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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Liquids Production Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production Projection Tables (1990-2030) Liquids Production Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Liquids Production Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Liquids Production Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Liquids Production Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table G1 World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case Table G1. World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table G2 World Conventional Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case Table G2. World Conventional Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

2

EIA - Appendix G-Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Production in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Production in Five Cases Tables (2006-2035) Projections of Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Production in Five Cases Tables (2006-2035) International Energy Outlook 2010 Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Productions in Three Cases Tables (2006-2035) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 15 complete) Appendix G. Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Production in Three Cases Tables (2006-2035). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Appendix G. Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Production in Three Cases Tables (2006-2035). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table G1 World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case Table G1. World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

3

EIA - Appendix G-Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Production in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Production in Five Cases Tables (1990-2030) Projections of Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Production in Five Cases Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2009 Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Productions in Three Cases Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 15 complete) Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Production in Three Cases Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Production in Three Cases Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table G1 World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case Table G1. World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

4

EIA - Appendix G-Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Production in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Production in Five Cases Tables (1990-2030) Projections of Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Production in Five Cases Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Projections of Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Production in Five Cases Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Production in Five Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Liquids Production Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table G1 World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case Table G1. World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

5

Production Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Project Accounts Production Project Accounts Overview Most NERSC login accounts are associated with specific individuals and must not be shared. Sometimes it is...

6

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

7

Pinellas, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pinellas, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Pinellas, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE...

8

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids Petroleum & Other Liquids Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Crude Reserves and Production Refining and Processing Imports/Exports & Movements Stocks Consumption/Sales All Petroleum & Other Liquids Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Prices Change category... Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections This Week in Petroleum Data and analysis of recent events affecting the petroleum industry and

9

Nevada, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Nevada, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: NNSS and...

10

Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site:...

11

Ames Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Ames Laboratory, Former Production Workers...

12

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Southern Research Institute Project Number: FE0010231 Project Description Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, called syngas, into liquid hydrocarbons. It is a leading technology for converting syngas derived from gasification of coal and coal-biomass mixtures to hydrocarbons in coal to liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes. However, conventional FTS catalysts produce undesirable waxes (C21+) that need to be upgraded to liquids (C5-C20) by hydrotreating. This adds significantly to the cost of FTS. The objectives of this project are (i) to demonstrate potential for CBTL cost reduction by maximizing the production of C5-C20 hydrocarbon liquids using a selective FTS catalyst and (ii) to evaluate the impacts of the addition of biomass to coal on product characteristics, carbon foot print, and economics.

13

Production Cost Optimization Project 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Production Cost Optimization project assists participating members in implementing or enhancing heat rate optimization programs to reduce production costs through sustainable performance improvements. This Technical Update summarizes the status of the project and presents results for five (5) sites that have completed initial and follow-up assessments. A PCO assessment consists of benchmarking plant thermal performance using historical plant data along with an on-site performance appraisal to id...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

Natural gas liquids consumption, production, and reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas liquids are condensates that occur during production and liquids recovered during processing, and they are classified as lease condensate or natural gas plant liquids (NGPL). There has been a decline in total domestic production, but an increase in ethane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) during the past decade. Statistical tables illustrate trends in the production of NGPLs and liquefied refinery gases (LRG), imports and exports, and marketing and sales. World production data show that, while the US now produces close to 41% of world output, the production trends in other areas are increasing as ours decline. 10 tables. (DCK)

Sala, D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Project Number: FE0011958 Project Description Proof-of-concept of a metal-polymeric...

17

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases (Thousand Barrels per Day)

18

Net Primary Production (NPP) Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RegionalGlobal > Net Primary Production (NPP) Net Primary Production (NPP) Project Overview The ORNL DAAC Net Primary Production (NPP) data set collection contains field...

19

Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

20

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

22

Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

23

Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

24

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

25

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

26

Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

27

Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

28

Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

29

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

30

West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

31

Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

32

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Alternate Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal and CoalBiomass to Liquids Alternate Hydrogen Production In the Alternate Production technology pathway, clean syngas from coal is converted to high-hydrogen-content liquid...

33

Seversk Plutonium Production Elimination Project (SPPEP) | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seversk Plutonium Production Elimination Project (SPPEP) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

34

Zheleznogorsk Plutonium Production Elimination Project (ZPPEP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zheleznogorsk Plutonium Production Elimination Project (ZPPEP) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

35

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

36

Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production (Million Barrels) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 629 650 667 714 745 784 1979-2011 Alabama 3 2 7 5 6 6 1979-2011 Alaska 14 13 13 13 11 11 1979-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 California 11 11 11 11 10 10 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 1 1 1 1 1 1 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 10 10 10 10 9 9 1979-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Colorado 26 27 38 48 58 63 1979-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kansas 18 18 18 16 16 16 1979-2011 Kentucky 3 3 3 4 5 4 1979-2011 Louisiana

37

Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project  

SciTech Connect

Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese tallow tree and tung tree. High seed yields from these species are possible because, there stature allows for a third dimension in yield (up). Harvest regimes have already been worked out with tung, and the large seed makes shedding of the seed with tree shakers possible. While tallow tree seed yields can be mind boggling (12,000 kg seed/ha at 40% oil), genotypes that shed seed easily are currently not known. Efficient methods were developed to isolate polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters from bio-diesel. The hypothesis to isolate this class of fatty acids, which are used as popular dietary supplements and prescription medicine (OMACOR), was that they bind transition metal ions much stronger than their harmful saturated analogs. AgBF4 has the highest extraction ability among all the metal ions tested. Glycerol is a key product from the production of biodiesel. It is produced during the transesterification process by cleaving the fatty acids from the glycerol backbone (the fatty acids are used as part of the biodiesel, which is a fatty acid methyl ester). Glycerol is a non-toxic compound with many uses; however, if a surplus exists in the future, more uses for the produced glycerol needs to be found. Another phase of the project was to find an add-on process to the biodiesel production process that will convert the glycerol by-product into more valuable substances for end uses other than food or cosmetics, focusing at present on 1,3-propanediol and lactic acid.All three MSU cultures produced products at concentrations below that of the benchmark microorganisms. There was one notable isolate the caught the eye of the investigators and that was culture J6 due to the ability of this microorganism to co-produce both products and one in particularly high concentrations. This culture with more understanding of its metabolic pathways could prove a useful biological agent for the conversion of glycerol. Heterogeneous catalysis was examined as an alternative to overcome the disadvantages of homogeneous transesterification, such as the presence of salts in the glycer

Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Reserves, Estimated Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Reserves, Estimated Production (Million Barrels) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Reserves, Estimated Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

39

Liquid phase low temperature method for production of methanol ...  

Liquid phase low temperature method for production of methanol from synthesis gas and catalyst formulations therefor United States Patent

40

Table 18. Natural gas plant liquids proved reserves and production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

: Natural gas plant liquids proved reserves and production, 2009 - 2011 (excludes Lease Condensate) million barrels Reserves Production State and Subdivision 2009 2010 2011 2009...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Kansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Kansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

42

Production Network Supplier Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and compare energy and material efficiency across supply chain. No standard activities are presently identified for production network resilience ...

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Rocky Flats, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flats, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Rocky Flats, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE...

44

Kansas City Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Kansas City Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening...

45

Biological production of liquid fuels from biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A scheme for the production of liquid fuels from renewable resources such as poplar wood and lignocellulosic wastes from a refuse hydropulper was investigated. The particular scheme being studied involves the conversion of a cellulosic residue, resulting from a solvent delignified lignocellulosic feed, into either high concentration sugar syrups or into ethyl and/or butyl alcohol. The construction of a pilot apparatus for solvent delignifying 150 g samples of lignocellulosic feeds was completed. Also, an analysis method for characterizing the delignified product has been selected and tested. This is a method recommended in the Forage Fiber Handbook. Delignified samples are now being prepared and tested for their extent of delignification and susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis. Work is continuing on characterizing the cellulase and cellobiase enzyme systems derived from the YX strain of Thermomonospora.

Not Available

46

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

47

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

48

Production Worker Screening Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Production Worker Screening Projects Production Worker Screening Projects Sites listed below are the primary DOE sites served. Production workers from DOE sites not listed below are covered by the National Supplemental Screening Program (NSSP). Additional information regarding NSSP can be found on their website or by calling 1-866-812-6703. California: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, CA) Colorado: Rocky Flats Florida: Pinellas Idaho: Argonne National Laboratory-West Idaho National Laboratory Illinois: Argonne National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Iowa: Ames Laboratory Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Kentucky: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Missouri: Kansas City Plant Nevada:

49

Effectively utilizing project, product and process knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving project management, product development and engineering processes is for many companies crucial to survive in a fast changing environment. However, these activities are rarely integrated well due to the diversity of stakeholders with individual ... Keywords: CMMI, KM, PLM, Process improvement, Project management

Christof Ebert; Jozef De Man

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

51

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012...

52

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release...

53

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ORIGIN OF NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS PRODUCTION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form Approved XXXXXX XXXX ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ORIGIN OF NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS PRODUCTION FORM EIA-64A . REPORT YEAR 2012 . This report is . mandatory

54

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

55

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

56

,"Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

57

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

58

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

59

Figure 51. World production of liquids from biomass, coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 51. World production of liquids from biomass, coal, and natural gas in three cases, 2011 and 2040 (million barrels per day) Subject

60

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

62

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov nelson Rekos Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4066 nelson.rekos@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Western Greenbrier Co-Generation, LLC Lewisburg, WV Western Greenbrier Co-ProduCtion demonstration ProjeCt (disContinued) Project Description The Western Greenbrier Co-Production (WGC) project will generate about 100 megawatts of electricity and commercial quantities of salable ash by-products by burning waste coal presently contained in numerous coal refuse dumps in the vicinity of the plant. These refuse dumps, created by coal cleaning operations over

63

EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49: Medical Isotopes Production Project EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to establish a...

64

Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

65

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

66

Louisiana--North Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana--North Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

67

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

68

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

69

Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

70

Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

71

Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

72

Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

73

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

74

North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

75

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

76

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

77

Utah Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Utah Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

78

Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

79

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

80

Domestic supply of liquid fuels projected to increase, resulting ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Biodesulfurization of mild gasification liquid products. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mild gasification of coal, as being developed at IGT and elsewhere, is a promising new technology that can convert coal to multiple products: gas, solid, and liquids. Mild gasification liquids can be used as feedstock to make transportation fuels and chemicals. However, the sulfur content and aromaticity of mild gasification liquids limits their usefulness and biodesulfurization can potentially decrease both sulfur content and aromaticity. The objective of this project is to investigate and feasibility of using biodesulfurization to upgrade the quality of mild gasification liquids. During this project, it was shown that the middle distillate (360--440 F) fraction of liquids derived from the mild gasification of coal, and unfractionated liquids can be biodesulfurized. Moreover, it was demonstrated that lysed cell preparations and freeze-dried cells can be used to biodesulfurize mild coal gasification liquids. The importance of the finding that freeze-dried biocatalysts can be used to biodesulfurize mild coal gasification liquids is that freeze-dried cells can be produced at one location, stored indefinitely, and then shipped (at reduced weight, volume, and cost) to another location for coal biodesulfurization. Moreover, freeze-dried biocatalysts can be added directly to mild coal gasification liquids with only minimal additions of water so that reactor volumes can be minimized.

Kilbane, J.J. II [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

AVLIS production plant project schedule and milestones  

SciTech Connect

An AVLIS Production Plant Deployment Schedule for the engineering, procurement, and construction for both the Initial Increment of Production and the fully Activated Plant, has been developed by the project team consisting of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. with architect-engineer support from Bechtel National, Inc., Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation, and Westinghouse Corporation. The initial deployment phase consists of six separators modules and the three laser power amplifier modules consistent with the FY84 reference design with a name plate capacity of 5 million separative work units/yr followed by a full plant activation to approximately 13 million separative work units/yr. The AVLIS Production Plant project team's strategy for deployment schedule analysis focused on three schedule options: engineering limited schedule; authorization limited schedule; and funding limited project schedule. The three deployment schedule options developed by AVLIS project team have been classified in ranges such as an optimistic, rapid/moderate, or moderate/pessimistic based on the probability of meeting the individual schedule option's major milestones or program objectives of enriching uranium by the AVLIS process in an effective cost and schedule manner. 47 figures, 7 tables.

1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

84

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

85

Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption, and prices for individual states? No, EIA does not make projections for individual ...

86

Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption, and prices for individual states? No, EIA does not make projections for individual states.

87

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

88

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 121 116 93 1970's 79 55 70 71 75 68 61 45 64 49 1980's 41 29 40 55 61 145 234 318 272 254 1990's 300 395 604 513 513 582 603 734 732 879 2000's 586 691 566 647 634 700 794 859 1,008 1,295 2010's 4,578 8,931 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Processing

89

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

90

The Near-Term Product Development Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and members of the US wind industry have been working as partners to development advanced, highly efficient wind turbines. The overall goal of these partnerships is to develop turbines that can complete successfully in the world`s utility markets for low-cost electricity. The cost goal is to produce electricity at or below $0.05/kWh in moderate winds. Moderate winds (6.9 mps [15.4 mph] at hub heights) prevail in large expanses of the Great Plains, where much of the vast wind resources of this country are located. Under the Near-Term Product Development Project, begun in 1992, several US companies are building and testing turbine prototypes.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies [Internet]. [cited 2013/10/15]. Available from: http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Petroleum/projects/EP/Explor_Tech/P225.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oil_%26_Natural_Gas_Projects_Exploration_and_Production_Technologies&oldid=688583

92

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. In addition to the maximum jet fuel schemes, conceptual designs have also been formulated for maximizing profits from refining of the Great Plains by-products. Conceptual processing schemes for profitable production of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X have been developed, as has a maximum profit'' case. All four of these additional cases have now been transferred to Lummus for design and integration studies. Development of these schemes required the use of linear programming technology. This technology includes not only conventional refining processes which have been adapted for use with coal-derived liquids (e.g. hydrotreating, hydrocracking), but also processes which may be uniquely suited to the Great Plains by-products such as cresylic acid extraction, hydordealkylation, and needle coking. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

EIA - Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In three  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Data Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 6 complete) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Oil Production Capacity by Region and Country, Reference Case Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

94

The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radioactive Liquid Waste Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory OAS-L-13-15 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 26, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT MANAGER LOS ALAMOS FIELD OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is a Government- owned, contractor operated Laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex. Los Alamos' primary responsibility is to

95

Project: Sustainability Characterization for Product Assembly ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... optimization by the Sustainability Modeling and Optimization Project. ... mathematical formulation, computation methods, and the energy and material ...

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support 137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to renovate an existing building at the U.S. Department of Energy Kansas City Plant to accommodate equipment, security and environmental controls, and building restoration upon project completion, including disposal of equipment and wastes. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 21, 1995 EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas

97

Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Does EIA have gasoline prices by city, county, or zip code? Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption, and prices for individual states?

98

Savannah River Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Savannah River Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site: SRS Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Donna Cragle, PhD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 812-6703 Website: http://www.orau.org/nssp/ This project is conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), as a component of its National Supplemental Screening Program. ORAU has teamed with its partners, Comprehensive Health Services, National Jewish Health, the University of Colorado Denver, and Axion Health, to run the program. Construction Worker Screening Projects Construction Worker Projects, Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP)

99

Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,127 971 1,334 1970's 1,270 1,217 1,058 878 679 567 520 367 485 1,146 1980's 553 830 831 633 618 458 463 437 811 380 1990's 445 511 416 395 425 377 340 300 495 5,462 2000's 11,377 15,454 16,477 11,430 13,697 14,308 14,662 13,097 10,846 18,354 2010's 18,405 11,221 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

100

Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,499 3,667 3,475 1970's 3,235 2,563 1,197 1,118 952 899 823 674 883 1,308 1980's 1,351 1,327 1,287 1,258 1,200 1,141 1,318 1,275 1,061 849 1990's 800 290 413 507 553 488 479 554 451 431 2000's 377 408 395 320 254 231 212 162 139 168 2010's 213 268 424 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 115,177 140,290 179,117 1970's 193,209 195,072 197,967 206,833 194,329 189,541 172,584 166,392 161,511 165,515 1980's 142,171 142,423 128,858 124,193 132,501 117,736 115,604 124,890 120,092 121,425 1990's 119,405 129,154 132,656 130,336 128,583 146,048 139,841 150,008 144,609 164,794 2000's 164,908 152,862 152,724 124,955 133,434 103,381 105,236 110,745 94,785 95,359 2010's 102,448 95,630 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

102

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,351 3,244 2,705 1970's 2,330 2,013 1,912 1,581 1,921 2,879 6,665 11,494 14,641 15,686 1980's 15,933 14,540 14,182 13,537 12,829 11,129 11,644 10,876 10,483 9,886 1990's 8,317 8,103 8,093 7,012 6,371 6,328 6,399 6,147 5,938 5,945 2000's 5,322 4,502 4,230 3,838 4,199 3,708 3,277 3,094 3,921 2,334 2010's 2,943 2,465 2,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

103

California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,803 32,639 30,334 1970's 29,901 27,585 24,156 17,498 17,201 15,221 14,125 13,567 13,288 10,720 1980's 8,583 7,278 14,113 14,943 15,442 16,973 16,203 15,002 14,892 13,376 1990's 12,424 11,786 12,385 12,053 11,250 11,509 12,169 11,600 10,242 10,762 2000's 11,063 11,060 12,982 13,971 14,061 13,748 14,056 13,521 13,972 13,722 2010's 13,244 12,095 12,755 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

104

Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 11,500 8,573 8,579 1970's 6,574 6,133 6,063 5,441 5,557 5,454 5,231 4,764 6,192 3,923 1980's 6,845 5,638 6,854 6,213 6,516 6,334 4,466 2,003 2,142 1,444 1990's 1,899 2,181 2,342 2,252 2,024 2,303 2,385 2,404 2,263 2,287 2000's 1,416 1,558 1,836 1,463 2,413 1,716 2,252 1,957 2,401 3,270 2010's 4,576 4,684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

105

North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,150 5,428 4,707 1970's 4,490 3,592 3,199 2,969 2,571 2,404 2,421 2,257 2,394 2,986 1980's 3,677 5,008 5,602 7,171 7,860 8,420 6,956 7,859 6,945 6,133 1990's 6,444 6,342 6,055 5,924 5,671 5,327 4,937 5,076 5,481 5,804 2000's 6,021 6,168 5,996 5,818 6,233 6,858 7,254 7,438 7,878 10,140 2010's 11,381 14,182 26,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

106

Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 433,684 457,117 447,325 1970's 466,016 448,288 470,105 466,143 448,993 435,571 428,635 421,110 393,819 352,650 1980's 350,312 345,262 356,406 375,849 393,873 383,719 384,693 364,477 357,756 343,233 1990's 342,186 353,737 374,126 385,063 381,020 381,712 398,442 391,174 388,011 372,566 2000's 380,535 355,860 360,535 332,405 360,110 355,589 373,350 387,349 401,503 424,042 2010's 433,622 481,308 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

107

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,149 48,635 50,484 1970's 52,647 53,810 54,157 55,782 54,986 56,109 61,778 72,484 77,653 62,107 1980's 59,457 60,544 56,857 56,304 58,580 53,953 51,295 65,156 63,355 61,594 1990's 66,626 70,463 75,520 83,193 86,607 85,668 108,341 109,046 106,665 107,850 2000's 110,411 108,958 110,036 111,292 105,412 101,064 99,971 96,250 92,579 94,840 2010's 91,963 90,291 84,562 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

108

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,126 4,546 4,058 1970's 3,405 4,152 4,114 4,674 6,210 9,620 11,944 13,507 13,094 12,606 1980's 12,651 13,427 12,962 11,314 10,771 11,913 10,441 10,195 11,589 13,340 1990's 13,178 15,822 18,149 18,658 19,612 25,225 23,362 28,851 24,365 26,423 2000's 29,105 29,195 31,952 33,650 35,821 34,782 36,317 38,180 53,590 67,607 2010's 82,637 90,801 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

109

Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 236 1970's 225 281 243 199 501 694 661 933 1,967 4,845 1980's 4,371 4,484 4,727 4,709 5,123 5,236 4,836 4,887 4,774 5,022 1990's 4,939 4,997 5,490 5,589 5,647 5,273 5,361 4,637 4,263 18,079 2000's 24,086 13,754 14,826 11,293 15,133 13,759 21,065 19,831 17,222 17,232 2010's 19,059 17,271 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

110

Liquid fuels production in Middle Eastern and North African ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

111

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Project Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information CoalBiomass Feed and Gasification Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification FE0005293 Development of Kinetics and Mathematical...

