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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Electrically Deformable Liquid Marbles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid marbles, which are droplets coated with a hydrophobic powder, were exposed to a uniform electric field. It was established that a threshold value of the electric field, 15 cgse, should be surmounted for deformation of liquid marbles. The shape of the marbles was described as a prolate spheroid. The semi-quantitative theory describing deformation of liquid marbles in a uniform electric field is presented. The scaling law relating the radius of the contact area of the marble to the applied electric field shows a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

Edward Bormashenko; Roman Pogreb; Tamir Stein; Gene Whyman; Marcelo Schiffer; Doron Aurbach

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

3

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nonextensive Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study an effective relativistic mean-field model of nuclear matter with arbitrary proton fraction at finite temperature in the framework of nonextensive statistical mechanics, characterized by power-law quantum distributions. We investigate the presence of thermodynamic instability in a warm and asymmetric nuclear medium and study the consequent nuclear liquid-gas phase transition by requiring the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number and electric charge fraction. We show that nonextensive statistical effects play a crucial role in the equation of state and in the formation of mixed phase also for small deviations from the standard Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics.

A. Lavagno; D. Pigato

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

nuclear electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nuclear electricity nuclear electricity Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world nuclear energy. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Source Earth Policy Institute Date Released January 12th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EU nuclear nuclear electricity world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Summary nuclear energy consumption data (xls, 68.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment "Reuse of our data is permitted. We merely ask that wherever it is listed, it be appropriately cited"

6

Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

8

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

9

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor December 20, 1951 Arco, ID Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor

10

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants projected electricity

12

THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY The first time that electricity was generated from nuclear energy occurred in an experimental breeder reactor in Idaho in 1951. The idea for a breeder reactor (a reactor that could produce more fuel than it uses) first occurred to scientists working on the nation's wartime atomic energy program in the early 1940's. Experimental evidence indicated that the breeding of nuclear fuel was possible in a properly designed reactor, but time and resources were not then available to pursue the idea After the war, the newly established Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) assigned some of the nation's nuclear skills and resources to developing peaceful uses of the atom. The large bodies of uranium ore found in the 1950's were

13

Liquid metal pump for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump for use in pumping high temperature liquids at high pressures, particularly liquid metals used to cool nuclear reactors is described. It is of the type in which the rotor is submerged in a sump but is fed by an inlet duct which bypasses the sump. A chamber, kept full of fluid, surrounds the pump casing into which fluid is bled from the pump discharge and from which fluid is fed to the rotor bearings and hence to the sump. This equalizes pressure inside and outside the pump casing and reduces or eliminates the thermal shock to the bearings and sump tank.

Allen, H.G.; Maloney, J.R.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

Dwyer, O.E.

1958-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

A rotating suspended liquid film as an electric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid film generates electricity when a large external electric field is applied in the plane of the film. In our experiment suspended liquid film (soap film) is formed on a circular frame positioned horizontally on a rotating motor. This devise is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply external electric field in X-direction.The produced electric energy is piked up by two brushes in Y-direction of the suspended liquid film. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this letter we report that the same system can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to an electric energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed in very small scales like micro scales applicable in lab on a chip. The device is comparable to commercial DC electric motors or DC electric generators. but there is a significant difference in their working principle; in a DC electric motor or generator the Lorence force is the driving force, while in an LFEG the Coulomb force is the deriving force. So in despite to usual electric generators, this generator does not use a magnetic field and is purely electrical, which brings a similarity to bio mechanisms. We have investigated the characteristics of such a generator experimentally. This investigation sheds light on the physics of Electrohydrodynamics on liquid films.

Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

A rotating suspended liquid film as an electric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid film generates electricity when a large external electric field is applied in the plane of the film. In our experiment suspended liquid film (soap film) is formed on a circular frame positioned horizontally on a rotating motor. This devise is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply external electric field in X-direction.The produced electric energy is piked up by two brushes in Y-direction of the suspended liquid film. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this letter we report that the same system can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to an electric energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed in very small scales like micro scales applicable in lab on a chip. The device is comparable to commercial DC ele...

Amjadi, Ahmad; Namin, Reza Montazeri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Low Energy Nuclear Recoils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid Xenon (LXe) is expected to be an excellent target and detector medium to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Knowledge of LXe ionization and scintillation response to low energy nuclear recoils expected from the scattering of WIMPs by Xe nuclei is important for determining the sensitivity of LXe direct detection experiments. Here we report on new measurements of the scintillation yield of Xe recoils with kinetic energy as low as 10 keV. The dependence of the scintillation yield on applied electric field was also measured in the range of 0 to 4 kV/cm. Results are in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions that take into account the effect of biexcitonic collisions in addition to the nuclear quenching effect.

E. Aprile; K. L. Giboni; P. Majewski; K. Ni; M. Yamashita; R. Hasty; A. Manzur; D. N. McKinsey

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

18

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

19

Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Scintillation response of liquid xenon to low energy nuclear recoils  

SciTech Connect

Liquid Xenon (LXe) is expected to be an excellent target and detection medium to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). We have measured the scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils with kinetic energy between 10.4 and 56.5 keV relative to that of 122 keV gamma rays from {sup 57}Co. The scintillation yield of 56.5 keV recoils was also measured as a function of applied electric field, and compared to that of gamma rays and alpha particles. The Xe recoils were produced by elastic scattering of 2.4 MeV neutrons in liquid xenon at a variety of scattering angles. The relative scintillation efficiency is 0.130{+-}0.024 and 0.227{+-}0.016 for the lowest and highest energy recoils, respectively. This is about 15% less than the value predicted by Lindhard, based on nuclear quenching. Our results are in good agreement with more recent theoretical predictions that consider the additional reduction of scintillation yield due to biexcitonic collisions in LXe.

Aprile, E.; Giboni, K.L.; Majewski, P.; Ni, K.; Yamashita, M.; Hasty, R.; Manzur, A.; McKinsey, D.N. [Physics Department and Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ionization Yield from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid-Xenon Dark Matter Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ionization yield in the two-phase liquid xenon dark-matter detector has been studied in keV nuclear-recoil energy region. The newly-obtained nuclear quenching as well as the recently-measured average energy required to produce an electron-ion pair are used to calculate the total electric charges produced. To estimate the fraction of the electron charges collected, the Thomas-Imel model is generalized to describing the field dependence for nuclear recoils in liquid xenon. With free parameters fitted to experiment measured 56.5 keV nuclear recoils, the energy dependence of ionization yield for nuclear recoils is predicted, which increases with the decreasing of the recoiling energy and reaches the maximum value at 2~3 keV. This prediction agrees well with existing data and may help to lower the energy detection threshold for nuclear recoils to ~1 keV.

Mu, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fission and Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature dependence of the liquid-drop fission barrier is considered, the critical temperature for the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter being a parameter. Experimental and calculated data on the fission probability are compared for highly excited $^{188}$Os. The calculations have been made in the framework of the statistical model. It is concluded that the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid--gas phase transition is higher than 16 MeV.

E. A. Cherepanov; V. A. Karnaukhov

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Scintillation of liquid neon from electronic and nuclear recoils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the time dependence of scintillation light from electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid neon, finding a slow time constant of 15.4+-0.2 us. Pulse shape discrimination is investigated as a means of identifying event type in liquid neon. Finally, the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency is measured to be 0.26+-0.03 for 387 keV nuclear recoils.

J. A. Nikkel; R. Hasty; W. H. Lippincott; D. N. McKinsey

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

24

Liquid metal thermal-electric converter electrode development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done in support of distributed receiver technology development. Dish-electric systems are being pursued in an effort to circumvent the need for energy transport by providing for heat-to-electricity energy conversion by individual heat engines at the focal point of parabolic dish concentrators. The Liquid Metal Thermal-Electric Converter is an engine that can convert thermal energy to electricity without the need for moving parts. The report documents the results of contracted work in the development of a long-lifetime, high-performance electrode for LMTEC, including the materials prepared for it. 17 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

Martinez, J.I. (ed.)

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Liquidity Constraints and High Electricity Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the subsidy cost recovered in the pricing of larger levels of electricity use. As an illustration, Figure 1 below shows a hypothetical two-part tari¤ for Northern Ireland. It shows a price below the current ?at rate tari¤ up to 200 KWh per month and a higher... this assumption is generally true (i.e. there is a positive correlation between income and electricity use) ca 20% of households in Northern Ireland with an annual income of £ 20,000 or less consume more than 375 KWh per month ?which is, their consumption lies...

Brutscher, Philipp-Bastian

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Electric heater for nuclear fuel rod simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an electric cartridge-type heater for use as a simulator for a nuclear fuel pin in reactor studies. The heater comprises an elongated cylindrical housing containing a longitudinally extending helically wound heating element with the heating element radially inwardly separated from the housing. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of boron nitride electrically insulate the heating element from the housing while providing good thermal conductivity. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of magnesia or a magnesia-15 percent boron nitride mixture are disposed in the cavity of the helical heating element. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the magnesia or the magnesia-boron nitride mixture is higher than that of the boron nitride disposed about the heating element for urging the boron nitride radially outwardly against the housing during elevated temperatures to assure adequate thermal contact between the housing and the boron nitride.

McCulloch, Reginald W. (Knoxville, TN); Morgan, Jr., Chester S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dial, Ralph E. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development > Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Overview Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Generation IV Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Advanced Reactor Development and Technology Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Bookmark and Share STAR-LM: Simplified, Modular, Small Reactor Featuring Flow-thru Fuel Cartridge STAR-LM: Simplified, Modular, Small Reactor Featuring Flow-thru Fuel Cartridge. Click on image to view larger image. Argonne has traditionally been the foremost institute in the US for

28

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system. It is for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors having a pool of liquid metal coolant with the heat generating fissionable fuel core substantially immersed in the pool of liquid metal coolant. The passive cooling system including a combination of spaced apart side-by-side partitions in generally concentric arrangement and providing for intermediate fluid circulation and heat transfer therebetween.

Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Nuclear modules for space electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of interplanetary cargo and piloted missions requires calculations of the performances and masses of subsystems to be integrated in a final design. In a preliminary and scoping stage the designer needs to evaluate options iteratively by using fast computer simulations. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the development of models and calculational procedures for the analysis (neutronic and thermal hydraulic) of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nuclear modules will be integrated into the whole simulation of the nuclear electric propulsion system. The vehicles use either a Brayton direct-conversion cycle, using the heated helium from a NERVA-type reactor, or a potassium Rankine cycle, with the working fluid heated on the secondary side of a heat exchanger and lithium on the primary side coming from a fast reactor. Given a set of input conditions, the codes calculate composition. dimensions, volumes, and masses of the core, reflector, control system, pressure vessel, neutron and gamma shields, as well as the thermal hydraulic conditions of the coolant, clad and fuel. Input conditions are power, core life, pressure and temperature of the coolant at the inlet of the core, either the temperature of the coolant at the outlet of the core or the coolant mass flow and the fluences and integrated doses at the cargo area. Using state-of-the-art neutron cross sections and transport codes, a database was created for the neutronic performance of both reactor designs. The free parameters of the models are the moderator/fuel mass ratio for the NERVA reactor and the enrichment and the pitch of the lattice for the fast reactor. Reactivity and energy balance equations are simultaneously solved to find the reactor design. Thermalhydraulic conditions are calculated by solving the one-dimensional versions of the equations of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum with compressible flow. 10 refs., 1 tab.

Difilippo, F.C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Economics of Nuclear and Renewable Electricity Energy Science Coalition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear energy arose as a ‘spin-off ’ from nuclear weapons. Its use grew rapidly during the 1960s, nurtured by huge subsidies and the belief that nuclear electricity would soon become ‘too cheap to meter’. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, at the end of 2009 there were 438 operating nuclear power reactors in the world, total

Dr Mark Diesendorf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

32

Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Nuclear Equation of State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A canonical ensemble model is used to describe a caloric curve of nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Allowing a discontinuity in the freeze out density from one spinodal density to another for a given initial temperature, the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition can be described as first order. Averaging over various freeze out densities of all the possible initial temperatures for a given total reaction energy, the first order characteristics of liquid-gas phase transition is smeared out to a smooth transition. Two experiments, one at low beam energy and one at high beam energy show different caloric behaviors and are discussed.

S. J. Lee; A. Z. Mekjian

1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Polymer-disordered liquid crystals: Susceptibility to electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When nematic liquid crystals are embedded in random polymer networks, the disordered environment disrupts the long-range order, producing a glassy state. If an electric field is applied, it induces large and fairly temperature-independent orientational order. To understand the experiments, we simulate a liquid crystal in a disordered polymer network, visualize the domain structure, and calculate the response to a field. Furthermore, using an Imry-Ma-like approach we predict the domain size and estimate the field-induced order. The simulations and analytic results agree with each other, and suggest how the materials can be optimized for electro-optic applications.

Lena M. Lopatina; Jonathan V. Selinger

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

34

Experimental observables on nuclear liquid gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress on nuclear liquid gas phase transition (LGPT) or critical behavior has been simply reviewed and some signals of LGPT in heavy ion collisions, especially in NIMROD data, are focused. These signals include the power-law charge distribution, the largest fluctuation of the fragment observables, the nuclear Zipf law, caloric curve and critical exponent analysis etc.

Y. G. Ma

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Multifragmentation and nuclear phase transitions (liquid-fog and liquid-gas)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid-fog phase transition. The charge distributions of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p(3.6 GeV) + Au and p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed within the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition Tc as a free parameter. The analysis presented here provides strong support for a value of Tc > 15 MeV.

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; V. K. Rodionov; A. V. Simomenko; V. V. Kirakosyan; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; E. A. Kuzmin; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nuclear symmetry energy effects on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated within relativistic mean-field model using the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy constrained from the measured neutron skin thickness of finite nuclei. We find symmetry energy has a significant influence on several features of liquid-gas phase transition. The boundary and area of the liquid-gas coexistence region, the maximal isospin asymmetry and the critical values of pressure and isospin asymmetry all of which systematically increase with increasing softness in the density dependence of symmetry energy. The critical temperature below which the liquid-gas mixed phase exists is found higher for a softer symmetry energy.

Bharat K. Sharma; Subrata Pal

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

37

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants ...

38

A Model of Nuclear Recoil Scintillation Efficiency in Noble Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scintillation efficiency of low-energy nuclear recoils in noble liquids plays a crucial role in interpreting results from some direct searches for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter. However, the cause of a reduced scintillation efficiency relative to electronic recoils in noble liquids remains unclear at the moment. We attribute such a reduction of scintillation efficiency to two major mechanisms: 1) energy loss and 2) scintillation quenching. The former is commonly described by Lindhard's theory and the latter by Birk's saturation law. We propose to combine these two to explain the observed reduction of scintillation yield for nuclear recoils in noble liquids. Birk's constants $kB$ for argon, neon and xenon determined from existing data are used to predict noble liquid scintillator's response to low-energy nuclear recoils and low-energy electrons. We find that energy loss due to nuclear stopping power that contributes little to ionization and excitation is the dominant reduction mechanism in scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils, but that significant additional quenching results from the nonlinear response of scintillation to the ionization density.

