCCE/AES Cotton Specialist, Shafter Research &

Sanden, Blake; Ferguson, Louise; Kallsen, Craig E.; Marsh, Brian; Hutmacher, Robert B.; Corwin, Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL of this work was to investigate the mineralogy of smectites in the soils surrounding a representative alkaline

Ahmad, Sajjad

160

Effects of environmental salinity and dietary protein levels on digestibility in four species of penaeid shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SALINITY AND DIETARY PROTEIN LEVELS ON DIGESTIBILITY IN FOUR SPECIES OF PENAEID SHRIMP A Thesis SILVIO ROMERO DE C ~ COELHO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SALINITY AND DIETARY PROTEIN LEVELS ON DIGESTIBILITY IN FOUR SPECIES OF PENAEID SHRIMP A Thesis SILVIO ROMERO DE C...

Coelho, Silvio Romero de C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The influence of copper and bicarbonate ions on the corrosion of aluminum alloys saline solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INFLUENCE OF COPPER AND BICARBONATE IONS ON THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS IN SALINE SOLUTIONS A Thesis by ALCIBIADES BECERRA-DIAZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineerinq THE INFLUENCE OF COPPER AND BICARBONATE IONS ON THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS IN SALINE SOLUTIONS A Thesis by ALCIBIADES BECERRA-DIAZ Approved as to sty1e...

Becerra-Diaz, Alcibiades

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The effect of environmental salinity on the flavor characteristics of penaeid shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for levels of free amino acids (FAA). Selected samples were frozen and later analyzed for specific amino acid canposition. Shrimp subjected to decreasing salinities showed corresponding decreases in free amino acid concentration, with minimum values being... reached in 24 to 48 hours. Likewise, with increasing salinities there was a corresponding increase in the free amino acid concentration, with maximum values reached in 24 hours. Glycine, proline, arginine, serine/threonine, and alanine made the most...

McCoid, Valerie Zullo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Environmental factors influencing fish assemblage structure in a naturally saline river system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING FISH ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE IN A NATURALLY SALINE RIVER SYSTEM A Thesis by NIKKOAL JEAN DICTSON Submitted to Texas A&M University... Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ABSTRACT Environmental Factors Influencing Fish Assemblage Structure in a Naturally Saline River System. (May 2000) Nikkoal Jean Dictson, B. S. , New Mexico State University; Chair of Advisory Committee...

Dictson, Nikkoal Jean

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

OPTIMAL GEOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE DISPOSAL IN SALINE AQUIFERS IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

Susan D. Hovorka

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The redox and iron-sulfide geochemistry of Salt Pond and the thermodynamic constraints on native magnetotactic bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salt pond is a meromictic system with an outlet to the sea allowing denser seawater to occupy the monimolimnion while the mixolimnion has relatively low salinity and is the site of greater mixing and microbial activity. ...

Canovas, Peter A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir: Its unique behaviour and influence on reservoir engineering calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The salinity of the produced water from First Eocene reservoir of Wafra field was studied through its past history. The change in the salinity of the initially produced water (from about 500 to 20,000 ppm NaCl) was attributed to the meteoric water which might have entered the reservoir through its outcrops to the west of the field. The correct value of the connate water salinity (23,000 ppm) that should be used in estimating the original oil in place by the volumetric method was determined by three different approaches. In addition, a technique to be followed in calculating the volumetric original oil in place for the First Eocene reservoir is outlined to overcome the complex behaviour of aquifer salinity. The change in the produced water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir with time was studied and proved that water is dumping from an upper water bearing zone into First Eocene reservoir. Upper water dumping, which apparently has supported the reservoir pressure, was confirmed to occur behind casing in many deeper wells penetrating the First Eocene reservoir by the analysis of their temperature and noise logs.

Ghoniem, S.A.A.; Al-Zanki, F.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Water salinity of First Eocene reservoir: Unique behavior and influence on reservoir engineering calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The salinity of the produced water from the First Eocene reservoir of the Wafra field was studied through its history. The change in the salinity of the initially produced water (from about 500 to 20,000 ppm NaCl) was attributed to meteoric water that might have entered the reservoir through outcrops west of the field. The correct value of the interstitial water salinity (23,000ppm) that should be used in estimating the original oil in place (OOIP) by the volumetric method was determined by three different approaches. In addition, a technique to overcome the complex behavior of aquifer salinity in calculating the volumetric OOIP for the First Eocene reservoir is outlined. A study of the change in the produced water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir with time proved that water is dumping from an upper water-bearing zone into the reservoir. Analysis of temperature and noise logs confirmed that this upper water dumping, which apparently has supported the reservoir pressure, occurred behind casing in many deeper wells penetrating the First Eocene reservoir.

Ghoniem, S.A.; Al-Zanki, F.H.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Low-Salinity Waterflooding to Improve Oil Recovery - Historical Field Evidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of wa-terfloods. Laboratory water-flood tests and single-well tracer tests have shown that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery, but work designed to test the method on a field scale has not yet been undertaken. Historical waterflood records could unintentionally provide some evidence of improved recovery from waterflooding with lower salinity brine. Nu-merous fields in the Powder River basin of Wyoming have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) obtained from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Three Minnelusa formation fields in the basin were identified as potential candidates for waterflood comparisons based on the salinity of the connate and injection water. Historical pro-duction and injection data for these fields were obtained from the public record. Field waterflood data were manipulated to be displayed in the same format as laboratory coreflood re-sults. Recovery from fields using lower salinity injection wa-ter was greater than that using higher salinity injection wa-ter—matching recovery trends for laboratory and single-well tests.

Eric P. Robertson

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Geochemistry of /sup 210/Pb in the southeastern, US estuarine system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was an attempt to determine the geochemical behavior of /sup 210/Pb in southeastern salt marsh estuaries. As a part of this study the /sup 210/Pb dating technique was applied to natural and anthropogenic deposits of the region. /sup 210/Pb activity of sediment and water from the Georgia coastal area was measured by alpha spectroscopy. The effects of grain size and carbon content of the sediment on /sup 210/Pb concentrations was evaluated and the activity of /sup 210/Pb in dissolved and particulate phases of rivers was measured as a function of salinity. Ages and sedimentation rates of sedimentary deposits were also determined for some deposits. /sup 210/Pb activity in dissolved and particulate phases of rivers showed no clear trends as functions of salinity. River particulate activities were three to four times higher than dissolved activities. The relationship between /sup 210/Pb activity in salt marsh sediments and grain size was highly significant. Direct application of the /sup 210/Pb method to date and determine sedimentation rates of natural and anthropogenic deposits was partially successful. The anthropogenic deposits, however, had to be dated on the basis of normalizing /sup 210/Pb activities to grain size (% silt and clay) and carbon content (% carbon).

Storti, F.W.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University to Y, the rare- earth elements (REE, La to Lu), Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta. The rare elements, Canada ĂŁ 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 13.21.1 Introduction 543 13.21.1.1 Uses of Rare Elements

Chakhmouradian, Anton

173

Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 155, 1998, pp. 773785. Printed in Great Britain Mineralogy, sulphur isotope geochemistry and the development of sulphide structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineralogy, sulphur isotope geochemistry and the development of sulphide structures at the Broken Spur mineralogy and sulphur isotope analysis. Young mound sulphides from Broken Spur have a pyrrhotite- dominated mineralogy unusual for bare ridge vent systems. However, pyrrhotite is metastable and is ultimately converted

174

Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The effect of NaCl salinity on bell pepper photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annuum cv. Tambel-2, were grown in hydroponics and then salinized to 0, 50, 100 or 150 mM NaC1. Photosynthetic rates of individual leaves were measured on several occasions during the salinization period (usually 10 to 14 d) with an ' open' gas...-exchange system. These rates were reduced by NaC1 concentrations of 100 mM or higher. Stomatal conductance was concurrently reduced, but nonstomatal effects seem to be primarily responsible for decreases in photosynthesis. The correlation between either leaf...

Bethke, Paul Carl

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The influence of irrigation water salinity on optimal nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium liquid fertilizer rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Dieffenbachia when the amount of fertilizers in the irrigation water increased above the optimum range. In a second experiment with Spa thi phyllum and cucumber, the combination of 5 levels of fertilizers (0, 125, 250, 375, 500 mg I N) and 5 salinity levels... (0, 500, 1000, 1500, 2000 mg I salts) were tested. Nutrient analysis were performed in leaves, petioles, and roots of Spathiphyilum. In Spathiphyllum, the maximum growth was observed at 250 mg I N and no salts. With high salinity in the water (2000...

Campos Nu?n?ez, Ricardo

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Thermal resistance and acclimation at various salinities in the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus Lacepede  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as to style snd content by: a rman o ommx ee ea o epar en em er May 1971 ABSTRACT Thermal Resistance and Acclimation at Various Salinities in the Sheepshead Minnow (CW ' d ~et 7 p d ). (Nap 1971) Herbert Benton Simmons, B. S. , Texas ~ University... of regression analysis between sur:ival time and the length and sex of the fish at four salinities 25 27 28 LlST OF TABLES (continued) 10. Results of retression analysis between survival ime arid the posit' on of the fj eh in the lethal tank at the time...

Simmons, Herbert Benton

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sensitivity analysis of three-dimensional salinity simulations in North San Francisco Bay using the unstructured-grid SUNTANS model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the confluence of the Sacramento­San Joaquin Rivers and comprises San Pablo Bay, Suisun Bay and Central Bay and San Joaquin rivers, while high inflows result in enhanced salinity stratification and gravitationalSensitivity analysis of three-dimensional salinity simulations in North San Francisco Bay using

Fringer, Oliver B.

179

f your soil has a high salinity content, the plants growing there will not be as vigorous as they would  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I f your soil has a high salinity content, the plants growing there will not be as vigorous as they would be in normal soils. Seeds will germinate poorly, if at all, and the plants will grow slowly much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil's salinity levels and suggest measures

180

Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation of a hydraulic barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- up in the storage reservoir. For some man-made leakages (e.g. abandoned well), and more importantlyGHGT-10 Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation emissions. Depleted oil and gas fields or saline aquifers are seen as possible storage reservoirs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

TWO-DIMENSIONAL REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING OF CO2 INJECTION IN A SALINE AQUIFER AT THE SLEIPNER SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems are under consideration for CO2 storage in the subsurface (Holloway, 1997), (i) depleted oil or gas reservoirs, (ii) unmineable coal beds and (iii) saline aquifers. Deep saline aquifers offer) dissolution trapping, which represents CO2 dissolved in the liquid phase (oil or brine), and (iii) mineral

Boyer, Edmond

182

A method for quick assessment of CO2 storage capacity in closed and semi-closed saline formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, USA 1. Introduction Geological carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep forma- tions (e.g., saline of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Carbon Sequestration Regio 2008 Published on line 21 March 2008 Keywords: Geological CO2 sequestration Storage capacity Saline

Zhou, Quanlin

183

Cey. J. Sci. (Bio. Sci.) 37 (1): 49-59, 2008 SALINITY IMPLICATIONS OF WASTEWATER IRRIGATION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cey. J. Sci. (Bio. Sci.) 37 (1): 49-59, 2008 SALINITY IMPLICATIONS OF WASTEWATER IRRIGATION and shortage of good quality water, wastewater irrigation is a growing phenomenon in many arid and semi-arid countries. A common characteristic of wastewater is high salinity, with cities typically adding 200 ­ 500 mg

Scott, Christopher

184

Effects of biofilms, sunlight, and salinity on corrosion potential and corrosion initiation of stainless alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This phenomenon of corrosion potential ennoblement on stainless alloys is well known for full strength seawater. This report presents data on the extent to which that process occurs as a function of salinity and sunlight level for: stainless steels S30400 and S31600; stainless alloys S44735 (29-4C), S44660 (Seacure), NO8367 (6XN) and N10276 (C-276); and R50250 (Ti-Gr2). The results showed that natural population biofilms formed from all salinity waters under low light level conditions were capable of ennobling the corrosion potentials of all test alloys, although R50250 was consistently ennobled the least. Both the amount of ennoblement and the highest steady potential reached were maximized in fresh water and decreased for all alloys with increasing salinity. The critical pitting potentials for all test alloys were measured in coastal seawater. In addition, the critical pitting potentials for alloys S30400 and S31600 were measured (or estimated from the literature) as a function of salinity. The effect of ennoblement on the initiation and propagation of crevice corrosion are currently under investigation. The effect of sunlight on corrosion potential ennoblement was examined for the super alloy N10276 (C-276). Mechanisms by which ennoblement may be affected by sunlight were discussed, and it was hypothesized that the phenomenon may be at least partially understood in terms of pH fluctuations within the biofilm under the influence of periodic changes in the rates of photosynthesis and respiration.

Dexter, S.C.; Zhang, H.-J. (Delaware Univ., Lewes, DE (USA). Coll. of Marine Studies)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Predicting the surface tension of aqueous 1-1 electrolyte solutions at high salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the surface tension of aqueous 1-1 electrolyte solutions at high salinity Philippe Leroy 74, 19 (2010) p. 5427-5442" DOI : 10.1016/j.gca.2010.06.012 #12;2 ABSTRACT The surface tension to predict, under isothermal and isobaric conditions, the surface tension of 1:1 electrolytes at high

Boyer, Edmond

186

Using Trends and Geochemical Analysis to Assess Salinity Sources along the Pecos River, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing salinity has been a growing concern for users of waters from the Pecos River and the reservoirs it feeds in the Texas portion of the River's watershed. Irrigation water diverted from the river in the northern reach of this watershed...

Hoff, Aaron

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline modifying the leak hydraulic properties (e.g. permeability) may be unfeasible. An appealing option.e. by creating a hydraulic barrier. The present article presents and discusses the operational and strategic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

188

SUPPORTING INFORMATION Photochemical Chlorine and Bromine Activation from Artificial Saline Snow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 SUPPORTING INFORMATION Photochemical Chlorine and Bromine Activation from Artificial Saline Snow@chem.utoronto.ca Additional Results Ozone concentration Since the dark ozonation of frozen NaCl/NaBr solutions is known. The products of the photodissociation of ozone adsorbed to an ice surface at relatively warm temperatures

Meskhidze, Nicholas

189

Capacitive mixing power production from salinity gradient energy enhanced through exoelectrogen-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to generate electrical power directly from salinity gradient energy using capacitive electrodes have recently generation and wastewater treatment. Introduction Harnessing the entropic energy released when river water with these capacitive electrodes two different ways: either through changes in membrane potentials due to ion

190

Testing models for the Messinian salinity crisis: The Messinian record in Almera, SE Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing models for the Messinian salinity crisis: The Messinian record in AlmerĂ­a, SE Spain Juan C Fuentenueva s.n., Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain b School of Earth, Ocean and Planetary Sciences, SE Spain, display excellent exposures of Messinian (Late Miocene) sequences. The Sorbas, AlmerĂ­a

Riding, Robert

191

Controls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0053, USA b Department of Geological Sciences, The University of TexasControls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA Sunil Mehtaa, *, Alan E. Fryara , Jay L. Bannerb a Department of Geological Sciences, University

Banner, Jay L.

192

Water relation characteristics and photosynthesis of saline-stressed seedlings of non-halophyte species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water relation characteristics and photosynthesis of saline-stressed seedlings of non of the present study was to ex- amine the distribution of salts and its effect on photosynthesis for non as relative values against 0% treatment. Photosynthesis by O. asiaticus var. aurantiacus decreased

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs Sean T Description Date 0 Original document 1/29/2008 1 Estimate for carbon content of crude oil was incorrect (see p an invaluable summer at the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin working with Sue

194

An ecological study of the Gulf Menhaden (Brevoortia patronus) in a low salinity estuary in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Depar tment Member (Member DECEMBER 1970 ABSTRACT An Ecological Study of the Gulf Mhd(B t'a~t)5aL* Salinity Estuary in Texas. (December, 1970) Hoyt W. Holcomb, Jr. , B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. R. J. Baldauf An ecological...

Holcomb, Hoyt West

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Laboratory measurement of hydrodynamic saline dispersion within a micro-fracture network induced in granite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory measurement of hydrodynamic saline dispersion within a micro-fracture network induced plug of Ailsa Craig micro-granite by thermal stressing, to produce an isotropic network of fractures number­dispersion relationship for the micro-fracture network is very similar to that predicted for other

196

Author's personal copy Effect of fluid salinity on subcritical crack propagation in calcite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Effect of fluid salinity on subcritical crack propagation in calcite Fatma Accepted 22 October 2012 Available online 31 October 2012 Keywords: Subcritical crack growth Calcite Salt Damage The slow propagation of cracks, also called subcritical crack growth, is a mechanism of fracturing

197

Re-evaluating the 238 U-salinity relationship in seawater: Implications for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

02543, USA c Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3006, Laramie, WY 82071 form 13 July 2011 Accepted 14 July 2011 Available online 23 July 2011 Keywords: Uranium Salinity for applications of uranium decay- series radionuclides used to understand particle export and cycling in marine

Buesseler, Ken

198

THE EFFECTS OF NON-CONDENSIBLE GAS AND SALINITY ON STEAM ADSORPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF NON-CONDENSIBLE GAS AND SALINITY ON STEAM ADSORPTION A REPORT SUBMITTED reservoir materials was investigated by a transient flow technique using steam and C02 gas. Theoretical pressure exerted by steam pressure inside the sample was measured against time during a desorption process

Stanford University

199

UrbanSolutionsCenter Evaluating Salinity Tolerance in Nursery and Landscape Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waters. · Best management irrigation and fertilization practices will effectively deal with poor, higher usage of poor-quality irrigation waters, and regulatory and environmental pressures to capture and varieties of plants that can tolerate saline and poor-quality water, and to evaluate management practices

200

FY 1984 and FY 1985 geochemistry and materials studies in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemistry and materials studies are being performed in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program. The work is largely restricted to: (1) characterizing magmatic environments at sites of interest, (2) testing engineering materials in laboratory simulated magmatic environments, (3) investigating chemical mass transport effects inherent in designs for direct contact heat exchangers, and (4) evaluating degassing hazards associated with drilling into and extracting energy from shallow magma. Magma characterization studies have been completed for shallow magma at Long Valley, Coso volcanic field, and Kilauea volcano. The behavior of 17 commercially available materials has been examined in rhyolite magma at 850/sup 0/C and 200 MPa for periods up to seven days. Analysis of reaction products from materials tests to date indicate that oxidation is the main corrosion problem for most alloys in rhyolitic magma. Considerations of corrosion resistance, high-temperature strength, and cost indicate nickel-base superalloys offer the most promise as candidates for use in rhyolitic magma.