112

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 have also been produced and shipped to the US Air Force for further testing. Lummus-Crest Inc. is now completing a preliminary process design for the profitable production of JP-8 and has made recommendations for a production run to produce larger quantities of JP-8. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels, for maximizing profits, and for profitable production of each of the three jet fuels from the by-product liquids have been developed. Economic analyses of the designs show that jet fuel can be produced from the by-products, but not economically. However, jet fuel production could be subsidized profitably by processing the phenolic and naphtha streams to cresols, phenols, BTX, and other valuable chemical by-products. Uncertainties in the studies are marketability of the chemical by-products, replacement fuel costs, and viable schemes to process the phenol stream, among others. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 are nearly completed. Specification of a design basis for profitable production of JP-8 is under way. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Experimental work to date has shown that the tar oil stream requires substantially more severe processing than the preliminary design estimates indicated. A new design basis is now being tested and samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X are in production, based on that new, more severe processing scheme. Six barrels of tar oil have been hydrotreated according to the first step of the processing scheme and will be used to produce barrel quantities of JP-8. 2 refs., 2 figs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of jet fuel (JP-4, JP-8, JP-8X) produced from the liquid by-products of the gasification of lignite coal from the Great Plains Gasification Plant were analyzed to determine the quantity and type of organo-oxygen compounds present. Results were compared to similar fuel samples produced from petroleum. Large quantities of oxygen compounds were found in the coal-derived liquids and were removed in the refining process. Trace quantities of organo-oxygenate compounds were suspected to be present in the refined fuels. Compounds were identified and quantified as part of an effort to determine the effect of these compounds in fuel instability. Results of the analysis showed trace levels of phenols, naphthols, benzofurans, hexanol, and hydrogenated naphthols were present in levels below 100 ppM. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Knudson, C.L.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fernald, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects Production Workers Screening Projects Fernald, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Fernald Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office Ray Beatty and Mooch Callaway 1150 Harrison Ave., Suite 106 Harrison, OH 45030 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is being conducted by Queens College of the City University of New York. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test. This program also offers CT scans for early lung cancer detection to workers who have an elevated risk of lung cancer as a result of a combination of occupational exposures, age,

118

Mound, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects Production Workers Screening Projects Mound, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Mound Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: 1-877-866-6802 Local Outreach Office Eric Parker, Paige Gibson and Mike Ball 113 East Central Avenue W. Carrollton, OH 45449 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is being conducted by the United Steelworkers, in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

119

Liquid low-level waste generation projections for ORNL in 1993  

SciTech Connect

Liquid low-level waste (LLLW) is generated by various programs and projects throughout Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These wastes are collected in underground collection tanks, bottles, and trucks; they are then neutralized with sodium hydroxide and treated for volume reduction at the ORNL evaporator facility. This report presents historical and projected data concerning the volume and characterization of LLLW, prior to and after evaporation. Storage space for projected waste generation is also discussed.

DePaoli, S.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Manhattan Project: F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX Hanford Engineer Works, 1945 Resources > Photo Gallery Plutonium production area, Hanford, ca. 1945 The F Reactor plutonium production complex at Hanford. The "boxy" building between the two water towers on the right is the plutonium production reactor; the long building in the center of the photograph is the water treatment plant. The photograph was reproduced from Henry DeWolf Smyth, Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb under the Auspices of the United States Government, 1940-1945 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1945). The Smyth Report was commissioned by Leslie Groves and originally issued by the Manhattan Engineer District. Princeton University Press reprinted it in book form as a "public service" with "reproduction in whole or in part authorized and permitted."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis LEXINGTON, Ky. - The conversion plants at EM's Paducah and Portsmouth sites surpassed a fiscal year 2013 goal by converting 13,679 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), more than doubling production a year earlier. EM's Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) and contractor Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services LLC (BWCS) began operations in 2011 to convert the nation's 800,000-metric-ton inventory of DUF6 to more benign forms for sale, ultimate disposal or long-term storage. "Since 2011, we have been ramping up production to determine and achieve the safe, sustainable operating rate of the plants," said George E.

122

DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis LEXINGTON, Ky. - The conversion plants at EM's Paducah and Portsmouth sites surpassed a fiscal year 2013 goal by converting 13,679 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), more than doubling production a year earlier. EM's Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) and contractor Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services LLC (BWCS) began operations in 2011 to convert the nation's 800,000-metric-ton inventory of DUF6 to more benign forms for sale, ultimate disposal or long-term storage. "Since 2011, we have been ramping up production to determine and achieve the safe, sustainable operating rate of the plants," said George E.

123

Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 PADD 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1981-2013 East Coast 1993-2008 Appalachian No. 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1993-2013 PADD 2 12,892 13,208 13,331 13,524 15,204 15,230 1981-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 1,975 1,690 2,171 1,877 2,630 2,746 1993-2013

124

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms Facebook Twitter ... Supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products on a national and regional level. The data series describe ...

125

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating costs for most households are forecast to rise from last winters level : ... with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries.

126

Pantex, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Pantex, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Pantex, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Former Pantex Worker Medical Surveillance Program Covered DOE Site: Pantex Worker Population Served: All Workers Principal Investigator: Arthur Frank, MD, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 378-8939 Local Medical Clinics: WTAMU Health Partners Clinic 4400 S. Washington Street Amarillo, TX 79110 Texas Diagnostic Imaging Center (X-rays only) 1000 Coulter Drive Amarillo, TX 79106 Former workers at risk from exposures while working at Pantex are offered a free medical screening. This project is carried out by Drexel University School of Public Health in conjunction with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler. Workers from this site who do not live in close proximity to the above

127

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Production Workers Screening Projects Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: James Harbison 2525 Cairo Road Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

128

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support 7: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to renovate an existing building at the U.S. Department of Energy Kansas City Plant to accommodate equipment, security and environmental controls, and building restoration upon project completion, including disposal of equipment and wastes. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 21, 1995 EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri

129

Idaho National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Idaho National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Idaho National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: INL Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: David Fry 1055 Austin Avenue Idaho Falls, ID 83404 Community Care 2725 Channing Way Idaho Falls, ID 83404 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers, in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing

130

An analysis of battery electric vehicle production projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In mid 2008 and early 2009 Deutsche Bank and The Boston Consulting Group each released separate reports detailing projected Battery Electric Vehicle production through 2020. These reports both outlined scenarios in which ...

Cunningham, John Shamus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products Speaker(s): Dragan Charlie Curcija Date: May 26, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The heat transfer performance of...

132

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer analyzes vapors during the gasification and pyrolysis processes. NREL's biomass projects are designed to advance the production of liquid transportation fuels from...

133

Project summary Improving the Productivity of Algal Bioreactors for Biofuel and Biochemical Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project summary Improving the Productivity of Algal Bioreactors for Biofuel and Biochemical-derived fuels, or biofuels, are seen as a substantial portion of a sustainable energy portfolio. Aquatic algal biofuel production currently exist. Many private companies are currently attempting

Walter, M.Todd

134

ARM - Evaluation Product - Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) 2000.03.01 - 2006.02.28 Site(s) SGP General Description The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties

135

PROJECT RULISON A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O N S T I M U L A T I O N EXPERIMENT U S I N G A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE Issued By PROJECT RULISON JOINT OFFICE OF INFORMATION U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION - AUSTRAL OIL COMPANY, INCORPORATED THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR - CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION May 1, 1969 OBSERVATION AREA J SURFACE GROUND ZERO AREA S C A L E - I inch e q u a l s approximatly I 2 m i l e s Project Rulison Area Map PROJECT RULISON A N INDUSTRY-GOVERNMENT NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 ON STIMULATION EXPERIMENT USING A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE I. INTRODUCTION Project Rulison is o joint experiment sponsored by Austral O i l Company, Incorporated, of Houston, Texas, the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Department o f the Interior, w i t h the Program Management provided b y CER Geonuclear Corporotion of L

136

Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Atomic Weapons Workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) in Burlington, Iowa Covered DOE Site: IAAP Worker Population Served: All Line 1/Division B Workers Principal Investigator: Laurence Fuortes, MD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 282-5818 Local Medical Clinics: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics 200 Hawkins Drive Iowa City, IA 52242 Henry County Health Center 407 South White Street Mt. Pleasant, IA 62641 Great River Medical Center 1221 S. Gear Avenue West Burlington, IA 52655 Website: http://cph.uiowa.edu/iowafwp/ This project is intended to screen for occupational health conditions among

137

Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products Speaker(s): Dragan Charlie Curcija Date: May 26, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The heat transfer performance of fenestration products is routinely determined using computer simulations combined with physical testing. Initial efforts to develop simulation and test procedures for the fenestration products in the 1980's focused on simple planar windows since they are the dominant share of the market. However, once these procedures were developed (with resulting ISO standards and national rating and labeling requirements), manufacturers of more physically complex fenestration products (skylights, green house windows, tubular skylights) demanded procedures for simulating and testing their products. Dr Curcija

138

Fuel gas production by microwave plasma in liquid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to apply plasma in liquid to replace gas-phase plasma because we expect much higher reaction rates for the chemical deposition of plasma in liquid than for chemical vapor deposition. A reactor for producing microwave plasma in a liquid could produce plasma in hydrocarbon liquids and waste oils. Generated gases consist of up to 81% hydrogen by volume. We confirmed that fuel gases such as methane and ethylene can be produced by microwave plasma in liquid.

Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Tawara, Michinaga; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kenya [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Shikoku Industry and Technology Promotion Center, 2-5 Marunouchi, Takamatsu, Kagawa 760-0033 (Japan)

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Solar electric thermal hydronic (SETH) product development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Positive Energy, Inc. received a second Technology Maturation and Commercialization Project Subcontract during the 1999 round of awards. This Subcontract is for the purpose of further aiding Positive Energy, Inc. in preparing its Solar Electric Thermal Hydronic (SETH) control and distribution package for market introduction. All items of this subcontracted project have been successfully completed. This Project Report contains a summary of the progress made during the SETH Development Project (the Project) over the duration of the 1999 Subcontract. It includes a description of the effort performed and the results obtained in the pursuit of intellectual property protection and development of product documentation for the end users. This report also summarizes additional efforts taken by and for the SETH project outside of the Subcontract. It presents a chronology of activities over the duration of the Subcontract, and includes a few selected sample copies of documents offered as evidence of their success.

Stickney, B.L.; Sindelar, A.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However, the phenolic and naphtha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10--15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10 percent of the US market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream. 9 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.; Tatterson, D.F. (Amoco Oil Co., Naperville, IL (USA). Research and Development Dept.); Fornoff, L.L.; Link, M.A.; Stahlnecker, E.; Torster, K. (Lummus Crest, Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 4 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 4 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

142

C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

Gerald P. Huffman

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

Gerald P. Huffman

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOEs Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to shift the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal consumption by 66% using electrolysis and nuclear power as the hydrogen source. In addition, nuclear integration decreases CO2 emissions by 84% if sequestration is assumed and 96% without sequestration, when compared to conventional CTL. The preliminary economic assessment indicates that the incorporation of 11 HTGRs and the associated HTSEs impacts the expected return on investment, when compared to conventional CTL with or without sequestration. However, in a carbon constrained scenario, where CO2 emissions are taxed and sequestration is not an option, a reasonable CO2 tax would equate the economics of the nuclear assisted CTL case with the conventional CTL case. The economic results are preliminary, as they do not include economies of scale for multiple HTGRs and are based on an uncertain reactor cost estimate. Refinement of the HTGR cost estimate is currently underway. To reduce well to wheel (WTW) GHG emissions below baseline (U.S. crude mix) or imported crude derived diesel, integration of an HTGR is necessary. WTW GHG emissions decrease 8% below baseline crude with nuclear assisted CTL. Even with CO2 sequestration, conventional CTL WTW GHG emissions are 24% higher than baseline crude emissions. Current efforts are underway to investigate the incorporation of nuclear integrated steam methane reforming for the production of hydrogen, in place of HTSE. This will likely reduce the number of HTGRs required for the process.

Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Based Production (Million Barrels) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

146

New Mexico--East Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) New Mexico--East Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

147

New Mexico--West Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) New Mexico--West Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

148

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

149

Separating liquid and solid products of liquefaction of coal or like carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Slurryform products of coal liquefaction are treated with caustic soda in presence of H.sub.2 O in an inline static mixer and then the treated product is separated into a solids fraction and liquid fractions, including liquid hydrocarbons, by gravity settling preferably effected in a multiplate settling separator with a plurality of settling spacings.

Malek, John M. (P.O. Box 71, Lomita, CA 90717)

1979-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Reserves & Production Crude Reserves & Production Change category... Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Heating Oil and Propane Update Weekly residential, wholesale, and spot prices; and production, demand, and stocks of heating fuels. (Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season which extends from October through March. ) Weekly Petroleum Status Report The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Petroleum Status Report - Archive This Week in Petroleum Data and analysis of recent events affecting the petroleum industry and

151

Current Projects: Product Authenticity Tags - Vulnerability Assessment Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product Authenticity Tags Product Authenticity Tags VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure)

152

FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has two primary purposes: (1) Build a small-footprint (SFP) fuel production plant to prove the feasibility of this relatively transportable technology on an intermediate scale (i.e. between laboratory-bench and commercial capacity) and produce as much as 150,000 gallons of hydrogen-saturated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel; and (2) Use the virtually sulfur-free fuel produced to demonstrate (over a period of at least six months) that it can not only be used in existing diesel engines, but that it also can enable significantly increased effectiveness and life of the next-generation exhaust-after-treatment emission control systems that are currently under development and that will be required for future diesel engines. Furthermore, a well-to-wheels economic analysis will be performed to characterize the overall costs and benefits that would be associated with the actual commercial production, distribution and use of such FT diesel fuel made by the process under consideration, from the currently underutilized (or entirely un-used) energy resources targeted, primarily natural gas that is stranded, sub-quality, off-shore, etc. During the first year of the project, which is the subject of this report, there have been two significant areas of progress: (1) Most of the preparatory work required to build the SFP fuel-production plant has been completed, and (2) Relationships have been established, and necessary project coordination has been started, with the half dozen project-partner organizations that will have a role in the fuel demonstration and evaluation phase of the project. Additional project tasks directly related to the State of Alaska have also been added to the project. These include: A study of underutilized potential Alaska energy resources that could contribute to domestic diesel and distillate fuel production by providing input energy for future commercial-size SFP fuel production plants; Demonstration of the use of the product fuel in a heavy-duty diesel vehicle during the Alaska winter; a comparative study of the cold-starting characteristics of FT and conventional diesel fuel; and demonstration of the use of the fuel to generate electricity for rural Alaskan villages using both a diesel generator set, and a reformer-equipped fuel cell.

Stephen P. Bergin

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Professors and graduate students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and hydrocarbon gases and liquids produced from coal. An Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report summarizes the results obtained in this program during the period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2006. The results are presented in detailed reports on 16 research projects headed by professors at each of the five CFFS Universities and an Executive Summary. Some of the highlights from these results are: (1) Small ({approx}1%) additions of acetylene or other alkynes to the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction increases its yield, causes chain initiation, and promotes oxygenate formation. (2) The addition of Mo to Fe-Cu-K/AC F-T catalysts improves catalyst lifetime and activity. (3) The use of gas phase deposition to place highly dispersed metal catalysts on silica or ceria aerogels offers promise for both the F-T and the water-gas shift WGS reactions. (4) Improved activity and selectivity are exhibited by Co F-T catalysts in supercritical hexane. (5) Binary Fe-M (M=Ni, Mo, Pd) catalysts exhibit excellent activity for dehydrogenation of gaseous alkanes, yielding pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes in one reaction. A fluidized-bed/fixed-bed methane reactor was developed for continuous hydrogen and nanotube production. (6) A process for co-production of hydrogen and methyl formate from methanol has been developed. (7) Pt nanoparticles on stacked-cone carbon nanotubes easily strip hydrogen from liquids such as cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, tetralin and decalin, leaving rechargeable aromatic phases. (8) Hydrogen volume percentages produced during reforming of methanol in supercritical water in the output stream are {approx}98%, while CO and CO2 percentages are <2 %.

Gerald P. Huffman

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Production of 35S for a Liquid Semiconductor Betavoltaic  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific energy density from radioactive decay is five to six orders of magnitude greater than the specific energy density in conventional chemical battery and fuel cell technologies. We are currently investigating the use of liquid semiconductor based betavoltaics as a way to directly convert the energy of radioactive decay into electrical power and potentially avoid the radiation damage that occurs in solid state semiconductor devices due to non-ionizing energy loss. Sulfur-35 was selected as the isotope for the liquid semiconductor demonstrations because it can be produced in high specific activity and it is chemically compatible with known liquid semiconductor media.

Meier, David E.; Garnov, A. Y.; Robertson, J. D.; Kwon, J. W.; Wacharasindhu, T.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Solvent Refined Coal II. Catalysts III. Purpose andSondreal, E.A. , "Viscosity of Coal Liquids - The Effect ofAnthraxylon - Kinetics of Coal Hydrogenation," Ind. and Eng.

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

157

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

158

,"Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

159

,"California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

160

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

,"Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_soh_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_soh_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

162

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

163

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

164

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

165

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

166

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

167

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

168

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

169

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

170

,"Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sin_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sin_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

171

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

172

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

173

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

174

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_stx_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_stx_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

175

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports/Exports & Movements Imports/Exports & Movements Change category... Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Petroleum Status Report The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Petroleum Status Report - Archive This Week in Petroleum Data and analysis of recent events affecting the petroleum industry and markets. (archived versions) Archived Versions This Week in Petroleum Short-Term Energy Outlook - Petroleum Section Released: January 7, 2014 Short-term petroleum supply, demand, and price projections.

176

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Petroleum Short, timely articles with graphs about recent petroleum issues and trends Heating Oil and Propane Update Weekly residential, wholesale, and spot prices; and production, demand, and stocks of heating fuels. (Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season which extends from October through March. ) Weekly Petroleum Status Report The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. (archived versions)

177

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stocks Stocks Change category... Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Heating Oil and Propane Update Weekly residential, wholesale, and spot prices; and production, demand, and stocks of heating fuels. (Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season which extends from October through March. ) Weekly Petroleum Status Report The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Petroleum Status Report - Archive This Week in Petroleum Data and analysis of recent events affecting the petroleum industry and

178

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refining & Processing Refining & Processing Change category... Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Petroleum Status Report The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Petroleum Status Report - Archive Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Released: November 27, 2013 Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) report containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity

179

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Sales Consumption & Sales Change category... Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Heating Oil and Propane Update Weekly residential, wholesale, and spot prices; and production, demand, and stocks of heating fuels. (Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season which extends from October through March. ) Weekly Petroleum Status Report The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Petroleum Status Report - Archive This Week in Petroleum Data and analysis of recent events affecting the petroleum industry and

180

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

182

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ORIGIN OF NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS PRODUCTION FORM ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

REPORT YEAR 2013 (A) (B) (C) No. Months covered by this report: ... PO Box 279 U. S. Department of Energy, EIA. Area of Origin Code Natural Gas Liquids Production

183

BWRVIP-53-A: BWR Vessel and lnternals Project, Standby Liquid Control Line Repair Design Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP), formed in June, 1994, is an association of utilities focused exclusively on BWR vessel and internals issues. This BWRVIP report documents criteria which can be used to design a repair for the standby liquid control (SLC) line in a BWR. A previous version of this report was published as BWRVIP-53 (TR-108716). This report (BWRVIP-53- A) incorporates changes proposed by the BWRVIP in response to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Request...

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

RARE-EARTH METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM LIQUID U-Bi  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fission product metals can be removed from solution in liquid bismuth without removal of an appreciable quantity of uranium by contacting the liquid metal solution with fused halides, as for example, the halides of sodium, potassium, and lithium and by adding to the contacted phases a quantity of a halide which is unstable relative to the halides of the fission products, a specific unstable halide being MgCl/sub 3/.

Wiswall, R.H.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Synthesis gas production by mixed conducting membranes with integrated conversion into liquid products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Natural gas or other methane-containing feed gas is converted to a C.sub.5 -C.sub.19 hydrocarbon liquid in an integrated system comprising an oxygenative synthesis gas generator, a non-oxygenative synthesis gas generator, and a hydrocarbon synthesis process such as the Fischer-Tropsch process. The oxygenative synthesis gas generator is a mixed conducting membrane reactor system and the non-oxygenative synthesis gas generator is preferably a heat exchange reformer wherein heat is provided by hot synthesis gas product from the mixed conducting membrane reactor system. Offgas and water from the Fischer-Tropsch process can be recycled to the synthesis gas generation system individually or in combination.

Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Russek, Steven Lee (Allentown, PA); Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Structured catalyst bed and method for conversion of feed materials to chemical products and liquid fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is a structured monolith reactor and method that provides for controlled Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The invention controls mass transport limitations leading to higher CO conversion and lower methane selectivity. Over 95 wt % of the total product liquid hydrocarbons obtained from the monolithic catalyst are in the carbon range of C.sub.5-C.sub.18. The reactor controls readsorption of olefins leading to desired products with a preselected chain length distribution and enhanced overall reaction rate. And, liquid product analysis shows readsorption of olefins is reduced, achieving a narrower FT product distribution.

Wang, Yong (Richland, WA), Liu; Wei (Richland, WA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'SPIT PRODUCTION PROJECT,IG-0551 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENERGY'SPIT PRODUCTION PROJECT,IG-0551 THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'SPIT PRODUCTION PROJECT,IG-0551 The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is...