D. -M. Mei; Z. -B. Yin; L. C. Stonehill; A. Hime

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Critical Temperature for the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The charge distribution of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p (8.1 GeV) + Au collisions is analyzed in the framework of the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition $T_c$ as a free parameter. It is found that $T_c=20\\pm3$ MeV (90% CL).

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; E. V. Duginova; V. K. Rodionov; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; O. V. Bochkarev; E. A. Kuzmin; L. V. Chulkov; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled, top entry loop nuclear fission reactors. It comprises: a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant; a passive cooling system; and a secondary passive cooling system.

Boardman, C.E.; Hunsbedt, A.; Hui, M.M.

1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nuclear-renewables energy system for hydrogen and electricity production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change concerns and expensive oil call for a different mix of energy technologies. Nuclear and renewables attract attention because of their ability to produce electricity while cutting carbon emissions. However ...

Haratyk, Geoffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: July 25, 2013 Data for : May 2013 Next Release: August 2013 Contacts: Michael Mobilia Phone: 202-287-6318 E-mail:...

44

Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

Forsberg, C.W.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

The statistical multifragmentation model for liquid-gas phase transition with a compressible nuclear liquid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new formulation of the statistical multifragmentation model based on the analysis of the virial expansion for a system of the nuclear fragments of all sizes. The developed model not only enables us to account for short-range repulsion, but also to calculate the surface free energy which is induced by the interaction between the fragments. We propose a new parameterization for the liquid phase pressure which allows us to introduce a compressible nuclear liquid into the statistical multifragmentation model. The resulting model is exactly solvable and has no irregular behavior of the isotherms in the mixed phase region that is typical for mean-field models. The general conditions for the 1-st and 2-nd (or higher) order phase transitions are formulated. It is shown that all endpoints of the present model phase diagram are the tricritical points, if the Fisher exponent $\\tau$ is in the range $\\{3}{2} \\le \\tau \\le 2$. The treatment of nuclear liquid compressibility allows us to reduce the tricritical endpoint density of the statistical multifragmentation model to one third of the normal nuclear density. A specific attention is paid to of the fragment size distributions in the region of a negative surface tension at supercritical temperatures.

V. V. Sagun; A. I. Ivanytskyi; K. A. Bugaev; I. N. Mishustin

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble of asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble of asymmetric nuclear matter K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro@rio.odn.ne.jp Abstract New calculus of the liquid-gas phase transition is developed. The appearance of the retrograde condensation is also proved. The liquid-gas phase transition in warm nuclear

48

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Clearance and Tagging Guideline for Nuclear Electric Generating Stations, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clearance and tagging programs at nuclear electric generating facilities serve to protect personnel from injury and to protect equipment from damage. These programs are thus of vital importance from both a worker safety standpoint and an operations and maintenance cost standpoint. This guideline presents a clearance and tagging approach, developed with broad industry input, that nuclear electric generating companies can use as a basis for comparison with their own programs.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Commercial Nuclear Electric Power in the United States: Problems and Prospects  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article briefly reviews the origins of commercial nuclear electric power, the efforts to dispose of high-level nuclear waste, the costs of building and operating nuclear electric power plants, and other energy-related developments pertinent to the future of nuclear electric power.

Information Center

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear multifragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state of nuclear matter suggests that at suitable beam energies the disassembling hot system formed in heavy ion collisions will pass through a liquid-gas coexistence region. Searching for the signatures of the phase transition has been a very important focal point of experimental endeavours in heavy ion collisions, in the last fifteen years. Simultaneously theoretical models have been developed to provide information about the equation of state and reaction mechanisms consistent with the experimental observables. This article is a review of this endeavour.

S. Das Gupta; A. Z. Mekjian; M. B. Tsang

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

Application of Information Theory in Nuclear Liquid Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information entropy and Zipf's law in the field of information theory have been used for studying the disassembly of nuclei in the framework of the isospin dependent lattice gas model and molecular dynamical model. We found that the information entropy in the event space is maximum at the phase transition point and the mass of the cluster show exactly inversely to its rank, i.e. Zipf's law appears. Both novel criteria are useful in searching the nuclear liquid gas phase transition experimentally and theoretically.

Yu-Gang Ma

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

52

Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Berglund, Robert C. (Saratoga, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nuclear electric dipole moment of 3He  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we calculate the {sup 3}He electric dipole moment (EDM) generated by parity- and time-reversal violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. While the results are somehow sensitive to the interaction model chosen for the strong two- and three-body interactions, we demonstrate the pion-exchange dominance to the EDM of {sup 3}He, if the coupling constants for {pi}, {rho} and {omega}-exchanges are of comparable magnitude, as expected. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of {sup 3}He EDM would be complementary to the currently planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and would constitute a powerful constraint to the models of the pion P- and T-violating interactions.

Stetcu, Ionel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friar, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hayes, A C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, C P [UNIV WISCONSIN; Navratil, P [LIVERMORE NAT LAB

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor  

SciTech Connect

A monitoring system for detecting changes in the liquid levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting changes in the density of the liquid in these regions. A plurality of gamma radiation detectors are used, arranged vertically along the outside of the reactor vessel, and collimator means for each detector limits the gamma-radiation it receives as emitting from only isolated regions of the vessel. Excess neutrons produced by the fission reaction will be captured by the water coolant, by the steel reactor walls, or by the fuel or control structures in the vessel. Neutron capture by steel generates gamma radiation having an energy level of the order of 5-12 MeV, whereas neutron capture by water provides an energy level of approximately 2.2 MeV, and neutron capture by the fission fuel or its cladding provides an energy level of 1 MeV or less. The intensity of neutron capture thus changes significantly at any water-metal interface. Comparative analysis of adjacent gamma detectors senses changes from the normal condition with liquid coolant present to advise of changes in the presence and/or density of the coolant at these specific regions. The gamma detectors can also sense fission-product gas accumulation at the reactor head to advise of a failure of fuel-pin cladding.

DeVolpi, Alexander (Bolingbrook, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic device  

SciTech Connect

A single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) device. The single channel device provides useful output AC electric energy. The generator includes a two-cylinder linear-piston engine which drives liquid metal in a single channel looped around one side of the MHD device to form a double-duct contra-flowing liquid metal MHD generator. A flow conduit network and drive mechanism are provided for moving liquid metal with an oscillating flow through a static magnetic field to produce useful AC electric energy at practical voltages and currents. Variable stroke is obtained by controlling the quantity of liquid metal in the channel. High efficiency is obtained over a wide range of frequency and power output. 5 figs.

Haaland, C.M.; Deeds, W.E.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Liquid Fuel From Renewable Electricity and Bacteria: Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: UCLA is utilizing renewable electricity to power direct liquid fuel production in genetically engineered Ralstonia eutropha bacteria. UCLA is using renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide into formic acid, a liquid soluble compound that delivers both carbon and energy to the bacteria. The bacteria are genetically engineered to convert the formic acid into liquid fuel—in this case alcohols such as butanol. The electricity required for the process can be generated from sunlight, wind, or other renewable energy sources. In fact, UCLA’s electricity-to-fuel system could be a more efficient way to utilize these renewable energy sources considering the energy density of liquid fuel is much higher than the energy density of other renewable energy storage options, such as batteries.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Liquid-gas instability and superfluidity in nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study effects of the medium polarization on superfluidity in symmetric nuclear matter in a relativistic formalism. An effect of the liquid-gas instability is emphasized. We examine two types of decomposition of the nucleon propagator; the standard Feynman-density and the particle-hole-antiparticle ones. In both cases, the medium polarization effect is determined by a characteristic cancellation among the \\sigma, the longitudinal \\omega, and the \\sigma-\\omega mixed polarizations. The instability leads to increase of pairing gap. Around the saturation density that is free from the instability the medium polarization enhances pairing gap in the former case whereas reduces in the latter. At the lowest density that is also free from the instability the gap increases in both cases.

Masayuki Matsuzaki

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition and supernovae evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the large density fluctuations appearing at the onset of the first order nuclear liquid-gas phase transition can play an important role in the supernovae evolution. Due to these fluctuations, the neutrino gas may be trapped inside a thin layer of matter near the proto-neutron star surface. The resulting increase of pressure may induce strong particle ejection a few hundred milliseconds after the bounce of the collapse, contributing to the revival of the shock wave. The Hartree-Fock+RPA scheme, with a finite-range nucleon-nucleon effective interaction, is employed to estimate the effects of the neutrino trapping due to the strong density fluctuations, and to discuss qualitatively the consequences of the suggested new scenario.

Jerome Margueron; Jesus Navarro; Patrick Blottiau

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Boiling of nuclear liquid in core-collapse supernova explosions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the possibility of boiling instability of nuclear liquid in the inner core of the proto-neutron star formed in the core collapse of a type II supernova. We derive a simple criterion for boiling to occur. Using this criterion for one of best described equations of state of supernova matter, we find that boiling is quite possible under the conditions realized inside the proto-neutron star. We discuss consequences of this process such as the increase of heat transfer rate and pressure in the boiling region. We expect that taking this effect into account in the conventional neutrino-driven delayed-shock mechanism of type II supernova explosions can increase the explosion energy and reduce the mass of the neutron-star remnant.

Peter Fomin; Dmytro Iakubovskyi; Yuri Shtanov

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Boiling of nuclear liquid in core-collapse supernova explosions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the possibility of boiling instability of nuclear liquid in the inner core of the proto-neutron star formed in the core collapse of a type II supernova. We derive a simple criterion for boiling to occur. Using this criterion for one of best described equations of state of supernova matter, we find that boiling is quite possible under the conditions realized inside the proto-neutron star. We discuss consequences of this process such as the increase of heat transfer rate and pressure in the boiling region. We expect that taking this effect into account in the conventional neutrino-driven delayed-shock mechanism of type II supernova explosions can increase the explosion energy and reduce the mass of the neutron-star remnant.

Fomin, Peter; Shtanov, Yuri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Aging assessment of large electric motors in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large electric motors serve as the prime movers to drive high capacity pumps, fans, compressors, and generators in a variety of nuclear plant systems. This study examined the stressors that cause degradation and aging in large electric motors operating in various plant locations and environments. The operating history of these machines in nuclear plant service was studied by review and analysis of failure reports in the NPRDS and LER databases. This was supplemented by a review of motor designs, and their nuclear and balance of plant applications, in order to characterize the failure mechanisms that cause degradation, aging, and failure in large electric motors. A generic failure modes and effects analysis for large squirrel cage induction motors was performed to identify the degradation and aging mechanisms affecting various components of these large motors, the failure modes that result, and their effects upon the function of the motor. The effects of large motor failures upon the systems in which they are operating, and on the plant as a whole, were analyzed from failure reports in the databases. The effectiveness of the industry`s large motor maintenance programs was assessed based upon the failure reports in the databases and reviews of plant maintenance procedures and programs.

Villaran, M.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mixing-Demixing Phase Diagram for Simple Liquids in Non-Uniform Electric Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We deduce the mixing-demixing phase diagram for binary liquid mixtures in an electric field for various electrode geometries and arbitrary constitutive relation for the dielectric constant. By focusing on the behavior of the liquid-liquid interface, we produce simple analytic expressions for the dependence of the interface location on experimental parameters. We also show that the phase diagram contains regions where liquid separation cannot occur under any applied field. The analytic expression for the boundary "electrostatic binodal" line reveals that the regions' size and shape depend strongly on the dielectric relation between the liquids. Moreover, we predict the existence of an "electrostatic spinodal" line that identifies conditions where the liquids are in a metastable state. We finally construct the phase diagram for closed systems by mapping solutions onto those of an open system via an effective liquid composition. For closed systems at a fixed temperature and mixture composition, liquid separation occurs in a finite "window" of surface potential (or charge density). Larger potentials or charge densities counterintuitively destroy the interface, leading to liquid mixing. These results give valuable guides for experiments by providing easily testable predictions for how liquids behave in non-uniform electric fields.

Jennifer Galanis; Yoav Tsori

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main thermodynamical properties of the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition were explored in the framework of the relativistic mean-field hadronic model in three statistical ensembles: canonical, grand canonical and isobaric. We have found that the liquid-gas phase transition, i.e., the first order phase transition which is defined by the plateau in the isotherms, cannot contain the plateau in the caloric curves in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles. The plateau in the isotherms is incompatible with the plateau in the caloric curves at fixed baryon density. Moreover, for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition the caloric curve has a plateau only at fixed pressure or chemical potential. The results of the statistical multifragmentation models for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition were reanalyzed. It was revealed that one class of statistical multifragmentation models do indeed predict the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition for the nuclear multifragmentation. However, there is another class o...

Parvan, A S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Electrically heated liquid tank employing heat pipe heat transfer means  

SciTech Connect

The heating apparatus for applying heat to the interior of a chamber includes a modular, removable, electrical, heat-producing unit and a heat pipe mountable in a wall of the chamber with one end of the pipe arranged to receive heat from the electrical heat producing unit exterior of the housing and with another end of the pipe constructed and arranged to apply heat to the medium within the chamber. The heat pipe has high conductivity with a low temperature differential between the ends thereof and the heat producing unit includes an electric coil positioned about and removably secured to the one end of the heat pipe. The electric coil is embedded in a high thermal conducitivity, low electrical conductivity filler material which is surrounded by a low thermal conductivity insulating jacket and which is received around a metal core member which is removably secured to the one end of the heat pipe.

Shutt, J.R.

1978-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Quantum read-out and fast initialization of nuclear spin qubits with electric currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear spin qubits have the longest coherence times in the solid state, but their quantum read-out and initialization is a great challenge. We present a theory for the interaction of an electric current with the nuclear spins of donor impurities in semiconductors. The theory yields a sensitivity criterion for quantum detection of nuclear spin states using electrically detected magnetic resonance, as well as an all electrical method for fast nuclear spin qubit initialization.

Noah Stemeroff; Rogerio de Sousa

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

Modeling of Plasma-Assisted Conversion of Liquid Ethanol into Hydrogen Enriched Syngas in the Nonequilibrium Electric Discharge Plasma-Liquid System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we report recent results of our experimental and theoretical studies related to plasma conversion of liquid ethanol into hydrogen-enriched syngas in the plasma-liquid system with the electric discharge in a gas channel with liquid wall using available diagnostics and numerical modeling.