Westrich, H.R.; Weirick, L.J.; Cygan, R.T.; Reece, M.; Hlava, P.F.; Stockman, H.W.; Gerlach, T.M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Next-Generation Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Code PFLOTRAN: Application to CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers P. Lichtner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to investigate sequestration of CO2 in vari- ous geologic media including depleted oil reservoirs and saline

Mills, Richard

203

Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70.degree. C. to 90.degree. C., at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

SALINITY AND SODICITY INTERACTIONS OF WEATHERED MINESOILS IN NORTHWESTERN NEW MEXICO AND NORTH EASTERN ARIZONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weathering characteristics of minesoils and rooting patterns of key shrub and grass species were evaluated at sites reclaimed for 6 to 14 years from three surface coal mine operations in northwestern New Mexico and northeastern Arizona. Non-weathered minesoils were grouped into 11 classifications based on electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Comparisons of saturated paste extracts, from non-weathered and weathered minesoils show significant (p < 0.05) reductions in SAR levels and increased EC. Weathering increased the apparent stability of saline and sodic minesoils thereby reducing concerns of aggregate slaking and clay particle dispersion. Root density of four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canascens), alkali sacaton (Sporobolus airoides), and Russian wildrye (Psathyrostachys junceus) were nominally affected by increasing EC and SAR levels in minesoil. Results suggest that saline and sodic minesoils can be successfully reclaimed when covered with topsoil and seeded with salt tolerant plant species.

Brent Musslewhite; Song Jin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

206

Corrosion behavior of newly developed TiAgFe dental alloys in neutral saline solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion behavior of newly developed Ti­Ag­Fe dental alloys in neutral saline solution B. B. Zhang, B. L. Wang, L. Li and Y. F. Zheng* The corrosion behavior of Ti­5Ag­xFe alloys (x ¼ 1, 2.5, 5 wt) Ti,Ti­ 5Ag­xFe alloys exhibited higher corrosion potentials, lower current densities, and larger

Zheng, Yufeng

207

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake for RSL formation, CaCl2 brines and chloride deposits in basins may provide clues to the origin of ancient,2,10­14 , the composition of the brine is unlike any other body of water in the world, as ,90% of the salt is CaCl2 1

Marchant, David R.

208

Water Balance, Salt Loading, and Salinity Control Options of Red Bluff Reservoir, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objectives: i) to outline water balance of the reservoir, ii) to establish salt loading trends over the past several decades, and iii) to evaluate the impact of salt loading on salinity of the reservoir and its outflow. We also outlined the needs... presumably has less seepage losses. The study reported here was conducted i) for examining the reservoir water balance of Red Bluff over the past several decades, ii) for establishing salt loading trends, and iii) for evaluating the impact of salt...

Miyamoto, S.; Yuan, Fasong; Anand, Shilpa

209

Soil and plant responses from land application of saline-sodic waters: Implications of management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land application of co-produced waters from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells is one management option used in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana. Unfortunately the co-produced CBNG waters may be saline and/or sodic. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of irrigation with CBNG waters on soils and plants in the PRB. Soil properties and vegetation responses resulting from 1 to 4 yr of saline sodic water (electrical conductivity (EC) 1.6-4.8 dS m{sup -1} sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), 17-57 mmol L- applications were studied during 2003 and 2004 field seasons on sites (Ustic Torriorthent Haplocambid, Haplargid and Paleargid) representing native range grasslands seeded grass hayfields and alfalfa hayfields. Parameters measured from each irrigated site were compared directly with representative non-irrigated sites. Soil chemical and physical parameters including pH, EC, SAR, exchangeable sodium percent, texture, bulk density, infiltration and Darcy flux rates, were measured at various depth intervals to 120 cm. Mulitple-year applications of saline sodic water produced consistent trends of increased soil EC AND SAR values to depths of 30 cm reduced surface infiltration rates and lowered Darcy flux rates to 120 cm. Significant differences (p {le} 0.05) were determined between irrigated and non-irrigated areas for EC, SAR infiltration rates and Darcy flux (p {le} 0.10) at most sites. Saline sodic CBNG water applications significantly increased native perennial grass biomass production and cover on irrigated as compared with non-irrigated sites; however overall species evenness decreased. Biological effects were variable and complex reflecting site-specific conditions and water and soil management strategies.

Vance, G.F.; King, L.A.; Ganjegunte, G.K. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department for Renewable Resources

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Steric sea level variations during 19571994: Importance of salinity John I. Antonov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­3000 m layer during the 1957­1994 period resulted in a sea level rise at a mean rate of about 0.55 mm per sea level rise at a rate of 1.3 ± 0.5 mm/yr if the added water comes from sources other than floating and salinity variability, steric sea level, sea level rise, climate change, Labrador sea Citation: Antonov, J

211

Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Tolerant Turf: Collaborators work to improve turfgrasses' response to drought and salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

genetics at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Dallas, and researchers from #18;ve other universities have partnered with three objectives in mind#30;to develop, improve, and commercialize drought- and salinity-tolerant turfgrass. #29... in the #18;eld,? she said. Dr. Grady Miller, North Carolina State University professor and Extension turf specialist, said, ?It is critical that we #18;nd turfgrasses that can be used that require fewer inputs (water and pesticides). To meet the demand...

Smith, Courtney

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The effects of salinity on the growth and survival of the postlarval stages of Gambusia affinis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristics of Sites of Capture of Gravid Female Gambusis 37 II llla- Iilb- IVa- Salinity Agustments for 25 Liters of %ster Temperature Record - Replication I (1961) Temperature Record - Replication II $962) Measurements of Specimens of Replication I... f961) 37 38 39 IVb - Measurements of Specimens of Replication II f962) LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES FIGURE I TABLE I TABLE ll TABLE III TABLE IVa TABLE IV b Experimental Design Summary Table of Results of Repllcatlon I (l961) 20 Summary...

Omundson, Glenn Erwin

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Salinity variations and chemical compositions of waters in the Frio Formation, Texas Gulf Coast. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waters produced from sandstone reservoirs of the deep Frio Formation exhibit spatial variations in chemical composition that roughly coincide with the major tectonic elements (Houston and Rio Grande Embayments, San Marcos Arch) and corresponding depositional systems (Houston and Norias deltas, Greta-Carancahua barrier/strandplain system) that were respectively active along the upper, lower, and middle Texas Coast during Frio deposition. Within an area, salinities are usually depth dependent, and primary trends closely correspond to pore pressure gradients and thermal gradients. Where data are available (mainly in Brazoria County) the increases in TDS and calcium with depth coincide with the zone of albitization, smectite-illite transition, and calcite decrease in shales. Waters have fairly uniform salinities when produced from the same sandstone reservoir within a fault block or adjacent fault blocks with minor displacement. In contrast, stratigraphically equivalent sandstones separated by faults with large displacement usually yield waters with substantially different salinities owing to the markedly different thermal and pressure gradients across the faults that act as barriers to fluid movement.

Morton, R.A.; Garrett, C.M. Jr.; Posey, J.S.; Han, J.H.; Jirik, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

High Resolution Simulation and Characterization of Density-Driven Flow in CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are routinely used to study the process of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers. In this paper TOUGH2-MP. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration involves injecting CO2

216

Tolerance of combined salinity and O2 deficiency in Hordeum marinum accessions from the grain-belt of Western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grain-belt of Western Australia for tolerance to salinity,in the accessions from Western Australia, as well as K +from the grain-belt of Western Australia. Single heads were

Malik1,2,3, AI; English1,2, JP; Shepherd1,4, KA; Islam2,5, AKMR; Colmer1,2, TD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Storage capacity and injection rate estimates for CO? sequestration in deep saline aquifers in the conterminous United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A promising method to mitigate global warming is injecting CO? into deep saline aquifers. In order to ensure the safety of this method, it is necessary to understand how much CO? can be injected into an aquifer and at what ...

Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Response of Benthic Microalgal Community Composition at East Beach, Galveston Bay, Texas to Changes in Salinity and Nutrients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organisms (Thrush 1991). Thrush stated that sediment characterization needs to be determined to examine its impact on the density of the organisms. A study conducted in the sandy intertidal sandflats in Barnstable, MA found the patch sizes for microalgal...). Organisms have the ability to adapt to higher salinities by physically and biochemically regulating their cell structure through osmotic regulation (Kirst 1990). Organisms are affected by changes in salinity one of three ways, impacting cellular water...

Lee, Alyce R.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Respiratory response of the sea anemone Bunodosoma cavernata (Bosc) to changes in temperature and salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Respiratory Rate . 6 2 Analysis of Variance Procedure for 0-2 Hour Average. . . 12 3 Analysis of Variance Procedure for 30 Minutes 13 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Acclimation Temperature 5 Duncan's Multiple Range... Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Experimental Temperature . 15 16 6 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Experimental Salinity 17 7 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average...

Retzer, Kent Arnold

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effects of Salinity and Specific Ions on Seedling Emergence and Growth of Onions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rio Grande Valley. Harkey silt loam was collected in September of 2006 from the A P horizon of a field planted to cotton in previous years at two locations; the middle of a disked field, and a flat water check-in basin. These samples are numbered... 1 and 2, respectively (Table 1). In addition, the third soil sample designated as Harkey silt loam 3 was used after leaching a check-in basin with tap water in October, 2006 in order to have a soil sample with low salinity. These samples were air...

Miyamoto, S.; Martinez, I.; Niu, G.

222

Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

Rapaka, Saikiran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The effect of salinity on the growth of blue Tilapia (Tilapia aurea)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND DISCUSSION Survi val Toward the end of the experiment some fish entered the f1lter pipes and died. Table 2 shows the number of fish alive at each weight measurement. Levels of pH, N02, N03 (Table 3) were within the toler- ance levels (Stickney 1979...). The Effect of Salinity on Growth Rates Table 4 shows the average fish weight for each tank taken over the four-month experimental period. Since weight was measured suc- cessively for each tank, analysis of variance with repeated measures (Huck et al. 1974...

Rahimaldin, Samy Abdulaziz

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Flow Instabilities During Injection of CO2 into SalineAquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability so that waves or rounded lobes of saturation may appear and grow into fingers that lead to enhanced dissolution, bypassing, and possibly poor sweep efficiency. This paper presents an analysis, through high-resolution numerical simulations, of the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. We explore the influence of viscosity ratio, relative permeability functions, and capillary pressure on finger growth and spacing. In addition, we address the issues of finger triggering, convergence under grid refinement and boundary condition effects. Simulations were carried out on scalar machines, and on an IBM RS/6000 SP (a distributed-memory parallel computer with 6080 processors) with a parallelized version of TOUGH2.

Garcia, Julio E.; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Property:LithologyInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to: navigation,PVYearsDisplay/GraphicsLength (m)

226

Monitoring of saline tracer movement with vertically distributed self-potential measurements at the HOBE agricultural test site, Voulund, Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The self-potential (SP) method is sensitive to water fluxes in saturated and partially saturated porous media, such as those associated with rainwater infiltration and groundwater recharge. We present a field-based study at the Voulund agricultural test site, Denmark, that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to focus on the vertical self-potential distribution prior to and during a saline tracer test. A coupled hydrogeophysical modeling framework is used to simulate the SP response to precipitation and saline tracer infiltration. A layered hydrological model is first obtained by inverting dielectric and matric potential data. The resulting model that compares favorably with electrical resistance tomography models is subsequently used to predict the SP response. The electrokinetic contribution (caused by water fluxes in a charged porous soil) is modeled by an effective excess charge approach that considers both water saturation and pore water salinity. Our results suggest that the effective excess char...

Jougnot, Damien; Haarder, Eline B; Looms, Majken C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, “Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species,” we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task “Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes,” We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt BACKUS, Ethan L.1, GAGNON, Kelli E.1, EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.1, and KHALIL, Khalil Isaac2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt University, Egypt Sponsored by NSF-OISE-1004021 Session 92:T3. Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research over 30,000 km2 in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The deposits most resemble Algoma-type iron

El-Shazly, Aley

229

Feasibility of Geophysical Monitoring of Carbon-Sequestrated Deep Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is sequestered from the bottom of a brine reservoir and allowed to migrate upward, the effects of the relative permeability hysteresis due to capillary trapping and buoyancy driven migration tend to make the reservoir patchy saturated with different fluid phases over time. Seismically, such a patchy saturated reservoir induces an effective anisotropic behavior whose properties are primarily dictated by the nature of the saturation of different fluid phases in the pores and the elastic properties of the rock matrix. By combining reservoir flow simulation and modeling with seismic modeling, it is possible to derive these effective anisotropic properties, which, in turn, could be related to the saturation of CO{sub 2} within the reservoir volume any time during the post-injection scenario. Therefore, if time-lapse seismic data are available and could be inverted for the effective anisotropic properties of the reservoir, they, in combination with reservoir simulation could potentially predict the CO{sub 2} saturation directly from the time-lapse seismic data. It is therefore concluded that the time-lapse seismic data could be used to monitor the carbon sequestrated saline reservoirs. But for its successful implementation, seismic modeling and inversion methods must be integrated with the reservoir simulations. In addition, because CO{sub 2} sequestration induces an effective anisotropy in the sequestered reservoir and anisotropy is best detected using multicomponent seismic data compared to single component (P-wave) data, acquisition, processing, and analysis is multicomponent seismic data is recommended for these time-lapse studies. Finally, a successful implementation of using time-lapse seismic data for monitoring the carbon sequestrated saline reservoirs will require development of a robust methodology for inverting multicomponent seismic data for subsurface anisotropic properties.

Mallick, Subhashis; Alvarado, Vladimir

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluation of materials for systems using cooled, treated geothermal or high-saline brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lack of adequate quantities of clean surface water for use in wet (evaporative) cooling systems indicates the use of high-salinity waste waters, or cooled geothermal brines, for makeup purposes. High-chloride, aerated water represents an extremely corrosive environment. In order to determine metals suitable for use in such an environment, metal coupons were exposed to aerated, treated geothermal brine salted to a chloride concentration of 10,000 and 50,000 ppM (mg/L) for periods of up to 30 days. The exposed coupons were evaluated to determine the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion characteristics of the metals. The metals exhibiting corrosion resistance at 50,000 ppM chloride were then evaluated at 100,000 and 200,000 ppM chloride. Since these were screening tests to select materials for components to be used in a cooling system, with primary emphasis on condenser tubing, several materials were exposed for 4 to 10 months in pilot cooling tower test units with heat transfer for further corrosion evaluation. The results of the screening tests indicate that ferritic stainless steels (29-4-2 and SEA-CURE) exhibit excellent corrosion resistance at all levels of chloride concentration. Copper-nickel alloys (70/30 and Monel 400) exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the high-saline water. The 70/30 copper-nickel alloy, which showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, exhibited mild pitting in the 30-day tests. This pitting was not apparent, however, after 6 months of exposure in the pilot cooling tower tests. The nickel-base alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, but their high cost prevents their use unless no other material is found feasible. Other materials tested, although unsuitable for condenser tubing material, would be suitable as tube sheet material.

Suciu, D.F.; Wikoff, P.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Well injectivity during CO2 storage operations in deep saline aquifers6 1: Experimental investigation of drying effects, salt precipitation and7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technique than can potentially limit the accumulation29-17Jan2014 #12;3 1. Introduction51 52 Geological sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers studied54 much less than mature oil & gas reservoirs. Injection of carbon dioxide into saline aquifers55

Boyer, Edmond

232

Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management and salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management: impoundments, marsh sediments, ponds, salinity Abstract Physical characteristics of sediments in coastal marsh compositions of waterbird communities. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain potentially

Afton, Alan D.

233

MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH restricted to: (i) supercritical CO2 injection and storage within the Dogger reservoir aquifer, (ii) CO2 the cement-rock formation interface in the abandoned well (iii) impacts on the Albian aquifer water quality

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

234

Inverse relationship between salinity and n-alkane dD values in the mangrove Avicennia marina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ratios in lipids derived from mangroves have the potential to be used for paleohydrologic reconstructions incorporated in leaf waxes, and/or (iii) increased secretion of salty brine by leaves at high salinity ratios of mangrove lipid biomarkers can be developed as a paleosalinity indicator. They also imply

Sachs, Julian P.

235

HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES, CHRISTMAS ISLAND, 1954-69 GUNTHER It SECKEL' AND MARIAN Y. Y. YONG' ABSTRACT Harmonic functions, with daily sampling, are on average 0.07° C. Harmonic analysis spanning the entire sampling duration shows

236

The blue crab Callinectes sapidus inhabits estuarine environments that range in salinity from full-strength sea water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The blue crab Callinectes sapidus inhabits estuarine environments that range in salinity from full euryhaline organisms, blue crabs have evolved compensatory mechanisms to minimize perturbations to the intracellular environment during osmotic stress. While the hemolymph of blue crabs fluctuates iso- osmotically

Kinsey, Stephen

237

2004-2005 Texas Water Resources Institute Mills Scholarship Application Water Management, Soil Salinity and Landscape Ecology in Laguna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Bruce Herbert (O) 979-845-2405 herbert@geo.tamu.edu #12;Heather R. Miller 2004-05 TWRI Mills 2 Water2004-2005 Texas Water Resources Institute Mills Scholarship Application Water Management, Soil Salinity and Landscape Ecology in Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge Heather R. Miller Department

Herbert, Bruce

238

Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

Increasing gas hydrate formation temperature for desalination of high salinity produced water with secondary guests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from ?2 °C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 °C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydrate turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.

Cha, Jong-Ho [ORISE; Seol, Yongkoo [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN APPLICATIONS FOR MODELING AND ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN SALINE AQUIFERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a computer modeling effort to couple reservoir simulation and ED/RSM using Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Analysis, and Optimization Methods, to assess geologic, geochemical, geomechanical, and rock-fluid effects and factors on CO2 injectivity, capacity, and plume migration. The project objective was to develop proxy models to simplify the highly complex coupled geochemical and geomechanical models in the utilization and storage of CO2 in the subsurface. The goals were to investigate and prove the feasibility of the ED/RSM processes and engineering development, and bridge the gaps regarding the uncertainty and unknowns of the many geochemical and geomechanical interacting parameters in the development and operation of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration and storage sites. The bottleneck in this workflow is the high computational effort of reactive transport simulation models and large number of input variables to optimize with ED/RSM techniques. The project was not to develop the reactive transport, geomechanical, or ED/RSM software, but was to use what was commercially and/or publically available as a proof of concept to generate proxy or surrogate models. A detailed geologic and petrographic mineral assemblage and geologic structure of the doubly plunging anticline was defined using the USDOE RMOTC formations of interest data (e.g., Lower Sundance, Crow Mountain, Alcova Limestone, and Red Peak). The assemblage of 23 minerals was primarily developed from literature data and petrophysical (well log) analysis. The assemblage and structure was input into a commercial reactive transport simulator to predict the effects of CO2 injection and complex reactions with the reservoir rock. Significant impediments were encountered during the execution phase of the project. The only known commercial reactive transport simulator was incapable of simulating complex geochemistry modeled in this project. Significant effort and project funding was expended to determine the limitations of both the commercial simulator and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) R&D simulator, TOUGHREACT available to the project. A simplified layer cake model approximating the volume of the RMOTC targeted reservoirs was defined with 1-3 minerals eventually modeled with limited success. Modeling reactive transport in porous media requires significant computational power. In this project, up to 24 processors were used to model a limited mineral set of 1-3 minerals. In addition, geomechanical aspects of injecting CO2 into closed, semi-open, and open systems in various well completion methods was simulated. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) as a storage method was not modeled. A robust and stable simulation dataset or base case was developed and used to create a master dataset with embedded instructions for input to the ED/RSM software. Little success was achieved toward the objective of the project using the commercial simulator or the LBNL simulator versions available during the time of this project. Several hundred realizations were run with the commercial simulator and ED/RSM software, most having convergence problems and terminating prematurely. A proxy model for full field CO2 injection sequestration utilization and storage was not capable of being developed with software available for this project. Though the chemistry is reasonably known and understood, based on the amount of effort and huge computational time required, predicting CO2 sequestration storage capacity in geologic formations to within the program goals of ±30% proved unsuccessful.