188

Electric Energy Conservation and Production project: (Volume 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A final report has been prepared under the Electric Energy Conservation and Production Project, conducted by the Blackfeet Indian Tribe and its consultants, Black Hawk Associates, Inc. The report addresses two major issues - the heavy reliance on electricity by residents of the Blackfeet Reservation, and the opportunities for electricity production from wind energy resources on the Reservation. The findings of this report help provide a basis for comprehensive energy management planning on the Reservation, analyze the potential for minimizing electricity demand and maximizing the efficiency of electrical end-uses through appropriate conservation measures, assess the potential of wind energy resources located on the Reservation, and identify and assess the technical, financial, legal, institutional, and regulatory issues involved in wind energy development within the Blackfeet Reservation.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ARM - Evaluation Product - MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor 2005.02.01 - 2011.04.25 Site(s) FKB GRW HFE NIM PYE SBS General Description A new algorithm is being developed for the ARM Program to derive liquid water path (LWP) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the 2-channel (23.8 and 31.4 GHz) microwave radiometers (MWRs) deployed at ARM climate research facilities. This algorithm utilizes the "monoRTM" radiative transfer model (http://rtweb.aer.com), a combination of both an advanced statistical and physical-iterative retrieval, and brightness temperature offsets applied before the retrieval is performed. This allows perhaps the

190

Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Fluid Hyphenated Techniques for Dissolution and Separation of Lanthanides, Actinides, and Fission Products  

SciTech Connect

This project is investigating techniques involving ionic liquids (IL) and supercritical (SC) fluids for dissolution and separation of lanthanides, actinides, and fission products. The research project consists of the following tasks: Study direct dissolution of lanthanide oxides, uranium dioxide and other actinide oxides in [bmin][Tf{sub 2}N] with TBP(HNO{sub 3}){sub 1.8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.6} and similar types of Lewis acid-Lewis base complexing agents; Measure distributions of dissolved metal species between the IL and the sc-CO{sub 2} phases under various temperature and pressure conditions; Investigate the chemistry of the dissolved metal species in both IL and sc-CO{sub 2} phases using spectroscopic and chemical methods; Evaluate potential applications of the new extraction techniques for nuclear waste management and for other projects. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) and ionic liquids are considered green solvents for chemical reactions and separations. Above the critical point, CO{sub 2} has both gas- and liquid-like properties, making it capable of penetrating small pores of solids and dissolving organic compounds in the solid matrix. One application of sc-CO{sub 2} extraction technology is nuclear waste management. Ionic liquids are low-melting salts composed of an organic cation and an anion of various forms, with unique properties making them attractive replacements for the volatile organic solvents traditionally used in liquid-liquid extraction processes. One type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based on the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cation [bmin] with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion [Tf{sub 2}N] is of particular interest for extraction of metal ions due to its water stability, relative low viscosity, high conductivity, and good electrochemical and thermal stability. Recent studies indicate that a coupled IL sc-CO{sub 2} extraction system can effectively transfer trivalent lanthanide and uranyl ions from nitric acid solutions. Advantages of this technique include operation at ambient temperature and pressure, selective extraction due to tunable sc-CO{sub 2} solvation strength, no IL loss during back-extraction, and no organic solvent introduced into the IL phase.

Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Bruce Mincher

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Liquid Fuels Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquid Fuels Market Module Liquid Fuels Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 145 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the LFMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The LFMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. petroleum refining

192

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

193

12 GeV Upgrade Project - Cryomodule Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing ten 100+MV SRF cryomodules (C100) as part of the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project. Once installed, these cryomodules will become part of an integrated accelerator system upgrade that will result in doubling the energy of the CEBAF machine from 6 to 12 GeV. This paper will present a complete overview of the C100 cryomodule production process. The C100 cryomodule was designed to have the major components procured from private industry and assembled together at Jefferson Lab. In addition to measuring the integrated component performance, the performance of the individual components is verified prior to being released for production and assembly into a cryomodule. Following a comprehensive cold acceptance test of all subsystems, the completed C100 cryomodules are installed and commissioned in the CEBAF machine in preparation of accelerator operations. This overview of the cryomodule production process will include all principal performance measurements, acceptance criterion and up to date status of current activities.

J. Hogan, A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, M.A. Drury, M. Wiseman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in Soil Stabilization Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Background CAEEC is a cooperation among industry, government, and the research community to work together to solve CCB- related problems and promote the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable utilization and disposal of CCBs. Objectives To improve the technical and economic aspects of coal combustion by-product (CCB) management. Description CARRC tasks fall into three general categories: Member-prioritized research tasks, Technical and administrative tasks, and Special projects that support CARRC objectives and strengthen and increase the availability of sound technical data for CARRC use.

195

NETL: C&CBTL -Laboratory Scale Liquids Production and Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel production system using coal containing different percentages of biomass such as corn stover and switchgrass at a rate of two liters per day. Altex Coal Biomass to Drop-In...

196

Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Projected Alaska North Slope oil production at risk beyond ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most Popular Tags. electricity; oil/petroleum; liquid fuels; ... Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites U.S. Department ...

198

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

199

New Zealand Energy Data: Liquid Biofuels Production (2007 - 2009...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy. Included here are the annual estimates of total production of biodiesel and bioethanol (2007 - 2009).
2011-01-25T23:42:06Z 2011-01-27T19:24:54Z http:www.med.govt.nz...

200

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL provides middle distillates to an unsaturated global market and offers opportunities to generate power for commercial purposes from waste by-product streams, which normally are associated with increased expenses incurred from additional handling cost. The key concept investigated in this work is the possibility of integrating the GTL process with power generation using conventional waste by-product steam streams. Simulation of the integrated process was conducted with the aim of identifying the critical operating conditions for successful integration of the GTL and power generation processes. About 500 MW of electric power can be generated from 70% of the exit steam streams, with around 20 to 25% steam plant thermal efficiency. A detailed economic analysis on the LNG, stand-alone GTL, and Integrated GTL Power-Generation plants indicates that the integrated system is more profitable than the other options considered. Justifying the technology and economics involved in the use of the by-product streams to generate power could increase the net revenue and overall profitability of GTL projects. This technology may be transferable to GTL projects in the world, wherever a market for generated power exists.

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Task 1 of the work, in which processes to produce each of the three jet fuels, JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X, were designed, has been completed. The formal Task 1 report should issue next quarter. Task 2 work was initiated this quarter. In Task 2, process conditions for producing jet fuel from the Great Plains tar oil stream will be verified and samples of each of the three jet fuels will be produced. Experimental work shows that the hydrotreating conditions specified in Task 1 will not convert sufficient aromatics in the tar oil to produce jet fuel. Alternative schemes have been proposed and are being tested in the laboratories at Amoco Research Center. The simplest of these schemes, in which the heavy ends from the hydrotreater are recycled to extinction, was tested and proved infeasible. A second stage, fixed bed hydrotreater will be added to the process along with the expanded bed, first-stage hydrotreater and the hydrocracker specified in the Task 1 design. Future work will include additional experiments to specify the best process configuration and production of samples of each of the three grades of jet fuel. 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

203

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

204

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Syntroleum plant is mechanically complete and currently undergoing start-up. The fuel production and demonstration plan is near completion. The study on the impact of small footprint plant (SFP) fuel on engine performance is about half-completed. Cold start testing has been completed. Preparations have been completed for testing the fuel in diesel electric generators in Alaska. Preparations are in progress for testing the fuel in bus fleets at Denali National Park and the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority. The experiments and analyses conducted during this project show that Fischer-Tropsch (FT) gas-to-liquid diesel fuel can easily be used in a diesel engine with little to no modifications. Additionally, based on the results and discussion presented, further improvements in performance and emissions can be realized by configuring the engine to take advantage of FT diesel fuel's properties. The FT fuel also shows excellent cold start properties and enabled the engine tested to start at more the ten degrees than traditional fuels would allow. This plant produced through this project will produce large amounts of FT fuel. This will allow the fuel to be tested extensively, in current, prototype, and advanced diesel engines. The fuel may also contribute to the nation's energy security. The military has expressed interest in testing the fuel in aircraft and ground vehicles.

Steve Bergin

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

Annual report of the origin of natural gas liquids production form EIA-64A  

SciTech Connect

The collection of basic, verifiable information on the Nation`s reserves and production of natural gas liquids (NGL) is mandated by the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (Public Law 93-275) and the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91). Gas shrinkage volumes reported on Form EIA-64A by natural gas processing plant operators are used with natural gas data collected on a {open_quotes}wet after lease separation{close_quotes} basis on Form EIA-23, Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, to estimate {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} natural gas reserves and production volumes regionally and nationally. The shrinkage data are also used, along with the plant liquids production data reported on Form EIA-64A, and lease condensate data reported on Form EIA-23, to estimate regional and national gas liquids reserves and production volumes. This information is the only comprehensive source of credible natural gas liquids data, and is required by DOE to assist in the formulation of national energy policies.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nonconventional Liquid Fuels  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Higher prices for crude oil and refined petroleum products are opening the door for nonconventional liquids to displace petroleum in the traditional fuel supply mix. Growing world demand for diesel fuel is helping to jump-start the trend toward increasing production of nonconventional liquids, and technological advances are making the nonconventional alternatives more viable commercially. Those trends are reflected in the AEO2006 projections.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company has conducted bench- and pilot plant-scale experiments to produce jet fuels from the tar oil from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota. Experiments show that the hydroprocessing conditions recommended in Task 1 are not severe enough to saturate the aromatics in the tar oil to meet jet fuel specifications. Alternatives were investigated. Jet fuel specifications can be achieved when the tar oil is: hydrotreated in an expanded-bed hydrotreater to lower aromatics and heteroatom content; the effluent is then hydrotreated in a second, fixed bed hydrotreater; and, finally, the 550{degree}F boiling fraction from the two hydrotreaters is hydrocracked to extinction. The process was verified by pilot-plant production of 2 barrels of JP-8 turbine fuel, which met all but the flash point specification for JP-8. In addition, small samples of JP-4, JP-8, and high-density fuel were produced as a part of Task 2. 13 figs., 21 tabs.

Furlong, M.; Fox, J.; Masin, J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Where can I find shale gas and coal bed methane production and reserves data? Where is the boundary for state and federal offshore oil and gas production?

209

EIA World Oil Production Projections, 1990-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1. EIAs International Energy Outlook 2000 predicts that the global conventional oil production peak will occur after 2020, since production is still ...

210

EIA - Appendix I-Projections of Natural Gas Production in Five...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Production in Five Cases Tables (2007-2035) International Energy Outlook 2010 Projections of Natural Gas Production in Five Cases Tables (2007-2035) Formats Data Table...

211

ARM - PI Product - MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govDataPI Data ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water govDataPI Data ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor 2005.02.01 - 2011.04.25 Site(s) FKB GRW HFE NIM PYE SBS General Description A new algorithm is being developed for the ARM Program to derive liquid water path (LWP) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the 2-channel (23.8 and 31.4 GHz) microwave radiometers (MWRs) deployed at ARM climate research facilities. This algorithm utilizes the "monoRTM" radiative transfer model (http://rtweb.aer.com), a combination of both an advanced statistical and physical-iterative retrieval, and brightness temperature offsets applied before the retrieval is performed. This allows perhaps the

212

Status of Process Development for Pyrolysis of Biomass for Liquid Fuels and Chemicals Production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is one of several thermochemical conversion strategies to produce useful fuels from biomass material . The goal of fast pyrolysis is to maximize liquid product yield. Fast pyrolysis is accomplished by the thermal treatment of the biomass in an air-free environment. Very short heat up and cool-down is a requirement for fast pyrolysis. The typical residence time in the pyrolysis reactor is 1 second. In order to accomplish the fast heatup, grinding the biomass to a small particle size in the range of 1 mm is typical and pre-drying of the biomass to less than 10 weight percent moisture is considered the standard. Recovery of the product liquid, called bio-oil, is accomplished by a variety of methods all of which require a quick quench of the product vapor. A definition of fast pyrolysis bio-oil is provided for the CAS # RN 1207435-39-9 recently issued by ChemAbstracts Services.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

None

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF LIGHT ISOTOPE PRODUCT FROM LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION UNITS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for removing the lighter isotope of a gaseous-liquid product from a number of diffusion columns of a liquid thermal diffusion system in two stages by the use of freeze valves. The subject liquid flows from the diffusion columns into a heated sloping capsule where the liquid is vaporized by the action of steam in a heated jacket surrounding the capsule. When the capsule is filled the gas flows into a collector. Flow between the various stages is controlled by freeze valves which are opened and closed by the passage of gas and cool water respectively through coils surrounding portions of the pipes through which the process liquid is passed. The use of the dual stage remover-collector and the freeze valves is an improvement on the thermal diffusion separation process whereby the fraction containing the lighter isotope many be removed from the tops of the diffusion columns without intercolumn flow, or prior stage flow while the contents of the capsule is removed to the final receiver.

Hoffman, J.D.; Ballou, J.K.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Spring Chinook Salmon Production in the Deschutes Basin Project Narrative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with limited production, development of acclimation facilities, and development of a tribal production facility of the cultural and spiritual identity of the people of CTWSRO, and are an essential aspect of tribal nutritional

216

Reorganizing for Multi-Project Management: Toyota's New Structure of Product Development Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to discuss an emerging organizational structure for new product development at large Japanese automobile firms. This study specifically focuses on describing the objectives and outcomes of changes in product development organization implemented at Toyota in 1992 and 1993. This reorganization is the most fundamental change in product development organization that Toyota has implemented since it established the Shusa (product manager) organization around 1965. The new organization is aimed at multi-project management. It has three vehicle development centers in which multiple projects are grouped together, in contrast to either traditional single-project-oriented or function-oriented organizations.

Kentaro Nobeoka; Edited Michael Cusumano

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products July 6, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research to help find ways of converting into useful products CO2 captured from emissions of power plants and industrial facilities will be conducted by six projects announced today by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects are located in North Carolina, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia, and Quebec, Canada (through collaboration with a company based in Lexington, Ky.) and have a total value of approximately $5.9 million over two-to-three years, with $4.4 million of DOE funding and $1.5 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the

218

NETL: Utilization Projects - Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material In pursuit of developing value added products from sulfite-rich scrubber material, e.g., low-density panels, carpet underlayment, siding, pre-cast building material, lumber panels, particle and wafer type boards, the following four experimental tasks are proposed: A comprehensive characterization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials produced by power plant generation. Specifically, the mercury, selenium, arsenic, boron, and organic content will be monitored The sulfite-rich scrubber material will be combined with cheap but renewable agricultural byproducts like micronized core fibers and/or micronized wheat straw, and the composites will be formulated by exploiting the natural polymers of the byproducts. The conditions under which structural composites can be formulated using injection molding and compressive molding will be evaluated.

219

Manhattan Project: Production Reactor (Pile) Design, Met Lab, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge PRODUCTION REACTOR (PILE) DESIGN Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge PRODUCTION REACTOR (PILE) DESIGN (Met Lab, 1942) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 By 1942, scientists had established that some of the uranium exposed to radioactivity in a reactor (pile) would eventually decay into plutonium, which could then be separated by chemical means from the uranium. Important theoretical research on this was ongoing, but the work was scattered at various universities from coast to coast. In early 1942, Arthur Compton arranged for all pile research to be moved to the Met Lab at the University of Chicago.

220

EIA projects little change in U.S. coal production in 2013 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook projects total U.S. coal production in 2013 to be close to its 2012 level in the November 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook as coal ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Biological production of liquid fuels from biomass. Annual report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of liquid fuels from renewable resources such as poplar wood and lignocellulosic wastes from a refuse hydropulper were studied. The particular scheme being studied involves the conversion of a cellulosic residue, resulting from a solvent delignified lignocellulosic feed, into either high concentration sugar syrups or into ethyl and/or butyl alcohol. The process is aimed at achieving total raw material utilization and maximization of high value by-product recovery. Specific goals of the investigation are the demonstration of the process technical feasibility and economic practicality and its optimization for maximum economic yield and efficiency. The construction of a pilot apparatus for solvent delignifying 150g samples of lignocellulosic feeds has been completed. Also, an analysis method for characterizing the delignified product has been selected and tested. Delignified samples are now being prepared and tested for their extent of delignification and susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis.

Pye, E.K.; Humphrey, A.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Spring 2009; Composite Data Products, Final Version March 19, 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through March 2009.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Spring 2010; Composite Data Products, Final Version March 29, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through March 2010.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project; Spring 2008 Composite Data Products, Final Version: February 29, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through February 2008.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2009; Composite Data Products, Final Version September 11, 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2009.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Future of Liquid Biofuels for APEC Economies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated by APEC Energy Working Group (EWG) to maximize the energy sector's contribution to the region's economic and social well-being through activities in five areas of strategic importance including liquid biofuels production and development.

Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

CO sub 2 sources for microalgae-based liquid fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers in the Aquatic Species Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute are developing species of microalgae that have high percentages of lipids, or oils. These lipids can be extracted and converted to diesel fuel substitutes. Because microalgae need carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a nutrient, optimal microalgae growth occurs in CO{sub 2}-saturated solutions. For this reason, the authors of this study sought to identify possible large-scale sources of CO{sub 2} for microalgae-based liquid fuels production. The authors concluded that several such promising sources exist. 42 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs.

Feinberg, D.; Karpuk, M.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

Bonnell, Leo W. (Macungie, PA); Perka, Alan T. (Macungie, PA); Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Project Annual Operating Report CY 1999  

SciTech Connect

A total of 5.77 x 10 7 gallons (gal) of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Complex (PWTC) - Building 3544 ion exchange system during calendar year (CY) 1999. This averaged to 110 gpm throughout the year. An additional 3.94 x 10 6 gal of liquid waste (average of 8 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated using the zeolite treatment system due to periods of high Cesium levels in the influent wastewater. A total of 6.17 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste (average of 118 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated at Building 3544 during the year. During the year, the regeneration of the ion exchange resins resulted in the generation of 8.00 x 10 3 gal of Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) concentrate and 9.00 x 10 2 gal of LLLW supernate. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at Building 3544. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the Process Waste Collection and Transfer System and Figure 2 shows a diagram of the Building 3544 treatment process. Figures 3, 4 5, and 6 s how a comparison of operations at Building 3544 in 1997 with previous years. Figure 7 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1995.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this program in its third year, as briefly summarized below. (1) Nanoscale iron-based catalysts containing molybdenum, palladium, or nickel and supported on alumina have been developed that are very effective for the dehydrogenation of methane and ethane to produce pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes, a potentially valuable byproduct. Some of the nanotube structures are being investigated as a safe storage medium for hydrogen. Dehydrogenation of higher hydrocarbons, including several liquids that are compatible with vehicular transportation under fuel cell power, is currently under investigation. (2) Operation of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis under supercritical fluid (SCF) solvent conditions increases liquid fuel yields and improves the selectivity of the process to produce desired products. (3) Small additions ({approx}1%) of organic probe molecules with carbon-carbon triple bonds to the FT reaction markedly shift the molecular weight distribution and increase the oxygenate content of the products. The goal is to develop better technology for producing cleaner burning diesel fuel and other fuels. (4) Several different types of catalyst are under investigation to develop better control of FT fuel product distributions. (5) C1 processes have been developed for producing ethylene and propylene, two high-value products, from methanol. Novel silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) catalysts containing nickel and other metals are used. (6) Binary tungsten-cobalt carbide catalysts have been found to have excellent activities and lifetimes for reforming of methane into synthesis gas using carbon dioxide. This type of catalyst is being further investigated for synthesis gas reactions relevant to the goal of producing hydrogen from coal.

Gerald P. Huffman

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

Gerald P. Huffman

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Projection of Favorable Gas-Producting Areas From Paleoenvironmental Data  

SciTech Connect

Paleoenvironmental biofacies analysis of recent wells in dark Devonian shales in the Applachian Basin has shown that these facies can be projected to areas with no control points. In particular, the facies distribution in Perry County, Kentucky, were found to be precisely those that were predicted earlier from biofacies and organic geochemical data from the VA-1 well in Wise County, Virginia, and the KY-2 well in Martin County, Kentucky. This demonstrates the importance of these data in assessing the volume of gas in the shale throughout the basin as well as in selecting future test sites. The recent biofacies and geochemical work together with a review of the tectonics of the basin have contributed to an evolving interpretation of the geologic control of the biofacies. While a marine environment persisted throughout the Upper Devonian over the Applachian and Illinois Basin (and probably the Michigan Basin), dynamic emergent areas controlled an intermittent introduction of large amounts of organic matter. Large amounts of non-marine organic matter were periodically transported in the basin from a dynamic source province to the Southeast; massive "blooms" of Tasmanites intermittently spread both east and west from the edges of the emerging Cincinnati Arch. At times one or the other of these organic types swept entirely across the basins; at other times a more normal open marine biota flourished and was deposited, probably under the influence of connections to the open seas to the south and northwest, the north being closed by the collision and suturing of continental plates and the east by the growing Applachian Mountains.

Zielinski, R.E.; Dixon, J. A.; McIver, R. D.; Reaugh, A. B.

1979-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Design space exploration for minimizing multi-project wafer production cost, ASPDAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Chip floorplan in a reticle for Multi-Project Wafer (MPW) plays a key role in deciding chip fabrication cost. In this paper 1, we propose a methodology to explore reticle flooplan design space to minimize MPW production cost, facilitated by a new cost model and an efficient reticle floorplanning method. It is shown that a good floorplan saves 47 % and 42 % production cost with respect to a poor floorplan for small and medium volume production, respectively. I.

Rung-bin Lin; Meng-chiou Wu; Wei-chiu Tseng; Ming-hsine Kuo; Tsai-ying Lin; Shr-cheng Tsai

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Increase Productivity - Implement Energy Management Systems with Project Management Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Glass Division is the second smallest of Ford Motor Company's 20 odd major divisions. It employs four percent of Ford's people, uses but one and one-half percent of the manufacturing space yet it consumes 20 percent of the energy. As Plant Engineering Manager of this small but active division, I devote a big part of my time on justifying energy expenditures and the means to reduce these costs. Ten years ago energy costs were one tenth of today's costs and just about three percent of the division's operating costs. Now they are approaching twelve percent. We believe that energy management systems would contribute to improved productivity in the manufacturing and fabricating facilities. But instinctiveness is not enough to get the funds approved to install the system. We are planning to conduct a major undertaking to prove feasibility. It will be a methodical plan of action. We have prepared a graphic plan of action of the major work items that have to be done to prepare the feasibility report. This presentation highlights the work associated with completing the feasibility report. From this report we develop the documents required for management approval. And we feel comfortable that this approach will result in having energy management systems installed in our division plants.