Levko, Dmitry; Naumov, Vadim; Chernyak, Valery; Yukhymenko, Vitaly; Prysiazhnevych, Irina; Olszewski, Sergey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Electric power transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC)  

SciTech Connect

The original study of transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC), which was completed in September 1975, was updated in June 1978. The present 1983 revision takes cognizance of recent changes in the electric power situation of the PNW with respect to: (1) forecasts of load growth, (2) the feasibility of early use of 1100 kV transmission, and (3) the narrowing opportunities for siting nuclear plants in the region. The purpose of this update is to explore and describe additions to the existing transmission system that would be necessary to accommodate three levels of generation at HNEC. Comparisons with a PNW system having new thermal generating capacity distributed throughout the marketing region are not made as was done in earlier versions.

Harty, H.; Dowis, W.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Space nuclear power system and the design of the nuclear electric propulsion OTV  

SciTech Connect

Payload increases of three to five times that of the Shuttle/Centaur can be achieved using nuclear electric propulsion. Various nuclear power plant options being pursued by the SP-100 Program are described. These concepts can grow from 100 kW/sub e/ to 1MW/sub e/ output. Spacecraft design aspects are addressed, including thermal interactions, plume interactions, and radiation fluences. A baseline configuration is described accounting for these issues. Safety aspects of starting the OTV transfer from an altitude of 300 km indicate no significant additional risk to the biosphere.

Buden, D.; Garrison, P.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Nuclear-Renewables Energy System for Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Safety and Technology of Nuclear Hydrogen Production, Control, and Management / Nuclear Hydrogen Production

Geoffrey Haratyk; Charles W. Forsberg

71

Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Scintillation efficiency and ionization yield of liquid xenon for monoenergetic nuclear recoils down to 4 keV  

SciTech Connect

Liquid xenon (LXe) is an excellent material for experiments designed to detect dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). A low energy detection threshold is essential for a sensitive WIMP search. The understanding of the relative scintillation efficiency (L{sub eff}) and ionization yield of low energy nuclear recoils in LXe is limited for energies below 10 keV. In this article, we present new measurements that extend the energy down to 4 keV, finding that L{sub eff} decreases with decreasing energy. We also measure the quenching of scintillation efficiency caused by the electric field in LXe, finding no significant field dependence.

Manzur, A.; Curioni, A.; Kastens, L.; McKinsey, D. N.; Ni, K.; Wongjirad, T. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Liquid level, void fraction, and superheated steam sensor for nuclear-reactor cores. [PWR; BWR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure relates to an apparatus for monitoring the presence of coolant in liquid or mixed liquid and vapor, and superheated gaseous phases at one or more locations within an operating nuclear reactor core, such as pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor.

Tokarz, R.D.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

74

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, ... Sources & Uses Petroleum Coal Natural Gas Renewable Nuclear Electricity Consumption Total Energy. Topics

75

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

76

Electrical controlled rheology of a suspension of weakly conducting particles in dielectric liquid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of suspensions of fine particles in dielectric liquid (electrorheological fluids) subjected to an electric field lead to a drastic change of the apparent viscosity of the fluid. For high applied fields (~ 3-5 kV/mm) the suspension congeals to a solid gel (particles fibrillate span the electrode gap) having a finite yield stress. For moderate fields the viscosity of the suspension is continuously controlled by the electric field strength. We have roposed that in DC voltage the field distribution in the solid (particles) and liquid phases of the suspension and so the attractive induced forces between particles and the yield stress of the suspension are controlled by the conductivities of the both materials. In this paper we report investigation and results obtained with nanoelectrorheological suspensions: synthesis of coated nanoparticles (size ~ 50 to 600 nm, materials Gd2O3:Tb, SiOx...), preparation of ER fluids (nanoparticles mixed in silicone oil), electrical and rheological characterization ...

Guegan, Q; Foulc, J N; Tillement, O; Guegan, Quentin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter  

SciTech Connect

We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al.. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well-described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

Sorensen, P; Dahl, C E

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

Isospin and momentum dependence of liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot neutron-rich nuclear matter is investigated within a self-consistent thermal model using different interactions with or without isospin and/or momentum dependence. The boundary of the phase-coexistence region is shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy as well as the isospin and momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction.

Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen; Bao-An Li; Hong-Ru Ma

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connectors and methods of connecting electrical conductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connection comprises an insulated, sheathed instrument lead having electrical conductors extending from one end thereof to provide two exposed lead wires, a watertight cable having electrical conducting wires therein and extending from one end of the cable to provide two lead wires therefrom, two butt splice connectors each connecting the ends of respective ones of the lead wires from the instrument lead and cable, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing positioned over each butt splice connector and an adjacent portion of a respective lead wire from the cable and heat shrunk into position, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing on the end portion of the instrument lead adjacent the lead wires therefrom and heat shrunk thereon and a length of outer heat shrinkable plastic tubing extending over the end portion of the instrument lead and the heat shrinkable tubing thereon and over the butt splice connectors and a portion of the cable adjacent the cable lead lines, the outer heat shrinkable tubing being heat shrunk into sealing position on the instrument lead and cable.

Powell, J.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

Galle-Bishop, John Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight… (more)

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Isospin Lattice-Gas Model and Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Asymmetric Nuclear Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An isospin lattice-gas model, which is a spin-1 Ising model, is employed to investigate the liquid-gas phase transition in asymmetric nuclear matter. We consider nuclear matter as a lattice where each lattice site can be either empty or occupied by a proton or a neutron, with a nearest-neighbor interaction among the nucleons. With the Bragg-Williams mean field approximation, we calculate various thermodynamic properties of nuclear matter for different densities and different proton-neutron asymmetry parameter s. Our model exhibits liquidgas phase transition below a critical temperature Tc, and predicts a monotonic decreasing of Tc as the magnitude of s is increased. The dependence of the nuclear matter isotherms on the asymmetry parameter s is discussed. Ray, Shamanna and Kuo / Liquid-gas phase transition in Nuclear matter 2 1.

S. Ray; J. Shamanna; T. T. S. Kuo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

84

Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Application Studies  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This portion describes the studies of advanced applications of nuclear reactors that were performed, including various types of aircraft, missiles, space vehicles, ships, and portable power plants.

Comassar, S.

1962-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Non-congruence of liquid-gas phase transition of asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first explore the liquid-gas mixed phase in a bulk calculation, where two phases coexist without the geometrical structures. In the case of symmetric nuclear matter, the system behaves congruently, and the Maxwell construction becomes relevant. For asymmetric nuclear matter, on the other hand, the phase equilibrium is no more attained by the Maxwell construction since the liquid and gas phases are non-congruent; the particle fractions become completely different with each other. One of the origins of such non-congruence is attributed to the large symmetry energy. Subsequently we explore the charge-neutral nuclear matter with electrons by fully applying the Gibbs conditions to figure out the geometrical (pasta) structures in the liquid-gas mixed phase. We emphasize the effects of the surface tension and the Coulomb interaction on the pasta structures. We also discuss the thermal effects on the pasta structures.

Toshiki Maruyama; Toshitaka Tatsumi

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

Non-congruence of liquid-gas phase transition of asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first explore the liquid-gas mixed phase in a bulk calculation, where two phases coexist without the geometrical structures. In the case of symmetric nuclear matter, the system behaves congruently, and the Maxwell construction becomes relevant. For asymmetric nuclear matter, on the other hand, the phase equilibrium is no more attained by the Maxwell construction since the liquid and gas phases are non-congruent; the particle fractions become completely different with each other. One of the origins of such non-congruence is attributed to the large symmetry energy. Subsequently we explore the charge-neutral nuclear matter with electrons by fully applying the Gibbs conditions to figure out the geometrical (pasta) structures in the liquid-gas mixed phase. We emphasize the effects of the surface tension and the Coulomb interaction on the pasta structures. We also discuss the thermal effects on the pasta structures.

Maruyama, Toshiki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Isospin dependence of liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using the Furnstahl, Serot and Tang's model, the effect of density dependence of the effective nucleon-nucleon-rho-meson (NN-rho) coupling on the liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated. A limit pressure p_lim has been found. We found that the liquid-gas phase transition cannot take place if p>p_lim. The binodal surface for density dependent NN-rho coupling situation is addressed.

W. L. Qian; Ru-Keng Su; Ping Wang

2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Determination of the nuclear-induced electrical conductivity in a nuclear-driven MHD device  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The continual need for more efficient energy conversion techniques for space, sea, and terrestrial systems has renewed interest in nuclear-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion. The concept of nuclear-driven MHD energy conversion utilizes a flow seeded with a neutron absorbing species. The energy released in neutron absorption or fission processes is used to ionize the flow and enhance electrical conductivity. Research into the use of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He mixtures in the 1960`s and 1970`s suggested the enhancement is insufficient for MHD purposes. However, new calculations suggest a region of conditions not previously considered may provide significant conductivity enhancement. Specifically, at densities less than standard atmospheric density and neutron flux greater than 1{times}10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}s, conductivity greater than 10 mho/m may be achievable. These calculations also suggest conductivity`s of several hundred mho/m may be possible for an achievable range of conditions. Additionally, the nuclear-induced conductivity is strongly density dependent and weakly temperature dependent. Therefore, higher flow velocities, and hence higher power densities than those used in traditional MHD channels utilizing thermal ionization are possible. In order to confirm these promising calculations, a series of experiments has been proposed.

Bitteker, L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Isospin Lattice-Gas Model and Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Asymmetric Nuclear Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An isospin lattice-gas model, which is a spin-1 Ising model, is employed to investigate the liquid-gas phase transition in asymmetric nuclear matter. We consider nuclear matter as a lattice where each lattice site can be either empty or occupied by a proton or a neutron, with a nearest-neighbor interaction among the nucleons. With the Bragg-Williams mean field approximation, we calculate various thermodynamic properties of nuclear matter for different densities and different proton-neutron asymmetry parameter $s$. Our model exhibits liquid-gas phase transition below a critical temperature $T_c$, and predicts a monotonic decreasing of $T_c$ as the magnitude of $s$ is increased. The dependence of the nuclear matter isotherms on the asymmetry parameter $s$ is discussed.

S. Ray; J. Shamanna; T. T. S. Kuo

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

90

Overview of nuclear MHD power conversion for multi-megawatt electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of recent research findings on space applications of nuclear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power for generation of multi klb f electric thrust at thousands of seconds of specific impulse is presented. The high operating temperatures of the nuclear MHD system and potential for direct coupling of the output power to the electric thruster system are characterizing features that allow for design of ultracompact and ultralight nuclear electric propulsion systems. Order of magnitude figures for some mission-critical parameters are collated from various engineering analyses. Specific mass and specific impulse values highlight the inherent benefits of further research and development investment in MHD power.

Blair M. Smith; Travis W. Knight; Samim Anghaie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Present Status and Future Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than two decades ago, the van der Waals behavior of the nucleon - nucleon force inspired the idea of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. Heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies offer the unique possibility for studying this phase transition in a finite, hadronic system. A general overview of this subject is given emphasizing the most recent results on nuclear calorimetry.

J. Pochodzalla; ALADIN collaboration

1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction $f_s$ between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a non-trivial function of the strangeness fraction.

P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear electric propulsion : assessing the design of Project Prometheus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high fuel efficiency of electric propulsion makes it a viable alternative for long-distance space travel. Project Prometheus was a NASA-led project that sought to demonstrate that distant electric propulsion missions ...

Goycoolea, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Nuclear Electric Propulsion: A “Better, Safer, Cheaper” Transportation System for Human Exploration of Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for “split?sprint” human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study

John S. Clark; Jeffrey A. George; Leon P. Gefert; Michael P. Doherty; Robert J. Sefcik

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method for passive cooling liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, and system thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Busboom, Herbert J. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter from realistic many-body approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of a liquid-gas phase transition for hot nuclear systems at subsaturation densities is a well established prediction of finite temperature nuclear many-body theory. In this paper, we discuss for the first time the properties of such phase transition for homogeneous nuclear matter within the Self-Consistent Green's Functions approach. We find a substantial decrease of the critical temperature with respect to the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. Even within the same approximation, the use of two different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions gives rise to large differences in the properties of the critical point.

A. Rios; A. Polls; A. Ramos; H. Müther

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Liquid-gas phase transition and Coulomb instability of asymmetric nuclear systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of nuclear systems at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. For two formulations of the model the critical temperature, $T_c$, for symmetric nuclear matter is found to be 15.8 MeV and 17.9 MeV. These values are consistent with those derived from recent experiments. The limiting temperatures for finite nuclei are in good agreement with the experimental points.

P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

In-medium properties of nuclear fragments at the liquid-gas phase coexistence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactions of nuclear multifragmentation of excited finite nuclei can be interpreted as manifestation of the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. During this process the matter at subnuclear density clusterizes into hot primary fragments, which are located in the vicinity of other nuclear species. In recent experiments there were found evidences that the symmetry and surface energies of primary fragments change considerably as compared to isolated cold or low-excited nuclei. The new modified properties of primary fragments should be taken into account during their secondary de-excitation.

A. S. Botvina

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

Liquid-gas mixed phase in nuclear matter at finite temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the geometrical structure of Liquid-gas (LG) mixed phase which is relevant to nuclear matter in the crust region of compact stars or supernovae. To get the equation of state (EOS) of the system, the Maxwell construction is found to be applicable to symmetric nuclear matter, where protons and neutrons behave simultaneously. For asymmetric nuclear matter, on the other hand, the phase equilibrium can be obtained by fully solving the Gibbs conditions since the components in the L and G phases are completely different. We also discuss the effects of surface and the Coulomb interaction on the mixed phase.

Toshiki Maruyama; Toshitaka Tatsumi

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition of the system in ideal thermal equilibrium is studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The time evolution of a many-nucleon system confined in a container is solved for a long time to get a microcanonical ensemble of a given energy and volume. The temperature and the pressure are extracted from this ensemble and the caloric curves are constructed. The present work is the first time that a microscopic dynamical model which describes nuclear multifragmentation reactions well is directly applied to get the nuclear caloric curve. The obtained constant pressure caloric curves clearly show the characteristic feature of the liquid-gas phase transition, namely negative heat capacity (backbending), which is expected for the phase transition in finite systems.

Takuya Furuta; Akira Ono

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy and environmental advantages of cogeneration with nuclear and coal electrical utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electrical-utility cogeneration from nuclear energy and coal is examined for improving regional energy-resource utilization efficiency and environmental performance. A case study is presented for a large and diverse hypothetical region which ... Keywords: coal, cogeneration, combined heat and power, efficiency, emissions, nuclear energy

Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ultrafiltration treatment for liquid laundry wastes from nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

The authors conduct a comprehensive analysis of the waste constituents--radioactive and organic--of the laundry water resulting from the on-site laundering and decontamination of clothing worn in nuclear power plants. The primary isotope contaminants consist of niobium and zirconium 95, manganese 54, cobalt 60, iron 59, and cesium 134 and 137. A variety of filter and adsorbent materials used in an ultrafiltration process are comparatively tested for their effectiveness in removing not only these isotopes but also the organic contaminants in the process of recycling the water. Those materials consist of copper hexacyanoferrate, polyacrylophosphonic acid, and several metal-polymer complexes.