Rogers, John

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now interpreted as a large negative anomaly associated with the entire field. The results of the State Smock horizontal well and the Bowers 4-25 well confirmed the lack of additional recoverable hydrocarbons in the Vernon Field. (4) The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach, Burke County, North Dakota area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the geological and geophysical data; the microbial values here were the highest we have observed. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling, however, a pipeline has not yet been completed that would allow the wells to be placed into production. We also present in this annual report the results of recent efforts to map carbonate facies tracts in the middle Devonian Dundee and Rogers City Limestones using gamma ray, bulk density, and photoelectric effect geophysical well log amplitudes. This work was undertaken to identify fairways for exploration in the Dundee and Rogers City where surface geochemical techniques could then be used to screen potential leads.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electrochemical corrosion behavior of biomedical Ti22Nb and Ti22Nb6Zr alloys in saline medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical corrosion behavior of biomedical Ti­22Nb and Ti­22Nb­6Zr alloys in saline medium B addition and potentiodynamic polarization on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Ti­22Nb and Ti­22Nb­6Zr alloy samples.The corrosion tests were carried out in 0.9% NaCl at 37 8C and neutral p

Zheng, Yufeng

243

Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

Doughty, Christine

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

Deltaic sedimentation in saline, alkaline Lake Bogoria, Kenya: Response to environmental change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lake Bogoria is a meromictic, saline (90 g/l TDS), alkaline (pH: 10.3) lake with Na-CO[sub 3]-Cl waters, located in a narrow half-graben in the central Kenya Rift. It is fed by hot springs, direct precipitation, and a series of ephemeral streams that discharge into the lake via small deltas and fan-deltas. Examination of the exposed deltas and >50 short cores from the lake floor, have revealed a wide range of deltaic and prodeltaic sediments, including turbidites and subaqueous debris-flow deposits. Studies of 3 long cores and the exposed delta stratigraphy have shown how the style of deltaic sedimentation has responded to environmental changes during the last 30,000 years. During humid periods when lake level is high the lake waters are fresher and less dense. Theoretically, high sediment yield and more constant discharge may promote underflow (hyperpycnal flow), generating low-density turbidity currents. In contrast, during low stages with dense brine, the less dense, inflowing waters carry fine sediment plumes toward the center of the lake where they settle from suspension (hypopycnal flow). Although applicable as a general model, the sediment record shows that reality is more complex. Variations in meromixis and level of the chemocline, together with local and temporal differences in sediment yield and discharge, may permit density flows even when the lake is under a predominant hypopycnal regime. During periods of aridity when sodium carbonate evaporites were forming, exposed delta plains were subject to desiccation with local development of calcrete and zeolitic paleosols.

Renaut, R.W. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Tiercelin, J.J. (Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Domaines Oceaniques)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Footprint of the CO[subscript 2] Plume during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers: Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at the Basin Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a sharp-interface mathematical model of CO[subscript 2] migration in deep saline aquifers, which accounts for gravity override, capillary trapping, natural groundwater flow, and the shape of the plume during the ...

Juanes, Ruben

246

Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

salinity simulations of sea level rise scenarios. AppendixSan Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversiona 1-D model of sea level rise in an estuary must account for

Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Scaling of capillary trapping in unstable two-phase flow: Application to CO[subscript 2] sequestration in deep saline aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of flow instabilities on capillary trapping mechanisms is a major source of uncertainty in CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Standard macroscopic models of multiphase flow in porous media are unable to ...

Szulczewski, Michael L.

248

The effect of temperature, salinity and pH on the fertilizability of the ova and fertilizing capacity of sperm of Fundulus heteroclitus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, SALINITY AND PH ON THE FERTILIZABILITY OF THE OVA AND FERTILIZING CAPACITY OF SPERM OF FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS A Thesis by Robert Sanford Foster, IY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major Subject: Biology THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, SALINITY AND PH ON THE FERTILIZABILITY OF THE OVA AND FERTILIZING CAPACITY OF SPERM OF FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS A...

Foster, Robert Sanford

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Geochemistry AFM (Icon) | EMSL  

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250

Subtask 2.17 - CO{sub 2} Storage Efficiency in Deep Saline Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) continues to advance, and large-scale implementation of geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage progresses, it will be important to understand the potential of geologic formations to store meaningful amounts of CO{sub 2}. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage in deep saline formations (DSFs) has been suggested as one of the best potential methods for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere, and as such, updated storage resource estimation methods will continue to be an important component for the widespread deployment of CCS around the world. While there have been several methodologies suggested in the literature, most of these methods are based on a volumetric calculation of the pore volume of the DSF multiplied by a storage efficiency term and do not consider the effect of site-specific dynamic factors such as injection rate, injection pattern, timing of injection, pressure interference between injection locations, and overall formation pressure buildup. These volumetric methods may be excellent for comparing the potential between particular formations or basins, but they have not been validated through real-world experience or full-formation injection simulations. Several studies have also suggested that the dynamic components of geologic storage may play the most important role in storing CO{sub 2} in DSFs but until now have not directly compared CO{sub 2} storage resource estimates made with volumetric methodologies to estimates made using dynamic CO{sub 2} storage methodologies. In this study, two DSFs, in geographically separate areas with geologically diverse properties, were evaluated with both volumetric and dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource estimation methodologies to compare the results and determine the applicability of both approaches. In the end, it was determined that the dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource potential is timedependent and it asymptotically approaches the volumetric CO{sub 2} storage resource potential over very long periods of time in the two systems that were evaluated. These results indicate that the volumetric assessments can be used as long as the appropriate storage efficiency terms are used and it is understood that it will take many wells over very long periods of time to fully realize the storage potential of a target formation. This subtask was funded through the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)– U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme.

Gorecki, Charles; Liu, Guoxiang; Braunberger, Jason; Klenner, Robert; Ayash, Scott; Dotzenrod, Neil; Steadman, Edward; Harju, John

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Changes in Hepatic Blood Flow During Transcatheter Arterial Infusion with Heated Saline in Hepatic VX2 Tumor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. This study evaluates the influence of transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline on hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to tumor and normal hepatic tissues in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods. All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Twenty rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into the following two groups: (a) the treated group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL transarterial injection of 60 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery; (b) the control group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL injection of 37 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery. Using ultrasonography, the blood flows in both the portal vein and hepatic artery were measured, and the changes in the hemodynamic indices were recorded before and immediately after the injection. The changes in the tumor and normal liver tissues of the two groups were histopathologically examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining after the injection. Results. After the transcatheter arterial heated infusion, there was a decrease in the hepatic arterial blood flow to the tumor tissue, a significant decrease in the hepatic artery mean velocity (P < 0.05), and a significant increase in the resistance index (P < 0.05). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in the normal liver tissue or the tumor tissue after heated perfusion, and coagulated blood plasma was observed in the cavities of intratumoral blood vessels in the treated group. Conclusions. The changes in tumor blood flow in the rabbit VX2 tumor model were presumably caused by microthrombi in the tumor vessels, and the portal vein likely mediated the heat loss in normal liver tissue during the transarterial heated infusion.

Cao Wei, E-mail: cawe-001@163.com [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Li Jing, E-mail: lijing02@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery (China); Wu Zhiqun, E-mail: zhiqunwu@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Zhou Changxi, E-mail: changxizhou@163.com [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Respiratory Disease (China); Liu Xi, E-mail: xiliu@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound Diagnostics (China); Wan Yi, E-mail: yiwan@163.com [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Health Statistics, Institute for Health Informatics (China); Duan Yunyou, E-mail: yunyouduan@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound Diagnostics (China)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Vernon Field demonstration project in Isabella County, Michigan. This new case history and well summary format organizes and presents the technical and historical details of the Vernon Field demonstration, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion. Planning for the annual project meeting in Tampa, Florida has begun. This meeting will be held March 7-9, 2003 at the same site as the last three meetings. The goals of this project were to: (1) test the use of multi-lateral wells to recover bypassed hydrocarbons and (2) to access the potential of using surface geochemistry to reduce drilling risk. Two new demonstration wells, the State-Smock and the Bowers 4-25, were drilled to test the Dundee Formation at Vernon Field for bypassed oil. Neither well was commercial, although both produced hydrocarbon shows. An extensive geochemical survey in the vicinity of Vernon Field, covering much of Isabella County, has produced a base map for interpretation of anomalies in Michigan. Several potential new anomalies were discovered that could be further investigated.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the study was to test a new analytical technique, Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME), for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. This involved measuring the effectiveness of SPME to extract hydrocarbons under controlled conditions in the laboratory. As part of the study, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the laboratory results. Presented in this quarterly report is the condensed version of the Case History and Well Summary for the Bear Lake area in Manistee County, Michigan. The full version will be in the annual report. The condensed case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and horizontal lateral for Bear Lake, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydrogeological restrictions to saline ground-water discharge in the Red River of the North drainage basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discharge of saline water from bedrock aquifers along the eastern margin of the Williston basin is restricted by surficial glacial till and lacustrine deposits in the Red River of the North drainage basin. Water from these aquifers reaches the surface by (1) diffusion; (2) slow, upward seepage along zones of relatively larger hydraulic conductivity in the till and lacustrine deposits; or (3) flow from artesian wells. Ground-water quality varies near the surface because of mixing of water being discharged from bedrock aquifers with shallower ground water in the surficial deposits. Ground-water quality, hydraulic-gradient, and hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from pumped-well and slug tests indicate that flow in the surficial deposits is eastward, but at slow rates because of small hydraulic conductivities. Base-flow and specific-conductance measurements of water in tributaries to the Red River of the North indicate that focused points of ground-water discharge result in substantial increases in salinity in surface water in the northern part of the basin in North Dakota. Core analyses and drillers' logs were used to generalize hydrogeologic characteristics of the deposits in the basin, and a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model was used to simulate the basin's geohydrologic processes. Model results indicate that the ground-water flow paths in the bedrock aquifers and surficial deposits converge, and that water from the bedrock aquifers contributes to the overall increase in ground-water discharge toward the east. Model results are supported by water-quality data collected along an east-west hydrogeologic section.

Strobel, M.L. (Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States) Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

CO2 Saline Storage Demonstration in Colorado Sedimentary Basins: Applied Studies in Reservoir Assessment and Dynamic Processes Affecting Industrial Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multitask research project was conducted in anticipation of a possible future increase in industrial efforts at CO2 storage in Colorado sedimentary basins. Colorado is already the home to the oldest Rocky Mountain CO2 storage site, the Rangely Oil Field, where CO2-EOR has been underway since the 1980s. The Colorado Geological Survey has evaluated storage options statewide, and as part of the SW Carbon Sequestration Partnership the Survey, is deeply engaged in and committed to suitable underground CO2 storage. As a more sustainable energy industry is becoming a global priority, it is imperative to explore the range of technical options available to reduce emissions from fossil fuels. One such option is to store at least some emitted CO2 underground. In this NETL-sponsored CO2 sequestration project, the Colorado School of Mines and our partners at the University of Colorado have focused on a set of the major fundamental science and engineering issues surrounding geomechanics, mineralogy, geochemistry and reservoir architecture of possible CO2 storage sites (not limited to Colorado). Those are the central themes of this final report and reported below in Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 6. Closely related to these reservoir geoscience issues are also legal, environmental and public acceptance concerns about pore space accessibility—as a precondition for CO2 storage. These are addressed in Tasks 1, 5 and 7. Some debates about the future course of the energy industry can become acrimonius. It is true that the physics of combustion of hydrocarbons makes it impossible for fossil energy to attain a carbon footprint anywhere nearly as low as that of renewables. However, there are many offsetting benefits, not the least that fossil energy is still plentiful, it has a global and highly advanced distribution system in place, and the footprint that the fossil energy infrastructure occupies is orders of magnitude smaller than renewable energy facilities with equivalent energy capacity. Finally, inexpensive natural gas here in North America is pushing coal for electricity generation off the market, thus reducing US CO2 emissions faster than any other large industrialized nation. These two big factors argue for renewed efforts to find technology solutions to reduce the carbon footprint (carbon dioxide as well as methane and trace gases) of conventional and unconventional oil and gas. One major such technology component is likely to be carbon capture, utilization and storage.

Nummedal, Dag; Sitchler, Alexis; McCray, John; Mouzakis, Katherine; Glossner, Andy; Mandernack, Kevin; Gutierrez, Marte; Doran, Kevin; Pranter, Matthew; Rybowiak, Chris

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTRY, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. A major part of the remaining project will focus on using surface geochemistry to delineate prospects. A Niagaran reef field geochemical survey, the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan is scheduled to take place this summer. Previous wells drilled in Bagley Prospect area in the early 1970's and in place in late 2002 and early 2003 resulted in discoveries and numerous hydrocarbon shows in the Brown Niagaran reservoir interval. The Bagley region is still considered an area of interest by the industry and appears ripe for a geochemical survey. Our industry partner is interested in a possible test in the Bagley prospect because subsurface geophysical and geological interpretation indicates the presence of structures. Anomalous production and pressure data further suggest the region is not yet well understood and should not be considered mature. The most recent well, the Bagley 1-22A sidetrack, was unsuccessful at locating a new reef culmination to the south of the original vertical well and did not encounter hydrocarbon shows. The sidetrack and well were plugged and abandoned. The proposed geochemical survey will concentrate on areas away from the Bagley 1-22A to the north and west but will include the entire prospect so that the existing data can be used in interpretations. Bagley appears to offer a unique combination of potential and data for a geochemical study that focuses on looking for new oil in an area that has exhausted traditional geologic and geophysical methods. The Bear Lake pinnacle reef trend in Manistee County, Michigan, is also scheduled for further geochemical work this summer. Industry interest, mostly by small companies, is picking up in this area and it is also ripe for targeted geochemical surveys for the same reasons cited above.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

Zhou, Quanlin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Training Students to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO{sub 2} Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to expose and train multiple students in geological tools that are essential to reservoir characterization and geologic sequestration including but not limited to advanced petrological methods, mineralogical methods, and geochemical methods; core analysis, and geophysical well-log interpretation. These efforts have included training of multiple students through geologically based curriculum and research using advanced petrological, mineralogical, and geochemical methods. In whole, over the last 3+ years, this award has supported 5,828 hours of student research, supporting the work of several graduate and undergraduate students. They have all received training directly related to ongoing CO{sub 2} sequestration demonstrations. The students have all conducted original scientific research on topics related to understanding the importance of lithological, textural, and compositional variability in formations that are being targeted as CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs and seals. This research was linked to the Mount Simon Sandstone reservoir and overlying Eau Claire Formation seal in the Illinois Basin- a system where over one million tons of CO{sub 2} are actively being injected with the first large-scale demonstration of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage in the U.S. Student projects focused specifically on 1) reservoir porosity characterization and evaluation, 2) petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical evidence of fluid-related diagenesis in the caprock, 3) textural changes in reservoir samples exposed to experimental CO{sub 2} + brine conditions, 4) controls on spatial heterogeneity in composition and texture in both the reservoir and seal, 5) the implications of small-scale fractures within the reservoir, and 6) petrographic and stable isotope analyses of carbonates in the seal to understand the burial history of the system. The student-led research associated with this project provided real-time and hands-on experience with a relevant CO{sub 2} system, provided relevant information to the regional partnerships who are working within these formations, and provides more broadly applicable understanding and method development for other carbon capture and storage systems.

Bowen, Brenda

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for SOH-1 test hole Authors Frank A. Trusdell, Elizabeth A. Novak, Rene' S. Evans and Kelly Okano Published U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, The date "unknown"...

264

Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

upwelling zone. The upwelling zone lies within a epidote-quartz veined, coarse-grained granite at depth in the southern portion of the field. The mineralogy of the clays varies...

265

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

upwelling zone. The upwelling zone lies within a epidote-quartz veined, coarse-grained granite at depth in the southern portion of the field. The mineralogy of the clays varies...

266

The determination of lithology from core physical properties measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that these experiments are noninvasive also allows for further post-cruise studies. For the study I chose Leg 162 (July-September 1995 in the North Atlantic) for the density of data, the experiments performed, the quantity and quality of post-cruise publications...

Clark, Paula Ann

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007)is

268

Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList ofPassiveMachineBalance

269

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList ofPassiveMachineBalanceArea, California |

270

Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Volcano, Hawaii |

271

Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Volcano, Hawaii

272

Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProceduresFY JumpThis is a property of typeHeatSource

273

Stratigraphic Relations and Lithologic Variations in the Jemez Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen, Minnesota: Energy ResourcesStockbridge isIllinois)Mexico |

274

Appendix A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_ ,'I-Amchitka, Alaska,

275

Lithological control on the deformation mechanism and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 2012; Hsu et al., 2009a; Kaneko et al., 2010; Noda and Lapusta, 2010; Perfettini et al., 2010; Harris and Segall, 1987; Hashimoto et al., 2009; Loveless and Meade, 2011; Chlieh et al., 2008; Moreno et al., 2010

Winfree, Erik

276

Modeling of fate and transport of co-injection of H2S with CO2 in deep saline formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. However, costs of capture and compression of CO{sub 2} from industrial waste streams containing small quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds such as SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} are very expensive. Therefore, studies on the co-injection of CO{sub 2} containing other acid gases from industrial emissions are very important. In this paper, numerical simulations were performed to study the co-injection of H{sub 2}S with CO{sub 2} in sandstone and carbonate formations. Results indicate that the preferential dissolution of H{sub 2}S gas (compared with CO{sub 2} gas) into formation water results in the delayed breakthrough of H{sub 2}S gas. Co-injection of H{sub 2}S results in the precipitation of pyrite through interactions between the dissolved H{sub 2}S and Fe{sup 2+} from the dissolution of Fe-bearing minerals. Additional injection of H{sub 2}S reduces the capabilities for solubility and mineral trappings of CO{sub 2} compared to the CO{sub 2} only case. In comparison to the sandstone (siliciclastic) formation, the carbonate formation is less favorable to the mineral sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Different from CO{sub 2} mineral trapping, the presence of Fe-bearing siliciclastic and/or carbonate is more favorable to the H{sub 2}S mineral trapping.