Spinner, M. P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Guide for prioritizing power plant productivity improvement projects: handbook of availability improvement methodology  

SciTech Connect

As part of its program to help improve electrical power plant productivity, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a methodology for evaluating productivity improvement projects. This handbook presents a simplified version of this methodology called the Availability Improvement Methodology (AIM), which provides a systematic approach for prioritizing plant improvement projects. Also included in this handbook is a description of data taking requirements necessary to support the AIM methodology, benefit/cost analysis, and root cause analysis for tracing persistent power plant problems. In applying the AIM methodology, utility engineers should be mindful that replacement power costs are frequently greater for forced outages than for planned outages. Equivalent availability includes both. A cost-effective ranking of alternative plant improvement projects must discern between those projects which will reduce forced outages and those which might reduce planned outages. As is the case with any analytical procedure, engineering judgement must be exercised with respect to results of purely mathematical calculations.

Not Available

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Production of liquid fuels and chemicals by microalgae. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overall objective of the project was to conceptually determine if simple open pond systems have application for the production of fuels from microalgae. To demonstrate the overall objective, work concentrated on showing the potential microalgal yields that are possible from an open pond system on a sustained basis. Furthermore, problems associated with this experimental system were documented and reported so that future endeavors shall benefit. Finally, operational costs were documented to permit preliminary economic analysis of the system. The major conclusions of this project can be summarized as follows: (1) Using two wildtype species in northern California a yearly average productivity of 15 gm/m/sup 2//day, or 24 tons/acre/yr can be obtained in water with TDS = 4 to 8 ppt. (2) This can probably be increased to 20 to 25 gm/m/sup 2//day or 32 to 40 tons/acre/y in southern California. (3) Productivity can probably be further increased by using competitive strains screened for low respiration rates, tolerances to high levels of dissolved oxygen, broad temperature optima, and resistance to photoinhibition. (4) In systems with randomized, turbulent mixing, productivity is independent of channel velocity at least for productivities up to 25 to 30 gm/m/sup 2//day and velocities from 1 to 30 cm/sec. (5) Storage product induction requires one to three days of growth in batch mode under n-depleted conditions. (6) Critical cost centers include CO/sub 2/ input, harvesting and system capital cost. (7) Media recycling, necessary for water conservation, has no adverse effects, at least in the short term for strains which do not excrete organics, and when the harvesting method is at least moderately effective for all algal forms which may be present. 8 refs., 28 figs., 56 tabs.

Weissman, J.C.; Goebel, R.P.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Technologies for the Co-Production Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks August 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The total value of the projects is approximately $8.2 million, with $6.4 million of DOE funding and $1.8 million of non-Federal cost sharing. Syngas is a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen which can subsequently be converted either to power, fuels, or chemicals. The

239

NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind to Hydrogen Project: Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Todd Ramsden, Kevin Harrison, Darlene Steward November 16, 2009 NREL/PR-560-47432 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL Wind2H2 RD&D Project * The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with Xcel Energy and DOE has designed, operates, and continues to perform testing on the wind-to-hydrogen (Wind2H2) project at the National Wind Technology Center in Boulder * The Wind2H2 project integrates wind turbines, PV arrays and electrolyzers to produce from renewable energy

240

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

Steve Bergin

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

Steve Bergin

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

242

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WESTERN WESTERN GREENBRIER CO-PRODUCTION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT VOLUME 1 OF 3 DOE / EIS-0361 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory NOVEMBER 2007 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Title: Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0361) Location: Rainelle, West Virginia Contact: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the Department of Energy's process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Roy Spears, Document Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy 3610 Collins Ferry Road

243

Production of copper and brass nanoparticles upon laser ablation in liquids  

SciTech Connect

The production of nanoparticles upon ablation of copper and brass by pulsed radiation from Nd:YAG and copper lasers in water, ethanol, and acetone is studied. The nanoparticles were investigated by the methods of X-ray diffractometry, optical spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The produced copper and brass nanoparticles were shown to exhibit a plasmon resonance lying in the visible spectral range near 580 and 510 nm. The brass nanoparticles produced by ablation in ethanol have a shell approximately 10-nm thick for an average dimension of 20-30 nm. A chemical modification of ethanol was observed, which manifested itself in the appearance of intense UV absorption bands. Upon laser irradiation of brass nanoparticles in a liquid their absorption spectrum gradually transformed into the spectrum of copper nanoparticles. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Kazakevich, Pavel V; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A [Scientific Center for Wave Studies, A.M.Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, Valerii V [Laser Materials and Technology Research Center, A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research.

Gerald P. Huffman

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. These feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Some highlights of the results obtained during the first year of the current research contract are summarized as: (1) Terminal alkynes are an effective chain initiator for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactions, producing normal paraffins with C numbers {ge} to that of the added alkyne. (2) Significant improvement in the product distribution towards heavier hydrocarbons (C{sub 5} to C{sub 19}) was achieved in supercritical fluid (SCF) FT reactions compared to that of gas-phase reactions. (3) Xerogel and aerogel silica supported cobalt catalysts were successfully employed for FT synthesis. Selectivity for diesel range products increased with increasing Co content. (4) Silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) molecular sieve catalysts have been developed for methanol to olefin conversion, producing value-added products such as ethylene and propylene. (5) Hybrid Pt-promoted tungstated and sulfated zirconia catalysts are very effective in cracking n-C{sub 36} to jet and diesel fuel; these catalysts will be tested for cracking of FT wax. (6) Methane, ethane, and propane are readily decomposed to pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes using binary Fe-based catalysts containing Mo, Ni, or Pd in a single step non-oxidative reaction. (7) Partial dehydrogenation of liquid hydrocarbons (cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane) has been performed using catalysts consisting of Pt and other metals on stacked-cone carbon nanotubes. (8) An understanding of the catalytic reaction mechanisms of the catalysts developed in the CFFS C1 program is being achieved by structural characterization using multiple techniques, including XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, NMR, ESR, and magnetometry.

Gerald P. Huffman

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project.

NONE

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Characterization and utilization of hydrotreated products produced from the Whiterocks (Utah) tar sand bitumen-derived liquid  

SciTech Connect

The bitumen-derived liquid produced in a 4-inch diameter fluidized-bed reactor from the mined and crushed ore from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit has been hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor. The purpose was to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variable. A sulfided nickel-molybendum on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in all experiments. Moderately severe operating conditions were employed; that is, high reaction temperature (617--680 K) high reactor pressure (11.0--17.1 MPa) and low liquid feed rate (0.18--0.77 HSV); to achieve the desired reduction in heteroatom content. Detailed chemical structures of the bitumen-derived liquid feedstock and the hydrotreated total liquid products were determined by high resolution gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analyses. The compounds identified in the native bitumen included isoprenoids; bicyclic, tricycle, and tetracyclic terpenoids; steranes; hopanes; and perhydro-{beta}-carotenes. In addition, normal and branched alkanes and alkenes and partially dehydrogenated hydroaromatics were identified in the bitumen-derived liquid. The dominant pyrolysis reactions were: (1) the dealkylation of long alkyl side chains to form {alpha} - and isoolefins; and (2) the cleavage of alkyl chains linking aromatic and hydroaromatic clusters. Olefinic bonds were not observed in the hydrotreated product and monoaromatic hydrocarbons were the predominant aromatic species. The properties of the jet fuel fractions from the hydrotreated products met most of the jet fuel specifications. The cetane indices indicated these fractions would be suitable for use as diesel fuels.

Tsai, C.H.; Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Oblad, A.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Elucidating the solid, liquid and gaseous products from batch pyrolysis of cotton-gin trash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cotton-gin trash (CGT) was pyrolyzed at different temperatures and reaction times using an externally-heated batch reactor. The average yields of output products (solid/char, liquid/bio-oil, and gaseous) were determined. The heating value (HV) of CGT was measured to be around 15-16 MJ kg- 1 (6500-7000 Btu lb-1). In the first set of tests, CGT was pyrolyzed at 600, 700, and 800C and at 30, 45, and 60 min reaction period. The maximum char yield of 40% by weight (wt.%) was determined at 600C and 30 min settings, however, the HV of char was low and almost similar to the HV of CGT. A maximum gas yield of 40 wt.% was measured at 800C and 60 min and the highest liquid yield of 30 wt.% was determined at 800C and 30 min. In the modified pyrolysis test, the effects of temperature (500, 600, 700, and 800C) on the product yield and other properties were investigated. The experiment was performed using the same reactor purged with nitrogen at a rate of 1000 cm3 min-1. Gas yield increased as temperature was increased while the effect was opposite on char yield. The maximum char yield of 38 wt.% was determined at 500C and 30 min. The char had the largest fraction in the energy output (70-83%) followed by gas (10-20%) and bio-oil (7- 9%). Maximum gas yield of 35 wt.% was determined at 800C. The average yield of CO, H2 and total hydrocarbons (THC) generally increased with increased temperature but CO2 production decreased. Methane, ethane, and propane dominated the THC. The bio-oil yield at 600C was the highest at about 30 wt.% among the temperature settings. The HV of bio-oil was low (2-5 MJ kg-1) due to minimal non-HC compounds and high moisture content (MC). A simple energy balance of the process was performed. The process was considered energy intensive due to the high amount of energy input (6100 kJ) while generating a maximum energy output of only 10%. After disregarding the energy used for preparation and pyrolysis, the energy losses ranged from 30-46% while the energy of the output represent between 55-70% of the input energy from CGT.

Aquino, Froilan Ludana

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: First Set of Composite Data Products for Publication - March 1, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides the initial composite data products available for publication from NREL's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Spring 2007 Composite Data Products; March 8, 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides the composite data products from Spring 2007 from NREL's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Thomas, H.; Welch, C.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes to a solid, relatively insoluble, thermally stable form is provided and comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, e.g., kaolin, bentonite, dickite, halloysite, pyrophyllite, etc., with the sodium nitrate-containing radioactive wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at a temperature of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to thereby entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid waste, such as neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes (e.g., anhydrous salt cake) is converted at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to the solid mineral form-cancrinite having an approximate chemical formula 2(NaAlSiO.sub.4) .sup.. xSalt.sup.. y H.sub.2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO.sub.3. In another embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C, the resulting reaction product is air dried eitheras loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600.degree. C to form the solid mineral form-nepheline which has the approximate chemical formula of NaAlSiO.sub.4. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10.sup.-.sup.2 to 10.sup.-.sup.4 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for cancrinite and 10.sup.-.sup.3 to 10.sup.-.sup.5 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for nepheline.

Barney, Gary S. (Richland, WA); Brownell, Lloyd E. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the first six months of the subject contract (DE-FC26-02NT-4159), from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003.

Gerald P. Huffman

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

required to meet the target G G G G G Introduction This project focuses on the APR of biomass-derived liquids for the production of hydrogen. We target the development of...

255

NETL: News Release - DOE Project Revives Oil Production in Abandoned Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 , 2006 4 , 2006 DOE Project Revives Oil Production in Abandoned Fields on Osage Tribal Lands Novel Oil Recovery Technique Developed Under DOE's Native American Initiative WASHINGTON, DC - A technology developed with U.S. Department of Energy funding has revived oil production in two abandoned oilfields on Osage Indian tribal lands in northeastern Oklahoma, and demonstrated a technology that could add billions of barrels of additional domestic oil production in declining fields. Production has jumped from zero to more than 100 barrels of oil per day in the two Osage County, Okla., fields, one of which is more than 100 years old. The technology was successfully pilot-tested in the century-old field, and using the knowledge gained, the technology was applied to a neighboring field with comparable success. This suggests that such approaches could revitalize thousands of other seemingly depleted oilfields across America's Midcontinent region.

256

Great Plains gasification project  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes organizational and research work on a coal gasification project which is based on North Dakota lignite. Many design changes have been incorporated into this plant, which is now being built after years of delay due to environmental, financial, and regulatory problems. Engineering and operational details are given for a project designed for conversion of 22,000 tons/day of liquid into fuel gas and several by products. Economic considerations are included.

Kuhn, A.K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Recent developments in the production of liquid fuels via catalytic conversion of microalgae: experiments and simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize food versus fuel concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi,Fan; Wang, Pin; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Available Technologies: Sugar Extraction and Ionic Liquid ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Biomass pretreatment for biofuel production; Recovery of products using biphasic liquid-liquid extraction; Recovery and ...

259

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Figure S-1. Figure S-1. General Location Map U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Lab Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project DEIS November 2006 WV 20 S 12 S 63 WV 39 Proposed Co- Production Facility Anjean and Joe Knob Coal Refuse Piles U S 6 0 U S 6 0 US 219 WV 20 WV 39 AN1 AN2 AN3 DN1 DN2 GV W V 2 0 U S 6 0 C R 1 Figure 1-1. General Location Map U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Lab Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project DEIS November 2006 WV 20 S 12 S 63 WV 39 Proposed Co- Production Facility Anjean and Joe Knob Coal Refuse Piles U S 6 0 U S 6 0 US 219 WV 20 WV 39 AN1 AN2 AN3 DN1 DN2 GV W V 2 0 U S 6 0 C R 1 S 63 Rainelle Anjean Quinwood Charmco Lewisburg Savannah Quarry Greystone Quarry Boxley Quarry Anjean and Joe Knob Coal Refuse Piles Green Valley Coal Refuse Pile

260

Exploitation of olive mill wastewater and liquid cow manure for biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Co-digestion of organic waste streams is an innovative technology for the reduction of methane/greenhouse gas emissions. Different organic substrates are combined to generate a homogeneous mixture as input to the anaerobic reactor in order to increase process performance, realize a more efficient use of equipment and cost-sharing by processing multiple waste streams in a single facility. In this study, the potential of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of a mixture containing olive mill wastewater (OMW) and liquid cow manure (LCM) using a two-stage process has been evaluated by using two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) under mesophilic conditions (35 {sup o}C) in order to separately monitor and control the processes of acidogenesis and methanogenesis. The overall process was studied with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 19 days. The digester was continuously fed with an influent composed (v/v) of 20% OMW and 80% LCM. The average removal of dissolved and total COD was 63.2% and 50%, respectively. The volatile solids (VS) removal was 34.2% for the examined mixture of feedstocks operating the system at an overall OLR of 3.63 g CODL{sub reactor}{sup -1}d{sup -1}. Methane production rate at the steady state reached 0.91 L CH{sub 4}L{sub reactor}{sup -1}d{sup -1} or 250.9 L CH{sub 4} at standard temperature and pressure conditions (STP) per kg COD fed to the system.

Dareioti, Margarita A.; Dokianakis, Spyros N.; Stamatelatou, Katerina; Zafiri, Constantina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 1 Karatheodori St., GR 26500 Patras (Greece); Kornaros, Michael, E-mail: kornaros@chemeng.upatras.g [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 1 Karatheodori St., GR 26500 Patras (Greece)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Agenda for the Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review Agenda for Tuesday, November 6, 2007 Location: BCS Incorporated, 8929 Stephens Road, Laurel, MD. 20723 410-997-7778 8:30 - 9:00 Continental Breakfast 9:00 DOE Targets, Tools and Technology o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets DOE, Arlene Anderson o H2A Overview, NREL, Darlene Steward o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Cost Analysis DTI, Brian James 10:00 Research Review o Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production Systems, H2Gen, Sandy Thomas o Integrated Short Contact Time Hydrogen Generator, GE Global Research, Wei Wei o Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar

262

Liquid-liquid reaction of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite for the production of singlet oxygen in a centrifugal flow singlet oxygen generator  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made to produce gas-phase singlet oxygen O{sub 2}(a{sup 1{Delta}}{sub g}) in a liquid-liquid reaction between acidic hydrogen peroxide (AHP) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The attempt arises from the fact that basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) has long been the prime source for producing singlet delta oxygen through its reaction with chlorine. However, BHP suffers from the defect of being unstable during storage. Exploratory experiments were performed in a centrifugal flow singlet oxygen generator (CF-SOG) with two streams of solutions, AHP and NaOCl, mixed in a slit nozzle and then injected into the arc-shaped concavity in the CF-SOG to form a rotating liquid flow with a remarkable centrifugal force. With the help of this centrifugal force, the product of the O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) reaction was quickly separated from the liquid phase. The gas-phase O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) was detected via the spectrum of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) cooperative dimolecular emission with a CCD spectrograph. Experimental results show that it is feasible to produce gas-phase O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) from the AHP + NaOCl reaction, and the stronger the acidity, the more efficient the O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) production. However, since in the AHP + NaOCl reaction, Cl{sub 2} unavoidably appears as a byproduct, its catalytic action on the decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into ground-state O{sub 2} remains a major obstacle to utilising the AHP + NaOCl reaction in producing gas-phase O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}). Qualitative interpretation shows that the AHP + NaOCl reaction is virtually the reaction of interaction of molecular H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with molecular HOCl, its mechanism being analogous to that of reaction of BHP with Cl{sub 2}, where HOOCl is the key intermediate. It is difficult to form the intermediate HOOCl via the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + NaOCl reaction in a basic medium, thus gas-phase O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) cannot be obtained in appreciable quantities. (active media)

Cui Rongrong; Deng Liezheng; Shi Wenbo; Yang Heping; Sha Guohe; Zhang Cunhao [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Bubble point suppression in unconventional liquids rich reservoirs and its impact on oil production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The average pore size in producing unconventional, liquids-rich reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this nano-pore scale, capillary and surface disjoining (more)

Firincioglu, Tuba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Production of Oxygen Gas and Liquid Metal by Electrochemical Decomposition of Molten Iron Oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is the electrolytic decomposition of a metal oxide, most preferably into liquid metal and oxygen gas. The successful deployment of MOE hinges upon the existence of an inert anode capable of ...

Wang, Dihua

266

Hydrogen production from liquid hydrocarbons demonstration program. Final report, 26 August 1985-1 September 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force now uses diesel-engine generators as sources of heat and electricity at selected remotes sites. Simultaneously, it has investigated alternative cogeneration candidates that offer improved reliability, maintain ability, and economics. One system that shows high potential is a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant consisting of a fuel conditioner to convert logistic fuels such as DEF-2, DF-a and JP-4 to a hydrogen-rich gas, and a power conditioner to convert the direct-current power to alternating current. The objective of the project work was to define, and demonstrate, a fuel conditioner to meet performance criteria established for the Air Force Remote Site Fuel Cell Power Plant program. Key criteria included high fuel-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, rapid startup and load-following capability, and minimum water consumption during operations. A process configuration which has the potential to produce a minimum of 0.365 pound of hydrogen per pound of feed diesel consumed is described. The hydrogen-containing product is a suitable fuel for phosphoric-acid fuel-cell power plant. A 2 mole per hour (hydrogen) demonstration plant was designed, constructed and started up. Results are summarized.

O'Hara, J.B.; Chow, T.K.; Ling, J.K.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Liquid fuels production from biomass. Progress report No. 6, 1 October-31 December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current program to convert biomass into liquid hydrocarbon fuels is an extension of the previous program to ferment marine algae to acetic acid. In that study, it was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation both by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids to aliphatic hydrocarbons via Kolbe Electrolysis, which may be used as a diesel fuel. The specific goals for the current program are: (1) establish conditions under which substrates other than marine algae may be converted in good yield to organic acids. The primary task in this regard is methane suppression; (2) modify the current 300 liter fixed packed bed batch fermenter to operate in a continuous mode; (3) change from membrane extraction of organic acids to liquid-liquid extraction; (4) optimize the energy balance of the electrolytic oxidation process. The primary task in this regard is to reduce the working potential required for the electrolysis while maintaining an adequate current density; and (5) scale the entire process up to match the output of the 300 liter fermenter. The accomplishments in this program are on schedule. Experimental results show that the electrolysis of organic acids produced by fermentation to liquid hydrocarbon fuels already have a favorable energy balance of 6/1 based on the applied potential and over 10/1 based on the working potential.