Kichik, V.A.; Maslova, M.N.; Svittsov, A.A.; Kuleshov, N.F.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Financing arrangements and industrial organisation for new nuclear build in electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Finnish and French plants under construction –, but rising fossil fuel and CO2 prices are reviving interest in nuclear power. A potential nuclear power renaissance in liberalised electricity markets will face a number of hurdles associated... with the CO2 price in Europe. The attractiveness of carbon free technologies such as nuclear plant for a power producer is reinforced by the additional cost placed on fossil fuel generation technologies by climate policies and CO2 emissions pricing...

Finon, Dominique; Roques, Fabien A

109

Electric Field Induced Rotation of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flakes: Mechanisms and Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric fields can induce motion of polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (pCLC) flakes suspended in a fluid medium. The platelet-shaped pCLC flakes with a Grandjean texture show strong selective reflection when lying flat in the plane of a conventional cell. As their orientation with respect to normally incident light changes, their selective reflection color shifts toward the blue and diminishes until the flakes are no longer easily visible beyond 7-12{sup o} of rotation. Reproducibility and control of motion has been observed in moderately conductive host fluid. Flakes in such hosts do not respond to a DC electric field, but they rotate 90{sup o} in an AC field within a given frequency band. The response times and frequency regions for motion depend partially on the field magnitude, the dielectric properties of the host fluid and the flake geometry. We observe flakes reorienting in less than 500 ms in an electric field of 0.17 Vrms/mm, while subsecond reorientation is seen in fields as low as 5 x 10-2 Vrms/mm. This response time is comparable with typical electronic-paper applications, but with a significantly lower electric field. Displays using pCLC flakes would not require backlighting, sheet polarizers, color filters or alignment layers. Numerous additional applications for pCLC flakes are envisioned, including filters, polarizers, and spatial light modulators.

Kosc, T. Z.; Marshall, K. L.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulous, J. C.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Liquid-Gas Phase Transitions in a Multicomponent Nuclear System with Coulomb and Surface Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition is studied in a multi-component nuclear system using a local Skyrme interaction with Coulomb and surface effects. Some features are qualitatively the same as the results of Muller and Serot which uses relativistic mean field without Coulomb and surface effects. Surface tension brings the coexistance binodal surface to lower pressure. The Coulomb interaction makes the binodal surface smaller and cause another pair of binodal points at low pressure and large proton fraction with less protons in liquid phase and more protons in gas phase.

S. J. Lee; A. Z. Mekjian

2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

Experimental evidence for a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear systems  

SciTech Connect

At certain combinations of temperature and density, nuclear matter may exist as a liquid-gas mixture exhibiting phase instabilities, a characteristic signature of which may be found in the emission of intermediate-mass fragments in nuclear collisions. The present analysis of fragment distributions from proton-- and heavy-ion--induced reactions, in the framework of a theory of condensation, is suggestive of the occurrence of such phase transitions with a critical exponent kapprox.1.7 and a critical temperature T/sub C/approx.12 MeV.

Panagiotou, A.D.; Curtin, M.W.; Toki, H.; Scott, D.K.; Siemens, P.J.

1984-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nuclear Chemical and Mechanical Instability and the Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties of nuclei are studied in a mean field model using a Skryme interaction. Properties of two component systems are investigated over the complete range of proton fraction from a system of pure neutrons to a system of only protons. Besides volume, symmetry, and Coulomb effects we also include momentum or velocity dependent forces. Applications of the results developed are then given which include nuclear mechanical and chemical instability and an associated liquid/gas phase transition in two component systems. The velocity dependence leads to further changes in the coexistence curve and nuclear mechanical and chemical instability curves.

S. J. Lee; A. Z. Mekjian

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Cupertino, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition within the lattice gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition on the basis of a two-component lattice gas model. A Metropolis type of sampling method is used to generate microscopic states in the canonical ensemble. The effective equation of state and fragment mass distributions are evaluated in a wide range of temperatures and densities. A definition of the phase coexistence region appropriate for mesoscopic systems is proposed. The caloric curve resulting from different types of freeze-out conditions are presented.

J. Borg; I. N. Mishustin; J. P. Bondorf

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Decarbonizing the Electric Sector: Combining Renewable and Nuclear Energy using Thermal Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both renewable and nuclear energy can provide significant contributions to decarbonizing the electric sector. However, a grid employing large amounts of wind and solar energy requires the balance of the system to be highly flexible to respond to the increased variability of the net load. This makes deployment of conventional nuclear power challenging both due to the technical challenges of plant cycling and economic limits of reduced capacity factor. In the United States nuclear power plants generally provide constant, base load power and are most economic when operated at constant power levels. Operating nuclear power plants in load-following modes decreases the plants' annual energy output and increases the levelized cost of energy, decreasing economic competitiveness. One possible solution is to couple thermal energy storage to nuclear power plants. This would enable the reactor to remain at nearly constant output, while cycling the electrical generator in response to the variability of the net load. This paper conceptually explores combinations of wind, solar, and nuclear that can provide a large fraction of a system's electricity, assuming the use of thermal energy storage that would allow nuclear power to provide load following and cycling duty while operating at a constant reactor power output.

Denholm, P.; King, J.; Kutscher, C.; Wilson, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Aerothermodynamics, Comprehensive Technical Report, Direct Air Cycle, General Electric's Air Craft Nuclear Propulsion Program  

SciTech Connect

This is one of twenty-one volumes summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume summarizes the methods and techquies developed for use in the thermal design of nuclear reactors associated with that program.

Noyes, R.N.

1961-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight systems has been limited to low-power, ...

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pacific gas electric: 1993 EL P Utility of the Year. Incentive nuclear regulation spurs financial comeback  

SciTech Connect

Incentive agreements for Diablo Canyon nuclear plant helped spur Pacific Gas Electric Co.'s financial comeback. Consistent nuclear plant capacity factors above 80 percent contributed 38 percent of 1992 PG E earnings per share. This, plus aggressive cost cutting and reorganization, industry leading demand-side management, environmental measures and a rate refund and freeze are among the reasons Electric Light Power magazine names Pacific Gas Electric Co. the 1993 EL P Utility of the Year. San Francisco-based PG E is the 25th utility to receive the annual award for investor-owned electric utilities. PG E employees strive to create the kind of environment that can address increasing industry competitiveness. Rather than just doing their jobs, people consistently challenge each other to do their jobs better, trying to anticipate the changes of tomorrow and the next millennium.

Hoske, M.T.; Beaty, W.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electrical resistivity for detecting subsurface non-aqueous phase liquids: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

Soils and groundwater have been contaminated by hazardous substances at many places in the United States and many other countries. The contaminants are commonly either petroleum products or industrial solvents with very low solubility in water. These contaminants are usually called non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The cost of cleaning up the affected sites in the United States is estimated to be of the order of 100 billion dollars. In spite of the expenditure of several billion dollars during the last 15 years, to date, very few, if any major contaminated site has been restored. The presence of NAPL pools in the subsurface is believed to be the main cause for the failure of previous cleanup activities. Due to their relatively low water solubility, and depending on their volume, it takes tens or even hundreds of years to deplete the NAPL sources if they are not removed from the subsurface. The intrinsic electrical resistivity of most NAPLs is typically in the range of 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 12}{Omega}-m, which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of groundwater containing dissolved solids (usually in the range of a few {Omega}-m to a few thousand {Omega}-m). Although a dry soil is very resistive, the electrical resistivity of a wet soil is on the order of 100 {Omega}-m and is dependent on the extent of water saturation. For a given soil, the electrical resistivity increases with decrease of water saturation. Therefore, if part of the pore water is replaced by a NAPL, the electrical resistivity will increase. At many NAPL sites, both the vadose and phreatic zones can be partially occupied by NAPL pools. It is the great contrast in electrical resistivity between the NAPLs and groundwater that may render the method to be effective in detecting subsurface NAPLs at contaminated sites. The following experiments were conducted to investigate the change of the electrical resistivity of porous media when diesel fuel (NAPL) replaces part of the water.

Lee, K.H.; Shan, C.; Javandel, I.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Aging Management Guidelines for Commercial Nuclear Power Plants -- Electrical and Mechanical Penetrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the application process for license renewal, nuclear utilities must perform an evaluation to confirm that they have appropriately considered aging effects on plant components within the scope of the License Renewal Rule. This report provides guidelines for managing relevant degradation mechanisms applicable to electrical and mechanical penetrations in nuclear power plants. Use of these guidelines will provide utilities with a basis for verifying that effective methods for managing age-related ...

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Potential growth of nuclear and coal electricity generation in the US  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand should continue to grow at about the same rate as GNP, creating a need for large amounts of new generating capacity over the next fifty years. Only coal and nuclear at this time have the abundant domestic resources and assured technology to meet this need. However, large increase in both coal and nuclear usage will require solutions to many of the problems that now deter their increased usage. For coal, the problems center around the safety and environmental impacts of increased coal mining and coal combustion. For nuclear, the problems center around reactor safety, radioactive waste disposal, financial risk, and nuclear materials safeguards. This report assesses the impacts associated with a range of projected growth rates in electricity demand over the next 50 years. The resource requirements and waste generation resulting from pursuing the coal and nuclear fuel options to meet the projected growth rates are estimated. The fuel requirements and waste generation for coal plants are orders of magnitude greater than for nuclear. Improvements in technology and waste management practices must be pursued to mitigate environmental and safety concerns about electricity generation from both options. 34 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

Bloomster, C.H.; Merrill, E.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Table of Nuclear Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole Moments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ma25 ZP A327 157 (87) 4492 295 ps 5- +2.6(5) IPAD 1974He13 PR C10 919 (74) 20 Ca 41 0 1.0x10 5 y 7 Research NP Nuclear Physics NuoC Nuovo Cimento NuoCL Nuovo Cimento Letters OptL Optics Letters ORNL Oak) +0.822567(3) [2H] N ZNat 23a 1202 (68)/PL A25 440 (67)/ ORNL-1775 (54) -0.00083(8) st [7Li] MB,R CPL

125

Joint electric power alternatives study. Appendix G. Joint parallel nuclear alternatives study for Russia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Parallel Nuclear Alternatives Study for Russia (JPNAS) is a parallel study to the Joint Electric Power Alternatives Study (JEPAS). The JPNAS assessed the costs of enhancing the safety level of Russian nuclear power plants (NPPs), decommissioning of RBMK-1000 and first generation VVER-440 units, completion of NPP construction, NPP repowering into fossil fuel plants, and construction of new generation NPPs. In the framework of the JEPAS, the JPNAS provides data on the nuclear sector which is needed to formulate an integrated resources plan and schedule for investments for the development of Russia`s power sector.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems  

SciTech Connect

The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Solar-Powered, Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Low-Electricity Humidity Control: Report and Summary Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the capabilities of a new high-performance, liquid-desiccant dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) to enhance cooling efficiency and comfort in humid climates while substantially reducing electric peak demand at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), which is 12 miles east of Panama City, Florida.

Dean, J.; Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Miller, J.; Lowenstein, A.; Barker, G.; Slayzak, S.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear electric dipole moment of {sup 3}He  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we calculate the {sup 3}He electric dipole moment (EDM) generated by parity- and time-reversal violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. While the results are somehow sensitive to the interaction model chosen for the strong two- and three-body interactions, we demonstrate the pion-exchange dominance to the EDM of {sup 3}He, if the coupling constants for {pi}, {rho} and {omega}-exchanges are of comparable magnitude, as expected. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of {sup 3}He EDM would be complementary to the currently planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and would constitute a powerful constraint to the models of the pion P- and T-violating interactions.

Stetcu, I.; Friar, J. L.; Hayes, A. C. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Liu, C.-P. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Navratil, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-414, California 94551 (United States)

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

The influence of Coulomb on the liquid-gas phase transition and nuclear multifragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition is analyzed from the topologic properties of the event distribution in the obervables space. A multi-canonical formalism allows to directly relate the standard phase transition with neutral particles to the case where the non saturating Coulomb interaction is present, and to interpret the effect of Coulomb as a deformation of the probability distributions and a rotation of the order parameter. This formalism is applied to a statistical multifragmentation model and consequences for the nuclear multifragmentation phase transitions are drawn.

F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; Al. H. Raduta; Ad. R. Raduta

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical temperature Tc for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is stimated both from the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case,the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the IMF yields in p(8.1 GeV)+Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation (SMM). In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited 188Os is compared with the calculated one with Tc as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 16 MeV.

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; A. Budzanowski; S. P. Avdeyev; A. S. Botvina; E. A. Cherepanov; W. Karcz; V. V. Kirakosyan; P. A. Rukoyatkin; I. Skwirczynska; E. Norbeck

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electric dipole-forbidden nuclear transitions driven by super-intense laser fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric dipole-forbidden transitions of nuclei interacting with super-intense laser fields are investigated considering stable isotopes with suitable low-lying first excited states. Different classes of transitions are identified, and all magnetic sublevels corresponding to the near-resonantly driven nuclear transition are included in the description of the nuclear quantum system. We find that large transition matrix elements and convenient resonance energies qualify nuclear M1 transitions as good candidates for the coherent driving of nuclei. We discuss the implications of resonant interaction of intense laser fields with nuclei beyond the dipole approximation for the controlled preparation of excited nuclear states and important aspects of possible experiments aimed at observing these effects.

Adriana Pálffy; Jörg Evers; Christoph H. Keitel

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRICAL POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM TO SELECTED PORTIONS OF THE NUCLEAR HVAC SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design requirement probability of 0.01 or less in a 4-hour period ensures that the nuclear heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in the primary confinement areas of the Dry Transfer Facilities (DTFs) and Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) is working during a Category 1 drop event involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) assemblies (BSC 2004a , Section 5.1.1.48). This corresponds to an hourly HVAC failure rate of 2.5E-3 per hour or less, which is contributed to by two dominant causes: equipment failure and loss of electrical power. Meeting this minimum threshold ensures that a Category 1 initiating event followed by the failure of HVAC is a Category 2 event sequence. The two causes for the loss of electrical power include the loss of offsite power and the loss of onsite power distribution. Thus, in order to meet the threshold requirement aforementioned, the failure rate of mechanical equipment, loss of offsite power, and loss of onsite power distribution must be less than or equal to 2.5E-3 per hour for the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF. The loss of offsite power occurs at a frequency of 1.1E-5 per hour (BSC 2004a, Section 5.1.1.48). The purpose of this analysis is to determine the probability of occurrence of the unavailability of the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF due to loss of electrical power. In addition, this analysis provides insights on the contribution to the unavailability of the HVAC system due to equipment failure. The scope of this analysis is limited to finding the frequency of loss of electrical power to the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF.