Zhang, W.; Xu, T.; Li, Y.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection ProcessDuring CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For purposes of geologic storage, CO2 would be injected into saline formations at supercritical temperature and pressure conditions, and would form a separate phase that is immiscible with the aqueous phase (brine). At typical subsurface temperature and pressure conditions, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) has lower density than the aqueous phase and would experience an upward buoyancy force. Accordingly, the CO2 is expected to accumulate beneath the caprock at the top of the permeable interval, and could escape from the storage formation wherever (sub-)vertical pathways are available, such as fractures or faults through the caprock, or improperly abandoned wells. Over time, an increasing fraction of CO2 may dissolve in the aqueous phase, and eventually some of the aqueous CO2 may react with rock minerals to form poorly soluble carbonates. Dissolution into the aqueous phase and eventual sequestration as carbonates are highly desirable processes as they would increase permanence and security of storage. Dissolution of CO2 will establish phase equilibrium locally between the overlying CO2 plume and the aqueous phase beneath. If the aqueous phase were immobile, CO2 dissolution would be limited by the rate at which molecular diffusion can remove dissolved CO2 from the interface between CO2-rich and aqueous phases. This is a slow process. However, dissolution of CO2 is accompanied by a small increase in the density of the aqueous phase, creating a negative buoyancy force that can give rise to downward convection of CO2-rich brine, which in turn can greatly accelerate CO2 dissolution. This study explores the process of dissolution-diffusion-convection (DDC), using high-resolution numerical simulation. We find that geometric features of convection patterns are very sensitive to small changes in problem specifications, reflecting self-enhancing feedbacks and the chaotic nature of the process. Total CO2 dissolution rates on the other hand are found to be quite robust against modest changes in problem parameters, and are essentially constant as long as no dissolved CO2 reaches the lower boundary of the system.

Pruess, Karsten; Zhang, Keni

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A finite difference model describing the dynamic effects of horizontal salinity gradients on the mean circulation of a shallow rectangular basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the bar-built estuary. It is formed by the development of an offshore barrier beach partly or wholly en- closing a sound. It has large horizontal dimensions and very shallow depths. There are usually several sources of freshwater inflow along... terms dominate the secondary effects. If its value is greater than one then the salinity (density) effects dominate. As examples he stated that in the Thames (D = . 8) the non-linear convective terms A would dominate, whereas in the Hersey estuary (D...

Elliott, Brady Allen

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An investigation of a method of determining the salinity of sea water by the electrical conduction method without the use of electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method was in 1916. The suggest1on was macle that two 1dentical electolytic cells 1n two of the arms of a Wheatstone bridge circuit be placed in a water bath to bring them to the same temperature. One of the cells contained a standard solution while... measurements are described in the 11terature. ' These instrumer ts employed. Wheatstone bridge cir- 4, 5 cuits by which the conductivity of a batch, or flowing sample, of sea water was co:spared with a standard of known salinity contained in a sealed cell...

Adams, William Floyd

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Predictive modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep saline sandstone reservoirs: Impacts of geochemical kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One idea for mitigating the increase in fossil-fuel generated CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is to inject CO{sub 2} into subsurface saline sandstone reservoirs. To decide whether to try such sequestration at a globally significant scale will require the ability to predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2}. Thus, models are needed to predict the rates and extents of subsurface rock-water-gas interactions. Several reactive transport models for CO{sub 2} sequestration created in the last decade predicted sequestration in sandstone reservoirs of ~17 to ~90 kg CO{sub 2} m{sup -3|. To build confidence in such models, a baseline problem including rock + water chemistry is proposed as the basis for future modeling so that both the models and the parameterizations can be compared systematically. In addition, a reactive diffusion model is used to investigate the fate of injected supercritical CO{sub 2} fluid in the proposed baseline reservoir + brine system. In the baseline problem, injected CO{sub 2} is redistributed from the supercritical (SC) free phase by dissolution into pore brine and by formation of carbonates in the sandstone. The numerical transport model incorporates a full kinetic description of mineral-water reactions under the assumption that transport is by diffusion only. Sensitivity tests were also run to understand which mineral kinetics reactions are important for CO{sub 2} trapping. The diffusion transport model shows that for the first ~20 years after CO{sub 2} diffusion initiates, CO{sub 2} is mostly consumed by dissolution into the brine to form CO{sub 2,aq} (solubility trapping). From 20-200 years, both solubility and mineral trapping are important as calcite precipitation is driven by dissolution of oligoclase. From 200 to 1000 years, mineral trapping is the most important sequestration mechanism, as smectite dissolves and calcite precipitates. Beyond 2000 years, most trapping is due to formation of aqueous HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Ninety-seven percent of the maximum CO{sub 2} sequestration, 34.5 kg CO{sub 2} per m{sup 3} of sandstone, is attained by 4000 years even though the system does not achieve chemical equilibrium until ~25,000 years. This maximum represents about 20% CO{sub 2} dissolved as CO{sub 2},aq, 50% dissolved as HCO{sub 3}{sup -}{sub ,aq}, and 30% precipitated as calcite. The extent of sequestration as HCO{sub 3}{sup -} at equilibrium can be calculated from equilibrium thermodynamics and is roughly equivalent to the amount of Na+ in the initial sandstone in a soluble mineral (here, oligoclase). Similarly, the extent of trapping in calcite is determined by the amount of Ca2+ in the initial oligoclase and smectite. Sensitivity analyses show that the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration is sensitive to the mineral-water reaction kinetic constants between approximately 10 and 4000 years. The sensitivity of CO{sub 2} sequestration to the rate constants decreases in magnitude respectively from oligoclase to albite to smectite.

Balashov, Victor N.; Guthrie, George D.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Lopano, Christina L. J.; Rimstidt, Donald; Brantley, Susan L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{sub 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.

Zhang, Wei; Li, Yilian; Xu, Tianfu; Cheng, Huilin; Zheng, Yan; Xiong, Peng

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

Biomass production, forage quality, and cation uptake of Quail bush, four-wing saltbush, and seaside barley irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reported here investigated capacity of Atriplex lentiformis (Torr.) S. Wats. (Quail bush), Atriplex X aptera A. Nels. (pro sp.) (Wytana four-wing saltbush), and Hordeum marinum Huds. (seaside barley) to produce biomass and crude protein and take up cations when irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water, in the presence of a shallow water table. Water tables were established at 0.38, 0.76, and 1.14m below the surface in sand-filled columns. The columns were then planted to the study species. Study plants were irrigated for 224 days; irrigation water was supplied every 7 days equal to water lost to evapotranspiration (ET) plus 100mL (the volume of water removed in the most previous soil solution sampling). Water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) or coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wastewater. Biomass production did not differ significantly between water quality treatments but did differ significantly among species and water table depth within species. Averaged across water quality treatments, Hordeum marinum produced 79% more biomass than A. lentiformis and 122% more biomass than Atriplex X aptera, but contained only 11% crude protein compared to 16% crude protein in A. lentiformis and 14% crude protein in Atriplex X aptera. Atriplex spp. grown in columns with the water table at 0.38m depth produced more biomass, took up less calcium on a percentage basis, and took up more sodium on a percentage basis than when grown with the water table at a deeper depth. Uptake of cations by Atriplex lentiformis was approximately twice the uptake of cations by Atriplex X aptera and three times that of H. marinum. After 224 days of irrigation, crop growth, and cation uptake, followed by biomass harvest, EC and SAR of shallow groundwater in columns planted to A. lentiformis were less than EC and SAR of shallow ground water in columns planted to either of the other species.

Bauder, J.W.; Browning, L.S.; Phelps, S.D.; Kirkpatrick, A.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Irrigation Water Quality Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Na2SO4 Moderate to large Calcium chloride CaCl2 Moderate Calcium sulfate (gypsum) CaSO4 2H2O Moderate

288

Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

streams and under- ground sources contain dissolved substances known chemically as salts. Ocean water contains approximately 3 percent salts, or 40 tons of salts per acre-foot of water. Waters used for irriga- tion generally contain .1 to 5 tons... of salt per acre-foot of water. In general terms, salt is thought of as table alt; however, thousands of different salts are known. Examples of common salts in irrigation water are table salt (sodium chloride), Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate), gypsum...

Lyerly, Paul J.; Longenecker, Donald E.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substances I chemically as salts. Ocean water contains rimately 3 percent salts, or 40 tons of salts .-foot of water. Waters used for irriga- ~erally contain .1 to 5 tons of salt per acre- water. . -er acrf +ion gen 'pot of ,.. ,enera1 terms, salt... and rock materials through which .he water must seep before becoming available inr irrigation. Mountain streams often contain less than one-tenth ton of salt per acre-foot of .rater. Drainage waters and ground waters in lesert valleys may contain...

Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Effect of Soaking in Hot Saline Solution and Humid Atmosphere on the Passive Film Behavior of a Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloy 22, a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, is the candidate material for fabrication of canisters for disposal of high-level and spent nuclear fuel waste in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository in Nevada. This paper investigated the passive film behavior and corrosion properties on Alloy 22 as a function of soaking in hot, saline environments and in hot, humid atmospheres. Environmental parameters include potential, temperature, pH in chloride and multi-species solutions. Hot, humid exposures are planned for temperatures up to 300 C. Soaking times are planned to extend for up to 1000 hours. This work is part of a multi-investigator study to determine the durability of passive films and localized corrosion processes in metal exposed to moist particulate and deposits. Of particular interest are the long-term stability of the passive film and the effects of soaking in aqueous solutions or hot, humid atmospheres. A combination of electrochemical methods measure changes in passive film properties, and a combination of surface analysis techniques are used to characterize the film composition and structure. Electrochemical methods include Potentiodynamic Polarization tests for the general corrosion behavior; along with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Mott-Schottky (M-S) analysis for electronic properties of the passive films. Alterations in the chemical composition and structure of the passive film are characterized using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results for freshly formed films are shown in figure 1. The EIS results show that the interfacial impedance increased with increasing potential to maximum within the passive range and then decreased as the potential was increased further. interfacial impedance was found to decrease with increasing temperature. Mott-Schottky analysis indicated that the oxide film which is n-type in the passive region changes to p-type in the transpassive region. Figure 2 shows the representative chemical soaking results at 90 C for up to 240 hours; the interfacial impedance increased with soaking time. Results from this work are combined with those from collaborative studies to correlate the passive film properties with the resistance to localized corrosion using multi-crevice assemblies and micro-corrosion cells. The passive film growth and dissolution are interpreted with reference to processes based on the point defect model.

P. Pharkya; J.H. Payer

2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

ES 6216 Isotope Geochemistry Student Presentation Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary material Boundary conditions and numerical solution of Equation 4 The travelling of the interior solution and the other parameters. Non-existence of advancing contact-line solutions to Equation 1 then the elastic term in (1) dominates the gravitational term as r R and the dominant asymptotic balance (i

Black, Robert X.

293

EMSL Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Standards and Technology (NIST) David Shuh Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Eric Roden (offsite) University of Wisconsin Charles Werth University of Illinois at...

294

Characterization Well R-7 Geochemistry Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for four groundwater-sampling rounds conducted at characterization well R-7. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine if contaminants from Technical Area (TA)-2 and TA-21 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Figure 1.0-1 shows the well's location in the narrow upper part of Los Alamos Canyon, between the inactive Omega West reactor and the mouth of DP Canyon. Well R-7 is in an excellent location to characterize the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in both perched groundwater and the regional aquifer near sites of known Laboratory effluent release, including radionuclides and inorganic chemicals (Stone et al. 2002, 72717). The Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship-Remediation (RRES-R) Program (formerly the Environmental Restoration [ER] Project) installed well R-7 as part of groundwater investigations to satisfy requirements of the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599) and to support the Laboratory's ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (LANL 1996, 70215). Well R-7 was designed primarily to provide geochemical or water quality and hydrogeologic data for the regional aquifer within the Puye Formation. This report also presents a geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for well R-7 and provides hydrogeochemical interpretations using analytical results for groundwater samples collected at the well. Discussion of other hydrogeochemical data collected within the east-central portion of the Laboratory, however, is deferred until they can be evaluated in the context of sitewide information collected from other RRES and Hydrogeologic Workplan characterization wells (R-8A, R-9, and R-9i). Once all deep groundwater investigations in the east-central portion of the Laboratory are completed, geochemical and hydrogeologic conceptual models for the Los Alamos Canyon watershed may be included in a groundwater risk analysis. These models will include an evaluation of potential contaminant transport pathways. Well R-7 was completed on March 9, 2001, with three screens (363.2 to 379.2 ft, 730.4 to 746.4 ft, and 895.5 to 937.4 ft). Screen No.2 was dry during characterization sampling. Four rounds of groundwater characterization samples, collected from a perched zone and the regional aquifer from depths of 378.0 ft (screen No.1) and 915.0 ft (screen No.3), were chemically characterized for radionuclides, metals and trace elements, major ions, high-explosive (HE) compounds, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, organic compounds, and stable isotopes (H, N, and O). Although well R-7 is primarily a characterization well, its design and construction also meet the requirements of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant monitoring well as described in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document ''RCRA Groundwater Monitoring: Draft Technical Guidance,'' November 1992, EPA 530-R-93- 001. Incorporation of this well into a Laboratory-wide groundwater-monitoring program will be considered, and more specifically evaluated (e.g., sampling frequency, analytes, etc.), when the results of the well R-7 characterization activities are comprehensively evaluated in conjunction with other groundwater investigations in the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599).

P.Longmire; F.Goff

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mineralogy and geochemistry of recent carbonate sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-calcite). A large loss of certain trace elements (e. g. magnesium, strontium and barium) occurs during diagenesis (Stehli and Hower, 1961), Aragonite formed at or near the surface of the earth is metastable relative to calcite. The free energy difference...-calciMs. Clearly then, Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios, when used in conjunction with a knowledge of carbonate mineralogy, can act as diagenetic indicators (Pilkey and Hower, 1960). Magnesium released in the conversion of high Mg- to low Mg- calcites, as well...

Sommer, Sheldon E

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geochemistry of Aluminum in High Temperature Brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective ofthis research is to provide quantitative data on the equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of aluminum minerals required to model changes in permeability and brine chemistry associated with fluid/rock interactions in the recharge, reservoir, and discharge zones of active geothermal systems. This requires a precise knowledge of the thermodynamics and speciation of aluminum in aqueous brines, spanning the temperature and fluid composition rangesencountered in active systems. The empirical and semi-empirical treatments of the solubility/hydrolysis experimental results on single aluminum mineral phases form the basis for the ultimate investigation of the behavior of complex aluminosilicate minerals. The principal objective in FY 1998 was to complete the solubility measurements on boehmite (AIOOH) inNaC1 media( 1 .O and 5.0 molal ionic strength, IOO-250°C). However, additional measurements were also made on boehmite solubility in pure NaOH solutions in order to bolster the database for fitting in-house isopiestic data on this system. Preliminary kinetic Measurements of the dissolution/precipitation of boehmite was also carried out, although these were also not planned in the earlier objective. The 1999 objectives are to incorporate these treatments into existing codes used by the geothermal industry to predict the chemistry ofthe reservoirs; these calculations will be tested for reliability against our laboratory results and field observations. Moreover, based on the success of the experimental methods developed in this program, we intend to use our unique high temperature pH easurement capabilities to make kinetic and equilibrium studies of pH-dependent aluminosilicate transformation reactions and other pH-dependent heterogeneous reactions.

Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

297

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification andinterface1JUNInformation

298

Environmental Geochemistry of Rads | Environmental Radiation Protection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: NetworkingEnvironment EnvironmentFIB/SEM (Quanta)

299

Property:Geochemistry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProcedures JumpGreenButtonIDGeochemistry Property Type String

300

Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

Patrick Longmire

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Miocene core complex development and coeval supradetachment basin evolution of Paros, Greece  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Brichau et al., 2006), detrital ages of the hanging wall rocks (Sanchez-Gomez et al., 2002) and new lithologic and structural mapping (Papp, 2007). This study builds on the foundation laid by these authors and contributes to the growing body of science... and Geochemistry, 58, 441–448. Sanchez-Gomez, M., Avigad, D., Heimann, A., 2002. Geochronology of clasts in allochthonous Miocene sedimentary sequence on Mykonos and Paros Islands: implications for backarc extension in the Aegean Sea. Journal...

Bargnesi, Evan Anthony

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

The foraminiferal and lithologic characteristics of the Reklaw formation of Leon, Robertson and Milam counties, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the power auger was a piece of tubing four inches ln diameter, with two "Ln shaped cutting':teeth at the base. 15 As the teeth cut on the bottom of the hole the material was forced irrto the tubing preventing contamination 6f' strata. from"bbove. Samples... the portable power auger to obtain samples from unexposed local- ities and who critically read the manuscript. The writer is grateful to Mr. C. M. Maggio and Mr. D. I. Miller for their aid in collecting samples . ABSTRACT The Reklaw formation of Leon...

Davis, Kenneth Eugene

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The effects of lithology and initial fault angle in physical models of fault-propagation folds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimentally deformed physical rock models are used to examine the effects of changing mechanical stratigraphy and initial fault angle on the development of fault-propagation folds over a flat-ramp-flat thrust geometry. This study also...

McLain, Christopher Thomas

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lithology and well log study of Campbell E-2 geothermal test...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well log study of Campbell E-2 geothermal test well, Humboldt House geothermal prospect, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

306

RADIOACTIVITY DOSAGE OF ORNAMENTAL GRANITIC ROCKS BASED ON CHEMICAL, MINERALOGICAL AND LITHOLOGICAL DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred samples of granitic rock were collected from granite traders in Belo Horizonte. Autoradiography, optical microscopy, diffractometry, and chemical analysis (X-ray spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, gravimetry and electron probe microanalysis) were used to determine the mineral assemblages and lithotypes. Autoradiographic results for several samples showed the presence of monazite, allanite and zircon. Chemical analysis revealed concentrations of uranium of {le} 30ppm, and thorium {le} 130ppm. Higher concentrations generally correlated with high concentrations of light rare earths in silica-rich rocks of granitic composition. Calculations were made of radioactive doses for floor tiles in a standard room for samples with total concentration of uranium and thorium greater than 60ppm. On the basis of calculations of {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 226}Ra from Th, K and U analysis, the doses calculated were between 0.11 and 0.34 mSv/year, which are much lower than the acceptable international exposure standard of 1.0 mSv/year.

Salas, H.T.; Nalini, H.A. Jr.; Mendes, J.C.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydraulic Fracture Optimization with a Pseudo-3D Model in Multi-layered Lithology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Fracturing is a technique to accelerate production and enhance ultimate recovery of oil and gas while fracture geometry is an important aspect in hydraulic fracturing design and optimization. Systematic design procedures are available...

Yang, Mei

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mass-transport deposits on the Algerian margin (Algiers area): morphology, lithology and sedimentary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: On 21st May 2003, a damaging earthquake of Mw: 6.9 struck the region of Boumerdès 40 km east. Keywords: Algeria, mass-transport deposit, morphology, triggering mechanism. 1. Introduction The Algerian-25Mar2010 Author manuscript, published in "4th International Symposium, Austin : United States (2009

Boyer, Edmond

309

Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 1,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open

310

Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Volcano,

311

Dataset: Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections | DOE  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite-- Energy,ConvertingANL-MPACT-092613 Testing ofData

312

Lithologic descriptions and temperature profiles of five wells in the southwestern Valles caldera region, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have been well constrained with the use of data from the VC-1, AET-4, WC 23-4, PC-1 and PC-2 wells. Data from these wells indicate that thermal gradients west of the caldera margin are between 110 and 140)degrees)C/km, with a maximum gradient occurring in the bottom of PC-1 equal to 240)degrees)C/km as a result of thermal fluid flow. Gradients within the caldera reach a maximum of 350)degrees)C/km, while the maximum thermal gradient measured southwest of the caldera in the thermal outflow plume is 140)degrees)C/km. The five wells exhibit high thermal gradients (>60)deghrees)C/km) resulting from high conductive heat flow associated with the Rio Grande rift and volcanism in the Valles caldera, as well as high convective heat flow associated with circulating geothermal fluids. Gamma logs run in four of the five wells appear to be of limited use for stratigraphic correlations in the caldera region. However, stratigraphic and temperature data from the five wells provide information about the structure and thermal regime of the southern and western Valles caldera region. 29 refs., 9 figs. 2 tabs.

Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Miles, D.; Waibel, A.; Swanberg, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At its most basic level, the injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites involves a system comprising the wellbore and the target reservoir. The wellbore is the only conduit available to emplace CO{sub 2} into reservoirs for long-term storage. At the same time, wellbores in general have been identified as the most likely conduit for CO{sub 2} and brine leakage from geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites, especially those in sedimentary basins with historical hydrocarbon production. We have developed a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO{sub 2} injection and leakage through wellbores. The model describes the following processes: (1) upward or downward wellbore flow of CO{sub 2} and variable salinity water with transition from supercritical to gaseous CO{sub 2} including Joule-Thomson cooling, (2) exsolution of CO{sub 2} from the aqueous phase as pressure drops, and (3) cross flow into or interaction with layers of surrounding rock (reservoirs). We use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO{sub 2}-water mixtures under different flow regimes and interacting with surrounding rock. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme. This manual provides instructions for compilation and use of the new model, and presents some example problems to demonstrate its use.

Pan, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

Salinity patterns in the Houston Ship Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This direction was selected because of its apparent effect on the tidal elevations. Strong winds from that direction would be expected to result in higher flood tide elevations. The longest length of run for winds across Galveston Bay that effect the channel... is in that direction. The wind ? bay relationship is shown in Figure 13, Later, component velocities from a direction of 90' were used in the evaluation. This was 37 TABLE 8 TOTAL MASS ifOVEMENT Calculation Sampling Run Date: 2 August 1968 Time: 1200 Hours...

Withers, Richard Ercelray

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Salinity routing in reservoir system modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in several major river basins in Texas and neighboring states. WRAP is the river/reservoir system simulation model incorporated in the Water Availability Modeling (WAM) System applied by agencies and consulting firms in Texas in planning and water right...

Ha, Mi Ae

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

316

Calcite Reaction Kinetics in Saline Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the calcite surface than K^ or that water is less available in NaCl solutions. Rates increased with increasing pCO2 and temperature, and their influence diminished at high I. Arrhenius plots yielded a relatively high activation energy (Ea ? 20 ± 2 kJ mol-1...

Finneran, David

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sandia National Laboratories: sea surface salinity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-active perovskiteremoving thereversetunneling

318

Ses Salines > UIB (en transport pblic)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Durada: 51 min. Cost mitjĂ  del viatge1 : 9'42 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 10,54 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,006 Kg Durada: 100 min. Cost mitjĂ  del viatge2 : 1,21 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg 1 any Temps acumulat3 : 12,47 dies Despesa per any3 : 3.317'25 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 3

Oro, Daniel

319

AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data for the spatial delineation of lithology and fluid units of deepwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data for the spatial delineation application of ampli- tude-versus-angle AVA inversion of prestack-seismic am- plitude data to detect-log data. Standard techniques such as crossplot analysis, Biot-Gass- mann fluid substitution, AVA

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

320

Lithologic influences on groundwater recharge through incised glacial till from profile to regional scales: Evidence from glaciated Eastern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Jozsef Szilagyi3,4 Received 3 May 2013; revised 11 December 2013; accepted 18 December 2013. [1 of both recharge rates and mechanisms. Citation: Gates, J. B., G. V. Steele, P. Nasta, and J. Szilagyi

Szilagyi, Jozsef

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ERRATA SHEET for ''Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site''  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conversion error has been discovered in the physical property data table for Emplacement Hole U-19bg (Supplemental Data) presented on Page 89. Data in the column labeled ''Bulk Density (g/cc)'' are actually presented in pounds per cubic foot rather than grams per cubic centimeter. The following table presents the bulk density values for U-19bg in pounds per cubic foot and grams per cubic centimeter.

L. B. Prothro; S. L. Drellack, Jr.; B. M. Allen

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An AVO method toward direct detection of lithologies combining P-P and P-S reflection data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-space models: uncon- solidated shale/sand, shale/salt, gas shale/limestone, and lime- stone/salt [VP : Pˇwave velocity; VS : Sˇwave velocity; and ˝ : density]. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 14 2.2 Numerical values... considered in this chapter. The estimated values approximate the actual ones with an error no greater than 1 percent. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 26 3.1 Elastic parameters for an isotropic half-space similar to the shale/salt model from...

Carcuz Jerez, Juan Ramon de Jesus

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Foraminiferal and lithologic characteristics through the zone of the Midway-Wilcox contact in Bastrop, Williamson, and Milam counties, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to deterniae tho sedincntcry parsactors of qccrtilc deviatioa, qaartile shewacss, and qacrtile hartesis. The perceatages of sca, silt, snd clay~ the coefficient of sorting~ sad the ne4isa 4isnetor were nsefal ia iaterpreting the eaviroancatal coaditioas... (1807, p. 62) ia a revised versioa ef the Eoceae ca4 Gretaceoas ef iiabswa. peeress (1050, p. 10?20) aced the ease "Wills peiat" or "Easel Clays" te 4esigaate the Midway Creep ef Texas. Ia the saae pablicatioa, pcarose applied the tera "Tueler Selt...

Miller, David Irving

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Lithological control on the deformation mechanism and the mode of fault slip on the Longitudinal Valley Fault, Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Chlieh et al., 2008; Harris and Segall, 1987; Hashimoto et al., 2009; Hsu et al., 2009a; Kaneko et al., 2010; Loveless and Meade, 2011; Moreno et al., 2010; Noda and Lapusta, 2010; Perfettini et al., 2010

Avouac, Jean-Philippe

325

Lithological control on the deformation mechanism and the mode of fault slip on the Longitudinal Valley Fault, Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ruptures (e.g., Barbot et al., 2012; Chlieh et al., 2008; Harris and Segall, 1987; Hashimoto et al., 2009; Hsu et al., 2009a; Kaneko et al., 2010; Loveless and Meade, 2011; Moreno et al., 2010; Noda

326

Revised version Organic Geochemistry 28, 411-415, 1998.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Abstract A resistant soil organic residue, `humin', has been analysed by solid-state 13 C-NMR and pyrolysis, carbohydrates and phenols. Keywords : 13 C of soil alkanes, NMR, resistant aliphatic biopolymer, pyrolysis biomass decomposition products as well as from root exudates, the new proposed pathway is based upon

327

www.emsl.pnl.gov GEOCHEMISTRY/BIOGEOCHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These scientific advances are accomplished through strong, multidisciplinary collaborations between an engaged user on efficient conversions of light energy into biofuel. Researchers from PNNL and Washington University in St

328

The geochemistry of uranium in the Orca Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

no uranium enrichment, with concentrations ranging from 2. 1 to 4. gppm, reflective of normal Gulf of Mexico sediments. This is the result of two dominant processes operating within the basin. First, the sharp pycnocline at the brine/seawater interface... . . . . . . . . , . . . , 37 xi Figure Page 16 Ores Basin Seismic Reflection Profile A 40 17 Ores Basin Seismic Reflection Profile B 42 18 Proposed Mechanism of Uranium Uptake in the Atlantis II Deep 59 INTRODUCTION Economic Status of Uranium in the United States...

Weber, Frederick Fewell

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

UNCORRECTEDPROOF Hydrogeology and geochemistry of near-shore submarine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rates based on tidal signal and hydraulic gradient analysis indicate a fresh submarine groundwater by Elsevier Ltd. doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2007.07.020 ARTICLE IN PRESS Please cite this article in press as: June A

330

Terrestrial planetary dynamics: a view from U, Th geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The migration of U and Th inside a planet is controlled by its oxidation state imposed by the volatile composition. In the deep interior of a planet, an absence of oxidative volatiles will cause U and Th to stay in a state of metal or low valance compounds with a big density. Consequently, they migrate to the bottom of its mantle first, and then are gradually sequestered to its liquid metal core. Earth is rich in oxidative volatiles including water, therefore, U and Th in the core can be moved up by an internal circulation system consisting of the outer core, hot super plumes, asthenosphere and subduction zone (or cold super plumes). This internal circulation system is the key for the formation of plate tectonics, the geodynamo and the consequent geomagnetic field. Moreover, plentiful oxidative volatiles and water within Earth is the precondition to form such a circulation system. In the early stage (> 4 Ga), Mars developed an Earth-like internal circulation system due to relatively large amount of oxidative volatile compositions coming from its building material. This would have produced a dynamo and correspondingly an Earth-like magnetic field. However, this internal circulation system was destroyed by one or several giant impact events in the early stage, which drove off these volatile compositions. These events also shaped the striking hemispheric dichotomy structure on the Martian surface. The other result is that its dynamo and geomagnetic field have also disappeared. Since then, Mars has been the same as Mercury and Venus in that the heat release from the U and Th in their cores can not be moved by an internal circulation system gently, but by sporadically catastrophic resurfacing events (Venus), or super plumes (Mars) or gradual heat conduction (Mercury).

Xuezhao Bao

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Isotope Geochemistry of Thermal and Nonthermal Waters in the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal fluids display a positive oxygen 18 shift of not less than 2 because of rock-water isotopic exchange at 220-300C. The Valles geothermal system is capped by a...

332

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and 15N-N2 values indicate a contribution from the mantle and a subducted sediment source in an arc volcanic setting. Authors Cathy J. Janik and Marcia K. McLaren...

333

The geochemistry of phosphate in the Mississippi River delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phase phosphorus content of Mississippi River suspended material (RSM) and deltaic sediments was observed following closely spaced sampl1ng (l. 5-2. 0 cm) of the upper 30 cm of sediment and analys1s of both the solid and dissolved phases.... This procedure allows a more deta1led picture of the early diagenesis of phosphate than previously available in this area. Deltaic sediments show an average loss of sol1d phase phosphorus ' relative to RSM of 22'A. The loss is rap1d but does not take place...

Thyne, Geoffrey Dickerson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Organic geochemistry and stable isotope constraints on Precambrian biogeochemical processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Details of the biogeochemical cycles and the dominant mechanisms present in Precambrian remain heavily debated topics. The events of the Late Proterozoic onset to glaciations and what types of early life existed in the ...

Thomas, Katherine S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Research Projects of Vincent Salters in the Geochemistry Department...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and melt generation at Mid-Ocean Ridges (ed. J. P. Morgan, D. K. Blackman, and J. M. Sinton). AGU. McKenzie D. and O'Nions R. K. (1991) Partial melt distributions from inversion...

336

Problem Set 1 Geochemistry 400-500, Fall 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by this reaction (per mole). Neglect electron masses. b. You've invented a cold fusion reactor that produces 4 He of significant figures. 1. Assume that all the sun's power comes from the fusion reaction combining four 1 H gas occupies 22.414 liters at STP. 2. Assume that all the sun's radiant power comes from the fusion

Holliday, Vance T.

337

Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

·Carnegie Institution of Washington ·NASA Goddard Space Flight Center ·University of Michigan ·Southwest's atmosphere generated? Does Mercury have ice at its poles? Combining an ultraviolet spectrometer and infrared McClintock Other organizations involved: ·The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

338

Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research continues to be the understanding of the complex processes of fossil fuel formation and migration. DOE funded research to date has focused on case histories'' of down-hole well profiles of light hydrocarbons, pyrograms, pyrolysis-GC and -GCMS parameters, and biomarker data from wells in the Louisiana and Texas Gulf Coasts the Alaskan North Slope. In the case of the Alaskan North Slope, geological data and one-dimensional maturation modeling have been integrated in order to better constrain possible source rocks, timing, and migration routes for oil and gas generation and expulsion processes.This period, biomarker analyses and organic petrographic analyses were completed for the Ikpikpuk well. In the case of the Gulf Coast, we have obtained a one-dimensional maturation model of the Cost B-1 well in E. Cameron field of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. The completed E. Cameron data set adds to the enigma of the Gulf Coast oils found on the continental shelf of Louisiana. If significant quantities of the oil are coming from relatively organic lean Tertiary rocks, then non-conventional'' expulsion and migration mechanisms, such as gas dissolved in oil must be invoked to explain the Gulf Coast oils reservoired on the Louisiana continental shelf. We are designing and starting to assemble a hydrous pyrolysis apparatus to follow, the laboratory, rates of generation and expulsion of sediment gases. Initiation of some new research to examine {delta}{sup 13}C of individual compounds from pyrolysis is also described. We are beginning to examine both the laboratory and field data from the Gulf Coast in the context of a Global Basin Research Network (GBRN). The purpose is to better understand subsurface fluid flow processes over geologic time in sedimentary basins and their relation to resource accumulation (i.e., petroleum and metal ores). 58 refs.

Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Eglinton, T.; Dickinson, P.; Johnson, C.; Buxton, L.; Tarafa, M.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measure- 15 ments. An array of conductive heat flow, conductive heat flow data indicate a general crossvalley fluid flow, where 18 seawater enters the shallow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive 23 heat flow data

Johnson, H. Paul

340

Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for eight springs along the Corral Creek drainage. The springs along Corral Creek have Na-K-Ca temperatures that average 354C, a direct result of high potassium concentrations in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a...

342

A Summary of the Geology, Geochemistry, and Geophysics of the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area, Utah Authors S. H. Ward, W. T. Parry, W. P. Nash, W. R. Sill, K. L. Cook, R. B. Smith, D. S. Chapman, F. H. Brown, J. A. Whelan and J. R. Bowman Published Journal...

343

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geochemical reaction models into numerical reservoir simulation; scaling and wellflow chemistry modification; new reservoir tracers and flow-line tracer enthalpy technology....

344

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

deep structural controls on fluid pathways in the field, which has compartmentalized the fluids and limited the degree of mixing between them. Authors Ayling, B.; Molling, P.;...

345

Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective was to study petroleum formation, migration, and accumulation in marine sediments. Collaboration in Global Basin Research Network (GBRN) showed that the hydrocarbon parameters used in oil exploration are also valuable in understanding sedimentary basin fluid flow processes, crucial to production of drinking water, metal ore deposits, and gas and oil. Two goals are : (1) to run hydrous pyrolysis experiments on immature gas-prone source rocks, in order to evaluate the potential influence of gas evolution on oil migration and subsurface pressurization, and (2) to integrate organic geochemical data from the Louisiana Gulf Coast into GBRN subsurface visualization and computer modeling. Experimental methods (petrography, EPR, thermogravimetric Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) were also studied.

Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Seewald, J.M.; Eglinton, L.B.; Zawoysky, M.; Dickinson, P.; Dickneider, T.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Petroleum geochemistry of the Kura/Iori Interfluve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plate tectonic reconstructions suggest that the Kura/Iobi Interfluve was located in a back-arc; during the Paleogene when the main sources, reservoirs and seals were deposited and structural traps created. The Lower and Upper Eocene and, to a much lesser extent, the Lower Oligocene transgressive shales are the most probable candidates for effective oil-source rocks in the area. A source evaluation was made for selected core samples from Upper Eocene, Oligocene, and Lower Miocene shales. TOC, extractable organic matter, and the Rock-Eval genetic potential for these mudstones are high enough to consider them excellent potential source rocks. Oil-oil correlations carried out via biomarkers and other conventional geochemical techniques show that both the Middle Eocene and Lowermost Upper Eocene reservoired oils are very similar to each other and suggest that they are derived from common source facies. Oil-source correlations suggest that oils were generated from Eocene shales, off-structure, and that updip migration of hydrocarbons into anticlines having middle Eocene reservoirs, was fault controlled. Thinning of the Upper Eocene section on anticlines indicates that structural growth occurred contemporaneously with trap formation. The Upper Miocene and Pliocene orogeny breached, via thrust faulting, Eocene reservoirs with {open_quote}primary{close_quote} hydrocarbon accumulation already in place. Such breaching caused {open_quotes}selective{close_quote} re-migration of {open_quotes}light ends{close_quote} into shallower Miocene reservoirs or to the surface. Oil re-migration is particularly evident in traps located close to the thrust of the Greater Caucasus.

Rinaldi, G.G.L. [Unocal Corp., Sugar Land, TX (United States); Narimanov, A.A. [State Oil Co. of the Azerbaijan Republic, Baku (Azerbaijan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

348

Petroleum geochemistry of Atrau region, Pre-Caspian Basin, Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pre-Caspian Basin covers an area of approx. 500,000 sq. km. and is characterized mainly by thick (0-5000 m) Kungurian salts. Atrau region occupies 100,000 sq.km. and is located at the southern part of the basin. Oils of this basin are found in the sub-salt (Carboniferous reefs) and supra-salts (Triassic red beds and Jurassic-Cretaceous clastics) reservoirs. Seventeen crude oil samples analyzed from different wells appear to be paraffinic and paraffinic-naphthenic type. Some of the oils hardly contained any n-alkanes, probably owing to biodegradation. Biomarker signatures of saturate and aromatic fractions and stable carbon isotopes of whole oils revealed two genetically different oil families; family I and family II. Family I was generated from clastic supra-salt sediments having immature (%Rc=0.55) terrestrial organic matter. Family II was generated from carbonate rich sub-salt sediments, containing mature (%Rc=0.65-0.80) marine organic matter. Majority of Triassic, Kungurian and Upper Cretaceous successions contained enough organic matter with considerably low total petroleum potential (S1+S2). Upper Carboniferous sediments, on the other hand, contain enough and oil prone organic matter that reached peak oil generation stage (233.1 Ma) and hydrocarbon saturation level for expulsion as a result of high sedimentation rates in the Lower to Middle Triassic succession in Kobyekovskaya-2 well. Maximum paleotemperature reached in the area was not enough for H{sub 2}S formation and cracking of already generated hydrocarbons to natural gas.

Guerge, K. [TPAO dis Projeler Grup Baskanligi, Ankara (Turkey)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Revised version Organic Geochemistry 22, 1023-1027, 1994.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Abstract- A Pliocene oil shale (Pula, Hungary), a C3 plant Triticum aestivum and a C4 plant Zea mays were-alkane, n-alkene, Pula oil shale, Botryococcus braunii, alga, plant, waxes, sediment. INTRODUCTION n-rich, Pliocene deposit from Pula (Hungary). The bulk carbon isotope ratio of this oil shale was also determined

350

1 INTRODUCTION The geochemistry of clayrocks is of current inter-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of facilities for nuclear waste (radwaste) disposal and greenhouse gas storage. The low permeability formations for greenhouse gas storage or nuclear waste disposal facilities, respectively. In this context of research on the long-term evolution of ma- terials used in the context of nuclear disposal (nu- clear glass

Boyer, Edmond

351

Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithunCenterInformationNexxus(CTIChateaugay WindIn

352

Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC JumpCrow Lake Wind Jump to: navigation, searchInformation

353

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeadovSedgwick,Hawaii | OpenCalifornia-

354

Geochemistry and Isotopes of Fluids from Sulphur Springs, Valles Caldera,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa isNew Mexico | Open

355

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector:2008)theVolcano Jump to:Gold

356

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeaugaInformation Mexico - A Survey of Work toAlutoZonesetting

357

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geochemistry Sampling for Traditional and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FOR IMMEDIATEDOEFinalFracture Networks

358

Isotope Geochemistry of Thermal and Nonthermal Waters in the Valles  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot

359

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil Jump to:IowaResource Evaluation And Reservoir Management |

360

Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6TheoreticalFuelCellGemini SolarAssetsof Thermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6TheoreticalFuelCellGemini SolarAssetsof ThermalEnergy

362

Geochemistry of Thermal Waters in Long Valley, Mono County, California |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6TheoreticalFuelCellGemini SolarAssetsof ThermalEnergy|

363

Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceInformation Surface

364

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview OfIowa/Incentives < IowaOpen Energy

365

Geochemistry of speleothem records from southern Illinois: Development of (234  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hackleyb , Brandon Curryb a Department of Geology, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, 1301 W. Green St., 245 NHB, Urbana, IL 61801, United States b Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 E. Peabody 2004; accepted 22 February 2005 Abstract Natural waters universally show fractionation of uranium

Fouke, Bruce W.