Sanderson, J.E.; Wise, D.L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Bartlesville Energy Technology Center's research activities are summarized under the following headings: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction which is subdivided into resource assessment and production; liquid processing which includes characterization of liquids from petroleum, coal, shale and other alternate sources, thermodynamics and process technology; utilization; and project integration and technology transfer. (ATT)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Assessment of Air Emissions at the U S Liquids Exploration and Production Land Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to make the first set of measurements documenting the potential for emissions of pollutants from exploration and production (E&P) waste disposal facilities at Bourg, Louisiana and Bateman Island, Louisiana. The objective of the project was to quantify the emissions and to determine whether the measured emissions were potentially harmful to human health of workers and the adjacent community. The study, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) is designed to complement additional studies funded by Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LADNR) and the American Petroleum Institute. The distinguishing feature of this study is that actual, independent field measurements of emissions were used to assess the potential problems of this disposal technology. Initial measurements were made at the Bourg, LA facility, adjacent to the community of Grand Bois in late 1998-early 1999. Emission measurements were performed using aluminum chambers placed over the surface of the landfarm cells. Air was pulled through the chambers and the concentration of the contaminants in the air exiting the chambers was measured. The contaminants of interest were the ''BTEX'' compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), commonly found in E&P wastes and hydrogen sulfide, a noxious gas present naturally in many E&P wastes and crude oils. Measurements indicated that emissions were measurable using the techniques developed for the study. However, when the air concentrations of these contaminants that developed above the landfarm cells were compared with standards for workers from the Occupational and Safety and Health Association (''OSHA'') and for communities (Louisiana's ambient air standards), levels were not of concern. Since amounts of wastes being processed by the Bourg facility were considerably lower than normal, a decision was made to continue the study at the Bateman Island facility near Morgan City, LA. This facility was receiving more normal loadings of E&P wastes. Additional emission measurements were made at the Bateman Island facility within cells over a range of ''ages'', from those most recently loaded with E&P wastes to cells that have not received wastes for 9 months or more. As expected the greatest chance for emissions when the cell is most recently loaded. Again, measured fluxes did not produce air concentrations that were of concern. As expected, the highest fluxes were observed in the cells that had recently received wastes and older cells had very low emissions. Measurements of emissions of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) were also conducted at these two facilities. Levels of emissions were similar to the xange observed in the literature for natural salt marshes that surround these facilities. Production of sulfide within the cells was also measured by the most sensitive techniques available and measured sulfide production rates were low in the samples tested. The only potential concern at the facility with regards to sulfide was the levels of sulfide emitted from the sumps. The facility logbook at Bourg was analyzed to determine a time sequence of activities over 1998-1999. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality conducted a time-series of air concentrations for hazardous air pollutants during this period at the fenceline of the Bourg facility. These data were characterized by periods of static concentrations interspersed with peaks. A series of peaks were analyzed and compared with logbook records for the activities occurring at the time. In reverse fashion, a set of activities documented by the logbook was examined and the concentrations of benzene that developed from these activities were documented. No direct correlation could be made with the observed peaks and any activities suggesting that concentrations of benzene at the fenceline may be the result of a complex suite of activities including onsite activities not documented in the logbook (loading of the cells by truck haulers) and offsite activities (automobile traffic). Based on these results several recomme

John H. Pardue; K.T. Valsaraj

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

BWRVIP-27-A: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR Standby Liquid Control System / Core Plate Delta-P Inspection and Flaw Evaluation Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP), formed in June, 1994, is an association of utilities focused exclusively on boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel and internals issues. This BWRVIP report defines inspection requirements for BWR standby liquid control (SLC) system piping from the vessel nozzle safe-end inward. A previous version of this report was published as BWRVIP-27 (TR-107286). This report (BWRVIP-27-A) incorporates changes proposed by the BWRVIP in response to "U.S. Nucl...

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

Field-project designs for carbon dioxide sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide concerns about global warming and possible contributions to it from anthropogenic carbon dioxide have become important during the past several years. Coal seams may make excellent candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration; coal-seam sequestration could enhance methane production and improve sequestration economics. Reservoir-simulation computations are an important component of any engineering design before carbon dioxide is injected underground. We have performed such simulations for a hypothetical pilot-scale project in representative coal seams. In these simulations we assume four horizontal production wells that form a square, that is, two wells drilled at right angles to each other forming two sides of a square, with another pair of horizontal wells similarly drilled to form the other two sides. Four shorter horizontal wells are drilled from a vertical well at the center of the square, forming two straight lines orthogonal to each other. By modifying coal properties, especially sorption rate, we have approximated different types of coals. By varying operational parameters, such as injector length, injection well pressure, time to injection, and production well pressure, we can evaluate different production schemes to determine an optimum for each coal type. Any optimization requires considering a tradeoff between total CO{sub 2} sequestered and the rate of methane production. Values of total CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced are presented for multiple coal types and different operational designs. 30 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

W. Neal Sams; Grant Bromhal; Sinisha Jikich; Turgay Ertekin; Duane H. Smith [EG& G Technical Services, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electric Energy Conservation and Production Project: Vpolume 3: Wind energy potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A final report has been prepared under the Electric Energy Conservation and Production Project, conducted by the Blackfeet Indian Tribe and its consultants, Black Hawk Associates, Inc. The report addresses two major issues - the heavy reliance on electricity by residents of the Blackfeet Reservation, and the opportunities for electricity production from wind energy resources on the Reservation. The findings of this report (1) help provide a basis for comprehensive energy management planning on the Reservation, (2) analyze the potential for minimizing electricity demand and maximizing the efficiency of electrical end-uses through appropriate conservation measures, (3) assess the potential of wind energy resources located on the Reservation, and (4) identify and assess the technical, financial, legal, institutional, and regulatory issues involved in wind energy development within the Blackfeet Reservation.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Predicting the performance of system for the co-production of Fischer-Tropsch synthetic liquid and power from coal  

SciTech Connect

A co-production system based on Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactor and gas turbine was simulated and analyzed. Syngas from entrained bed coal gasification was used as feedstock of the low-temperature slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reactor. Raw synthetic liquid produced was fractioned and upgraded to diesel, gasoline, and liquid petrol gas (LPG). Tail gas composed of unconverted syngas and FT light components was fed to the gas turbine. Supplemental fuel (NG, or refinery mine gas) might be necessary, which was dependent on gas turbine capacity expander through flow capacity, etc. FT yield information was important to the simulation of this co-production system. A correlation model based on Mobil's two step pilot plant was applied. User models that can predict product yields and cooperate with other units were embedded into Aspen plus simulation. Performance prediction of syngas fired gas turbine was the other key of this system. The increase in mass flow through the turbine affects the match between compressor and turbine operating conditions. The calculation was carried out by GS software developed by Politecnico Di Milano and Princeton University. Various cases were investigated to match the FT synthesis island, power island, and gasification island in co-production systems. Effects of CO{sub 2} removal/LPG recovery, co-firing, and CH{sub 4} content variation were studied. Simulation results indicated that more than 50% of input energy was converted to electricity and FT products. Total yield of gasoline, diesel, and LPG was 136-155 g/N m{sup 3} (CO+H{sub 2}). At coal feed of 21.9 kg/s, net electricity exported to the grid was higher than 100 MW. Total production of diesel and gasoline (and LPG) was 118,000 t (134,000 t)/year. Under the economic analysis conditions assumed in this paper the co-production system was economically feasible.

Wang, X.; Xiao, Y.; Xu, S.; Guo, Z. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Engineering Thermophysics

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Liquid fuels production from biomass. Progress report No. 7, January 1-March 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current program to convert biomass into liquid hydrocarbon fuels is an extension of the previous program to ferment marine algae to acetic acid. In that study, it was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation broth by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids to aliphatic hydrocarbons via Kolbe Electrolysis, which may be used as a diesel fuel. The specific goals for the current program are: (1) establish conditions under which substrates other than marine algae may be converted in good yield to organic acids. The primary task in this regard is methane suppression; (2) modify the current 300 liter fixed packed bed batch fermenter to operate in a continuous mode; (3) change from membrane extraction of organic acids to liquid-liquid extraction; (4) optimize the energy balance of the electrolytic oxidation process. The primary task in this regard is to reduce the working potential required for the electrolysis while maintaining an adequate current density; (5) scale the entire process up to match the ouput of the 300 liter fermenter. The accomplishments in this program are on schedule. Experimental results have shown that the electrolysis of organic acids produced by fermentation to liquid hydrocarbon fuels is already operating with a favorable energy balance of 6/1 based on the applied potential and over 10/1 based on the working potential. 2-Bromoethanesulfonic acid, a coenzyme M analogue, has been shown to be an effective methane suppressor, and the program is being rapidly expanded to include biomass substrates other than marine algae. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward refining the process design and economic analysis presented previously.

Sanderson, J.E.; Garcia-Martinez, D.V.; George, G.S.; Dillon, J.J.; Wise, D.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

277

Liquid fuels production from biomass. Progress report No. 8, July 1-September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation broth by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids to aliphatic hydrocarbons via Kolbe electrolysis, which may be used as a diesel fuel. A coenzyme M analogue, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid has been shown to be an effective suppressor of methane in nonsterile anaerobic fermentation of cellulosic substrates. A tapered auger device has been designed and built which has been demonstrated on the bench to be effective for adding substrate and removing residue in a continuous manner from a fixed packed bed fermenter. A solvent extracter system using kerosene as the nonaqueous phase has been constructed and is currently in operation in series with the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermenter. The electrolytic oxidation of organic acids produced in the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermenter is operating with a favorable energy balance of 6/1 based on the applied potential. As stated earlier the liquid-liquid extractor system is operating in line with the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermentor. The other components of an integrated continuous system, the continuous feed device and the Kolbe electrolysis cell are operating satisfactorily out of line on a scale compatible with the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermentor. An economic analysis for a 1000 ton per day plant has been performed and has been improved and updated based on additional experimental results. Currently a cost based on utility financing including a reasonable return on investment of $5.48/million Btu is estimated, making the process fully competitive with the most favorable estimates from other processes for producing liquid fuels from renewable resources.

Sanderson, J.E.; Wise, D.L.; Levy, P.F.; Molyneaux, M.S.

1979-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Liquid fuels production from biomass. Progress report No. 8, April 1-June 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current program to convert biomass into liquid hydrocarbon fuels is an extension of the previous program to ferment marine algae to acetic acid. In that study, it was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation both by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids to aliphatic hydrocarbons via Kolbe Electrolysis, which may be used as a diesel fuel. The accompishments in this program for the first year of work are as follows: a coenzyme M anologue, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid has been shown to be an effective suppressor of methane in nonsterile anaerobic fermentation of cellulosic substrates; a tapered auger device has been designed and built which has been demonstrated on the bench to be effective for adding substrate and removing residue in a continuous manner from a fixed packed bed fermenter; a solvent extracter system using kerosene as the nonaqueous phase has been constructed and is currently in operation in series with the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermenter; although additional work is required to optimize the electrolysis process the electrolytic oxidation of organic acids produced in the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermenter is operating with a favorable energy balance of 6/1 based on the applied potential; the liquid-liquid extractor system is operating in line with 300 liter fixed packed bed fermentor; the other components of an integrated continuous system, the continuous feed device and the Kolbe electrolysis cell are operating satisfactorily out of line on a scale compatible with the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermentor; and an economic analysis for a 1000 ton per day plant has been performed and has been improved and updated based on additional experimental results.

Sanderson, J.E.; Garcia-Martinez, D.V.; George, G.S.; Dillon, J.J.; Molyneaux, M.S.; Barnard, G.W.; Wise, D.L.

1979-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

280

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 1 of 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

Stephen Bergin

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 3 of 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

Stephen Bergin

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

Stephen Bergin

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Production and Depletion of Supercooled Liquid Water in a Colorado Winter Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1990 Winter Icing and Storms Project (WISP), a shallow cold front passed through northeastern Colorado, followed by a secondary cold front. A broad high pressure area behind the initial front set up a Denver cyclone circulation within ...

Marcia K. Politovich; Ben C. Bernstein

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm3) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the 7Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ~200oC and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of > 4 kW/cm2 and volume power density of ~ 2 MW/cm3 at a lithium flow of ~4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91- 2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF.

S. Halfon; A. Arenshtam; D. Kijel; M. Paul; D. Berkovits; I. Eliyahu; G. Feinberg; M. Friedman; N. Hazenshprung; I. Mardor; A. Nagler; G. Shimel; M. Tessler; I. Silverman

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WITHDRAWING LIGHT ISOTOPIC PRODUCT FROM A LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process and apparatus are described for removing enriched product from the columns of a thermal diffusion plant for separation of isotopes. In the removal cycle, light product at the top cf the diffusion columns is circulated through the column tops and a shipping cylinder connected thereto unttl the concertation of enriched product in the cylinder reaches the desired point. During the removal, circulation through the bottoms is blocked bv freezing. in the diffusion cycle, the bottom portion is unfrozen, fresh feed is distributed to the bottoms of the columns, ard heavy product is withdrawn from the bottoms, while the tops of the columns are blocked by freezing.

Dole, M.

1959-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

New process modeling [sic], design, and control strategies for energy efficiency, high product quality, and improved productivity in the process industries. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

This project was concerned with the development of process design and control strategies for improving energy efficiency, product quality, and productivity in the process industries. In particular, (i) the resilient design and control of chemical reactors, and (ii) the operation of complex processing systems, was investigated. Specific topics studied included new process modeling procedures, nonlinear controller designs, and control strategies for multiunit integrated processes. Both fundamental and immediately applicable results were obtained. The new design and operation results from this project were incorporated into computer-aided design software and disseminated to industry. The principles and design procedures have found their way into industrial practice.

Ray, W. Harmon

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Production of liquid fuels with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent events by OPEC have sharply increased interest in the United States for synfuels, and there are plans for several types of synfuel demonstration plants. The early timing of these plants will probably preclude their use of a nuclear heat source, but their operation will be a necessary step to the eventual integration of a nuclear heat source. The applications using coal liquids that are considered active candidates for nuclear process heat, the reference heat source design, and nuclear and non-nuclear methods for coal liquefaction are described.

Quade, R.N.; Vrable, D.L.; Green, L. Jr.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Syngas production from heavy liquid fuel reforming in inert porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the low H2 density is the movement: the power required to pump hydrogen is around 4.5 times higher than for natural gas per unit of delivered energy [17]. Hydrogen can be stored on-board a vehicle as a compressed gas, as a liquid in cryogenic containers... and the transportation system are mainly based on the combustion of fossil fuels, generally defined as oil, coal and natural gas, as shown in Fig. 1.1. There are several issues to be considered about fossil fuel consumption. First of all, the greenhouse gas emission, due...

Pastore, Andrea

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

City of North Bonneville, Washington: Geothermal Exploration Project, production test well, Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Based on discussions with the City of North Bonneville, the production test well was drilled to a depth that would also explore for ground water temperatures near 130/sup 0/F (54.4/sup 0/C). Depth projections to a 130/sup 0/F bottom hole temperature were made by assuming a constant ground water temperature rise greater than 50/sup 0/C per kilometer, and by assuming that essentially homogeneous or equivalent conductive rock units would be encountered. Minimum water production requirements were not set, although the City determined that about 800 gpm would be acceptable. Large upper casing diameters of 16 and 12 inches were installed in order to provide the future use of either a vertical turbine or submersible pump, as desired by the city. The scope of work included interpretation of well characteristics, evaluation of ground water as a geothermal resource, geologic analysis of data from drilling and testing, drilling supervision, daily drilling cost accounting, and preparation of a final report. The report includes geologic evaluation of the drilling and test data, ground water and geothermal potential.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Optimal Simultaneous Production of Hydrogen and Liquid Fuels from Glycerol: Integrating the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel production Fischer-Tropsch or methanol synthesis . Moreover, under the reaction conditions hydrocarbons through the Fischer-Tropsch process. To do this, it is necessary to partially oxidize the CH4 production Fischer- Tropsch . Moreover, under the reaction conditions explored, no CO2 was detected, i

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

292

Hydrotreating of coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Sandia`s refining of coal-derived liquids project is to determine the relationship between hydrotreating conditions and Product characteristics. The coal-derived liquids used in this work were produced In HTI`s first proof-of-concept run using Illinois No. 8 coal. Samples of the whole coal liquid product, distillate fractions of this liquid, and Criterion HDN-60 catalyst were obtained from Southwest Research Inc. Hydrotreating experiments were performed using a continuous operation, unattended, microflow reactor system. A factorial experimental design with three variables (temperature, (310{degrees}C to 388{degrees}C), liquid hourly space velocity (1 to 3 g/h/cm{sup 3}(cat)), pressure (500 to 1000 psig H{sub 2}) is being used in this project. Sulfur and nitrogen contents of the hydrotreated products were monitored during the hydrotreating experiments to ensure that activity was lined out at each set of reaction conditions. Results of hydrotreating the whole coal liquid showed that nitrogen values in the products ranged from 549 ppM at 320{degrees}C, 3 g/h/cm{sup 3}(cat), 500 psig H{sub 2} to <15 ppM at 400{degrees}C, 1 g/h/ cm{sup 3}(cat), 1000 psig H{sub 2}.

Stohl, F.V.; Lott, S.E.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.; Oelfke, J.B.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 6. Preliminary analysis of upgrading alternatives for the Great Plains liquid by-production streams. Interim report, March 1987-February 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However the phenolic and naptha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10-15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10% of the U.S. market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Future of Liquid Biofuels for APEC Economies  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated by APEC Energy Working Group (EWG) to maximize the energy sector's contribution to the region's economic and social well-being through activities in five areas of strategic importance including liquid biofuels production and development.

Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

SRS - Programs - Liquid Waste Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Waste Disposition Liquid Waste Disposition This includes both the solidification of highly radioactive liquid wastes stored in SRS's tank farms and disposal of liquid low-level waste generated as a by-product of the separations process and tank farm operations. This low-level waste is treated in the Effluent Treatment Facility. High-activity liquid waste is generated at SRS as by-products from the processing of nuclear materials for national defense, research and medical programs. The waste, totaling about 36 million gallons, is currently stored in 49 underground carbon-steel waste tanks grouped into two "tank farms" at SRS. While the waste is stored in the tanks, it separates into two parts: a sludge that settles on the bottom of the tank, and a liquid supernate that resides on top of the sludge. The waste is reduced to about 30 percent of its original volume by evaporation. The condensed evaporator "overheads" are transferred to the Effluent Treatment Project for final cleanup prior to release to the environment. As the concentrate cools a portion of it crystallizes forming solid saltcake. The concentrated supernate and saltcake are less mobile and therefore less likely to escape to the environment in the event of a tank crack or leak.

297

Demonstration Development Project: Evaluation of a Test Loop to Demonstrate Handling Properties of Liquid CO2-Coal Slurry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants employing liquid CO2 in lieu of water as the slurrying medium to feed coal to the gasifier are a promising option for carbon capture and storage (CCS). This report summarizes the design and cost estimate for a proposed CO2-coal slurry test loop system. The objective is to validate a cost estimate for the construction of a full scale CO2-coal slurry test loop and aid in technical aspects of working with ...

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Using critical chain project management methodologies to build a production schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Chain project management methodologies have been used for the last ten years to manage a wide range of projects. These methods, which apply Eli Goldratt's Theory of Constraints, have demonstrated the ability to ...

Poppe, Clayton D. (Clayton Douglas)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment production in liquid-gas type phase transition region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment production during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

N. Buyukcizmeci; R. Ogul; A. S. Botvina

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment production in liquid-gas type phase transition region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment production during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

N. Buyukcizmeci; R. Ogul; A. S. Botvina

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute (SRI) Project Number: FE0012054 Project Description The focus of the project will be to develop, test, and optimize steam-reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, NH3, and CH4 in high-temperature and sulfur environments, increasing the ratio of hydrogen in syngas, as part of a modified, advanced gasification platform for the conversion of low-rank coals to syngas for coal-to-liquid and integrated gasification combined cycle applications. Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits Project Scope and Technology Readiness Level Accomplishments Contacts, Duration, and Cost Project Images Abstract Performer website: Southern Research Institute

302

Development of geothermally assisted process for production of liquid fuels and chemicals from wheat straw  

SciTech Connect

The effects of variations in autohydrolysis conditions on the production of fermentable sugars from wheat straw are investigated. Both the direct production of sugar from the autohydrolysis of hemicellulose and the subsequent yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose are considered. The principal parameters studied were time, temperature, and water/fiber weight ratio; however, the effects of adding minor amounts of phenol and aluminum sulfate to the autohydrolysis charge were also investigated. A brief study was made of the effects of two major parameters, substrate concentration and enzyme/substrate ratio, on the sugar yield from enzymatic hydrolysis of optimally pretreated straw. The efficiency with which these sugars could be fermented to ethanol was studied. In most cases experiments were carried out using distilled water; however, the effects of direct use of geothermal water were determined for each of the major steps in the process. An appendix to the body of the report describes the results of a preliminary economic evaluation of a plant designed to produce 25 x 10/sup 6/ gallons of ethanol per year from wheat straw using the best process conditions determined in the above work. Also appended are the results from a preliminary investigation of the applicability of autohydrolysis technology to the production of fermentable sugars from corn stover.

Murphy, V.G.; Linden, J.C.; Moreira, A.R.; Lenz, T.G.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 7. GPGP jet-fuels production program. Evaluation of technical uncertainties for producing jet fuels from liquid by-products of the Great Plains gasification plant. Interim report, 2 October 1987-30 September 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to analyze GPGP operations and develop correlations for the liquid by-products and plant operating factors such as coal feed rate and coal characteristics.

Fraser, M.D.; Rossi, R.J.; Wan, E.I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Bio-Derived Liquids From Bio-Derived Liquids Hydrogen From Bio Hydrogen From Bio - - Derived Liquids Derived Liquids Dave King, Yong Wang, PNNL BILIWIG Meeting Laurel, Maryland November 6, 2007 Innovation / Overview Innovation / Overview Innovation / Overview Project comprises two components z Ethanol steam reforming z Aqueous phase reforming (APR) Importance to small scale hydrogen production for distributed reforming for hydrogen production ‹ Ethanol is rapidly becoming an infrastructure fuel and is a logical feedstock ‹ APR provides vehicle for facile reforming of a variety of bio-derived feedstocks available in the biorefinery that are not conducive to conventional vapor phase reforming Distinctive technology approach/innovation z We are investigating single step ethanol reforming with emphasis on lower

306

NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about NREL's Wind to Hydrogen Project and producing renewable hydrogen for both energy storage and transporation, including the challenges, sustainable pathways, and analysis results.