N. Ramirez

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

Double liquid membrane system for the removal of actinides and lanthanides from acidic nuclear wastes  

SciTech Connect

Supported liquid membranes (SLM), consisting of an organic solution of n-octyl-(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in decalin are able to perform selective separation and concentration of actinide and lanthanide ions from aqueous nitrate feed solutions and synthetic nuclear wastes. In the membrane process a possible strip solution is a mixture of formic acid and hydroxylammonium formate (HAF). The effectiveness of this strip solution is reduced and eventually nullified by the simultaneous transfer through the SLM of nitric acid which accumulates in the strip solution. A possible way to overcome this drawback is to make use of a second SLM consisting of a primary amine which is able to extract only HNO/sub 3/ from the strip solution. In this work the results obtained by experimentally studying the membrane system: synthetic nuclear waste/CMPO-TBP membrane/HCOOH-HAF strip solution/primary amine membrane/NaOH solution, are reported. They show that the use of a second liquid membrane is effective in controlling the HNO/sub 3/ concentration in the strip solution, thus allowing the actinide and lanthanide ions removal from the feed solution to proceed to completion. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Chiarizia, R.; Danesi, P.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Liquid-gas phase transition in a two-components isospin lattice gas model for asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-components isospin lattice gas model has been employed to study the liquid-gas phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter. An additional degree of freedom, namely, the asymmetry parameter alpha has been considered carefully for studying the phase transition. We have shown that under the mean field approximation, the liquid-gas phase transition given by this model is of second order. The entropy continues at the phase transition point. The binodal surface is addressed.

Wei Liang Qian; Ru-Keng Su

2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants  

SciTech Connect

A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

Reed, S.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market  

SciTech Connect

Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel [AREVA, 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, Virginia, 24506 (United States); Carre, Franck [CEA, Saclay (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

75,000 KILOWATTS OF ELECTRICITY BY NUCLEAR FISSION AT THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

For presentation at ASCE Convention in Reno, Nevada on Thursday, June 23, 1860. A description of the Hallam Nuclear Power Facslity is presented. The history of the project, program participants, site description, component development program, reaetor building, reactor structure, reactor core, sodium systems, instrumentation and control, fuel and component handling, auxsilary sustems, special design features, and advantages of sodium graphite reactor systems are discussed. (M.C.G.)

Gronemeyer, F.C.; Merryman, J.W.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effective interaction dependence of the liquid-gas phase transition in symmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition for homogeneous symmetric nuclear matter is studied in the mean-field approximation. Critical properties are computed using a comprehensive group of Skyrme and Gogny forces in an effort to elucidate the effective interaction dependence of the results. Analytical models for the thermodynamical and critical properties are discussed and compared to an extensive set of mean-field data. In agreement with these models, a tight correlation is found between the flashing and the critical points. Accurate predictions for the critical temperature, based on saturation properties, can only be obtained after the density dependence of the effective mass is properly taken into account. While the thermodynamical properties coming from different mean-fields do not follow a law of corresponding states, the critical exponents for all the mean-fields have been found to be the same. Their values coincide with those predicted by the Landau mean-field theory of critical phenomena.

A. Rios

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

REACTOR AND SHIELD PHYSICS. Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle, Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program.  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume describes the experimental and theoretical work accomplished in the areas of reactor and shield physics.

Edwards, W.E.; Simpson, J.D.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main thermodynamical properties of the first order phase transition of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic model were explored in the isobaric, the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles on the basis of the method of the thermodynamical potentials and their first derivatives. It was proved that the first order phase transition of the RMF model is the liquid-gas type one associated with the Gibbs free energy $G$. The thermodynamical potential $G$ is the piecewise smooth function and its first order partial derivatives with respect to variables of state are the piecewise continuous functions. We have found that the energy in the caloric curve is discontinuous in the isobaric and the grand canonical ensembles at fixed values of the pressure and the chemical potential, respectively, and it is continuous, i.e. it has no plateau, in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles at fixed values of baryon density, while the baryon density in the isotherms is discontinuous in the isobaric and the canonical ensembles at fixed values of the temperature. The general criterion for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble was identified.

A. S. Parvan

2011-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

The effect of a micro bubble dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope transport in liquid metals under nuclear irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present work intend to be a first step towards the understanding and quantification of the hydrogen isotope complex phenomena in liquid metals for nuclear technology. Liquid metals under nuclear irradiation in,e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles. Other liquid metal systems of a nuclear reactor involve hydrogen isotope absorption processes, e.g., tritium extraction system. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. Here general models for hydrogen isotopes transport in liquid metal and absorption into gas phase, that do not depend on the mass transfer limiting regime, are exposed and implemented in OpenFOAMR CFD tool for 0D to 3D simulations. Results for a 0D case show the impact of a He dispersed phase of na...

Fradera, Jorge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Recommendations for Controlling Cavitation, Flashing, Liquid Droplet Impingement, and Solid Particle Erosion in Nuclear Power Plant Piping Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the most common forms of erosion encountered in nuclear power plant piping systems—cavitation, flashing, liquid droplet impingement, and solid particle erosion—and provides utility engineers with information on how to deal with these forms of damage.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Use of ion exchange for the treatment of liquids in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The current and future use of ion exchange (demineralization) as a method for treating liquid radioactive streams at nuclear power plants was investigated. Pertinent data were obtained by contacting utility companies, nuclear-steam-supply system vendors, selected AEC-operated facilities, as well as ion exchange resin and equipment manufacturers. Principal emphasis was on obtaining data concerning the decontamination of aqueous solutions characterized by levels of radioactivity that range from 10/sup -7/ to 1 mu Ci/ml. Ion exchange media commonly used in nuclear power plants are synthetic organic resins of polystyrene matrix. They are utilized primarily in the mixed-bed (deep-bed) ion exchange system. Powdered resin (mixed) systems (so-called filter- demineralizer'') are also used in several recent boiling-water-reactor plants. The term decontamination factor (DF), the ratio of the feed to effluent concentration, is widely used and is assumed by designers and operators of the plants to express the ion exchange system performance. In some cases, such DF values may not represent the true system performance. To achieve a desired DF, the feed and effiuent must be sampled for the nuclides of interest and the processing discontinued when the desired effluent concentration is exceeded. Average DF values that can be obtained for various ion-exchange systems and various groups of radionuclides if good engineering practice is used in the design and operation of these systems are listed. These values are based on ion- exchange fundamentals, literature data, laboratory experiments, and plant operating experience. They represent time-average values expected under normal operating conditions rather than maximum values attainable under optimum conditions. (auth)

Lin, K.H.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter with density-dependent relativistic mean-field models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is studied within density-dependent relativistic mean-field models where the density dependence is introduced according to the Brown-Rho scaling and constrained by available data at low densities and empirical properties of nuclear matter. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is obtained to be 15.7 MeV in symmetric nuclear matter falling on the lower edge of the small experimental error bars. In hot asymmetric matter, the boundary of the phase-coexistence region is found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The critical pressure and the area of phase-coexistence region increases clearly with the softening of the symmetry energy. The critical temperature of hot asymmetric matter separating the gas phase from the LG coexistence phase is found to be higher for the softer symmetry energy.

Guang-Hua Zhang; Wei-Zhou Jiang

2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at large $N_c$ in the Van der Waals approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at large number of colors ($N_c$) within the framework of the Van Der Waals (VdW) model. We argue that the VdW equation is appropriate at describing inter-nucleon forces, and discuss how each parameter scales with $N_c$. We demonstrate that $N_c=3$ (our world) is not large with respect to the other dimensionless scale relevant to baryonic matter, the number of neighbors in a dense system $N_N$. Consequently, we show that the liquid-gas phase transition looks dramatically different at $N_c \\to \\infty$ with respect of our world: The critical point temperature becomes of the order of $\\lqcd$ rather than below it. The critical point density becomes of the order of the baryonic density, rather than an order of magnitude below it. These are precisely the characteristics usually associated with the "Quarkyonic phase". We therefore conjecture that quarkyonic matter is simply the large $N_c$ limit of the nuclear liquid, and the interplay between $N_c$ and $N_N$ is the reason why the nuclear liquid in our world is so different from quarkyonic matter. We conclude by suggesting ways our conjecture can be tested in future lattice measurements.

Giorgio Torrieri; Igor Mishustin

2010-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Reversible temperature regulation of electrical and thermal conductivity using liquid–solid phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reversible temperature tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities of materials is of interest for many applications, including seasonal regulation of building temperature, thermal storage and sensors. Here we introduce ...

Zheng, Ruiting

155

Electrical conductivity and equation of state of liquid nitrogen, oxygen, benzene, and 1-butene shocked to 60 GPa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements are reported for the electrical conductivity of liquid nitrogen (N/sub 2/), oxygen (O/sub 2/) and benzene (C/sub 6/H/sub 6/), and Hugoniot equation of state of liquid 1-butene (C/sub 4/H/sub 8/) under shock compressed conditions. The conductivity data span 7 x 10/sup -4/ to 7 x 10/sup 1/ ..cap omega../sup -1/cm/sup -1/ over a dynamic pressure range 18.1 to 61.5 GPa and are discussed in terms of amorphous semiconduction models which include such transport phenomena as hopping, percolation, pseudogaps, and metallization. Excellent agreement is found between the equation-of-state measurements, which span a dynamic pressure range 12.3 to 53.8 GPa, and Ree's calculated values which assume a 2-phase mixture consisting of molecular hydrogen and carbon in a dense diamond-like phase. There is a 2-1/2 fold increase in the thermal pressure contribution over a less dense, stoichiometrically equivalent liquid. 90 refs., 48 figs., 8 tabs.

Hamilton, D.C.

1986-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

156

Numerical investigation of electric heating impacts on solid/liquid glass flow patterns.  

SciTech Connect

A typical glass furnace consists of a combustion space and a melter. Intense heat is generated from the combustion of fuel and air/oxygen in the combustion space. This heat is transferred mainly by radiation to the melter in order to melt sand and cullet (scrap glass) eventually creating glass products. Many furnaces use electric boosters to enhance glass melting and increase productivity. The coupled electric/combustion heat transfer patterns are key to the glass making processes. The understanding of the processes can lead to the improvement of glass quality and furnace efficiency. The effects of electrical boosting on the flow patterns and heat transfer in a glass melter are investigated using a multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with addition of an electrical boosting model. The results indicate that the locations and spacing of the electrodes have large impacts on the velocity and temperature distributions in the glass melter. With the same total heat input, the batch shape (which is determined by the overall heat transfer and the batch melting rate) is kept almost the same. This indicates that electric boosting can be used to replace part of heat by combustion. Therefore, temperature is lower in the combustion space and the life of the furnace can be prolonged. The electric booster can also be used to increase productivity without increasing the furnace size.

Chang, S. L.; Zhou, C. Q.; Golchert, B.

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

Abstract Electrospraying utilises electrical forces for liquid atomisation. Droplets obtained by this method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the initial mass concentration of the droplets, gg is the gas dynamic viscosity, ql is the liquid density) lithium batteries- luminescence (ZnScoatedCdSe// glass) (1­4mg/CdSe/mL) (100­300°C) CdSe(inZnSmatrix)Acetonitrile+ pyridine(2:1) 3

Haile, Sossina M.

158

Nuclear EMP simulation for large-scale urban environments. FDTD for electrically large problems.  

SciTech Connect

In case of a terrorist nuclear attack in a metropolitan area, EMP measurement could provide: (1) a prompt confirmation of the nature of the explosion (chemical or nuclear) for emergency response; and (2) and characterization parameters of the device (reaction history, yield) for technical forensics. However, urban environment could affect the fidelity of the prompt EMP measurement (as well as all other types of prompt measurement): (1) Nuclear EMP wavefront would no longer be coherent, due to incoherent production, attenuation, and propagation of gamma and electrons; and (2) EMP propagation from source region outward would undergo complicated transmission, reflection, and diffraction processes. EMP simulation for electrically-large urban environment: (1) Coupled MCNP/FDTD (Finite-difference time domain Maxwell solver) approach; and (2) FDTD tends to be limited to problems that are not 'too' large compared to the wavelengths of interest because of numerical dispersion and anisotropy. We use a higher-order low-dispersion, isotropic FDTD algorithm for EMP propagation.

Smith, William S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bull, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilcox, Trevor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shao, Xuan-Min [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costigan, Keeley R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Attainable entanglement of unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the chemical shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, Yu, Brown, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 71}, 032341 (2005)] investigated the entanglement attainable from unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Their research gave an insight into the role of the entanglement in a liquid-state NMR quantum computer. Moreover, they attempted to reveal the role of mixed-state entanglement in quantum computing. However, they assumed that the Zeeman energy of each nuclear spin which corresponds to a qubit takes a common value for all; there is no chemical shift. In this paper, we research a model with the chemical shifts and analytically derive the physical parameter region where unitary transformed thermal states are entangled, by the positive partial transposition (PPT) criterion with respect to any bipartition. We examine the effect of the chemical shifts on the boundary between the separability and the nonseparability, and find it is negligible.

Yukihiro Ota; Shuji Mikami; Motoyuki Yoshida; Ichiro Ohba

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Czech National R&D Program of Nuclear Incineration of PWR Spent Fuel in a Transmuter with Liquid Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The principle drawbacks of any kind of solid nuclear fuel are listed and briefly analysed in the first part of the paper. On the basis of this analysis, the liquid fuel concept and its benefits are introduced and briefly described in the following parts of the paper allowing to develop new reactor systems for nuclear incineration of spent fuel from conventional reactors and a new clean source of energy. As one of the first realistic attempts to utilise the advantages of liquid fuel, the reactor/blanket system with molten fluoride salts in the role of fuel and coolant simultaneously, as incorporated in the accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) being proposed in [1], has been proposed for a deeper, both theoretical and experimental studies in [2]. There will be a preliminary design concept of an experimental assembly LA-0 briefly introduced in the paper which is under preparation in the Czech Republic for such a project [3]. 1

M. Hron

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

162

Leaching of indium from obsolete liquid crystal displays: Comparing grinding with electrical disintegration in context of LCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two pre-treatment methods, prior to leaching of indium from obsolete LCD modules, were described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional grinding and electrical disintegration have been evaluated and compared in the context of LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental data on the leaching capacity for indium and the electricity consumption of equipment were inputted into the LCA model in order to compare the environmental performance of each method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An estimate for the environmental performance was calculated as the sum of six impact categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrical disintegration method outperforms conventional grinding in all impact categories. - Abstract: In order to develop an effective recycling system for obsolete Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs), which would enable both the leaching of indium (In) and the recovery of a pure glass fraction for recycling, an effective liberation or size-reduction method would be an important pre-treatment step. Therefore, in this study, two different types of liberation methods: (1) conventional grinding, and (2) electrical disintegration have been tested and evaluated in the context of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). In other words, the above-mentioned methods were compared in order to find out the one that ensures the highest leaching capacity for indium, as well as the lowest environmental burden. One of the main findings of this study was that the electrical disintegration was the most effective liberation method, since it fully liberated the indium containing-layer, ensuring a leaching capacity of 968.5 mg-In/kg-LCD. In turn, the estimate for the environmental burden was approximately five times smaller when compared with the conventional grinding.