366

The marine geochemistry of iron and iron isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addressed questions about the Fe cycle by measuring detailed profiles and transects of Fe species in the ocean and also by exploring the use of a new tracer of Fe, Fe isotopic fractionation. In the subtropical ...

Bergquist, Bridget A., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Invited review article Geochemistry of subduction zone serpentinites: A review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The geochemical data of serpentinites shows little mobility of compatible and rare earth el- ements (REE, CNRS, 1381 rue de la Piscine, 38400 Grenoble Cedex 09, France c Department of Earth Sciences their subduction as well as their impact in the global geochemical cycle. When studying serpentinites

368

Geochemistry of arsenic and antimony in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spoils remain which continue to contribute arsenic to the estuary. In Puget Sound, Washington, stack dust and liquid effluent from a large copper smelter contributed 1. 5 x 108 g As/yr as fine particles, 4 x 107 g As/yr as liquid effluent and 1. 5 x... Sound is a copper smelter which raises the concentration of arsenic and antimony for the southern third of the Sound by 20/o which is transported to the sediments or mixed and diluted with Pacific water. The Tejo River estuary, Portugal has...

Tripp, Anthony Roy

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

Greg N. Boitnott

2003-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

An Opto-Electric Micropump for Saline Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel method to pump fluid in lab on chip devices with velocities up to tens of micrometer per second is introduced. A focused laser beam locally heats up an electrolyte. A net charge tends to accumulate in the heat-absorbing area, due to unequal tendencies of positive and negative ions to move in the presence of the temperature gradient. An external electric field then exerts a net force on the accumulated charge and consequently on water. This causes flow of water, with velocities up to tens of micrometer per second, for a simple NaCl+water solution. The method lets us change direction and amount of fluid pumping, simply by replacing the focal area.

Reza Kiani Iranpour; Seyyed Nader Rasuli

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

acute salinity challenges: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

challengeS in UnderStanding earth'S dynamic SyStemS January 2009 Long-range Science PLan for SeiSmoLogy WorkSmoLogicaL granD chaLLengeS in unDerStanDing earth'S Dynamic SyStemS...

372

Viruses in the plankton of freshwater and saline Antarctic lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ÂŻagellates and other protists, and thereby short-circuit the microbial loop, reducing the transfer of carbon organic carbon concentration (r 0.845, P , it is likely that viruses play a pivotal role in carbon cycling in these extreme ecosystems. Keywords

Sommaruga, Ruben

373

antarctic saline lakes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are incorporated in the authigenically formed carbonates, smectites, and micas minerals) and, probably, iron-enriched micas (ferric-illite) in surface and subsurface...

374

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas ?a, storage in aquifers in the midwestern U.S states of Illinois and Indiana and salt caverns

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

METABOLIC RESPONSES TO ENVIRONMENTAL SALINITY IN THE CLAM CORBULA AMURENSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND SPERM ACTIVATION By: Aiza Cathe A. Go, Bernadette Nera, and Mark Samson Physiology & Cell and Molecular VISUALIZATION, MINING, AND ANALYSIS OF TIME- SERIES MICROARRAY EXPERIMENTS By: Ben Dalziel Computer Science. Tanner USING HOMOLOGY TO DETECT COPY NUMBER VARIATION ASSOCIATED WITH BREAST CANCER RECURRENCE By: Daniel

376

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW: BASIN-SCALE MODELING AND SALINITY MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) (www.iwmi.org) is looking for a person with a PhD in hydrology, hydrogeology, water resources management or a related discipline, which was awarded not more than 5 years ago. The person should have an in-depth understanding of the concepts of basin water resources management

377

A linear, temperature compensated, high frequency salinity measuring device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:zsle tube is ohunteLL by n Eeriec con~Lenser-reaisto; cor. bin;. tian, C6, ;:. z'. 0 R3, ta maintop. in a relstively constant load. l. 't . 'On the aecillntor, The 3F ener', 'y trF nef SvrecL tbroujg. the solution and the x eaistor shunt ~asses... deter@in d, by 3ein, Fir se~orn, and. (5) '?loller (1/$5) sho;rs that it h; ?;a cz inverse curvature . . "th concentration (. 'ioure XI). The ainilcrity of these curves and the curves for sodium chlorMa aolu'tiona (. 'iCure 111) led...

Kelly, Minton Jones

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

algerian saline steppes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

38 Retreating or Standing: Responses of Forest Species and Steppe Species to Climate Change in Arid Eastern Central Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

379

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce...

Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed 1984-

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

-density set by salinity -non-linear equation of state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dickson, CEFAS Changes in Arctic Climate are related to the Arctic Oscillation (AO) From D.Thompson, based A CHALLENGE TO MEASURE 80N Greenland Russia Alaska Lom onosov Ridge Mendeleev Ridge Nansen-Gakkel R Eurasian 80N Greenland Russia Alaska Lom onosov Ridge Mendeleev Ridge Nansen-Gakkel R Eurasian Basin Canadian

Washington at Seattle, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

USD 307 Ell-Saline Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTagusparkCalculator Jump to: navigation, search ToolConflict

382

Saline County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI Solaris a city in Utah County, Utah.Arkansas

383

Saline County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI Solaris a city in Utah County,

384

Saline County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI Solaris a city in Utah County,County is a county in

385

Saline County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI Solaris a city in Utah County,County is a county

386

co2-saline-storage | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage CleanDiscovery of θ1cmarquardt2013 NETLSaline

387

Anisotropy and Spatial Variation of Relative Permeability and Lithologic Character of Tensleep Sandstone Reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multidisciplinary study is designed to provide improvements in advanced reservoir characterization techniques. This goal is to be accomplished through: (1) an examination of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability in the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs of Wyoming; (2) the placement of that variation and anisotropy into paleogeographic, depositional, and diagenetic frameworks; (3) the development of pore-system imagery techniques for the calculation of relative permeability; (4) reservoir simulations testing the impact of relative permeability anisotropy and spatial variation on Tensleep Sandstone reservoir enhanced oil recovery; and (5) a geochemical investigation of the spatial and dynamic alteration in sandstone reservoirs that is caused by rock-fluid interaction during CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery processes.

Dunn, Thomas L.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The lithology, environment of deposition, and reservoir properties of sandstones in the Upper Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Concho Bluff Queen Field, Crane County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In summary, since the early 19/0's, these methods discussed previously which analyze of skeletal composition have emerged and become procedures of choice for diagnosing bone disorders. These techniques are performed using either X-rays, gamma rays... INTRODUCTION Determination of bone density dates back to the early 190(ys when attempts were made to measure mineral contutt using X-rays (Hodge et aL 1935). A significant poxtion of today's research relates to the accurate determimuion of bone density...

Newsom, Douglas Floyd

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Lithologic characteristics, depositional environments and geometries of reservoir and nonreservoir facies in the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) of Moose and Virey Fields, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the stratigraphic limit of LQE halite unit ?3 28 Map of the stratigraphic limit of LQE halite unit ?4 Page . 85 . . 86 . 87 29 Net sand thickness contour map of the Middle Queen Sandstone (MQS) unit . . . 88 30 Net sand thickness contour map of the MQS 'D...' Member . . . 31 Map of the stratigraphic limit of the lower MQS halite unit . , . . . 91 32 Net sand thickness contour map of the MQS 'C' Member . . . 33 Net sand thickness contour map of the MQS 'B' Member . . . 34 Net sand thickness contour map...

Aller, Gregory Shane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The lithology, environment of deposition, and diagenesis of the Queen Formation at McFarland, McFarland North, and Magutex Queen Fields, Andrews County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the samples was examined and measured with a petrographic microscope. The detrital and authigenic minerals and visual porosity of 125 thin sections were counted across bedding using the line method, and point-counting proceeded until 100 monocrystalline... quartz grains were counted per section. The detrital grains were classified as monocrystalline quartz, polycrystalline quartz, feldspar, rock fragments, other grains, and matrix. Cements and porosity were also counted. Each component part counted...

Holley, Carolayne Elizabeth

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Petrology and Geochemistry of Neoproterozoic Arc Plutons Beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain, SRS, SC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report is presented first a brief review of the regional geologic setting of the Savannah River Site, descriptions of the plutonic rock units sampled here, whole rock geochemical data on the plutonic igneous rocks, and finally, a discussion of how the crystalline basement rocks of the Savannah River Site formed and how they may correlate with other terranes exposed in the Piedmont of the Carolinas, Georgia, and Virginia.

Maryak, M.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

Chondrule trace element geochemistry at the mineral scale Emmanuel JACQUET1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Candidate heating/forming mechanisms, such as gas-liquid condensation (e.g., Blander et al. 2004; Varela et to the chondrule melt, as in the gas-melt interaction scenario of Libourel et al. (2006). The rapid cooling rate reservoirs sampled by chondrites. It is traditionally assumed that chondrule precursors were millimeter

Demouchy, Sylvie

395

7Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 68, pp. 93-140, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the compositions of coexisting Ti3+ -bearing fassaitic clinopyroxene + melilite pairs in natural inclusions shows temperatures where diffusion of Fe2+ becomes very slow. Two dynamic models for enrichment of oxygen relative to carbon and hydrogen were investigated quantitatively: radial transport of water ice-rich migrators across

Grossman, Lawrence

396

12Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 70 pp. 533-569, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

issues for which chemical reaction kinetics play a significant role; these include carbon sequestration contamination. Let's take carbon sequestration as an example. Geological carbon sequestration--the injection to geological carbon sequestration involves the accurate prediction of reaction kinetics among CO2, brine

Zhu, Chen

397

The marine geochemistry of dissolved gallium: A comparison with dissolved aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissolved Ga concentrations in the pacific Ocean range from 2 to 30 picomolar: they are low in surface waters (2-12 pM), with a subsurface maximum at 150-300 m (6-17 pM), a mid-depth minimum from 500 to 1,000 m (4-10 pM) and increasing values with depth to a maximum in the bottom waters (12-30 pM). The highest concentrations are in the central gyre, with lower values toward the north and east where productivity and particle scavenging increase. Dissolved Ga concentrations in the surface waters of the northwest Atlantic are nearly an order of magnitude higher than in the central North pacific, with higher values in the Gulf Stream than in the continental slope boundary region. The vertical distributions and horizontal transects indicate three sources of dissolved Ga to the oceans. The surface distribution reflects an eolian source with no net fluvial input to the open ocean; the subsurface maximum (a feature not seen for North Pacific dissolved Al) is attributed to vertical exchange processes; the source for the deep waters of the North Pacific is from a sediment surface remineralization process or a pore water flux. Scavenging removal throughout the water column is evident in the vertical profiles for both dissolved Ga and Al, with intensified removal in the boundary regions where productivity and particle scavenging are at a maximum. Residence times of dissolved Ga in surface waters are nearly an order of magnitude longer than the corresponding values for Al.

Orians, K.J.; Bruland, K.W. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (USA))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Crustal and upper mantle structure beneath1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Southampton, Southampton, U.K. 8 Yemen Geological Survey and mineral Resources Board, Sana'a, Yemen. 9 Sana] and how it is connected with global mantle flow [e.g.30 Montelli et al., 2006; Boschi et al., 2007, 2008

Boyer, Edmond

399

Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L.W. 1982. Factors affecting the corrosion of metals inatmosphere, Atmospheric Corrosion, Ed. W.H. Ailov, New York.P. , Minet, Y. 2007. Iron corrosion in Callovo–Oxfordian

Xu, T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Inorganic geochemistry of Devonian shales in southern West Virginia: geographic and stratigraphic trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of cuttings from twenty-one wells and a core from a single well in southern West Virginia were analyzed for major and minor elements: silicon, aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, titanium, phosphorus, manganese, sulfur, zinc, and strontium. Stratigraphic and geographic controls on elemental abundances were studied through canonical correlations, factor analyses, and trend surface analyses. The most abundant elements, silicon and aluminum, show gradual trends through the stratigraphic column of most wells, with silicon increasing and aluminum decreasing up-section. Other elements such as calcium, sulfur, and titanium change abruptly in abundance at certain stratigraphic boundaries. Important geographic trends run east-west: for instance, one can see an increase in sulfur and a decrease in titanium to the west; and a decrease in silicon from the east to the central part of the study area, then an increase further west. Although observed vertical trends in detrital minerals and geographic patterns in elemental abundances agree with the accepted view of a prograding delta complex during Late Devonian time, geographically-local, time restricted depositional processes influenced elemental percentages in subsets of the wells and the stratigraphic intervals studied. The black shales of lower Huron age do not represent simply a return of depositional conditions present in the earlier Rhinestreet time; nor do the gray shales of the Ohio Shale represent the same environmental conditions as the Big White Slate.

Hohn, M.E.; Neal, D.W.; Renton, J.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Tertiary igneous rocks of the Eagle Mountains, Van Horn, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alkaline Ign ~ ~ cons ~ ~ ~ Rocks 21 42 D I S CUSS I QN e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Petrogenesis 50 50 Source magma. Fractionation . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 50 52 Origin of West Texas Nagmas... of Permian and Cretaceous age. The only Permian rocks in the area are represented by the Hueco Limestone Formation. The Cretaceous System, however, is represented by the entire Comanche and Gulf Series (Fig. 2). The Hueco Formation is of marine origin...

Nelson, Ronald Alan

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The distribution and geochemistry of iridium in river suspended material and marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sapropels and Mid-Cretaceous Marine Black Shales Sources of Iridium The Argument for Iridium Enhancement in the Deep-Sea by Geochemical Processes: Ferromanganese Nodules SUMMARF AND CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C APPENDIX... Samples weighing from 0. 1 to 0. 5 grams were accurately weighed into 2/5 dram attached cap polyethlylene vials and sealed. Standards consisting of USGS standard rocks GSP-1 and AGV-1 and an in-house standar- dized marine sediment were prepared...

Fenner, Frederick Donald

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Isotopic and trace element geochemistry of lavas from the northern Mariana and southern volcano arcs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples from submarine volcanoes and islands were analyzed for concentrations of K, Rb, Sr, Ba, REE, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and some selected samples for {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd. These data show strong variations along the arc, being relatively depleted in the tholeiitic and low-K calc-alkaline volcanoes of the Volcano Arc (VA) and the Mariana Central Island Province (CIP). All of the Mariana Northern Seamount Province (NSP) and Volcano arc Iwo Jima (IJ) are enriched in LIL and LREE, particularly in the northern half, where the lavas have strong shoshonitic affinities. Chemical characteristics of these lavas suggest source- or melt-mixing, with the NSP shoshonites being derived from a LIL- and LREE-enriched OIB-like source or melt, while Mariana CIP and Volcano Arc melts are derived from a depleted MORB-like mangle that has been recharged with K, Rb, Sr and Ba by hydrous fluids. Neodymium and strontium isotopic data reveal {var epsilon}{sub Nd} values ranging from +2.4 to +9.5 and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr from 0.70320 to 0.70405. Anomalous trends of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and Ba/La found in some S-NSP lavas suggest that the addition of a sedimentary component may be superimposed on the two component mixing. The lavas from the Mariana and Volcano arcs, therefore, are interpreted as resulting from mixing of at least three components. The bulk of the lavas derive from an OIB-like mantle source (or melt) mixing with various proportions of a metasomatized depleted mantle source (or melt). These hybrid sources may be contaminated with minor amounts of subducted sediment and fluxed by multistage-fractionated metasomatic fluid which is derived from subducted sediment and slab after the mixing of the first two components.

Lin Pingnan.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 Investigation of physical, chemical and microbiological processes in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of rings: one centred on a hydrogen sulphide source and another on a methane source. Test-tubes are being or bedrock. Large accumulations of shallow, biogenic methane are estimated to account for 85% of northern accumulations of bitumen, coal and dissolved hydrogen sulphide (Hamilton & Hattori, 2008). The reducing source

405

Geochemistry of selected oils and rocks from the central portion of the West Siberian basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six analyzed oils, produced from Middle jurassic to Upper Cretaceous strata in the Middle Ob region of the West Siberian basin, show biomarker and stable carbon isotope compositions indicating an origin from the Upper Jurassic Bazhenov Formation. The chemical compositions of these oils are representative of more than 85% of the reserves in West Siberia (Kontorovich et al., 1975). Bazhenov-sourced oil in Cenomanian strata in the Van-Egan field underwent biodegradation in the reservoir, resulting in a low API gravity, an altered homohopane distribution, and the appearance of 25-norhopanes without alteration of the steranes. High API gravity oil from the Salym field has surpassed the peak of the oil window, consistent with abnormally high temperatures and pressures in the Bazhenov source rock from which it is produced. The remaining oils are very similar, including samples from Valanginian and Bathonian-Callovian intervals in a sequence of stacked reservoirs in the Fedorov field. Bazhenov rock samples from the study area contain abundant oil-prone, marine organic matter preserved under anoxic conditions. While the Upper Jurassic Vasyugan Formation shows lower oil-regenerative potential than the Bazhenov Formation, it cannot be excluded as a source rock because insufficient sample was available for biomarker analysis. Core from the Lower to Middle Jurassic Tyumen Formation in the YemYegov 15 well was compared with the oils because it is thermally mature and shows TOC and HI values, indicating slightly more favorable oil-generative characteristics than the average for the formation (2.75 wt. % for 270 samples; 95 mg HC/g TOC for 25 samples). The core contains terrigenous, gas-prone organic matter that shows no relationship with the analyzed oils. 59 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs.

Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Kontorovich, A.Eh.; Andrusevich, V.E. (Inst. of Geology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)); Moldowan, J.M. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)); Demaison, G.J. (Petroscience Inc., Walnut Creek, CA (United States)); Stasova, O.F. (NPO SIBGEO, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

GEOCHEMISTRY AND 40 AR GEOCHRONOLOGY OF IMPACT-MELT CLASTS IN LUNAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-melt clasts in lunar meteorites [1, 2]. The dissimilarity of DaG262 and Calcalong Creek impact-melt clasts clasts, melt veins and metal grains. Calcalong Creek [4] is a polymict breccia containing sub-mm clasts of both highlands and mare affinity welded by a glassy, vesicular matrix. It is unusual among lunar

Cohen, Barbara Anne

407

Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

PART II, Tackling Grand Challenges in Geochemistry: Q&A with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for scientific research and industrial development, and HFIR is a powerful reactor-based source. We use these in a couple of ways. One way (at HFIR) relies on the fact that...