Ramsden, T.; Harrison, K.; Steward, D.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, SmallerChapter 7 Recent Advances in Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography for the Analysis of Natural Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, Smaller Chapter 7 Recent Advances in Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography for the Analysis of Natural Products Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books F7E3E452FCB43F6D

309

Formulation and evaluation of highway transportation fuels from shale and coal oils: project identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Second annual report, March 20, 1980-March 19, 1981. [Broadcut fuel mixtures of petroleum, shale, and coal products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project work is reported for the formulation and testing of diesel and broadcut fuels containing components from petroleum, shale oil, and coal liquids. Formulation of most of the fuels was based on refinery modeling studies in the first year of the project. Product blends were prepared with a variety of compositions for use in this project and to distribute to other, similar research programs. Engine testing was conducted in a single-cylinder CLR engine over a range of loads and speeds. Relative performance and emissions were determined in comparison with typical petroleum diesel fuel. With the eight diesel fuels tested, it was found that well refined shale oil products show only minor differences in engine performance and emissions which are related to differences in boiling range. A less refined coal distillate can be used at low concentrations with normal engine performance and increased emissions of particulates and hydrocarbons. Higher concentrations of coal distillate degrade both performance and emissions. Broadcut fuels were tested in the same engine with variable results. All fuels showed increased fuel consumption and hydrocarbon emissions. The increase was greater with higher naphtha content or lower cetane number of the blends. Particulates and nitrogen oxides were high for blends with high 90% distillation temperatures. Operation may have been improved by modifying fuel injection. Cetane and distillation specifications may be advisable for future blends. Additional multi-cylinder and durability testing is planned using diesel fuels and broadcut fuels. Nine gasolines are scheduled for testing in the next phase of the project.

Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Productivity improvement in downstream EPC projects using value streams based organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Productivity improvements in manufacturing facilities have been studied in detail and there are many standardized tools and frameworks readily available to the industry for implementation. However the concept of productivity ...

Raghunathan, Krishnan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Co-Production Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Initiative (CCPI) Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Co-ProduCtion ProjeCt Description WMPI PTY., LLC of Gilberton, Pennsylvania has assembled a leading technology and...

312

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Pub - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids Petroleum & Other Liquids Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Crude Reserves and Production Refining and Processing Imports/Exports & Movements Stocks Consumption/Sales All Petroleum & Other Liquids Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports Proposed Natural Gas Liquids Realignment EIA has reviewed the approaches and terminology that have been used by EIA and others to categorize and organize natural gas liquids (NGL) data. The review uncovered definitional inconsistencies in the use of terms such as NGL, natural gas plant liquids (NGPL), and liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) that are adversely affecting the quality and clarity of U.S. and

313

Western LNG project - Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western LNG Project is a major new undertaking involving the liquefaction of conventional natural gas from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin at a plant on the British Columbia north coast. The gas in its liquid form will be shipped to Japan for consumption by utility companies. The Project represents a new era in gas processing and marketing for the Canadian natural gas industry.

Forgues, E.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Turning Bacteria into Biofuel: Development of an Integrated Microbial Electrocatalytic (MEC) System for Liquid Biofuel Production from CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: LBNL is improving the natural ability of a common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to use hydrogen and carbon dioxide for biofuel production. First, LBNL is genetically modifying the bacteria to produce biofuel at higher concentrations. Then, LBNL is using renewable electricity obtained from solar, wind, or wave power to produce high amounts of hydrogen in the presence of the bacteriaincreasing the organisms access to its energy source and improving the efficiency of the biofuel-creation process. Finally, LBNL is tethering electrocatalysts to the bacterias surface which will further accelerate the rate at which the organism creates biofuel. LBNL is also developing a chemical method to transform the biofuel that the bacteria produce into ready-to-use jet fuel.

None

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio- oil to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming and shift conversion

316

Information for LP MeOH Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJECT DATA ON EASTMAN CHEMICAL COMPANY'S PROJECT DATA ON EASTMAN CHEMICAL COMPANY'S CHEMICALS-FROM-COAL COMPLEX IN KINGSPORT, TN March 2003 Prepared by Eastman Chemical Company Kingsport, Tennessee and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania for the Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. Prepared for the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-92PC90543 Patents cleared by Chicago on 16 January 2002. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by Eastman Chemical Company and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. for the Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P., pursuant to a Cooperative Agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, and neither Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., Eastman Chemical Company, the Air

317

NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microalgal Biofuels Projects Microalgal Biofuels Projects A photo of a man in a white lab coat holding a glass flask that contains a small amount of clear green liquid. An NREL researcher analyzes algae samples for oil content using the Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter. NREL's microalgal biofuels projects focus on determining the feasibility and economic capability of employing algae as a cost-effective feedstock for fuel production. NREL researchers pioneered developing microalgal biofuels by leading the U.S. Department of Energy Aquatic Species Program from 1979 to 1996. Among NREL's RD&D projects in converting microalgae to biofuels are: Development of Algal Strains NREL and Chevron Corp. are collaborating to develop techniques to improve the production of liquid transportation fuels using microalgae. The

318

EIA projects little change in U.S. coal production in 2013 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... Coal production for the first three quarters (January-September) of 2012 was 46 million short tons ...

319

Project RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RU LlSON RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING FINAL REPOAT EBERLlNE INSTRUMENT CORPORATION Santa Fe, New Mexico Date Published - December 1973 PREPARED FOR THE U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION N E V A D A OPERATIONS OFFICE UNDER CONTRACT NO. AT(26-11-294 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Project RULISON ON-S1l'E RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS D U R I N G R E E N T R Y D R I L L I N G THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING \ F I N A L REPORT EBERLINE INSTRUMENT CORPORATION . Santa Fe, New Mexico 1 Date Published - December 1973 NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE . UNDER CONTRACT NO. AT(26-11-294 NOTICE ~~~~ This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United

320

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to metal carbides for production of liquid fuels and chemicals. Quarterly technical status report, April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Previous work at MIT indicates that essentially stoichiometric, rather than catalytic, reactions with alkaline earth metal oxides offer technical and economic promise as an innovative approach to upgrading natural gas to premium products such as liquid hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. In this approach, methane would be reacted with relatively low cost and recyclable alkaline earth metal oxides, such as CaO and MgO, at high temperatures (>1500{degrees}C) to achieve very high (i.e. approaching 100%) gas conversions to H{sub 2}, CO and the corresponding alkaline earth metal carbides. These carbides exist stably in solid form at dry ambient conditions and show promise for energy storage and long distance transport. The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop new scientific and engineering knowledge bases for further assessment of the approach by performing laboratory-scale experiments and thermodynamic and thermochemical kinetics calculations. Work on this project will be performed according to two tasks. Under Task 1 (Industrial Chemistry), a laboratory-scale electric arc discharge plasma reactor is being constructed and will be used to assess the technical feasibility of producing Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3} from MgO and methane, and to identify the operating conditions of interest for the commercial production of Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3} and/or CaC{sub 2} from MgO and/or CaO and methane. Under Task 2 (Mechanistic Foundations), preliminary thermodynamic calculations were performed for the Ca-C-H-O and Mg-C-H-O systems using the Chemkin program. A scoping run with CaO in an electrical screen heater reactor under reduced methane pressure was also conducted. No appreciable quantity of acetylene was detected upon hydrolysis of the solid residue. This can be attributed to the very small quantity of methane at the very low pressure coupled with inadequate contacting of whatever methane was present with the CaO powder.

Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Biomass production by fescue and switchgrass alone and in mixed swards with legumes. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

In assessing the role of biomass in alleviating potential global warming, the absence of information on the sustainability of biomass production on soils of limited agricultural potential is cited as a major constraint to the assessment of the role of biomass. Research on the sustainability of yields, recycling of nutrients, and emphasis on reduced inputs of agricultural chemicals in the production of biomass are among the critical research needs to clarify optimum cropping practice in biomass production. Two field experiments were conducted between 1989 and 1993. One study evaluated biomass production and composition of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) grown alone and with bigflower vetch (Vicia grandiflora L.) and the other assessed biomass productivity and composition of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) grown alone and with perennial legumes. Switchgrass received 0, 75 or 150 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually as NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} or was interseeded with vetch. Tall fescue received 0, 75, 150 or 225 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually or was interseeded with alfalfa (Medicago L.) or birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). It is hoped that production systems can be designed to produce high yields of biomass with minimal inputs of fertilizer N. Achievement of this goal would reduce the potential for movement of NO{sub 3} and other undesirable N forms outside the biomass production system into the environment. In addition, management systems involving legumes could reduce the cost of biomass production.

Collins, M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Univ. of Agronomy

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A large liquid argon time projection chamber for long-baseline, off-axis neutrino oscillation physics with the NuMI beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from neutrino oscillation experiments in the last ten years have revolutionized the field of neutrino physics. While the overall oscillation picture for three neutrinos is now well established and precision measurements of the oscillation parameters are underway, crucial issues remain. In particular, the hierarchy of the neutrino masses, the structure of the neutrino mixing matrix, and, above all, CP violation in the neutrino sector are the primary experimental challenges in upcoming years. A program that utilizes the newly commissioned NuMI neutrino beamline, and its planned upgrades, together with a high-performance, large-mass detector will be in an excellent position to provide decisive answers to these key neutrino physics questions. A Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) [2], which combines fine-grained tracking, total absorption calorimetry, and scalability, is well matched for this physics program. The few-millimeter-scale spatial granularity of a LArTPC combined with dE/dx measurements make it a powerful detector for neutrino oscillation physics. Scans of simulated event samples, both directed and blind, have shown that electron identification in {nu}{sub e} charged current interactions can be maintained at an efficiency of 80%. Backgrounds for {nu}{sub e} appearance searches from neutral current events with a {pi}{sup 0} are reduced well below the {approx} 0.5-1.0% {nu}{sub e} contamination of the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam [3]. While the ICARUS collaboration has pioneered this technology and shown its feasibility with successful operation of the T600 (600-ton) LArTPC [4], a detector for off-axis, long-baseline neutrino physics must be many times more massive to compensate for the low event rates. We have a baseline concept [5] based on the ICARUS wire plane structure and commercial methods of argon purification and housed in an industrial liquefied-natural-gas tank. Fifteen to fifty kton liquid argon capacity tanks have been considered. A very preliminary cost estimate for a 50-kton detector is $100M (unloaded) [6]. Continuing R&D will emphasize those issues pertaining to implementation of this very large scale liquid argon detector concept. Key hardware issues are achievement and maintenance of argon purity in the environment of an industrial tank, the assembly of very large electrode planes, and the signal quality obtained from readout electrodes with very long wires. Key data processing issues include an initial focus on rejection of cosmic rays for a surface experiment. Efforts are underway at Fermilab and a small number of universities in the US and Canada to address these issues with the goal of embarking on the construction of industrial-scale prototypes within one year. One such prototype could be deployed in the MiniBooNE beamline or in the NuMI surface building where neutrino interactions could be observed. These efforts are complementary to efforts around the world that include US participation, such as the construction of a LArTPC for the 2-km detector location at T2K [7]. The 2005 APS neutrino study [1] recommendations recognize that ''The development of new technologies will be essential for further advances in neutrino physics''. In a recent talk to EPP2010, Fermilab director P. Oddone, discussing the Fermilab program, states on his slides: ''We want to start a long term R&D program towards massive totally active liquid Argon detectors for extensions of NOvA''. [8]. As such, we are poised to enlarge our R&D efforts to realize the promise of a large liquid argon detector for neutrino physics.

Finley, D.; Jensen, D.; Jostlein, H.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; /Fermilab; Bromberg, C.; /Michigan State U.; Lu, C.; McDonald, T.; /Princeton U.; Gallagher, H.; Mann, A.; Schneps, J.; /Tufts U.; Cline, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Wang, H.; /UCLA; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B.T.; /Yale U.; Menary, S.; /York U., Canada

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

New Continuous Isosorbide Production from Sorbitol: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Agriculture Project Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Isosorbide is a new polymer additive derived from corn (via sorbitol) that when copolymerized with polyethylene terephthalate (PET), increases the strength and rigidity of the plastic. This project will develop an economically-viable, continuous catalytic process to convert sorbitol to isosorbide.

Carde, T.

2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Liquid fossil fuel technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented under the following headings: (1) extraction (technology assessment, oil research, gas research); (2) liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); (3) utilization (energy conservation); and (4) project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are also listed. Some of the highlights for this period are: the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center was converted into NIPER, the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research on October 1, 1983; modelling of enthalpies, heat capacities and volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions began using a mass action model; a series of experiments were run on upgrading by hydrogenation SRC-II coal liquid at different degrees of severity and the products have been analyzed; heavy crude oil extracts were separated into fraction with high performance liquid chromatography by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the mass spectra and electron spin resonance were determin ed; and particulates from exhaust gases of diesel engines using fire fuel types are being collected and will be analyzed by chemical methods and results will be compared with those obtained by biological assay. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluating reservoir production strategies in miscible and immiscible gas-injection projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miscible gas injection processes could be among the most widely used enhanced oil recovery processes. Successful design and implementation of a miscible gas injection project depends upon the accurate determination of the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) and other factors such as reservoir and fluid characterization. The MMP indicates the lowest pressure at which the displacement process becomes multicontact miscible. The experimental methods available for determining MMP are both costly and time consuming. Therefore, the use of correlations that prove to be reliable for a wide range of fluid types would likely be considered acceptable for preliminary screening studies. This work includes a comparative and critical evaluation of MMP correlations and thermodynamic models using an equation of state by PVTsim software. Application of gas injection usually entails substantial risk because of the technological sophistication and financial requirements to initiate the project. More detailed, comprehensive reservoir engineering and project monitoring are necessary for typical miscible flood projects than for other recovery methods. This project evaluated effects of important factors such as injection pressure, vertical-to-horizontal permeability ratio, well completion, relative permeability, and permeability stratification on the recovery efficiency from the reservoir for both miscible and immiscible displacements. A three-dimensional, three-phase, Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS) compositional simulator based on the implicit-pressure explicit-saturation (IMPES) technique was used to determine the sensitivity of miscible or immiscible oil recovery to suitable ranges of these reservoir parameters. Most of the MMP correlations evaluated in this study have proven not to consider the effect of fluid composition properly. In most cases, EOS-based models are more conservative in predicting MMP values. If screening methods identify a reservoir as a candidate for a miscible injection project, experimental MMP measurements should be conducted for specific gas-injection purposes. Simulation results indicated that injection pressure was a key parameter that influences oil recovery to a high degree. MMP appears to be the optimum injection pressure since the incremental oil recovery at pressures above the MMP is negligible and at pressures below the MMP recovery is substantially lower. Stratification, injection-well completion pattern, and vertical-to-horizontal permeability ratios could also affect the recovery efficiency of the reservoir in a variety of ways discussed in this work.

Farzad, Iman

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

EIA projections show U.S. energy production growing faster than ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA has just issued its Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Reference case, which highlights a growth in total U.S. energy production that exceeds growth in total U ...

329

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Concrete products in this project * Standard 8" concrete blocks * Standard 4' x 8' fiber-cement boards CO 2 The Goals * Maximizing carbon uptake by carbonation (at least...

330

Applying SE Methods Achieves Project Success to Evaluate Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock for Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

Applying basic systems engineering (SE) tools to the mission analysis phases of a 2.5-million dollar biomass pre-processing project for the U.S. Department of Energy directly assisted the project principal investigator understand the complexity and identify the gaps of a moving-target project and capture the undefined technical/functional requirements and deliverables from the project team and industrial partners. A creative application of various SE tools by non-aerospace systems engineers developed an innovative big picture product that combined aspects of mission analysis with a project functional flow block diagram, providing immediate understanding of the depth and breath of the biomass preprocessing effort for all team members, customers, and industrial partners. The big picture diagram became the blue print to write the project test plan, and provided direction to bring the project back on track and achieve project success.

Larry R. Zirker; Christopher T. Wright, PhD; R. Douglas Hamelin

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ultra-Clean Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: Dynamometer Durability Testing, the Denali Bus Fleet Demonstration, Bus Fleet Demonstrations Emissions Analysis, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Emissions Analysis, Feasibility Study of SFPs for Rural Alaska, and Cold Weather Testing of Ultra Clean Fuel.

Steve Bergin

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Advanced synfuel production with fusion  

SciTech Connect

An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers a nearly inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Analysis of the dynamics of saturation and pressure close to the wellbore for condensate reservoirs as a tool to optimize liquid production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas condensate reservoirs often exhibit a rapid decline in production with depletion. During early production, liquid dropout accumulates in the near wellbore area and this liquid dropout reduces the effective permeability to gas and thereby the well and field productivity. Our primary goal in this research is to understand the dynamics of condensate banking in the near well region of retrograde gases. We propose a relationship that can be used in determining gas oil ratios and near the wellbore saturation. The tasks accomplished in this study of gas condensate reservoir behavior include: Development of a generalized relationship, that allows us to estimate the gas-oil- ratio (GOR) and the effect condensate banking close to production wells. This simple relationship allows us to estimate GOR and condensate banking at any time by using basic data such as saturation pressure, field pressure, gas injection rates, and gas production rates. We recognize and acknowledge that further work is required in testing and improving this relation. We suggest the addition of molecular weights (or specific gravity) of the reservoir fluid to improve the correlative relationship. Comparison of field performance under a variety of production scenarios including natural depletion, gas cycling, water injection, and, the injection of different gases (methane, nitrogen and carbon dioxide). We provide a discussion of the effects of different production schemes upon saturation profiles and saturation histories, as well as the influence of various production-injection schemes on well and field productivity. We also include an analysis of the compositional changes driven by injection and the influence of these changes on reservoir performance.

Guerra Camargo, Andrea M

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Liquid Fuels Graphic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26. World Liquids Supply in three Cases, 2006 and 2030 Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2006-2030 Figure 28. World Liquids Consumption by Sector,...

336

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections Glossary › FAQS › Overview Projection Data Monthly Short-Term Forecasts to 2014 Annual Projections to 2040 International Projections Analysis & Projections Most Requested Annual Energy Outlook Related Congressional & Other Requests International Energy Outlook Related Presentations Short-Term Outlook Related Testimony All Reports Models & Documentation Price projections from Short-Term Energy Outlook › image chart of U.S. Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices as described in linked report Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, monthly. Increased tight oil production, vehicle efficiency reduce petroleum and liquid imports › graph of U.S. liquid fuels supply, as explained in the article text Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Today in Energy, December

337

Projected refined product balances in key Latin American countries: A preliminary examination  

SciTech Connect

Over the years, the East-West Center (EWC) has developed considerable expertise in refinery modeling, especially in the area of forecasting product balances for countries, given planned capacity changes, changes in product demand, changes in crude slates, and changes in product specifications. This expertise has been applied on an ongoing basis to the major refiners in the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region, along with the US West Coast as region in its own right. Refinery modeling in these three areas has been ongoing for nearly 15 years at the Center, and the tools and information sources are now well developed. To date, the EWC has not applied these tools to Latin America. Although research on Latin America has been an ongoing area of concern at the Center in recent years, the information gathered to date is still not of the level of detail nor quality available for other areas. The modeling efforts undertaken in this report are of a ``baseline`` nature, designed to outline the major issues, attempt a first cut at emerging product balances, and, above all, to elicit commentary from those directly involved in the oil industry in the key countries modeled. Our experience in other regions has shown that it takes a few years dialogue with refiners and government planner in individual countries to develop a reliable database, as well as the insights into operational constraints and practices that make accurate modeling possible. This report is no more than a first step down the road.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

General Electric Company Hanford Works, Project C-431-A Production Facility-Section A, design report  

SciTech Connect

The 100-C project is to be located adjacent to the present 100-B Area. It is planned to build an addition to the present 181-B river pump house using the same elevations for pump settings, intakes, and floors as for the present pump house, thus maintaining the same suction conditions and flood protection as B Area. The 105 Building will be located on higher ground than B Area and therefore, protection against possible flood damage is assured. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) general description of project; (2) addition to existing river pump house; (3) raw water lines from 181-B addition to 183-C lead house; (4) the 183-C filter plant; (5) 190-C process pump house; (6) power house addition; (7) high tanks; (8) retention basins; (9) outside streamlines; (10) primary substation; (11) outside underground lines; (12) outside electric lines; (13) roads, railroads, walks, fences; (14) structural design of all buildings; and (15) architectural design of all buildings.

Colburn, R.T.

1951-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum & Other Liquids Petroleum & Other Liquids Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Crude Reserves and Production Refining and Processing Imports/Exports & Movements Stocks Consumption/Sales All Petroleum & Other Liquids Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for crude oil and liquid fuels › image chart of World Liquid Fuels Supply and Demand as described in linked Short-Term Energy Outlook Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. EIA's latest weekly petroleum analysis › Featured chart from This Week in Petroleum using statistics from the Weekly Petroleum Status Report

340

Effect of Oxygen Concentration on Corrosion Product Transport at South Texas Project Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transport of corrosion products to PWR steam generators leads to sludge buildup on the tubesheet and fouling of tube-to-tube support crevices. In these regions, chemical impurities can concentrate and accelerate tubing corrosion, which can lead to significant losses in plant availability and steam generator replacement at more than $100 million per unit. This study investigated corrosion transport processes, with emphasis on the impact of oxygen concentration. The results will help utilities determine ap...

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SUMMARY S-1 SUMMARY This environmental impact statement (EIS) has been prepared by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) as amended (42 USC 4321 et seq.), to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and demonstration of a 98-megawatt (MWe) net power plant and cement manufacturing facility (the "Co- Production Facility"). The responsible organization for the federal action is the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a multi-purpose laboratory owned and operated by DOE. Proposed Action The Proposed Action is for DOE to decide whether to provide financial assistance to Western

342

Relative Investment Risks and Returns of Energy Management and Production Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering managers must routinely make decisions on how to allocate limited resources to achieve the most benefit. Energy conservation and increased or new productivity are two areas which compete for operating and capital budgets. This paper will describe how these objectives can be compared and properly addressed to result in a more satisfactory and reliable decision when allocating budget monies. Comparisons are made using a model to evaluate risk vs. return. The model numerically expresses alternatives in terms of confidence ratios or relative payouts modified by achievement probability.