Dodbiba, Gjergj, E-mail: dodbiba@sys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of System Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Nagai, Hiroki; Wang Lipang; Okaya, Katsunori; Fujita, Toyohisa [Department of System Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

THE LIQUID METAL LINEAR GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

In the utilization of nuclear heat energy, liquid metal could be used in a vapor cycle to propel a column of liquid metal in a jet pump or injector where electrical energy could be extracted by means of a MHD arrangement. The recirculating system is being studied as a means of increasing the efficiency. Results are described briefly for a preliminary run made using steam and water; the efficiency of conversion of steam kinetic energy to liquid kinetic energy was approximates 20%. The possible causes of the low efficiency and some of the methods for decreasing hydraulic losses are outlined. (D.L.C.)

Sowa, E.S.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Assessment of high temperature nuclear energy storage systems for the production of intermediate and peak-load electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased cost of energy, depletion of domestic supplies of oil and natural gas, and dependence on foreign suppliers, have led to an investigation of energy storage as a means to displace the use of oil and gas presently being used to generate intermediate and peak-load electricity. Dedicated nuclear thermal energy storage is investigated as a possible alternative. An evaluation of thermal storage systems is made for several reactor concepts and economic comparisons are presented with conventional storage and peak power producing systems. It is concluded that dedicated nuclear storage has a small but possible useful role in providing intermediate and peak-load electric power.

Fox, E. C.; Fuller, L. C.; Silverman, M. D.

1977-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

166

Technical evaluation of the adequacy of station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system, in conjunction with the offsite power sources, has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analysis shows that the station electric distribution system has the capacity and capability to supply voltage to the Class 1E equipment with their design ratings for the worst case loading condition.

Selan, J.C.

1981-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

167

Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program, Program Summary and References  

SciTech Connect

This is one of twenty-one volumes sumarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume discusses the background to the General Electric program, and summarizes the various direct-air-cycle nuclear test assemblies and power plants that were developed. Because of the requirements of high performance, low weight, and small size, vast improvements in existing technology were required to meet the flight objectives. The technological progress achieved during the program is also summarized. The last appendix contains a compilation of the abstracts, tables of contents, and reference lists of the other twenty volumes.

Thornton, G.; Rothstein, A.J.

1962-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

BEC-BCS Crossover and the Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Hot and Dense Nuclear Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of nucleon-nucleon correlations in symmetric nuclear matter at finite temperature is studied beyond BCS theory. Starting from a Hartree-Fock description of nuclear matter with the Gogny effective interaction, we add correlations corresponding to the formation of preformed pairs and scattering states above the superfluid critical temperature within the in-medium T-matrix approach, which is analogous to the Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink theory. We calculate the critical temperature for a BEC superfluid of deuterons, of a BCS superfluid of nucleons, and in the crossover between these limits. The effect of the correlations on thermodynamic properties (equation of state, energy, entropy) and the liquid-gas phase transition is discussed. Our results show that nucleon-nucleon correlations beyond BCS play an important role for the properties of nuclear matter, especially in the low-density region.

Meng Jin; Michael Urban; Peter Schuck

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

MOA: Magnetic Field Oscillating Amplified Thruster and its Application for Nuclear Electric and Thermal Propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfven had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfven waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept, utilising Alfven waves to accelerate ionised matter for propulsive purposes, is MOA - Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Alfven waves are generated by making use of two coils, one being permanently powered and serving also as magnetic nozzle, the other one being switched on and off in a cyclic way, deforming the field lines of the overall system. It is this deformation that generates Alfven waves, which are in the next step used to transport and compress the propulsive medium, in theory leading to a propulsion system with a much higher performance than any other electric propulsion system. Based on computer simulations, which were conducted to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. (authors)

Frischauf, Norbert [QASAR Technologie(s) GmbH, Johann Gottekgasse 39, A-1230, Vienna (Austria); Hettmer, Manfred; Grassauer, Andreas; Bartusch, Tobias [QASAR Technologie(s) GmbH, Johann Gottekgasse 39, A-1230, Vienna (Austria); Koudelka, Otto [Institute of Communication Networks and Satellite Communication, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 12/I, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

171

DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization was done over a two day period in June 2011, and confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

172

Negative heat capacity in the critical region of nuclear fragmentation: an experimental evidence of the liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental indication of negative heat capacity in excited nuclear systems is inferred from the event by event study of energy fluctuations in $Au$ quasi-projectile sources formed in $Au+Au$ collisions at 35 A.MeV. The excited source configuration is reconstructed through a calorimetric analysis of its de-excitation products. Fragment partitions show signs of a critical behavior at about 5 A.MeV excitation energy. In the same energy range the heat capacity shows a negative branch providing a direct evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition.

M. D'Agostino; F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; M. Bruno; F. Cannata; R. Bougault; N. Colonna; F. Gramegna; I. Iori; N. Le Neindre; G. V. Margagliotti; P. F. Mastinu; P. M. Milazzo; A. Moroni; G. Vannini

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

173

Eddy current position indicating apparatus for measuring displacements of core components of a liquid metal nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for measuring displacements of core components of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor by means of an eddy current probe. The active portion of the probe is located within a dry thimble which is supported on a stationary portion of the reactor core support structure. Split rings of metal, having a resistivity significantly different than sodium, are fixedly mounted on the core component to be monitored. The split rings are slidably positioned around, concentric with the probe and symmetrically situated along the axis of the probe so that motion of the ring along the axis of the probe produces a proportional change in the probes electrical output.

Day, Clifford K. (Richland, WA); Stringer, James L. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment production in liquid-gas type phase transition region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment production during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

N. Buyukcizmeci; R. Ogul; A. S. Botvina

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment production in liquid-gas type phase transition region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment production during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

N. Buyukcizmeci; R. Ogul; A. S. Botvina

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Q.E.D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the past decade, intense experimental effort has been devoted to the search for a liquid-gas phase transition in highly excited nuclei. Now, synthesis of the large body of existing multifragmentation data provides a strong case for identification of this phenomenon. In this presentation we discuss several salient features of the data that support their interpretation in terms of a spinodal liquid-gas phase transition.

V. E. Viola

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on synchronous stability of the electric power system  

SciTech Connect

The effects of a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the synchronous stability of the electric power transmission and distribution systems are evaluated. The various modes of coupling of EMP to the power system are briefly discussed, with particular emphasis on those perturbations affecting the synchronous stability of the transmission system. A brief review of the fundamental concepts of the stability problem is given, with a discussion of the general characteristics of transient analysis. A model is developed to represent single sets as well as repetitive sets of multiple faults on the distribution systems, as might be produced by EMP. The results of many numerical stability calculations are presented to illustrate the transmission system's response from different types of perturbations. The important parameters of both multiple and repetitive faults are studied, including the dependence of the response on the size of the perturbed area, the fault density, and the effective impedance between the fault location and the transmission system. Both major load reduction and the effect of the opening of tie lines at the time of perturbation are also studied. We conclude that there is a high probability that EMP can induce perturbations on the distribution networks causing a large portion of the transmission network in the perturbed area to lose synchronism. The result would be an immediate and massive power failure. (auth)

Manweiler, R.W.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

180

Effects of isospin and momentum dependent interactions on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot neutron-rich nuclear matter is investigated within a self-consistent thermal model using an isospin and momentum dependent interaction (MDI) constrained by the isospin diffusion data in heavy-ion collisions, a momentum-independent interaction (MID), and an isoscalar momentum-dependent interaction (eMDYI). The boundary of the phase-coexistence region is shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy with a softer symmetry energy giving a higher critical pressure and a larger area of phase-coexistence region. Compared with the momentum-independent MID interaction, the isospin and momentum-dependent MDI interaction is found to increase the critical pressure and enlarge the area of phase-coexistence region. For the isoscalar momentum-dependent eMDYI interaction, a limiting pressure above which the liquid-gas phase transition cannot take place has been found and it is shown to be sensitive to the stiffness of the symmetry energy.

Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen; Bao-An Li; Hong-Ru Ma

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Technical evaluation of the adequacy of station electric-distribution-system voltages for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system in conjunction with the offsite power sources has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analyses demonstrated that for the worst case conditions established, the Class 1E equipment will automatically start and continue to operate within the equiment design voltage rating.

Selan, J.C.

1981-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Performance testing and Bayesian Reliability Analysis of small diameter, high power electric heaters for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of plutonium from a nuclear weapon to nuclear reactor fuel requires an evaluation of the residual gallium as a potential corrosive material within an operating nuclear fuel element. Homogeneous trace levels of gallium may remain following conversion and have the potential to migrate along the thermal gradient within the fuel and concentrate at the cladding-fuel contact zone. A system to investigate this material transport phenomenon was constructed using small diameter (0.18 inch), indirect electric heaters to simulate the centerline temperatures of operating nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor. The heater was inserted into annular surrogate fuel pellets containing depleted uranium, cerium oxide and trace quantities (10 ppm) of gallium to perform an initial study of the gallium migration using non-plutonium fuels and evaluate the performance of the simulation system. Heat was removed from the operating heaters by using an innovative liquid metal heat exchanger. The heaters were of a new design and were required to operate at a nominal temperature of 1000?C and for a minimum of 5000 hours. An evaluation of the expected heater lifetime and the thermal simulation system was needed in order to justify the high expense of a proposed full test using prototypic mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) containing plutonium from converted nuclear weapons. Bayesian reliability analysis methods were used to determine the expected heater failure rate because of the expected short test duration and the small sample size. Results from the operation of the simulation system and lifetime data indicate the current heater design is capable of producing the required temperatures and thermal gradients normally found in operating nuclear fuels. However, a design weakness in the heaters resulted in an unacceptably high failure rate of the heaters. The heaters were determined to have a reliability of 0.83 % at 5000 hours of operation with a Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) of 485 hours. The current heater design would require some modification and further testing prior to beginning a full scale test using prototypic MOX fuel pellets.

O'Kelly, David Sean

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electric-pulse discharge as a novel technique to synthesize {beta}-SiC nano-crystallites from liquid-phase organic precursors  

SciTech Connect

{beta}-SiC nano-crystallites have been prepared by electric pulses discharged in liquid-phase organic precursors. The composition and crystal structure of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electronic and transmission electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the sample synthesized from the precursor (hexamethyl disilane) is composed of uniform grains with only 8 nm, while the one synthesize from the other precursor (dimethyl silicone oil) is of better crystalline structure with average grain size 22 nm, which may be attributed to discharge in liquid-phase source and short discharge intervals.

Du Kai [National Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, Jilin (China); Yang Haibin [National Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, Jilin (China); Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454003, Henan (China)], E-mail: chinawhirl@hotmail.com; Wei Ronghui; Li Minghui; Yu Qingjiang; Fu Wuyou; Yang Nan; Zhu Hongyang; Zeng Yi [National Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, Jilin (China)

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

185

Bounds on the entanglability of thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theorists have recently shown that the states used in current nuclear magnetic resonance (NMIR) quantum computing experiments are not entangled. Yet it is widely believed that entanglement is a necessary resource in the ...

Yu, Terri M. (Terri Mak), 1981-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Investment in nuclear generation in a restricted electricity market : an analysis of risks and financing options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the late 1970s, the US electric power industry has been undergoing major changes. The electric utility industry had mainly consisted of highly regulated, vertically integrated, local monopolies, providing customers ...

Berger, Raphael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford Retrievable Storage from the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, California  

SciTech Connect

During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 3.8% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated at the General Electric (GE) Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) in Pleasanton, California and shipped to the Hanford Site for storage. The purpose of this report is to characterize these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The waste was generated almost exclusively from the activities, of the Plutonium Fuels Development Laboratory and the Plutonium Analytical Laboratory. Section 2.0 provides further details of the VNC physical plant, facility operations, facility history, and current status. The solid radioactive wastes were associated with two US Atomic Energy Commission/US Department of Energy reactor programs -- the Fast Ceramic Reactor (FCR) program, and the Fast Flux Test Reactor (FFTR) program. These programs involved the fabrication and testing of fuel assemblies that utilized plutonium in an oxide form. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these programs are discussed in detail in Section 3.0. A detailed discussion of the packaging and handling procedures used for the VNC radioactive wastes shipped to the Hanford Site is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an in-depth look at this waste including the following: weight and volume of the waste, container types and numbers, physical description of the waste, radiological components, hazardous constituents, and current storage/disposal locations.

Vejvoda, E.J.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; DeLorenzo, D.S.; Weyns-Rollosson, M.I. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Compound nuclear decay and the liquid to vapor phase transition: a physical picture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyses of multifragmentation in terms of the Fisher droplet model (FDM) and the associated construction of a nuclear phase diagram bring forth the problem of the actual existence of the nuclear vapor phase and the meaning of its associated pressure. We present here a physical picture of fragment production from excited nuclei that solves this problem and establishes the relationship between the FDM and the standard compound nucleus decay rate for rare particles emitted in first-chance decay. The compound thermal emission picture is formally equivalent to a FDM-like equilibrium description and avoids the problem of the vapor while also explaining the observation of Boltzmann-like distribution of emission times. In this picture a simple Fermi gas thermometric relation is naturally justified and verified in the fragment yields and time scales. Low energy compound nucleus fragment yields scale according to the FDM and lead to an estimate of the infinite symmetric nuclear matter critical temperature between 18 a...

Moretto, L G; Phair, L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Testing of T-odd, P-even interactions by nonpolarized neutron transmission through a nonpolarized nuclear target placed into electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new possibility for the study of time-reversal violation is described. It consists in measurement of nonpolarized neutron transmission through nonpolarized nuclear target placed into electric field

V. G. Baryshevsky

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Light Collection in Liquid Noble Gases  

SciTech Connect

Liquid noble gases are increasingly used as active detector materials in particle and nuclear physics. Applications include calorimeters and neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, direct dark matter, muon electron conversion, and the neutron electric dipole moment. One of the great advantages of liquid noble gases is their copious production of ultraviolet scintillation light, which contains information about event energy and particle type. I will review the scintillation properties of the various liquid noble gases and the means used to collect their scintillation light, including recent advances in photomultiplier technology and wavelength shifters.