409

Geochemistry of Natural Components in the Near-Field Environment, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural near-field environment in and around the emplacement drifts of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, includes the host rock, dust, seepage, and pore water. The chemical compositions of these components have been determined for assessing possible chemical and mineralogical reactions that may occur after nuclear waste is emplaced. The rock hosting the proposed repository is relatively uniform as shown by a mean coefficient of variation (CV) of 9 percent for major elements. In contrast, compositional variations of dust (bulk and water-soluble fractions), pore water, and seepage are large with mean CVs ranging from 28 to 64 percent. (authors)

Peterman, Zell E. [Yucca Mountain Project Branch, U.S. Geological Survey, MS 963 Box 25046 Denver Federal Center, 6th and Kipling Sts., Denver, CO, 80225 (United States); Oliver, Thomas A. [c/o U.S. Geological Survey, S.M. Stoller Corporation, MS 421 Box 25046 Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO, 80225 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effects of pore-scale physics on uranium geochemistry in Hanford sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overall, this work examines a key scientific issue, mass transfer limitations at the pore-scale, using both new instruments with high spatial resolution, and new conceptual and modeling paradigms. The complementary laboratory and numerical approaches connect pore-scale physics to macroscopic measurements, providing a previously elusive scale integration. This Exploratory research project produced five peer-reviewed journal publications and eleven scientific presentations. This work provides new scientific understanding, allowing the DOE to better incorporate coupled physical and chemical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship.

Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

411

Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Pb, Zn and Ag Mine Tailings Originating From Carbonate-Rich Deposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mining for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico has been ongoing since 1576. Unsecured tailings heaps and associated acid mine drainage have presented problems related to soil quality, water quality, and dust emission...

McClure, Roberta 1981-

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nicolas F. Spycher Staff Geological Scientist Earth Sciences Division, Geochemistry Department ph. 510 495-2388  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Pruess, K., 2010. A Phase-partitioning model for CO2-brine mixtures at elevated temperatures geological sequestration on groundwater quality, U(VI) transport and reactive chemistry at contaminated DOE sites, metal cycling in contaminated lake sediments, and the study of coupled thermal, hydrological

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

414

Trace-element geochemistry of gradient hole cuttings: Beowawe geothermal area, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from 26 shallow temperature-gradient drill holes and of surface rock samples reveals trace element distributions developed within these rocks as a consequence of chemical interaction with thermal fluid within the Beowawe geothermal area. The presently discharging thermal fluids are dilute in all components except silica, suggesting that the residence time of these fluids within the thermal reservoir has been short and that chemical interaction with the reservoir rock minimal. Interaction between these dilute fluids and rocks within the system has resulted in the development of weak chemical signatures. The absence of stronger signatures in rocks associated with the present system suggests that fluids have had a similar dilute chemistry for some time. The spatial distribution of elements commonly associated with geothermal systems, such as As, Hg and Li, and neither laterally nor vertically continuous. This suggests that there is not now, nor has there been in the past, pervasive movement of thermal fluid throughout the sampled rock but, instead, that isolated chemical anomalies represent distinct fluid-flow chanels. Discontinuous As, Li and Hg concentrations near White Canyon to the east of the presently active surface features record the effects of chemical interaction of rocks with fluids chemically unlike the presently discharging fluids. The observed trace element distributions suggest that historically the Beowawe area has been the center of more than one hydrothermal event and that the near-surface portion of the present hot-water geothermal system is controlled by a single source fracture, the Malpais Fault, or an intersection of faults at the sinter terrace.

Christensen, O.D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Organic geochemistry and correlation of Paleozoic source rocks and Trenton crude oils, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shale samples from four cores of the New Albany and Antrim Shales (Devonian) and from six cores of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician), representing a broad geographic area of Indiana, have been analyzed for total organic carbon, total sulfur, pyrolysis yield (Rock-Eval), bitumen content, and illite crystallinity data. These data indicate that the New Albany, Antrim, and Maquoketa shales contain a sufficient quantity and quality of organic matter to be good petroleum source rocks. Bitumen ratios, Rock-Eval yields, gas chromatography of saturated hydrocarbons, and illite crystallinity data show that the Maquoketa shales have reached a higher level of thermal maturity than the New Albany and Antrim shales. The level of thermal maturity of the Maquoketa shales suggested a maximum burial depth considerably greater than the present depth.

Guthrie, J. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE ReSULTS AND PRELIMINARYG~UUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE K~SULTS AND PRELIMINARYPermeability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine and

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.07.010 Geochemistry of a chert breccia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12, 2004) Abstract--A complex history of diagenetic interactions between a siliceous sediment are carried by apatite, trapped as detritus in the matrix. The concentration of lithium in the matrix is high

Yehoshua, Kolodny

418

Geohydrology and groundwater geochemistry at a sub-arctic landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough, Alaska, landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperature, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of groundwater flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water supply wells. 11 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

10Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 59, pp. 233-258, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e., they can be assigned to a defined group of organisms, and are resistant to degradation. Reading in the water column (e.g., Summons and Powell 1986), the intensity of UV radiation penetrating lakes (Leavitt dioxide and water (Hedges and Keil 1995). The biological degradation of most proteins, nucleic acids

Brocks, Jochen J.

420

Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source of geothermal energy, is ulti- 0024-4937/$ - see front matter D 2005 Published by Elsevier BGeochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges Axel K Potsdam, Germany c Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati, Philippines Received 1 May 2004; accepted 25 May

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Method Precision (%)C Method Precision(%)C Atomic absorptionAtomic absorptionAtomic absorption Atomic absorption Phot omet ri c

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale water O2interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in ourfield study.

Jin, Lixin [University of Texas at El Paso] [University of Texas at El Paso; Ryan, Mathur [Juniata College, Huntingdon] [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University; Alex, Carone [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale-water-O2 interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in our field study.

Jin, Lixin [ORNL; Mathur, Ryan [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University; Carone, Alex [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Brantley, Susan L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Light hydrocarbon geochemistry of brines and sediments of the red sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- creased from 0. 34'C/yr for the period 1965-1966 to 0, 75'C/y for the years 1971 ? ]972, indicating that the Atlantis II Deep is at the beginning of a discharge period. Host recent measurements indicate a temperature of &61'C [Ross, 1977] and chlorinity... 'involved an equi] ibrat. ion pro" e:!urc in conjunctior. with headspace sampling. Although the hot ?stets cooled con & derably from t1&e& r in si. '&, temperatu& e. upon ascent. from the depths, they were. stiJ 1 very warm at the time. of sa?&pl. !. ng...

Burke, Roger Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wednesday, March 14, 2007 MARS SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY: VIEW FROM THE SURFACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Golombek M. Parker T. Squyres S. W. Sullivan R. Structure and Sedimentology of the Western Margin of Erebus Crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars [#2235] The structure, stratigraphy and sedimentology of two outcrops

Rathbun, Julie A.

426

Sulfur geochemistry of thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment from the Texas-Louisiana continental slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total reduced sulfide (TRS), acid volatile sulfide, and citrate-dithionate and HCl extractable iron. Pore-fluid measurements included []H?S, chloride, sulfate, ammonia and total dissolved inorganic carbon. Gas hydrate hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide...

Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0.25- to D.5-liter plastic bottles, which were thoroughlycollected in two I-liter plastic bottles. The new bottles~ twenty I-liter plastic bottles were rinsed and filled with

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant Behavior in EGS Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: Develop Improved Methods For Maintaining Permeable Fracture Volumes In EGS Reservoirs.

429

Geochemistry of coal from Cretaceous Corwin and Chandler formations, National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ninety coal samples from these formations within NPRA were collected and analyzed in order to evaluate coal quality and elemental distribution. Their apparent rank ranges from lignite A in the northern part of NPRA to high-volatile AS bituminous coal in the southern part. Mean vitrinite reflectance values range from 0.65 to 0.74%. Some Corwin Formation coal samples west of NPRA have coking potential with free-swelling indexes between 3.0 and 5.0. Compared to other western United States Cretaceous coal, NPRA coal is significantly lower in ash, volatile matter, O, Si, Al, Ca, Fe, Ti, Cu, F, Li, Mn, Mo, Pb, Sb, Se, Th, and Zn. Statistical comparisons of element concentrations indicate that the mean content of Si, Al, K, Li, Sc, Y, and Yb increases as the mean ash content increases (correlation coefficient at least 0.7). Sulfur values are extremely low (0.1%), and elements that normally show positive correlation with sulfur, such as Fe, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mo, Pb, and Zn, are also low. Therefore, coal from NPRA can be characterized by low ash and sulfur contents and low contents of elements of environmental concern, such as As, Be, Hg, Mo, Sb, and Se. The elements found to have positive correlations with ash content are probably present as aluminosilicate or stable oxide minerals. Variations in element content and quality of NPRA coal were probably influenced by the geochemical conditions that existed in the Corwin and Umiat delta systems.

Affolter, R.H.; Stricker, G.D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

tice sites of calcium carbonate and affect Mars' soil geochemistry, and calcium carbonate can  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that carbonate could form in relatively dry Mars-like conditions as submi- crometer coatings on soil particles (5. 17. In a calibration run on the TEGA engineering qualification model with a known amount of calcite plumbing surfaces. The sol 70 run shows that this effect is not due to a background signal. 20. A martian

Kounaves, Samuel P.

431

Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Applied to the Monitoring, Verification of Carbon Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This award was a training grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this award was solely to provide training for two PhD graduate students for three years in the general area of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The training consisted of course work and conducting research in the area of CCS. Attendance at conferences was also encouraged as an activity and positive experience for students to learn the process of sharing research findings with the scientific community, and the peer review process. At the time of this report, both students have approximately two years remaining of their studies, so have not fully completed their scientific research projects.

Swart, Peter

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Geochemistry of Samples from Borehole C3177(299-E24-21)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of geochemical and physical property analyses of twelve samples from the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) borehole #2. The borehole is in the middle of the 200 East Area, at the northeast corner of the ILAW disposal site.

Horton, Duane G.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Parker, Kent E.

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

Linking Molecular Microbiology and Geochemistry to Better Understand Microbial Ecology in Coastal Marine Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overall objective of the research presented here was to combine multiple geochemical parameters and molecular characterizations to provide a novel view of active microbial community ecology of sediments in a large-river deltaic estuary...

Reese, Brandi Kiel

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

Geochemistry and arsenic behaviour in groundwater resources of the Pannonian Basin (Hungary and Romania)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Romania) Helen A.L. Rowland a,d, , Enoma O. Omoregie b , Romain Millot c , Cristina Jimenez d,e , Jasmin Faculty of Environmental Sciences, University of Babes-Bolyai, Cluj Napoca, Romania e Institute handling by R. Fuge a b s t r a c t Groundwater resources in the Pannonian Basin (Hungary, Romania, Croatia

Wehrli, Bernhard

435

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Ca++ and Ba++ chemistry, and uranium solution is redoxchemistry samples collect dissolved gas samples collect uraniumUranium-238 Helium-4 and other noble gases. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 3.1 Groundwater Chemistry

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

m)T7(T^/f^\\ \\ / Riso-R-430 The Geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, stability-diagrams for the transuranium elements from uranium to americium under diverse conditions have is discussed, and recent experimental data are presented. INIS Descriptors: ACTINIDES, ADSORPTION, AMERICIUM-LEVEL HASTE 22 Uranium 31 Neptunium 35 Plutonium 38 Americium 41 CHEMISTRY OF TECHNETIUM 44 ADSORPTION

437

Chemie der Erde 67 (2007) 151174 Petrology, geochemistry and zircon age for redwitzite at Abertamy,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at about 322 Ma. The granitic melts have been so far mainly interpreted to be formed by heat supply from

Siebel, Wolfgang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Strontium isotope geochemistry of soil and playa deposits near Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic composition of strontium contained in the carbonate fractions of soils provides an excellent tracer which can be used to test models for their origin. This paper reports data on surface coatings and cements, eolian sediments, playas and alluvial fan soils which help to constrain a model for formation of the extensive calcretes and fault infilling in the Yucca Mountain region. The playas contain carbonate with a wide range of strontium compositions; further work will be required to fully understand their possible contributions to the pedogenic carbonate system. Soils from an alluvial fan to the west of Yucca Mountain show that only small amounts of strontium are derived from weathering of silicate detritus. However, calcretes from a fan draining a carbonate terrane have strontium compositions dominated locally by the limestone strontium component. Although much evidence points to an eolian source for at least some of the strontium in the pedogenic carbonates near Yucca Mountain, an additional component or past variation of strontium composition in the eolian source is required to model the pedogenic carbonate system.

Marshall, B.D.; Mahan, S.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Petrology, geochemistry, and palynology of Joggins Formation (Westphalian A) coals, Cumberland basin, Nova Scotia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five Westphalian A coals were collected from the Joggins Formation section exposed along Chignecto Bay at Joggins, Nova Scotia. Several of the coal beds along the bay were mined beginning in the early 17th century. There has been little detailed investigation of the coal beds of this classic section. The lowermost coal, the Upper Coal 29 (Fundy), is a high-vitrinite coal with a spore assemblage dominated by arboreous lycopod spores with tree ferns subdominant. The upper portions of the coal bed have the highest ratio of well-preserved to poorly-preserved telinite of any of the coals investigated. Coal 19 (Forty Brine) has 88% total vitrinite but, unlike the Fundy coal bed, the telinite has a poor preservation ratio and half of the total vitrinite population comprises gelocollinite and vitrodetrinite. The latter coal bed is directly overlain by a basin-wide limestone bed. The Lower Kimberly (Coal 15) shows good preservation of vitrinite with relatively abundant telinite among the total vitrinite. The Upper Kimberly, which underlies the tetrapod-bearing lycopsid trees found by Lyell and Dawson in 1852, exhibits an upward decrease in arboreous lycopod spores and an increase in the tree fern spore Punctatisporites minutus. The megaspore record is similarly dominated by Lagenicularugosa paralycopodites and tree fern spores. Telinite preservation increases upwards in the Upper Kimberly but overall is well below the preservation ratio of the Fundy coal bed. The coals are all high sulfur, up to 13.7% total sulfur for the lower lithotype of the Fundy coal bed. The Kimberly coals are not only high in total and pyritic sulfur, but also have high concentrations of chalcophile elements.

Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States); Calder, J.H. [Nova Scotia Dept. of Natural Resources, Halifax (Canada); Cortland, F.E. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon... interests. References 1. Marini, L. Geochemical Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. (Elsevier 2007). 2. IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, edited by Metz B. et al. (Cambridge University Press, UK and New York, USA, 2005). 3. Falkowski...

Cardoso, S. S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Geology, volcanology and geochemistry Drainage pattern and regional morphostructure at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83 Guillaume Bardin, Jean-Paul Raynal, Guy Kieffer Volcanic markers in coarse alluvium at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ....................................................103 Gérard Poupeau, Guy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mallants, D. , 2002. Gas generation and migration in Boomof Post-Disposal Gas Generation in a Repository for SpentCorrosion-Induced Gas Generation in a Nuclear Waste

Xu, T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Organic geochemistry and source rock characteristics of the Zagros Petroleum Province, southwest Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Zagros sector of SW Iran and its continuation into N Iraq forms the tectonized NE margin of the Middle East basin. Sedimentation in the Zagros began in the late Precambrian and continued with comparatively few interruptions until the Pliocene, when strong earth movements affected the area and gave rise to the present day large, elongated NW-SE trending structures. Some of the world's largest structurally-controlled oil fields are located in the Zagros. The most productive pay zone is the Oligo-Miocene Asmari Formation, although significant oil pools are present also in the Cenomanian-Turonian Sarvak limestone and in the Neocomian-Jurassic Khami Group carbonates. Recently, large gas deposits have been discovered in the Permo-Triassic carbonates assigned to the Deh Ram Group. Geochemical studies were carried out in five potential source beds of Eocene-Palaeocene (Pabdeh Formation), Maestrichtian-Campanian (Gurpi Formation), Albian (Kazhdumi Formation), Coniacian-Neocomian (Garau Formation) and Silurian (Gahkum Formation) age. The results showed that the organic matter in these formations is almost exclusively of marine algal origin, and that the Kazhdumi is the major source of the hydrocarbons in the Asmari and Sarvak reservoirs. The origin of the hydrocarbons in the Khami and Deh Ram reservoirs is at present speculative. 19 figures, 1 table.

Ala, M.A.; Kinghorn, R.R.F.; Rahman, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

APPLICATIONS OF HIGH RESOLUTION NMR TO GEOCHEMISTRY: CRYSTALLINE, GLASS, AND MOLTEN SILICATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tremoll e LIAI[S12°6 ) (spodumene) LI AI[ 5I 20~ ) (spoduemelithium feldspar, jadeite, spodumene, nepheline, cordler-

Schneider, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Geochemistry of the Yegua Aquifer system and its relation to microbial processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in southwestern North Dakota and northwestern South Dakota They noted a decrease in sulfate and an increase in HS- along the hydrologic flow path. In a study of the Black Creek aquifer in South Carolina, Chapelle and McMahon (1991) found evidence that sulfate... in South Carolina, Fredrickson et aL (1991) found higher viable counts in the coarse sands of the Middendorf formation than in the fine sands of the Cape Fear formation, or in lignites and lignite-sands. Also, at the Savannah River Site higher numbers...

Schlichenmeyer, Jeannette Leone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Geochemistry and mineralogy of fly-ash from the Mae Moh lignite deposit, Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concentration of 21 elements in fly ash from three boilers (75 MW, 150 MW, and 300 MW) at the EGAT power plant, Mae Moh, Thailand, were determined by INAA. The concentration of 10 major elements was determined by XRF. As, Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, and Sb generally increase in concentration going from bottom ash (BA) through the sequence of electrostatic precipitator ashes (ESPA) and reach maxima of As (352 ppm), Co (45 ppm), Cr (105 ppm), Mo (32 ppm), Ni (106 ppm), and Sb (15 ppm) in the ESPA. Ce, Cs, Fe, Hf, La, Sc, Ta, Tb, and Yb did not exhibit concentration trends or are variable except in the case of one boiler, which showed an increase going from BA to ESPA. Only Br decreased in composition going from BA to ESPA. Rb, Sm, U, and Th showed marked variation in trends. The major elements identified by EDS were Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Fe, and Ba, with minor amounts of Mg, Na, Ti, Mn, and Sr. Al, Si, K, and Ca occur together and are present in most of the fly-ash particles. Ba was found as a major component with Ca, Al, and Si. Fe and Ca are usually associated with sulfur. Some small spheres (< 5 {mu}m) are comprised almost entirely of Fe (probably as oxide). Symplectite textures are noted in high-Fe phases. All elements except Br are significantly enriched in the fly ash relative to the coal, which contains 35% ash. Particle chemistry is consistent with the major mineral phases identified by XRD, which include: quartz, magnetite, mullite, gehlenite, anorthite, hematite, anhydrite, and clinopyroxene.