Gaffney, B. J.; Inyard, F. H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electric Energy Conservation and Production Project: Volume 1, Electricity use patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report addresses two major issues: the heavy reliance on electricity by residents of the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana, and the opportunities for electricity production from wind energy resources on the Reservation. The findings of this report help provide a basis for comprehensive energy management planning on the Reservation, analyze the potential for minimizing electricity demand and maximizing the efficiency of electrical end-uses through appropriate conservation measures, assess the potential of wind energy resources located on the Reservation, and identify and assess the technical, financial, legal, institutional, and regulatory issues involved in wind energy development within the Blackfeet Reservation. This volume covers electricity use patterns.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

step toward the project's planned early 2011 startup. The project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

step toward the project's planned early 2011 startup. The project step toward the project's planned early 2011 startup. The project will capture CO 2 from the Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) Ethanol Production Facility and inject it into a deep saline reservoir more than one mile underground. Beginning in early 2011, up to 1 million metric tons of the captured CO 2 will be compressed into a dense, liquid-like state and injected over a three-year period. The Mt. Simon Sandstone, which is the rock formation targeted for the injection, is the thickest and most widespread saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin, with an estimated CO 2 storage capacity as high as 110 billion metric tons. Analysis of the survey data is a key component in the comprehensive monitoring program that will be implemented to ensure the injected

345

World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2009 (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The oil prices reported in AEO2009 represent the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil in 2007 dollars [50]. Projections of future supply and demand are made for liquids, a term used to refer to those liquids that after processing and refining can be used interchangeably with petroleum products. In AEO2009, liquids include conventional petroleum liquidssuch as conventional crude oil and natural gas plant liquidsin addition to unconventional liquids, such as biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Aquatic species project report: FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade...

348

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 Air and Water Volume 2 Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Progress and status of the IAEA coordinated research project: production of Mo-99 using LEU fission or neutron activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since late 2004, the IAEA has developed and implemented a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to assist countries interested in initiating indigenous, small-scale production of Mo-99 to meet local nuclear medicine requirements. The objective of the CRP is to provide interested countries with access to non-proprietary technologies and methods to produce Mo-99 using LEU foil or LEU mini-plate targets, or for the utilization of n,gamma neutron activation, e.g. through the use of gel generators. The project has made further progress since the RERTR 2006 meeting, with a Technical Workshop on Operational Aspects of Mo99 Production held 28-30 November 2006 in Vienna and the Second Research Coordination Meeting held in Bucharest, Romania 16-20 April 2007. The paper describes activities carried out as noted above, and as well as the provision of LEU foils to a number of participants, and the progress by a number of groups in preparing for LEU target assembly and disassembly, irradiation, chemical processing, and waste management. The participants' progress in particular on thermal hydraulics computations required for using LEU targets is notable, as also the progress in gel generator plant operations in India and Kazakhstan. Poland has joined as a new research agreement holder and an application by Egypt to be a contract holder is undergoing internal review in the IAEA and is expected to be approved. The IAEA has also participated in several open meetings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Study on Producing Medical Radioisotopes without HEU, which will also be discussed in the paper. (author)

Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo [Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: I.Goldman@iaea.org, E-mail: P.Adelfang@iaea.org; Ramamoorthy, Natesan [Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: N.Ramamoorthy@iaea.org

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Macroalgae Analysis A National GIS-based Analysis of Macroalgae Production Potential Summary Report and Project Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall project objective is to conduct a strategic analysis to assess the state of macroalgae as a feedstock for biofuels production. The objective in FY11 is to develop a multi-year systematic national assessment to evaluate the U.S. potential for macroalgae production using a GIS-based assessment tool and biophysical growth model developed as part of these activities. The initial model development for both resource assessment and constraints was completed and applied to the demonstration areas. The model for macroalgal growth was extended to the EEZ off the East and West Coasts of the United States, and a plan to merge the findings for an initial composite assessment was developed. In parallel, an assessment of land-based, port, and offshore infrastructure needs based on published and grey literature was conducted. Major information gaps and challenges encountered during this analysis were identified. Also conducted was an analysis of the type of local, state, and federal requirements that pertain to permitting land-based facilities and nearshore/offshore culture operations

Roesijadi, Guritno; Coleman, Andre M.; Judd, Chaeli; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Buenau, Kate E.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fermi National Acceleratory Laboratory, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Fermi National Acceleratory Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects...

352

Commercialization of Coal-to-Liquids Technology  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the current status of coal-to-liquids (CTL) commercialization efforts, including an analysis of efforts to develop and implement large-scale, commercial coal-to-liquids projects to create transportation fuels. Topics covered include: an overview of the history of coal usage and the current market for coal; a detailed description of what coal-to-liquids technology is; the history of coal-to-liquids development and commercial application; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coal-to-liquids; an analysis of the issues and challenges that are hindering the commercialization of coal-to-liquids technology; a review of available coal-to-liquids technology; a discussion of the economic drivers of coal-to-liquids project success; profiles of key coal-to-liquids developers; and profiles of key coal-to-liquids projects under development.

NONE

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS IN SUPPORT OF INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL IN 241-AP TANK FARMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The "Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Project" is in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14.

MACKEY TC; ABBOTT FG; CARPENTER BG; RINKER MW

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between the two liquid phases, separation will result. This is the principle upon which separation by liquid-liquid extraction is based, and there are a number of important applications of this concept in industrial processes. This paper will review the basic concepts and applications as well as present future directions for the liquid-liquid extraction process.

Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

FORSITE, a multiple-project management system: production of critical-path development schedules for geothermal electric-power-generation projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FORSITE is an advanced project monitoring software system that is designed to track and forecast the development of multiple projects. This paper describes the organization and operation of the FORSITE system including its overall structure and the functional relationships between its files and data bases. The paper also illustrates the operation of the system with an example of a generic critical-path management schedule produced by FORSITE. A program listing and schedule summaries are included as appendices.

Bernstein, A.J.; Entingh, D.J.; Gerstein, R.E.; Gould, A.V.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

RLC Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Russian Land Cover (RLC) The Russian Land Cover (RLC) Project Overview The Russian Land Cover (RLC) project provides 12 geospatial data products including land cover, forested...

357

Planning and Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning Ten-Year Capital Program Projects Lovell-Yellowtail Transmission Line Rebuild project Studies WACM Wind production summary overview (Oct. 2006)...

358

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection...

359

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection...

360

Analyse de faisabilit, conception et simulation de la distillation ractive liquide-liquide-vapeur. Application et validation exprimentale sur la production de l'actate de n-propyle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ces travaux de thse apportent une contribution la problmatique de la conception de procds de distillation ractive pour les systmes liquide-liquide-vapeur ractifs. Ce type (more)

Brehelin, Mathias

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

Kuester, J.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Project 134  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Goal To demonstrate a "whole plant" approach using by-products from a coal-fired power plant to sequester carbon in an easily quantifiable and verifiable form. Objectives...

363

Project 310  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbohydrate generated from agricultural enterprises in the U.S., such as corn wet-milling. This project is studying the production of a suite of specialty chemicals by...

364

The evaluation of a coal-derived liquid as a feedstock for the production of high-density aviation turbine fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conversion of coal-derived liquids to transportation fuels has been the subject of many studies sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the US Department of Defense. For the most part, these studies evaluated conventional petroleum processes for the production of specification-grade fuels. Recently, however, the interest of these two departments expanded to include the evaluation of alternate fossil fuels as a feedstock for the production of high-density aviation turbine fuel. In this study, we evaluated five processes for their ability to produce intermediates from a coal-derived liquid for the production of high-density turbine fuel. These processes include acid-base extraction to reduce the heteroatom content of the middle distillate and the atmospheric and vacuum gas oils, solvent dewaxing to reduce the paraffin (alkane) content of the atmospheric and vacuum gas oils, Attapulgus clay treatment to reduce the heteroatom content of the middle distillate, coking to reduce the distillate range of the vacuum gas oil, and hydrogenation to remove heteroatoms and to saturate aromatic rings in the middle distillate and atmospheric gas oil. The chemical and physical properties that the US Air Force considers critical for the development of high-denisty aviation turbine fuel are specific gravity and net heat of combustion. The target minimum values for these properties are a specific gravity of at least 0.85 and a net heat of combustion of at least 130,000 Btu/gal. In addition, the minimum hydrogen content is 13.0 wt %, the maximum freeze point is {minus}53{degrees}F ({minus}47{degrees}C), the maximum amount of aromatics is about 25 to 30 vol %, and the maximum amount of paraffins is 10 vol %. 13 refs., 20 tabs.

Thomas, K.P.; Hunter, D.E.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Physical Properties of Liquid Precursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a carrier gas through the liquid held in ... of decomposition products, dissolved gases, and other ... measure thermal stability, a gas chromatograph/mass ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Pilot project of biogas production from pig manure and urine mixture at ambient temperature in Ventanilla (Lima, Peru)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parque Porcino de Ventanilla has an extension of 840 ha with 2200 farmers dedicated to pig production. There is a lack of services in the area (i.e., water supply, electricity, or waste collection). Anaerobic treatment of pig manure would replace current dumping and incineration, reducing environmental pollution and hazards to public health, as well as providing an organic fertilizer and biogas. The objective of the present work was to study the viability of ambient temperature anaerobic digestion of pig manure diluted in urine, by means of on-site pilot scale reactors. The final goal was to establish design parameters for anaerobic digesters to be implemented; since it was part of a project to improve life conditions for the farmers through the incorporation of better management techniques. Experiments were carried out in a low-cost pilot plant, which consists of three anaerobic digesters (225 L total volume), without heating or agitation, placed in a greenhouse. The start-up of the digestion process was performed with a mixture of temperature adapted pig manure-sludge and fresh rumen, and showed a good performance regardless of the dilution of pig manure with water or urine, which is a key parameter due to the scarcity of water in the area under study.

Ferrer, I. [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic Maritime and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Modul D1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); GIRO Technological Center, Rambla Pompeu Fabra 1, 08100 Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: ivet.ferrer@upc.edu; Gamiz, M. [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic Maritime and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Modul D1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Almeida, M.; Ruiz, A. [Ciudad Saludable NLO, Av. Jorge Basadre 255, Of. 401, Lima 27 (Peru)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

NREL Improves System Efficiency and Increases Energy Transfer with Wind2H2 Project, Enabling Reduced Cost Electrolysis Production (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in improving energy transfer within a wind turbine-based hydrogen production system. Work was performed by the Wind2H2 Project team at the National Wind Technology Center in partnership with Xcel Energy.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Technical and Economic Evaluation of Macroalgae Cultivation for Fuel Production (Draft)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of macroalgae as sources of renewable liquid and gaseous fuels is evaluated. A series of options for production of macroalgae feedstock is considered. Because of their high carbohydrate content, the fuel products for which macroalgae are most suitable are methane and ethanol. Fuel product costs were compared with projected fuel costs in the year 1995.

Feinberg, D. A.; Hock, S. M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburg, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum & Other Liquids Petroleum & Other Liquids Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Crude Reserves and Production Refining and Processing Imports/Exports & Movements Stocks Consumption/Sales All Petroleum & Other Liquids Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports ‹ See All Petroleum Reports Drilling Productivity Report Release Date: December 9, 2013 | Next Release: January 13, 2014 | full report Previous Issue (pdf) month: December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 Go Contents Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Year-over-year summary Explanatory notes and sources Full report Report data (aggregated by region)

371

DEEPWATER SUBSEA LIQUID/GAS SEPARATION PROCESS UNDER LIVE OIL PRODUCTION CONDITIONS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes technical progress made during the period October 2001 to October 2002. At the end of the first technical progress report the project was moving from feasibility of equipment design work to application of this equipment to the actual site for potential demonstration. The effort focuses on reservoir analysis cost estimations of not only the sub-sea processing unit but also the wells, pipelines, installation costs, operating procedures and economic modeling of the development scheme associated with these items. Geologic risk analysis was also part of the overall evaluation, which is factored into the probabilistic economic analysis. During this period two different potential sites in the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed and one site in Norway was initiated but not completed during the period. A summary of these activities and results are included here.

E. (Eddie) T. Cousins

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

373

Center for Productivity Innovation's Student Project with Industry Program at the University of Tennessee, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A robust graduate engineering education experience requires students to learn the fundamental subject knowledge, to develop their ability to apply what they know to actual projects, and to contribute to the current body of knowledge by writing theses ... Keywords: Student Projects with Industry, engineering education, graduate research and education, industrial engineering, industry-university interaction

Rapinder Sawhney, Sima Maleki, Joseph Wilck, Pedraum Hashemian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings: Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV (DOE/EIS-0361) (04/29/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14 Federal Register 14 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 83 / Tuesday, April 29, 2008 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings: Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Record of Decision (ROD) and Floodplain Statement of Findings. SUMMARY: DOE has decided to implement the Proposed Action alternative, identified as the preferred alternative, in the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0361; November 2007) (FEIS). That alternative is to provide approximately $107.5 million (up to 50% of the development costs) to Western Greenbrier Co-Generation, LLC

375

Fusion energy for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Green IS for GHG emission reporting on product-level? an action design research project in the meat industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emission reporting gained importance in the last years, due to societal and governmental pressure. However, this task is highly complex, especially in interdependent batch production processes and for reporting on the product-level. Green ... Keywords: GHG emissions, Green IS, PCF, action design research, design science, meat industry, product carbon footprint

Hendrik Hilpert, Christoph Beckers, Lutz M. Kolbe, Matthias Schumann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Long-term Outlook for Oil and Other Liquid Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels, natural gas liquids, and crude oil production are key sources of increased domestic liquids supply. Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011. Gulf of Mexico.

378

Sandia National Laboratory (NM), Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (NM), Former Production Workers Screening Projects...

379

Preliminary study of discharge characteristics of slim holes compared to production wells in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is current interest in using slim holes for geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. A major question that must be addressed is whether results from flow or injection testing of slim holes can be scaled to predict large diameter production well performance. This brief report describes a preliminary examination of this question from a purely theoretical point of view. The WELBOR computer program was used to perform a series of calculations of the steady flow of fluid up geothermal boreholes of various diameters at various discharge rates. Starting with prescribed bottomhole conditions (pressure, enthalpy), the WELBOR code integrates the equations expressing conservation of mass, momentum and energy (together with fluid constitutive properties obtained from the steam tables) upwards towards the wellhead using numerical techniques. This results in computed profiles of conditions (pressure, temperature, steam volume fraction, etc.) as functions of depth within the flowing well, and also in a forecast of wellhead conditions (pressure, temperature, enthalpy, etc.). From these results, scaling rules are developed and discussed.

Pritchett, J.W. [S-Cubed, La Jolla, CA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Projects to Integrated Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Twitter Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Google Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Delicious Rank FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Digg Find More places to share FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on AddThis.com... Home Transportation Projects Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects Integrated Projects DOE Projects Non-DOE Projects Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Integrated Projects To maximize overall system efficiencies, reduce costs, and optimize

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Liquid Fuels Market Model (LFMM) Unveiling LFMM  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Implementation of the Renewable Fuel Implementation of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in the Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) of NEMS Michael H. Cole, PhD, PE michael.cole@eia.gov August 1, 2012 | Washington, DC LFMM / NEMS overview 2 M. Cole, EIA Advanced Biofuels Workshop August 1, 2012 | Washington, DC * LFMM is a mathematical representation of the U.S. liquid fuels market (motor gasoline, diesel, biofuels, etc.). EIA analysts use LFMM to project motor fuel prices and production approaches through 2040. * LFMM is a cost-minimization linear program (LP). For a given set of fuel demands, LFMM will find the least-cost means of satisfying those demands, subject to various constraints (such as the RFS). * LFMM is part of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which is a computer model of the U.S. energy economy. EIA uses

382

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 BROWN 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits & overview of deriving acrylates from coupling carbon dioxide and ethylene * Chemical catalysis approach: background and battles left to fight * Experimental assessment of the viability of thermochemical acrylate production * Perspectives for the future BROWN 3 Benefit to the Program * This project identifies the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide coupling with ethylene to acrylate at molybdenum catalysts. This research demonstrates the viability of acrylate production

383

Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

Scott Hara

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase methanol (LPMEOH) Process A DOE Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program seeks to offer the energy marketplace more efficient and environmentally benign coal utilization technology options by demonstrating them in industrial settings. This document is a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of one of the projects selected in Round III of the CCT Program, the commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process, initially described in a Report to Congress by DOE in 1992. Methanol is an important, large-volume chemical with many uses. The desire to demonstrate a new process for the production of methanol from coal, prompted Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to submit a proposal to DOE. In October 1992, DOE awarded a cooperative agreement to Air Products to conduct this project. In March 1995, this cooperative agreement was transferred to Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership), a partnership between Air Products and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman). DOE provided 43 percent of the total project funding of $213.7 million. Operation of the LPMEOH Demonstration Unit, which is sited at Eastman's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, Tennessee, commenced in April 1997. Although operation of the CCT project was completed in December 2002, Eastman continues to operate the LPMEOH Demonstration Unit for the production of methanol. The independent evaluation contained herein is based primarily on information from Volume 2 of the project's Final Report (Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Co., L.P. 2003), as well as other references cited.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Commercialization of coal to liquids technology  

SciTech Connect

After an overview of the coal market, technologies for producing liquids from coal are outlined. Commercialisation of coal-to-liquid fuels, the economics of coal-to-liquids development and the role of the government are discussed. Profiles of 8 key players and the profiles of 14 projects are finally given. 17 figs., 8 tabs.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Green Manufacturing Programs/Projects for the Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Manufacturing Programs/Projects for the Systems Integration Division. Production Network Supplier Characterization Project. ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Annual Energy Outlook 2010: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 82. Liquids production from biomass, coal, and oil shale, 2008-2035 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 83. Net...

388

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Place California Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product String representation...

389

Ultra-Deepwater Production Systems  

SciTech Connect

The report herein is a summary of the work performed on three projects to demonstrate hydrocarbon drilling and production methods applicable to deep and ultra deepwater field developments in the Gulf of Mexico and other like applications around the world. This work advances technology that could lead to more economic development and exploitation of reserves in ultra-deep water or remote areas. The first project is Subsea Processing. Its scope includes a review of the ''state of the art'' in subsea components to enable primary production process functions such as first stage liquids and gas separation, flow boosting, chemical treatment, flow metering, etc. These components are then combined to allow for the elimination of costly surface production facilities at the well site. A number of studies were then performed on proposed field development projects to validate the economic potential of this technology. The second project involved the design and testing of a light weight production riser made of composite material. The proposed design was to meet an actual Gulf of Mexico deepwater development project. The various engineering and testing work is reviewed, including test results. The third project described in this report encompasses the development and testing of a close tolerance liner drilling system, a new technology aimed at reducing deepwater drilling costs. The design and prototype testing in a test well are described in detail.

Ken L. Smith; Marc E. Leveque

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Dewatering equipment recommendations for the solids/liquid separation project at Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The final closure of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will include the plugging and abandonment of many existing wells and boreholes and the installation of diversion trenches for groundwater control. These activities will generate soil that must be dewatered before it can be disposed of. Three different types of dewatering equipment{emdash}rotary vacuum drum filters, automatic discharge pressure filters, and centrifuges{emdash}have been evaluated to assess their suitability for the WAG 6 project. Because of its lower cost and minimal prescreening requirements, it is recommended that a centrifuge be used to dewater the WAG 6 soils.

Taylor, P.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Dewatering equipment recommendations for the solids/liquid separation project at Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The final closure of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will include the plugging and abandonment of many existing wells and boreholes and the installation of diversion trenches for groundwater control. These activities will generate soil that must be dewatered before it can be disposed of. Three different types of dewatering equipment{emdash}rotary vacuum drum filters, automatic discharge pressure filters, and centrifuges{emdash}have been evaluated to assess their suitability for the WAG 6 project. Because of its lower cost and minimal prescreening requirements, it is recommended that a centrifuge be used to dewater the WAG 6 soils.

Taylor, P.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle quality qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.

Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino; Panetta, Paul D.; Pardini, Allan F.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Tucker, Brian J.; Weier, Dennis R.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Miller, James H.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Dempsey, Michael D. (Revere, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LOMEOH(TM)) Process  

SciTech Connect

The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOEP") Demonstration Project at K.ingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L, P. (the Partnership). The LPMEOHY Process Demonstration Unit is being built at a site located at the Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) complex in Kingsport. On 4 October 1994, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and signed the agreements that would form the Partnership, secure the demonstration site, and provide the financial commitment and overall project management for the project. These partnership agreements became effective on 15 March 1995, when DOE authorized the commencement of Budget Period No. 2 (Mod. AO08 to the Cooperative Agreement). The Partnership has subcontracted with Air Products to provide the overall management of the project, and to act as the primary interface with DOE. As subcontractor to the Partnership, Air Products will also provide the engineering design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of the LPMEOHTM Process Demonstration Unit, and will provide the technical and engineering supervision needed to conduct the operational testing program required as part of the project. As subcontractor to Air Products, Eastman will be responsible for operation of the LPMEOHTM Process Demonstration Unit, and for the interconnection and supply of synthesis gas, utilities, product storage, and other needed sewices. The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallons per day (260 tons-per-day (TPD)) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas fi-om Eastman's integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated is the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOHTM process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern day coal gasifiers. Originally tested at a small 3,200 gallons per day, DOE-owned experimental unit in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Natural Gas Liquids Estimated Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

802 827 788 811 831 840 1979-2008 802 827 788 811 831 840 1979-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 148 155 123 125 127 94 1981-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 120 127 98 102 108 80 1981-2008 Texas 28 28 25 23 19 14 1981-2008 Alaska 18 18 17 14 13 13 1979-2008 Lower 48 States 784 809 771 797 818 827 1979-2008 Alabama 5 4 5 5 4 9 1979-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 California 10 10 11 11 11 11 1979-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 1 1 1 1 1 1 1979-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 9 9 10 10 10 10 1979-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Colorado 29 32 31 32 33 45 1979-2008 Florida 1 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Kansas 23 22 20 19 19 19 1979-2008

396

Natural Gas Liquids Estimated Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

802 827 788 811 831 840 1979-2008 802 827 788 811 831 840 1979-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 148 155 123 125 127 94 1981-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 120 127 98 102 108 80 1981-2008 Texas 28 28 25 23 19 14 1981-2008 Alaska 18 18 17 14 13 13 1979-2008 Lower 48 States 784 809 771 797 818 827 1979-2008 Alabama 5 4 5 5 4 9 1979-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 California 10 10 11 11 11 11 1979-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 1 1 1 1 1 1 1979-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 9 9 10 10 10 10 1979-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Colorado 29 32 31 32 33 45 1979-2008 Florida 1 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Kansas 23 22 20 19 19 19 1979-2008

397

Carbon Dioxide and Ionic Liquid Refrigerants: Compact, Efficient Air Conditioning with Ionic Liquid-Based Refrigerants  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: Notre Dame is developing an air-conditioning system with a new ionic liquid and CO2 as the working fluid. Synthetic refrigerants used in air conditioning and refrigeration systems are potent GHGs and can trap 1,000 times more heat in the atmosphere than CO2 alonemaking CO2 an attractive alternative for synthetic refrigerants in cooling systems. However, operating cooling systems with pure CO2 requires prohibitively high pressures and expensive hardware. Notre Dame is creating a new fluid made of CO2 and ionic liquid that enables the use of CO2 at low pressures and requires minimal changes to existing hardware and production lines. This new fluid also produces no harmful emissions and can improve the efficiency of air conditioning systems enabling new use of CO2 as a refrigerant in cooling systems.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Market survey on products from the Tema Oil Refinery carried out as part of the feasibility study on the Tema Oil Refinery expansion project. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The Tema Oil Refinery (TOR), which was commissioned in 1963, is a simple hydroskimming plant which processes crude oil into LPG, gasoline, kerosene, gasoil, and fuel oil. It is the only petroleum refinery in Ghana. Over the years some of the equipment in the refinery has deteriorated or become obsolete necessitating major rehabilitation. A feasibility study is investigating the modernization and expansion of the refinery to meet projected market demands until the year 2005. The report presents the results of a market survey done on products from TOR.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. On this report, results are discussed for sonically assisted crossflow filtration of V-1067 resid, diluted with No. 2 fuel oil, and sonically assisted batch filtrations of solids concentrates from continuous cross-flow filtration experiments.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Commercial production and distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables: A scoping study on the importance of produce pathways to dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report summarizes a scoping study that examined the potential importance of fresh fruit and vegetable pathways to dose. A simple production index was constructed with data collected from the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA), the United States Bureau of the Census, and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff from Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, in cooperation with members of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP), selected lettuce and spinach as the produce pathways most likely to impact dose. County agricultural reports published in 1956 provided historical descriptions of the predominant distribution patterns of fresh lettuce and spinach from production regions to local population centers. Pathway rankings and screening dose estimates were calculated for specific populations living in selected locations within the HEDR study area.

Marsh, T.L.; Anderson, D.M.; Farris, W.T.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.; Wilfert, G.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis and evaluation in the production process and equipment area of the low-cost solar array project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy consumed in manufacturing silicon solar cell modules was calculated for the current process, as well as for 1982 and 1986 projected processes. In addition, energy payback times for the above three sequences are shown. The module manufacturing energy was partitioned two ways. In one way, the silicon reduction, silicon purification, sheet formation, cell fabrication, and encapsulation energies were found. In addition, the facility, equipment, processing matrial, and direct material lost-in-process energies were appropriated in junction formation processes and full module manufacturing sequences. A brief methodology accounting for the energy of silicon wafers lost-in-processing during cell manufacturing is described.

Goldman, H.; Wolf, M.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Application of direct contact heat exchangers to geothermal power production cycles. Project review, December 1, 1974--May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed on the development of direct contact heat exchanger power cycles for geothermal applications is reviewed. The period covered in the report is from the inception of the project in 1974 through May 31, 1977. Results from a large experimental program on heat exchanger develpment as well as from many analyses of components and cycle performance and economics are given. A number of working fluids and operating conditions have been considered, and no major obstacles for the implementation of the concept have been discovered.

Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Hansen, A.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to invert the conventional scale of values for products of coal utilization processes by making coal chars (carbons) that, because of their unique properties, are the most valuable materials in the product slate. A unique type of coal-derived carbon studied in this project is oxidized activated coal char having both adsorptive and catalyst properties. Major program elements were (a) preparation and characterization of materials (b) characterization of carbons and catalyst testing (c) completion of diesel engine testing of low-ash coal and (d) initiation of a two-year adsorption study. Materials prepared were (a) two low-ash coal samples one via ChemCoal processing of IBC-109 and the other by acid dissolution of IBC-109`s mineral matter, (b) coal char (MG char), (c) activated low-ash carbon (AC), (d) oxidized activated carbon (OAC). Amoco continued its support with state-of-the art analytical capabilities and development of catalyst testing procedures. Diesel engine tests were made with low ash coal dispersed in diesel fuel at solid loadings of 20% and 35%. The slurry was successfully burned in cylinder 2 of a two-cylinder diesel engine, after modifications of the engine`s fuel injection system. The higher speed proved to be more favorable but the slurry burned with a slightly improved thermal and combustion efficiency at both speeds with respect to diesel fuel alone. Adsorption studies included preparation of seven base-line carbon samples and their characterization, including their N{sub 2} BET surface areas and apparent densities. Paranitrophenol (PNP) adsorption isotherms were determined for the six controls. Oxidation of carbon with nitric acid decreases activated carbon`s PNP adsorption capacity while air oxidation increases adsorption capacity.

Kruse, C.W.; Carlson, S.L. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Snoeyink, V.L.; Feizoulof, C.; Assanis; Syrimis, M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana (United States); Fatemi, S.M. [Amoco, Naperville, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquefies them. Cryogenic liquids are kept in the liquid state at very low temperatures. Cryogenic liquids are liquid nitrogen, liquid argon and liquid helium. The different cryogens become liquids under different. In addition, when they vaporize the liquids expand to enormous volumes. For example, liquid nitrogen

405

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen Previous Video (Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Pennies) Shattering Pennies Liquid Nitrogen Cooled...

406

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

ADSORPTION SEPARATION PROCESSES FOR IONIC LIQUID CATALYTIC ...  

Presently disclosed are methods and apparatus for separation of reaction products from reaction mixtures in an ionic liquid catalysis process, particularly in ...

408

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

409

8. Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8. Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels B. Fuel Ethanol Production and Market Conditions Ethanol is consumed as fuel in the United States primarily as "gasohol"--a blend ...

410

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ???¢????????real-world???¢??????? retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation???¢????????s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products???¢???????? Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user???¢????????s fueling experience.

Edward C. Heydorn

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cold Water Model Simulation of Aluminum Liquid Fluctuations ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Electrode Technology for Aluminium Production ... Cold Water Model Simulation of Aluminum Liquid Fluctuations Induced by Anodic Gas in New...

413

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids Liquids James F. Wishart, Alison M. Funston, and Tomasz Szreder in "Molten Salts XIV" Mantz, R. A., et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2006) pp. 802-813. [Information about the volume (look just above this link)] Abstract: Ionic liquids have potentially important applications in nuclear fuel and waste processing, energy production, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments will require an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of ionic liquid radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material

414

Virtual Project Data Integration Testbed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... these findings to emphasize research and development ... and more productive project delivery. These include API, ASHRAE, ASME, buildingSMART ...

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beneficial Use of CO Beneficial Use of CO 2 in Precast Concrete Production DE-FE0004285 Yixin Shao, Yaodong Jia Liang Hu McGill University 3H Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation outline * Goals and objectives * Benefits to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishment to date * Summary 2 Objective Masonry blocks Fiber-cement panels Prefabricated buildings Concrete pipes To develop a carbonation process to replace steam curing in precast concrete production for energy reduction, and carbon storage and utilization. Goals * CO 2 sequestration capacity by cement:

416

Brookhaven National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects Brookhaven National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site:...

417

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program...

418

Liquid Fuel From Renewable Electricity and Bacteria: Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: UCLA is utilizing renewable electricity to power direct liquid fuel production in genetically engineered Ralstonia eutropha bacteria. UCLA is using renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide into formic acid, a liquid soluble compound that delivers both carbon and energy to the bacteria. The bacteriaare genetically engineered to convert the formic acid into liquid fuelin this case alcohols such as butanol. The electricity required for the process can be generated from sunlight, wind, or other renewable energy sources. In fact, UCLAs electricity-to-fuel system could be a more efficient way to utilize these renewable energy sources considering the energy density of liquid fuel is much higher than the energy density of other renewable energy storage options, such as batteries.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Project 320  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Philip Goldberg Philip Goldberg Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-5806 philip.goldberg@netl.doe.gov Marek Wojtowicz Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. 87 Church Street East Hartford, CT 06108 860-528-9806 marek@AFRinc.com Sequestration CARBON DIOXIDE RECOVERY FROM COMBUSTION FLUE GAS USING CARBON- SUPPORTED AMINE SORBENTS Background In Phase I, Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. will initiate development of a novel sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from combustion/incineration flue gas. The sorbent, based on amines supported on low-cost activated carbon, will be produced from scrap tires. Liquid-based amine systems are limited to relatively low concentrations to avoid corrosion. Corrosion should not be a

420

Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J R; Steinberg, M

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Liquid ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For 350 million years, fish have breathed liquid through gills. Mammals evolved lungs to breathe air. Rarely, circumstances can occur when a mammal needs to `turn back the clock' to breathe through a special liquid medium. This is particularly true if surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung is increased, as in acute lung injury. In this condition, surface tension increases because the pulmonary surfactant system is damaged, causing alveolar collapse, atelectasis, increased right-to-left shunt and hypoxaemia. 69 The aims of treatment are: (i) to offset increased forces causing lung collapse by applying mechanical ventilation with PEEP; (ii) to decrease alveolar surface tension with exogenous surfactant; (iii) to eliminate the air-liquid interface by filling the lung with a fluid in

U. Kaisers; K. P. Kelly; T. Busch

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP) at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Main Injector Particle Production Experiment at Fermilab uses particle beams of charged pions kaons proton and anti?proton with beam momenta of 5 to 90 GeV/c and thin targets spanning the periodic table from (liquid) hydrogen to uranium to measure particle production cross sections in a full acceptance spectrometer with charged particle identification for particles from 0.1 to 120 GeV/c using Time Projection Chamber

Sonam Mahajan; The MIPP Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Analysis & Projections - Projection Data - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find data from forecast models on crude oil and petroleum liquids, Find data from forecast models on crude oil and petroleum liquids, gasoline, diesel, natural gas, electricity, coal prices, supply, and demand projections and more. + EXPAND ALL Monthly Short-Term Forecasts to 2014 Additional Formats Short-Term Energy Outlook Released: January 8, 2013 WF01. Average Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter PDF 1. U.S. Energy Market Summary PDF 2. U.S. Energy Prices PDF 3a. Internatioal Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF 3b. Non-OPEC Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply PDF 3c. OPEC Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply PDF 3d. World Liquid Fuels Consumption PDF 4a. U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF 4b. U.S. Petroleum Refinery Balance PDF

424

RMOTC - Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production RMOTC Pumpjack in action During the process of the sale of NPR-3, RMOTC will focus on maximizing the value of the NPR-3 site and will continue with its Production Optimization Projects. NPR-3 includes 9,481 acres with more than 400 oil-producing wells. Current oil production is at approximately 240 barrels of oil per day. In July 2013, RMOTC began working on a number of Production Optimization Projects within the NPR-3 field, with the goal to optimize and improve flow and efficiency. Production Optimization Projects include repairing and replacing existing infrastructure with new infrastructure in order to optimize current wells and bring additional wells online. These Production Optimization Projects will continue throughout 2013 and are focused on improving current production and creating revenue for the America tax payer.

425

A Liquid Layer Solution for the Grid | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Liquid Layer Solution for the Grid A Liquid Layer Solution for the Grid A Liquid Layer Solution for the Grid September 15, 2011 - 2:47pm Addthis The Liquid Metal Battery is comprised of liquid metal electrodes and a liquid electrolyte of differing densities, which allows the liquids to separate and stratify without the need for any solid separator. The Liquid Metal Battery is comprised of liquid metal electrodes and a liquid electrolyte of differing densities, which allows the liquids to separate and stratify without the need for any solid separator. Kristina Pflanz Writer & Contractor, Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy What does this mean for me? With its all-liquid design, this battery is much more efficient than today's rechargeable batteries, which use 80-90% of the space to hold

426

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

427

Oklahoma Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

428

Colorado Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

429

Arkansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Arkansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

430

Wyoming Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Wyoming Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

431

Michigan Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Michigan Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

432

Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

433

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

434

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

435

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

436

Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

437

California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

438

Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

439

California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

440

New Mexico--East Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) New Mexico--East Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

New Mexico--West Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) New Mexico--West Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

442

New Mexico Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) New Mexico Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

443

Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

444

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

445

Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate,...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

446

Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

447

Argonne National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Production Workers Screening Projects Argonne National Laboratory, Former Production Workers...

448

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: 2011 State of Technology and Projections to 2017  

SciTech Connect

Review of the the status of DOE funded research for converting biomass to liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating for fiscal year 2011.

Jones, Susanne B.; Male, Jonathan L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NETL: Gasification Systems - Projects by State with Congressional District  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects by State Projects by State Gasification Systems Projects by State with Congressional District State Performer Congressional District Alabama National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility-Project List Modification of the Developmental Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) Feeder Long-Term Refractory Durability Tests (Transport Gasifier) Long-Term Candle Filter Tests (Transport Gasifier) Water-Gas Shift Tests to Reduce Steam Use Southern Company Services, Inc. AL07 High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute AL07 California Dry Solids Pump Coal Feed Technology Aerojet Rocketdyne CA30 Colorado A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient Magnetic Field by Polymer Beads ITN Energy Systems CO01

450

On strategic default and liquidity risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How does the uncertain provision of external finance affect investment projects' default probability and liquidity risk? In this paper, I study the strategic interaction between many creditors and a single borrower in the context of a two...

Tambakis, Demosthenes N

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to metal carbides for production of liquid fuels and chemicals. Quarterly technical status report, January 1--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Work on this project will be performed according to two tasks: Task 1, Industrial Chemistry and Applied Kinetics of Light Hydrocarbon Gas Conversion to Metal Carbides H{sub 2} and CO. We are building a laboratory-scale electric are discharge reactor, in which to assess the technical feasibility of producing Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, and CO from methane and MgO. We will also do experimental runs with CaO as well as mixtures of CaO and MgO and measure conversions of methane, CaO and/or MgO, and yields of Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3}, and/or CaC{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO to identify the operating conditions of interest for implementing these reactions on a commercial scale. Reaction conditions and parameters will be chosen based on the previous work at MIT with CaO and CH, and on results of thermodynamic and thermochemical kinetics calculations. Task 2: Mechanistic Foundations-For Convertings Light Hydrocarbon Gases to Metal Carbides-H{sub 2} and CO. We will evaluate the technical feasibility of carrying out methane reactions with CaO and MgO by thermal (e.g. 1500--2000{degrees}C) rather than under plasma conditions by performing experiments with the use of electrical screen heaters, heated tubular reactors, or other suitable apparatus. Extents and global rates of methane conversion, and yields as well as global production rates of CaC{sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3}, H{sub 2} and CO will be measured upon subjecting mixtures of methane and CaO and/or MgO to high temperatures and controlled residence times. We will conduct hypothesis-testing of possible mechanistic pathways with selected experiments and perform reaction modeling to better understand the underlying chemical and physical processes that could influence process scale-up possibilities.

Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Design and economics of a lignite-to-SNG (substitute natural gas) facility using Lurgi gasifiers with in-line conversion of by-product liquids to methane. Topical report (Final), December 1985-November 1986  

SciTech Connect

A first-pass conceptual design and screening cost estimate was prepared for a hypothetical plant to convert lignite to methane using Lurgi dry-bottom gasifiers and employing a black box reactor to convert by-product liquids in the gas phase to methane. Results were compared to those from conventional and modified Lurgi-plant designs. The in-line conversion plant can potentially reduce the cost of gas from a Lurgi plant by about 20%. Due to reduced capital investment, over $200 million could be invested in the reactor before the cost of gas from the in-line conversion plant is as high as that of a Lurgi plant.

Smelser, S.C.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Mountain Home Geothermal Project: geothermal energy applications in an integrated livestock meat and feed production facility at Mountain Home, Idaho. [Contains glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mountain Home Geothermal Project is an engineering and economic study of a vertically integrated livestock meat and feed production facility utilizing direct geothermal energy from the KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) southeast of Mountain Home, Idaho. A system of feed production, swine raising, slaughter, potato processing and waste management was selected for study based upon market trends, regional practices, available technology, use of commercial hardware, resource characteristics, thermal cascade and mass flow considerations, and input from the Advisory Board. The complex covers 160 acres; utilizes 115 million Btu per hour (34 megawatts-thermal) of geothermal heat between 300/sup 0/F and 70/sup 0/F; has an installed capital of $35.5 million;produces 150,000 hogs per year, 28 million lbs. of processed potatoes per year, and on the order of 1000 continuous horsepower from methane. The total effluent is 200 gallons per minute (gpm) of irrigation water and 7300 tons per year of saleable high grade fertilizer. The entire facility utilizes 1000 gpm of 350/sup 0/F geothermal water. The economic analysis indicates that the complex should have a payout of owner-invested capital of just over three years. Total debt at 11% per year interest would be paid out in 12 (twelve) years.

Longyear, A.B.; Brink, W.R.; Fisher, L.A.; Matherson, R.H.; Neilson, J.A.; Sanyal, S.K.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

AGING EFFECTS ON THE PROPERTIES OF IMIDAZOLIUM, QUATERNARY AMMONIUM, PYRIDINIUM AND PYRROLIDINIUM-BASED IONIC LIQUIDS USED IN FUEL AND ENERGY PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionic liquids are often cited for their excellent thermal stability, a key property for their use as solvents and in the chemical processing of biofuels. However, there has been little supporting data on the long term aging effect of temperature on these materials. Imizadolium, quaternary ammonium, pyridinium, and pyrrolidnium-based ionic liquids with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide anions were aged for 2520 hours (15 weeks) at 200?C in air to determine the effects of an oxidizing environment on their chemical structure and thermal stability over time. It was found that the minor changes in the cation chemistry could greatly affect the properties of the ILs over time.

Fox, E.

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

456

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Liquid Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 2 - Liquid Fuels World liquids consumption increases from 84 million barrels per day in 2005 to 99 million barrels per day in 2030 in the IEO2008 high price case. In the reference case, which reflects a price path that departs significantly from prices prevailing in the first 8 months of 2008, liquids use rises to 113 million barrels per day in 2030. Figure 26. World Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1990-2030 (Million Barrels Oil Equivalent per Day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2005-2030 (Million Barrels Oil Equivalent per Day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

457

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas J. Wolery Thomas J. Wolery Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 LLNL-PRES-574632 2 Team Members * Roger Aines * Bill Bourcier * Tom Wolery * Tom Buscheck * Tom Wolfe (consultant) * Mike DiFilippo (consultant) * Larry Lien (Membrane Development Specialists) 3 Presentation Outline * Overview of Active CO 2 Reservoir Management (ACRM) * Subsurface Reservoir Management: Made Possible by Brine Production, Yielding Many Benefits * Brine Disposal Options - What brines are out there? - What are the treatment options? 4 Benefit to the Program * This project is identifying and evaluating

458

EIA - AEO2010 - World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 In AEO2010, the price of light, low-sulfur (or “sweet”) crude oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma, is tracked to represent movements in world oil prices. EIA makes projections of future supply and demand for “total liquids,” which includes conventional petroleum liquids—such as conventional crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and refinery gain—in addition to unconventional liquids, which include biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil. World oil prices can be influenced by a multitude of factors. Some tend to be short term, such as movements in exchange rates, financial markets, and weather, and some are longer term, such as expectations concerning future demand and production decisions by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2009, the interaction of market factors led prompt month contracts (contracts for the nearest traded month) for crude oil to rise relatively steadily from a January average of $41.68 per barrel to a December average of $74.47 per barrel [38].

459

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart: project timeline - Project Milestones - Budget - Bibliography * Thank you 29 30 Organization Chart * Project team: Purdue University - Dr. Brenda B. Bowen: PI, student...

460

Low Silicon Solar Array Project. Feasibility of low-cost, high-volume production of silane and pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on silane production in a hydrogenation reactor is described. The kinetics and chemical equilibrium for the liquid phase disproportionation of H/sub 2/SiCl/sub 4/ and HSiCl/sub 3/ were studied and results are presented and discussed. Status of the studies on the feasibility and cost of manufacturing semiconductor grade polycrystalline silicon by the pyrolysis of silane in a fluid bed reactor and in a free space reactor is reported. Process design, the waste disposal system, and equipment specifications for the fluid bed pyrolysis of silane for silicon production are described. (WHK)

Breneman, W.C.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids production projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.