McKinsey, Dan [Yale University

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

REIMR - A Process for Utilizing Liquid Rocket Propulsion-Oriented 'Lessons Learned' to Mitigate Development Risk in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a summary overview of a study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) during the initial phases of the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program to evaluate a large number of technical problems associated with the design, development, test, evaluation and operation of several major liquid propellant rocket engine systems (i.e., SSME, Fastrac, J-2, F-1). One of the primary results of this study was the identification of the 'Fundamental Root Causes' that enabled the technical problems to manifest, and practices that can be implemented to prevent them from recurring in future propulsion system development efforts, such as that which is currently envisioned in the field of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). This paper will discus the Fundamental Root Causes, cite some examples of how the technical problems arose from them, and provide a discussion of how they can be mitigated or avoided in the development of an NTP system.

Ballard, Richard O. [Nuclear and Advanced Propulsion Systems Engineering Branch, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition within Fermionic Molecular Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time evolution of excited nuclei, which are in equilibrium with the surrounding vapour, is investigated. It is shown that the finite nuclear systems undergo a first oder phase transition. The caloric curve is presented for excited Oxygen, Magnesium, Aluminum and Calcium and the critical temperature is estimated for Oxygen.

J. Schnack; H. Feldmeier

1997-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

Method of removing Pu(IV) polymer from nuclear fuel reclaiming liquid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Pu(IV) polymer not extractable from a nuclear fuel reclaiming solution by conventional processes is electrolytically converted to Pu.sup.3+ and PuO.sub.2.sup.2+ ions which are subsequently converted to Pu.sup.4+ ions extractable by the conventional processes.

Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mailen, James C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Jimmy T. (Kingston, TN); Arwood, Phillip C. (Harriman, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Compound nuclear decay and the liquid to vapor phase transition: a physical picture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyses of multifragmentation in terms of the Fisher droplet model (FDM) and the associated construction of a nuclear phase diagram bring forth the problem of the actual existence of the nuclear vapor phase and the meaning of its associated pressure. We present here a physical picture of fragment production from excited nuclei that solves this problem and establishes the relationship between the FDM and the standard compound nucleus decay rate for rare particles emitted in first-chance decay. The compound thermal emission picture is formally equivalent to a FDM-like equilibrium description and avoids the problem of the vapor while also explaining the observation of Boltzmann-like distribution of emission times. In this picture a simple Fermi gas thermometric relation is naturally justified and verified in the fragment yields and time scales. Low energy compound nucleus fragment yields scale according to the FDM and lead to an estimate of the infinite symmetric nuclear matter critical temperature between 18 and 27 MeV depending on the choice of the surface energy coefficient of nuclear matter.

L. G. Moretto; J. B. Elliott; L. Phair

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

197

The nuclear liquid gas phase transition and phase coexistence: A review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk we will review the different signals of liquid gas phase transition in nuclei. From the theoretical side we will first discuss the foundations of the concept of equilibrium, phase transition and critical behaviors in infinite and finite systems. From the experimental point of view we will first recall the evidences for some strong modification of the behavior of hot nuclei. Then we will review quantitative detailed analysis aiming to evidence phase transition, to define its order and phase diagram. Finally, we will present a critical discussion of the present status of phase transitions in nuclei and we will draw some lines for future development of this field.

Ph. Chomaz

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 1. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of a project on the health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. In addition to presenting an executive summary of the project, it sets forth the main results of the four tasks of the project: to review the health impacts (and related standards) of these forms of power generation, to review the status of standards related to plant safety (with an emphasis on nuclear power), to consider the role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission in selection of standards, and to set forth methodologies whereby that Commission may review the health and safety aspects of proposed sites and facilities.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Advisory system for the diagnosis of lost electric output in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enhancement of efficiency is world-wide trend to survive under intense competition. In recent years, the efficiency in the power industry is also one of the important topics. In case of nuclear power plants(NPPs), the period and quality of maintenance ... Keywords: Advisory system, Bayesian network, Diagnosis, Nuclear power plant, Regression, Turbine cycle

Gyunyoung Heo; Soon Heung Chang; Seong Soo Choi; Gwang Hee Choi; Moon Hak Jee

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Modelling the Effects of Nuclear Fuel Reservoir Operation in a Competitive Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many countries, the electricity systems are quitting the vertically integrated monopoly organization for an operation framed by competitive markets. In such a competitive regime one can ask what the optimal management ...

Lykidi, Maria

202

The portfolio diversification value of nuclear power in liberalized electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key difference between a regulated and a liberalized electricity market is the establishment of a competitive generation marketplace via spot markets, day-ahead auctions, and over-the-counter trading activity. In a ...

Bean, Malcolm (Malcolm K.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Guidance for Developing an Electric Motor Specialist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The people responsible for electric motors in the power industry are known by various titlesmotor specialist, component engineer, motor technician, and electrical technician, to name a few. Although motor duties and responsibilities are often spread across several departmentssuch as maintenance, operations, engineering, and procurementit is up to the motor specialist to ensure that motor health and reliability are maintained. This report presents a tiered approach to developing the necessary skills and k...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dose Commitments from Nuclear Tests carried out beforeDose Commitments from Nuclear Tests carried out before 1968,of the dose from nuclear weapons test fallout. As indicated

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 runoff - co;il pile Geothermal wells Waste Disposal: WaterLiquid-Dominated Fields Geothermal Nuclear Water EmissionsOil 1. 2. 3. L 3 Gas Geothermal Nuclear Section 1.3 Noise

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electric field Induced Patterns in Soft Visco-elastic films: From Long Waves of Viscous Liquids to Short Waves of Elastic Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the electric field driven surface instability of visco-elastic films has two distinct regimes: (1) The visco-elastic films behaving like a liquid display long wavelengths governed by applied voltage and surface tension, independent of its elastic storage and viscous loss moduli, and (2) the films behaving like a solid require a threshold voltage for the instability whose wavelength always scales as ~ 4 x film thickness, independent of its surface tension, applied voltage, loss and storage moduli. Wavelength in a narrow transition zone between these regimes depends on the storage modulus.

N. Arun; Ashutosh Sharma; Partho S. G. Pattader; Indrani Banerjee; Hemant M. Dixit; K. S. Narayan

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electrical and electronic subsystems of a nuclear waste tank annulus inspection system  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear waste tank annulus inspection system is designed specifically for use at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Fuel Services Facility at West Valley, New York. This system sends a television and photographic camera into the space between the walls of a double-shell nuclear waste tank to obtain images of the inner and outer walls at precisely known locations. The system is capable of inspecting a wall section 14 ft wide by 27 ft high. Due to the high temperature and radiation of the annulus environment, the operating life for the inspection device is uncertain, but is expected to be at least 100 h, with 1000 R/h at 82/sup 0/C. The film camera is shielded with 1/2 in. of lead to minimize radiation fogging of the film during a 25-min picture taking excursion. The operation of the inspection system is semiautomated with remote manual prepositioning of the camera, followed by a computer controlled wall scan. This apparatus is currently set up to take an array of contiguous pictures, but is adaptable to other modes of operation.

Evenson, R.J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Correlation Between Aging and Seismic Qualification for Nuclear Plant Electrical Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shake-table tests indicate that aging has no effect on the performance of several common electrical components during or after earthquakes. These findings suggest that some components can be exempted from the costly artificial aging that in some cases is required for seismic qualification.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

Parsons, John E.

210

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

212

Plant Engineering: Electrical Cable Test Applicability Matrix for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When assessing cable degradation or failure assessment, using the correct test and assessment methodology is critical to obtaining the correct answer. Many in-plant and laboratory tests exist. Some apply to the cable types used in nuclear plants. Some apply only to distribution cables. Most have pertinence to only one issue or even one cable design. This report provides a correlation between specific cable problems and the appropriate tests that may be used to resolve the issue. The report starts with su...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

213

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for the Replacement of Large Electric Motors at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to prepare a primary source of guidance for a project manager who is coordinating a team of plant personnel tasked with replacing a large electric motor. The report provides a generic process that describes interfaces and key steps necessary to ensure that the motor is evaluated and replaced in the most cost-effective and efficient means possible. The report also provides guidance regarding the typical composition of the project team and demonstrates how performance of their...

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

DESIGN STUDY OF A NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOR 100-KW ELECTRIC AND 400-KW HEAT CAPACITY  

SciTech Connect

A conceptional design study was made of a lowpower ''package'' reactor plant for the production of 100 kw of electrical power and 400 kw of heat at remote Arctic installations. The power plant steam generator is proposed to be an unmanned, heterogeneous, boilingtype reactor capable of continuous operation for extended periods. The design is based on data derived from experiments with boiling-type reactors conducted by Argorne at the Reactor Testing Station, Arco, Idaho.

Treshow, M.; Snider, A.R.; Shaftman, D.H.

1955-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Technical evaluation report on the monitoring of electric power to the reactor-protection system for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical evaluation of the monitoring of electric power to the reactor protection system (RPS) at the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the proposed design modification will protect the RPS from abnormal voltage and frequency conditions which could be supplied from the power supplies and will meet certain requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed design modifications will protect the RPS from sustained abnormal voltage and frequency conditions from the supplying sources.

Selan, J.C.

1982-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Diesel Generator Tanks 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power provides about 20 % of the total electricity generated in the United States. In 2005, this was about 782 Billion kWh of the total electricity generation (EIA 2006). 2 As with fossil-fueled electricity generating plants, electricity in a nuclear power plant is produced by heated steam that drives a turbine generator. In a nuclear power plant, however, nuclear fission reactions in the core produce heat that is absorbed by a liquid that flows through the system and is converted to steam. Nuclear power plants are highly efficient and have become more so over the last 25 years. Operational efficiency (also referred to as plant performance or electricity production) can be measured by the capacity factor. The capacity factor is the ratio of the actual amount of electricity generated to the maximum possible amount that could be generated in a given period of time – usually a year. Today, nuclear power plants operate at an average 90 % capacity factor (compared to 56 % in 1980) (EIA 2006a). Thus, although nuclear generating capacity has remained roughly constant since 1990, at about 99 gigawatts (or about 10 % of the total U.S. electric generating capacity), the amount of electricity produced has increased 33 % since that time because of increased capacity utilization. Nuclear plants have the highest capacity factors of

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants to Assess PlantStandards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refabrication. through which nuclear fuel passes. Fusion.with the experience at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant (seecommitment from the nuclear fuel cycle; see Section 3.2.3. )

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applies, not only to the nuclear reactor, but also to otherdetailed de- sign of nuclear reactor power s tations is vgreat importance in nuclear reactor accidents. 3.2 Increase

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Risk perception & strategic decision making :general insights, a framework, and specific application to electricity generation using nuclear energy.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to promote increased understanding of decision making processes and hopefully to enable improved decision making regarding high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological systems. This report brings together insights regarding risk perception and decision making across domains ranging from nuclear power technology safety, cognitive psychology, economics, science education, public policy, and neural science (to name a few). It forms them into a unique, coherent, concise framework, and list of strategies to aid in decision making. It is suggested that all decision makers, whether ordinary citizens, academics, or political leaders, ought to cultivate their abilities to separate the wheat from the chaff in these types of decision making instances. The wheat includes proper data sources and helpful human decision making heuristics; these should be sought. The chaff includes ''unhelpful biases'' that hinder proper interpretation of available data and lead people unwittingly toward inappropriate decision making ''strategies''; obviously, these should be avoided. It is further proposed that successfully accomplishing the wheat vs. chaff separation is very difficult, yet tenable. This report hopes to expose and facilitate navigation away from decision-making traps which often ensnare the unwary. Furthermore, it is emphasized that one's personal decision making biases can be examined, and tools can be provided allowing better means to generate, evaluate, and select among decision options. Many examples in this report are tailored to the energy domain (esp. nuclear power for electricity generation). The decision making framework and approach presented here are applicable to any high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological system.

Brewer, Jeffrey D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coatings to Prevent Diffusion of Fission Products into Turbine Materials Used in High Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Electric Genera ting Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes EPRI activities relating to turbine blade coatings to prevent diffusion of fission products into turbine materials used in high temperature gas cooled nuclear electric generating stations. Specifically, this report describes activities that have identified candidate coatings and methodologies for evaluating the effectiveness of these coatings.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Participation of the Nuclear Power Plants in the New Brazilian Electric Energy Market  

SciTech Connect

A new regulation framework has been established for the Brazilian electric energy market by a law put into effect on March 15,2004. The main overall goals of this new regulation are: to allow the lowest possible tariffs for end users, while providing the necessary economic incentives for the operation of present installations (generating plants, transmission lines, distribution networks) and the expansion of the system; long-term planning of the extension of the installations required to meet the demand growth; separation of the generation, transmission and distribution activities by allocating them into different companies; new contracts between generating and distribution companies must result from bidding processes based on lowest-tariff criteria; and energy from new generating units required to meet the demand growth must be contracted by all distributing companies integrated to the National Interconnected Grid, in individual amounts proportional to their respective markets.

Mathias, S.G.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

SNMSP II: A system to fully automate special nuclear materials accountability reporting for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

The USNRC requires each licensee who is authorized to possess Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) to prepare and submit reports concerning SNM received, produced, possessed, transferred, consumed, disposed of, or lost. These SNM accountability reports, which need to be submitted twice a year, contain detailed information on the origin, quantity, and type of SNM for several locations. The amount of detail required makes these reports very time consuming and error prone when prepared manually. Yankee Atomic is developing an IBM PC-based computer code that fully automates the process of generating SNM accountability reports. The program, called SNMSP II, prints a number of summaries including facsimiles of the NRC/DOE-741, 742, 742C, and RW-859 reports in a format that can be submitted directly to the NRC/DOE. SNMSP II is menu-driven and is especially designed for people with little or no computer training. Input can be either from a mainframe-based corporate data base or manually through user-friendly screens. In addition, extensive quality assurance features are available to ensure the security and accuracy of the data. This paper discusses the major features of the code and describes its implementation at Yankee.

Pareto, V.; Venegas, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ionization signals from electrons and alpha-particles in mixtures of liquid Argon and Nitrogen - perspectives on protons for Gamma Resonant Nuclear Absorption applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report on a detailed study of ionization signals produced by Compton electrons and alpha-particles in a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) flled with different mixtures of liquid Argon and Nitrogen. The measurements were carried out with Nitrogen concentrations up to 15% and a drift electric feld in the range 0-50 kV/cm. A prediction for proton ionization signals is made by means of interpolation. This study has been conducted in view of the possible use of liquid Ar-N2 TPCs for the detection of gamma-rays in the resonant band of the Nitrogen absorption spectrum, a promising technology for security and medical applications.

Zeller, M; Delaquis, S; Ereditato, A; Janos, S; Kreslo, I; Messina, M; Moser, U; Rossi, B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

EIA - Electricity Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Independent Power Producers by Census Division and State, July 2013 : Census Region and State Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear

227

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2011 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu)...

228

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, Jeffrey Whealdon; Nenni, Joseph A; Timothy S. Yoder

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

NUCLEAR ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

could improve the economic and safety performance of these advanced reactors. Nuclear power can reduce GHG emissions from electricity production and possibly in co-generation...