Hart, B.R.; Powell, M.A.; Fyfe, W.S. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Ratanasthien, B. [Univ. of Chaing Mai (Thailand). Dept. of Geology

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

10Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry Vol. 68, pp. 219-246, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105-2143, U on protosolar abundances, relying on three-dimensional spectroscopic modeling of the solar photosphere, provides satellite densities shows that Saturn's icy satellites are inconsistent with solar composition, and must

Atreya, Sushil

449

A Summary of the Geology, Geochemistry, and Geophysics of the Roosevelt Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey FlatshydroMultiple Geothermal

450

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt LakeWashtenawInformation Henkle, EtEnergyCalifornia.

451

PART II, Tackling Grand Challenges in Geochemistry: Q&A with Andrew Stack |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012)

452

Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent6894093° Loading69. ItLewickiMaui

453

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 NoSan Leandro,LawFEMA - National FloodHYDROGEOLOGICAL

454

Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6TheoreticalFuelCellGemini SolarAssetsof ThermalEnergy| Open

455

Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6TheoreticalFuelCellGemini SolarAssetsof ThermalEnergy|Energy

456

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen, Minnesota:36052°,Sunfield,FarmsSupport Resources,| OpenZones Of High

457

The Geochemistry of the HGP-A Geothermal Well: A Review and an Update |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:Information 'Grand Paris'Book:OpenOpen Energy

458

Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

Dole, LR

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

459

1529-6466/00/0052-0001$05.00 Introduction to U-series Geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parks Road Oxford, OX1 3PR, United Kingdom 4 Department of Geology University of Illinois at Urbana of plate tectonic theory. These leaps in knowledge moved geology from its largely descriptive origins, with widespread application in disciplines as diverse as modern oceanography and igneous petrology. The uranium

Henderson, Gideon

460

The biostratigraphy, palaeoecology and geochemistry of a long lacustrine sequence from NW Greece  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this Study 5 1.4.1 The Last Interglacial 5 1.4.2 The Last Glacial - Holocene Transition 5 1.5 Organisation of this Report 6 1.6 Conventions 7 2. PHYSICAL SETTING 2.1 Study Site 9 2.2 Regional Geology 9 2.3 Basin Evolution 13 2.4 Climate 15 2.5 Basin... III excursion 90 504.10 Emperor excursion 92 504.11 Big Lost excursion 92 5.5 Amino Acid Epimerization Data 93 5.6 Uranium-Series Dating 95 5.7 Tephra 97 5.8 Summary and Proposed Age Model 99 FAUNAL BIOSTRATIGRAPHY AND MODERN ASSEMBLAGES 6...

Frogley, Michael Reginald

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

Graham, David W. (David William)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

NdHfSrPb isotopes and trace element geochemistry of Proterozoic lamproites from southern India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compositions. The Krishna lamproites show nearly uniform, parallel rare earth element (REE) distribution,, Dalim K. Paul b a Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY India, a rare Proterozoic occurrence of lamproites which are usually Cretaceous or younger in age

Basu, Asish R.

463

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time  Water  Quality  Management  in  the  Grassland  real-­?time  water  quality  management.     Environmental  Water  Quality  Management  …………………………………. ……..………..    

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to  a  common  drain   Solar  Panels  with  12-­?volt  by   10   Watt   solar   panels   fixed   to   the  Ducky  Strike  South   Solar  Panels  with  12-­?volt  

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

real-­?time  water  quality  management.     Environmental  real-­?time  water  quality  management.     Environmental  Management  of  Water  Quality  in  the  San   Joaquin  River.    California  Environmental  

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Three-Dimensional Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Salinity in the San Francisco Estuary: An Evaluation of Model Accuracy, X2, and the Low–Salinity Zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grid along the San Joaquin River between Prisoners Point and the junction with Middle River (location indicated by red square in map

MacWilliams, Michael L.; Bever, Aaron J.; Gross, Edward S.; Ketefian, Gerard S.; Kimmerer, Wim J.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trimble  GPS  and  Allegro  logging  unit.   Figure  the   survey   on   the   Allegro   Cx.   The  software  on  a  Juniper   Systems  Allegro  Cx,  a  rugged,  hand-­?

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System  for  Real-­?Time  Management  of  Water  Quality  Management  of  hydrologic  systems  for  water  quality  system  development  for  seasonal  wetland  salt   management  in  a  river  basin  subjected  to  water  quality  

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this  study  the  “treatment  wetland  ”  has  continued  wetland   impoundment,   and   a   treatment   (

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

GEOBULLETIN GeoBulletin is distributed weekly, by E-mail. Contributions are requested!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Geography at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt invites applications · Assistant Professor, Sedimentology for a faculty position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry · Post-doc in experimental petrology - U geochemistry, low-temperature geochemistry, mineralogy, paleoclimatology, sedimentology and stratigraphy

Carlson, Anders

471

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Lithology and cyclicity in the deposition of the Middle Ordovician McKee Sand member of the Tulip Creek Formation (Simpson Group) in the Tobosa Basin of Southeast New Mexico and West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lower Paleozoic rocks deposited on the inner craton of North America are characterized by thick sections of carbonate rocks separated by thin units of sandstones and shales. The origins of these sandstones are poorly understood...

Bosco, Michael John

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The lithology, environment of deposition, and reservoir evaluation of sandstones in the Upper Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Concho Bluff North and Jennifer Fields, Upton and Ector Counties, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE LI THOLOGY g ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOS ITION g AND RESERVOIR EVALUATION OF SANDSTONES IN THE UPPER QUEEN FORMATION (GUADALUPIAN, PERMIAN) AT CONCHO BLUFF NORTH AND JENNIFER F I ELDS g UPTON AND ECTOR COUNT I ES ~ TEXAS A Thesis by JAMES BROOX... EVALUATION OF SANDSTONES IN THE UPPER QUEEN FORMATION (GUADALUPIAN, PERMIAN) AT CONCHO BLUFF NORTH AND JENNIFER F IELDS ~ UPTON AND ECTOR COUNT I ES g TEXAS A Thesis by JAMES BROOX HARPER Approved as to style and content by: Jame (Chair Mazzullo...

Harper, James Broox

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

The effect of environmental salinity on organoleptic characteristics of penaeid shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acids (FAA) more so than from inorganic iona (Siebers et al. , 1972; Virkar and Webb, 1970; Weber and Van Marrewijk, 1972; Schoffeniels and Gilles, 1970). The remainder of the osmotically active components are low molecular weight organic com- pounds... Eriocheir sinensis ala, arg, glu, gly, pro, tau Vincent-Marique and Gilles, 1970 Eriocheir sineneis ala, glu, gly, pro, tau Virkar and Webb, 1970 ~M a arenaria ala, arg, glu, gly, tau, ornithine Weber and Van Marrewijk, 1972 ~Cran on ~crau on ala, gly...

Papadopoulos, Linda Suter

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Surface chemistry of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron and electrochemistry study in gas-flow physiological saline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,9 was about an early failure owing to insufficient strength caused by hydrogen embrittlement or agingSurface chemistry of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron and electrochemistry study in gas. The contact angle test with water and glycerol droplets shows a smaller angle (though >90 ) of NC-Fe than

Zheng, Yufeng

477

Manual on Conditional Reliability, Daily Time Step, Flood Control, and Salinity Features of WRAP (Draft)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

files describing the hydrology and the water management facilities and practices for the river basin or region of concern along with other related information. The programs are connected through input/output files. Certain programs create files... ......................................................................................................... 245 LIST OF FIGURES 2.1 System Schematic for the Example ................................................................................. 22 3.1 Stream Flow Hydrograph and Water Management Targets...

Wurbs, Ralph

478

Effect of Saline Waste Solution Infiltration Rates on Uranium Retention and Spatial Distribution in Hanford Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of vadose zone sediment: Borehole 299-E33-of contaminated Hanford sediments. Environmental Science andU(VI)-contaminated Hanford sediment. Geochimica Cosmochimica

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Waterflood and Enhanced Oil Recovery Studies using Saline Water and Dilute Surfactants in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to decrease the residual oil saturation. In calcareous rocks, water from various resources (deep formation, seawater, shallow beds, lakes and rivers) is generally injected in different oil fields. The ions interactions between water molecules, salts ions, oil...

Alotaibi, Mohammed

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

480

Stability Analysis for a Saline Boundary Layer Formed by Uniform Up ow Using Finite Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density in the deeper underground and high salt water density at the boundary layer), gravitation plays and Darcy's law. In this report we #12;rst give an overview of semi-analytical methods to analyse

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lithology geochemistry salinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

SALINITY AND TEMPERATURE IN SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY, CALIFORNIA, AT DUMBARTON BRIDGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Control Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 iii #12;Fig. 7. Time-series plot of daily RMS (root . . . . . 19 Fig. 2. Time-series plot of yearly total precipitation for the 1850-2002 water years (October Jose-Santa Clara Water pollution control plant for 1976-2002 from monthly reports to the Regional Water

482

Stress tolerance of a subtropical Crassostrea virginica population to the combined effects of temperature and salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roesijadi a,1 a Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA b Department of Mathematical Sciences, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA a r t i c l e i n (USEPA,1987; Barnes et al., 2007); restoration and maintenance of the local population of C. virginica

Qian, Lianfen

483

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE USE OF ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY FOR THE ANALYSES OF LEAD IN SALINE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) oceanographic cruise in thepurposes at two prospective OTEC prototype platform sites in

Case, Charles W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Workshop in honor of Antoine Salin: Recent advances on the dynamics of atomic and molecular particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Universidad de Rosario, Argentina) Alducin, Maite (Donostia International Physics Center, Spain) Arasa, Carina (Universidad de Barcelona, Spain) Arnau, Andrés (Universidad del País Vasco, Spain) Bauer, Peter (JKU Linz Physics Center, Spain) Crespos, Cédric (Université de Bordeaux I, France) Díaz, Cristina (University

Muiño, Ricardo Díez

485

Simultaneous removal of organic matter and salt ions from saline wastewater in bioelectrochemical systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in physical and chemical separation processes such as ion-exchange, electrodialysis, or reverse osmosis [1

486

Ammonium Bicarbonate Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes for Salinity Gradient Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as reverse electrodialysis (RED) rely on highly selective anion transport through polymeric anion exchange to address global energy needs, such as reverse electro- dialysis1-4 (RED), capacitive energy extraction based on Donnan potential5 (CDP), and capacitive reverse electro- dialysis6 (CRED), has encouraged

487

Integrated salinity reduction and water recovery in an osmotic microbial desalination cell{  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and vapor compression.1 Membrane technol- ogy driven by electric energy includes reverse osmosis, membrane distillation, and electrodialysis.2,3 The extensive consumption of energy by desalination technologies is still

488

E-Print Network 3.0 - alleviate salinity damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA Summary: , anti-acrolein therapy significantly alleviated myelin damage, delayed the Fig. 6 CAP reduction...

489

Heat extraction from salinity-gradient solar ponds using heat pipe heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical analysis on the heat extraction process from solar pond by using the heat pipe heat exchanger. In order to conduct research work, a small scale experimental solar pond with an area of 7.0 m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.5 m was built at Khon Kaen in North-Eastern Thailand (16 27'N102 E). Heat was successfully extracted from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond by using a heat pipe heat exchanger made from 60 copper tubes with 21 mm inside diameter and 22 mm outside diameter. The length of the evaporator and condenser section was 800 mm and 200 mm respectively. R134a was used as the heat transfer fluid in the experiment. The theoretical model was formulated for the solar pond heat extraction on the basis of the energy conservation equations and by using the solar radiation data for the above location. Numerical methods were used to solve the modeling equations. In the analysis, the performance of heat exchanger is investigated by varying the velocity of inlet air used to extract heat from the condenser end of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE). Air velocity was found to have a significant influence on the effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger. In the present investigation, there was an increase in effectiveness by 43% as the air velocity was decreased from 5 m/s to 1 m/s. The results obtained from the theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

Tundee, Sura; Terdtoon, Pradit; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singh, Randeep; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar [Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Group, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Bundoora East Campus, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

Long-Term Outcome Of Once Daily Saline Irrigation For The Treatment Of Pediatric Chronic Rhinosinusitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Results: One hundred four patients were reviewed. The mean age was 8.0 years, and 65.4% were male. Presenting symptoms included congestion(95.2%), cough(79.8%), and rhinorrhea(60.6%). Comorbid conditions include asthma(57.3%) and positive allergy test(50...

Pham, Vinh

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

Capacitive Mixing Power Production from Salinity Gradient Energy Enhanced through ExoelectrogenGenerated Ionic Currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an external power supply, the voltage window remains limited by the #12;3 3 membrane potential which the established membrane potential (Fig 6s). Because the voltage window is inherently small, obtaining across the membrane. #12;4 4 Fig. 1s: (a) Cyclic voltammetry of film electrodes within high

492

Reactive Multiphase behavior of CO2 in Saline Aquifers beneath the Colorado Plateau  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas reservoirs developed within the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountains region are natural laboratories for studying the factors that promote long-term storage of CO{sub 2}. They also provide sites for storing additional CO{sub 2} if it can be separated from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants in this part of the U.S.A. These natural reservoirs are developed primarily in sandstones and dolomites; shales, mudstones and anhydrite form seals. In many fields, stacked reservoirs are present, indicating that the gas has migrated up through the section. There are also geologically young travertine deposits at the surface, and CO{sub 2}-charged groundwater and springs in the vicinity of known CO{sub 2} occurrences. These near-surface geological and hydrological features also provide examples of the environmental effects of leakage of CO{sub 2} from reservoirs, and justify further study. During reporting period covered here (the second quarter of Year 2 of the project, i.e. January 1-March 31, 2002), the main achievements were: (1) Field trips to the central Utah and eastern Arizona travertine areas to collect data and water samples to support study of surface CO{sub 2}-rich fluid leakage in these two areas. (2) Partial completion of a manuscript on natural analogues CO{sub 2} leakage from subsurface reservoirs. The remaining section on the chemistry of the fluids is in progress. (3) Improvements to CHEMTOUGH code to incorporate kinetic effects on reaction progress. (4) Submission of two abstracts (based on the above work) to the topical session at the upcoming GSA meeting in Denver titled ''Experimental, Field, and Modeling Studies of Geological Carbon Sequestration''. (5) Submission of paper to upcoming GGHT-6 conference in Kyoto. Co-PI S. White will attend this conference, and will also be involved in three other papers.

R. G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

493

REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas reservoirs developed within the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountains region are natural laboratories for studying the factors that promote long-term storage of CO{sub 2}. They also provide sites for storing additional CO{sub 2} if it can be separated from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants in this part of the U.S.A. These natural reservoirs are developed primarily in sandstones and dolomites; shales, mudstones and anhydrite form seals. In many fields, stacked reservoirs are present, indicating that the gas has migrated up through the section. There are also geologically young travertine deposits at the surface, and CO{sub 2}-charged groundwater and springs in the vicinity of known CO{sub 2} occurrences. These near-surface geological and hydrological features also provide examples of the environmental effects of leakage of CO{sub 2} from reservoirs, and justify further study. During reporting period covered here (the first quarter of Year 3 of the project, i.e. October 1-December 31, 2002), the main achievements were: (1) Planning workshop for project participants as well as other Utah researchers involved in CO{sub 2} projects (22 October, 2002), and Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City; (2) Presentation of paper to special CO{sub 2} sequestration session at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, Denver, 29 October, 2002; (3) Presentation of paper to special CO{sub 2} sequestration session at the Fall Meeting of American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, 10 December, 2002; (4) Identification of dawsonite (sodium-aluminum carbonate) as a late stage mineral deposited in CO{sub 2} feedzone at Springerville, Arizona; (5) Successful matching of known physical constraints to flow beneath the Hunter cross section being used to simulate the effects of CO{sub 2} injection. In about 1000 years, most injected CO{sub 2} may be lost to the surface from the three shallowest reservoirs considered, assuming no reactive processes; and (6) Inclusion of reactive processes in numerical simulations, and indication that CO{sub 2} is sequestered for at 1000 years in form of dissolved CO{sub 2} and carbonate mineral precipitation.

R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

494

Freshwater and Saline Loads of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen to Hood Canal and Lynch Cove, Washington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Lynch Cove on Highway 106 just east of Twanoh State Park. (Photograph taken by F. William Simonds, U. Patrick Leahy, Acting Director U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia: 2006 For sale by U.S. Geological citation: Paulson, A.J.,Konrad, C.P., Frans, L.M., Noble, M., Kendall, C., Josberger, E.G., Huffman, R

495

Influence of Salinous Solutions in the Pressure and Volume Modulations of the Intracranial Cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

representative sample (53). Other important applications of the SPT have been to characterize the microstructure of specimens such as UHMWPE8 and PMMA9, popular polymers in the biomedical industry, which have been used in joint replacement and anchoring...: Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene which is usually abbreviated as UHMWPE is a common polymer in bone replacement applications because it is very resistant (54). 9 PMMA: Poly (methyl methacrylate) is usually abbreviated as PMMA. It is a common...

Ceballos, Mariana

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

496

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of mineral accessible surface area, and should not be used in reactive transport modeling. Our work showed that reaction rates would be overestimated by three to five times.

Peters, Catherine A

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

497

The detrimental effects of salinity on rooting of coleus cuttings and their alleviation with gypsum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The effect of NaC1 on root number and color intensity of the foliage were not altered by the addition of CaSO . The beneficial effects of CaS04 cou1d not be demonstrated in a peat-styrafoam medium. Acknowledgements I would like to express my sincere... Ca/Na ratios for the NaC1:Ca504 solutions 5 Electrical conductivities (E. C. ) of 2 KNO solutions with i ncreasing CaS04 concent/ations 6 The effects of pH and peat extract on rooting of 'Big Red' cuttings . Page 13 15 44 45 56 LIST...

Janssen, Antonius Hendrick

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Nouvelles problematiques posees par le cyclage thermo-mecanique en cavites salines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage of natural gas in salt caverns had been developed mainly for seasonal storage, resulting in a small number of yearly pressure cycles and moderate gas-production rates. The needs of energy traders are changing towards more aggressive operational modes. The "high-frequency cycling" operation of salt caverns raises questions concerning the effects of frequently repeated and intense mechanical and thermal loading. These questions concern the constitutive creep laws for salt, laboratory test procedures, criteria to be used at the design stage to provide operability, and the long-term integrity of the underground salt caverns.

Pellizzaro, Cyrille; Brouard, Benoît; Karimi-Jafari, Mehdi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Impact of Feedwater Salinity on Energy Requirements of a Small-Scale Membrane Filtration System   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many remote communities in both developed and developing countries lack electricity and clean drinking water. One solution, for such communities that rely on brackish groundwater, is a photovoltaic (PV) powered hybrid ...

Richards, B.S.; Masson, L.; Schäfer, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Conditional Reliability, Sub-Monthly Time Step, Flood Control, and Salinity Features of WRAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WRAP is a generalized river/reservoir system simulation model providing flexible capabilities for analyzing water resources development, management, control, allocation, and use. This supplemental reference and users manual documents expanded WRAP...

Salazar, A.A.; Olmos, H.E.; Hoffpauir, R.J.; Wurbs, R.A.