232

A New Mixed Fossil/Nuclear Energy System for the Production of Electricity with Zero Emission of Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Economic

W. Seifritz

233

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Power's Development in Japan for a Zero-Carbon Electricity Generation System by 2100  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Education, Economics, and Sustainability / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Qi Zhang; Keiichi N. Ishihara; Benjamin McLellan; Tetsuo Tezuka

234

NuclearScienceandEngineeringLaboratory Sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computational and visualization tools for application in nuclear power, nuclear security, nonproliferation of nuclear power to the electric grid. In the nuclear security, nonproliferation, and safeguards areas, ongoi

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

235

Developments in Molten Salt and Liquid-Salt-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last 5 years, there has been a rapid growth in interest in the use of high-temperature (700 to 1000 deg C) molten and liquid fluoride salts as coolants in nuclear systems. This renewed interest is a consequence of new applications for high-temperature heat and the development of new reactor concepts. Fluoride salts have melting points between 350 and 500 deg C; thus, they are of use only in high-temperature systems. Historically, steam cycles with temperature limits of {approx}550 deg C have been the only efficient method to convert heat to electricity. This limitation produced few incentives to develop high-temperature reactors for electricity production. However, recent advances in Brayton gas turbine technology now make it possible to convert higher-temperature heat efficiency into electricity on an industrial scale and thus have created the enabling technology for more efficient nuclear reactors. Simultaneously, there is a growing interest in using high-temperature nuclear heat for the production of hydrogen and shale oil. Five nuclear-related applications are being investigated: (1) liquid-salt heat-transport systems in hydrogen and shale oil production systems; (2) the advanced high-temperature reactor, which uses a graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel and a liquid salt coolant; (3) the liquid-salt-cooled fast reactor which uses metal-clad fuel and a liquid salt coolant; (4) the molten salt reactor, with the fuel dissolved in the molten salt coolant; and (5) fusion energy systems. The reasons for the new interest in liquid salt coolants, the reactor concepts, and the relevant programs are described. (author)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

ON THE MICROSCOPIC AND MACROSCOPIC ASPECTS OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE WITH APPLICATIONS TO SUPERHEAVY NUCLEI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-Drop Theory of Nuclear Fission, Lawrence Radiationemployed in the study of nuclear fission. determined some ofusual liquid drop model of nuclear fission assumes a charged

Tsang, Chin-Fu.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect

A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electric Power Annual 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation; Table 6.1. Stocks of coal, petroleum liquids, and petroleum coke: Electric power sector: XLS: Table 6.2.

239

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. This report is an update, and replaces the previous report by the same title issued April 2003. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, Jeffrey W.

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Performance and safety design of the advanced liquid metal reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) program led by General Electric is developing, under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, a conceptual design for an advanced sodium-cooled liquid metal reactor plant. This design is intended to improve the already excellent level of plant safety achieved by the nuclear power industry while at the same time providing significant reductions in plant construction and operating costs. In this paper, the plant design and performance are reviewed, with emphasis on the ALMR's unique passive design safety features and its capability to utilize as fuel the actinides in LWR spent fuel.

Berglund, R.C.; Magee, P.M.; Boardman, C.E.; Gyorey, G.L. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States). Advanced Nuclear Technology)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Atoms to electricity. [Booklet  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Atoms to electricity. [Booklet  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geoantineutrino Spectrum, 3He/4He - ratio radial distribution and Slow Nuclear Burning on the Boundary of the Liquid and Solid Phases of the Earth's core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of the geoantineutrino deficit and the experimental results of the interaction of uranium dioxide and carbide with iron-nickel and silica-alumina melts at high pressure (5-10 Gpa) and temperature (1600-22000 C) have motivated us to consider the possible consequences of the assumption made by V.Anisichkin and coauthors that there is an actinid shell on boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core. We have shown that the activation of a natural nuclear reactor operating as the solitary waves of nuclear burning in 238U- and/or 232Th-medium (in particular, the neutron-fission progressive wave of Feoktistov and/or Teller-Ishikawa-Wood) can be such a physical consequence. The simplified model of the kinetics of accumulation and burnup in U-Pu fuel cycle of Feoktistov is developed. The results of the numerical simulation of neutron-fission wave in two-phase UO2/Fe medium on a surface of the Earth's solid core are presented. The georeactor model of 3He origin and the 3He/4He-ratio distribution ...

Rusov, V D; Vaschenko, V N; Tarasov, V A; Zelentsova, T N; Bolshakov, V N; Litvinov, D A; Kosenko, S I; Byegunova, O A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Simulation of a Heisenberg XY- chain and realization of a perfect state transfer algorithm using liquid nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The three- spin chain with Heisenberg XY- interaction is simulated in a three- qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computer. The evolution caused by the XY- interaction is decomposed into a series of single- spin rotations and the $J$- coupling evolutions between the neighboring spins. The perfect state transfer (PST) algorithm proposed by M. Christandl et al [Phys. Rev. Lett, 92, 187902(2004)] is realized in the XY- chain.

Jingfu Zhang; Gui Lu Long; Wei Zhang; Zhiwei Deng; Wenzhang Liu; Zhiheng Lu

2005-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Rincon, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to consent to a proposal by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow public access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) reactor building located near Rincon, Puerto Rico for use as a museum. PREPA, the owner of the BONUS facility, has determined that the historical significance of this facility, as one of only two reactors of this design ever constructed in the world, warrants preservation in a museum, and that this museum would provide economic benefits to the local community through increased tourism. Therefore, PREPA is proposing development of the BONUS facility as a museum.

N /A

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

HIGH-TEMPERATURE LIQUID-METAL TECHNOLOGY REVIEW. A Bimonthly Technical Progress Review. Volume 1, No. 6  

SciTech Connect

Information is included on: sodium-heated steam generntor development; thermodynamic properties of K and Nb- Zr alloy; engineering properties of K and Cs; research on cavitation and cavitation damage in liquid metals, Hg and H/sub 2/ O, and mechanical pump impellers operating in liquid metal space power loops; sodium pumps and loops; 15 kw solar mechanical engine; sodium cold traps; reactor development; liquid metals technology of Hg, K, Na, NaK, Rb, and Cs; liquid metal heat and mass transfe r; heat rejection problems in nuclear space power plants; SPUR program; effects of high temperature Na on austenitic and ferritic steels; structural materials in LASL liquid sodium systems; LAMPRE program; twostage potassium test turbine; and application of nuclear electrical power to manned orbiting space stations. (P.C.H.)

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Recommended Practice for Evaluating Interchangeability for National Electric Manufacturing Association Frame Motor Replacement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Electric Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has a standardized system for designating electric motors. The NEMA system uses a frame size number and letter designation that describes the mounting dimensions, including foot hole mounting pattern, shaft diameter, shaft height, and other details; however, all design characteristicssuch as overall length, height, conduit box extension, and so onmust be evaluated to ensure proper form, fit, and function. The T-frame motor might be the most highly st...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

High temperature liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ã?nay, Devrim

251

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loyola University Design of liquid-liquid extraction systems for actinide and fission product separations Nuclear fuel and target dissolution Chemical processes for...

252

Executive Director for Operations UPDATE OF ISSUES RELATED TO NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR FINANCIAL QUALIFICATIONS IN RESPONSE TO RESTRUCTURING OF THE ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide the Commission with an update of electric utility deregulation and restructuring issues regarding the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their facilities safely. BACKGROUND: On October 24, 1997, the staff sent to the Commission SECY-97-253, "Policy Options for Nuclear Power Reactor Financial Qualifications in Response to Restructuring of the Electric Utility Industry. " In that paper, the staff discussed three options for the Commission's consideration regarding possible approaches that the NRC could use in assessing the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their plants safely. (The impact of deregulation and restructuring on decommissioning funding assurance is being addressed in a separate rulemaking, which was published in the Federal Register on September 10, 1997. A final rule is scheduled to be sent to the Commission by June 30, 1998.) In response to SECY-97-253, the Commission issued a staff requirements memorandum on January 15, 1998, and directed the staff to maintain the existing financial qualifications framework as discussed in Option 2 of SECY-97-253 and to "develop a coherent, efficient plan that would allow timely confirmation of the status of licensees (i.e., whether they meet the definition of 'electric utility')as deregulation actions are finalized by States. " In response, on April 16, 1998, the

L. Joseph Callan /s; Robert S. Wood

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Atoms to electricity  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for some 12 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1982. In the 1990's, it is expected to become second only to coal as a source of our electric power, almost doubling its present contribution to our national electricity supply. 14 references, 40 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

Gaubatz, Donald C. (Cupertino, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Guide for the Performance of OnSite and Vendor Shop Inspections of Electric Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry is experiencing a loss of expertise as its workforce ages. Compounding the problem is that many plants find that there is limited time to train new workers. Periodically, station and corporate motor specialists are asked to perform inspections of on-site motors to maintain a level of equipment reliability or to perform inspections for customers at vendor motor shops. This report should prove valuable during visual inspections of electric motors.

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Drilling research on the electrical detonation and subsequent cavitation in a liquid technique (spark drilling). Status report, July 1--December 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrical characteristics of water during a rapid electrical discharge have been determined. These characteristics were used in predicting energy in the spark drilling arc and in designing a new-generation spark drill. The design of this drill system is described, along with the proposed schedule of its fabrication and use. Other activities accomplished during this report period are also discussed.

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Electric Power Monthly – December 2009 Data issue  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0226 (2009/12) Electric Power Monthly December 2009 With Data for September 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and ...

259

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating ... electric power companies have announced the retirement of five nuclear reactors at four power plants.

260

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ties Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants. LBlr5921, Lawrencein U. S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. Octoberand Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licens- ing. StandardCommission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regula- tion.Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for Light Water Reactor

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Reg- ulation.Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licen- sing. StandardCommission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. Standard

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Ricon, Puerto Rico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 i DOE/EA-1394 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR AUTHORIZING THE PUERTO RICO ELECTRIC POWER AUTHORITY (PREPA) TO ALLOW PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE BOILING NUCLEAR SUPERHEAT (BONUS) REACTOR BUILDING, RINCÓN, PUERTO RICO January 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES V LIST OF TABLES V ACRONYMS VI UNIT ABBREVIATIONS VII SUMMARY VIII 1. INTRODUCTION 10 1.1 Purpose and Need for Action 10 1.2 Operational and Decommissioning History 15 1.3 Summary of Radiological Conditions at the BONUS Facility 19 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 25

264

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

265

Electric dipole moments of Hg, Xe, Rn, Ra, Pu, and TlF induced by the nuclear Schiff moment and limits on time-reversal violating interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the atomic electric dipole moments (EDMs) induced in ^{199}Hg, ^{129}Xe, ^{223}Rn, ^{225}Ra, and ^{239}Pu by their respective nuclear Schiff moments S. The results are (in units 10^{-17}S(e {fm}^{3})^{-1}e cm): d(^{199}Hg)=-2.8, d(^{129}Xe)=0.38, d(^{223}Rn)=3.3, d(^{225}Ra)=-8.5, d(^{239}Pu)=-11. We have also calculated corrections to the parity- and time-invariance-violating (P,T-odd) spin-axis interaction constant in TlF. These results are important for the interpretation of atomic and molecular experiments on EDMs in terms of fundamental P,T-odd parameters.

V. A. Dzuba; V. V. Flambaum; J. S. M. Ginges; M. G. Kozlov

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population growth surrounding a nuclear power plant once thegrowth by requiring that certification of nuclear power plant

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Evaluation Emergency Planning for Nuclear PowerPotential Definition of Nuclear Emergencies Developingan Emergency Plan . . . . Regulatory Review of Utilities!

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between the two liquid phases, separation will result. This is the principle upon which separation by liquid-liquid extraction is based, and there are a number of important applications of this concept in industrial processes. This paper will review the basic concepts and applications as well as present future directions for the liquid-liquid extraction process.

Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiation and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry...

270

Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids  

Using molecular dynamics simulations, the researchers found that particles are trapped in liquid environments when appropriate AC/DC electric fields ...

271

Guidebook for the Use of Synfuels in Electric Utility Combustion Systems, Volume 3: Liquid Fuels Derived From Shale and Tar Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of liquid fuels derived from oil shales or tar sands differ substantially and in varying degrees from those of conventional petroleum fuels. Utilities will find data and procedures in this guidebook to help them evaluate the modifications those fuels would require in their systems.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

Iselin, L.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. ... More Tables on Pennsylvania's Electricity Profile: Formats; Table 2.

274

Baldrige Award Recipients--Westinghouse Electric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... electric utilities operating nuclear power plants install fuel ... areas identified with statistical techniques and ... The Specialty Metals Plant, near Pittsburgh ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change heat exchanger with Na as the heat exchanger coolant. In order to design a very efficient and effective heat exchanger one must optimize the design such that we have a high heat transfer and a lower pressure drop, but there is always a trade-off between them. Based on NGNP operational parameters, a heat exchanger analysis with the sodium phase change will be presented to show that the heat exchanger has the potential for highly effective heat transfer, within a small volume at reasonable cost.

Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Application of Nuclear Energy for Seawater Desalination: Design Concepts of Nuclear Desalination Plants  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy is playing an important role in electricity generation, producing 16% of the world's electricity. However, most of the world's energy consumption is in the form of heat, in which case nuclear energy could also play an important role. In particular, process heat for seawater desalination using nuclear energy has been of growing interest to some Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency over the past two decades. This growing interest stems from increasingly acute freshwater shortages in many arid and semi-arid zones around the world. Indeed, several national and international nuclear desalination demonstration programs are already under way or being planned. Of particular interest are projects for seawater nuclear desalination plants in coastal regions, where saline feed water can serve the dual purpose of cooling water for the nuclear reactor and as feed water for the desalination plant. In principle any nuclear reactor can provide energy (low-grade heat and/or electricity), as required by desalination processes. However, there are some additional requirements to be met under specific conditions in order to introduce nuclear desalination. Technical issues include meeting more stringent safety requirements (nuclear reactors themselves and nuclear-desalination integrated complexes in particular), and performance improvement of the integrated systems. Economic competitiveness is another important factor to be considered for a broader deployment of nuclear desalination. For technical robustness and economic competitiveness a number of design variants of coupling configurations of nuclear desalination integrated plant concepts are being evaluated. This paper identifies and discusses various factors, which support the attractiveness of nuclear desalination. It further summarizes some of the key approaches recommended for nuclear desalination complex design and gives an overview of various design concepts of nuclear desalination plants, which are experienced, being implemented or evaluated by several IAEA Member States. Operating experience with nuclear desalination using a liquid-metal reactor BN-350 in Kazakhstan and several Pressurized Water Reactor units in Japan is discussed. Results of economic analyses of nuclear desalination are also presented in order to illustrate the competitiveness of this technology with other conventional desalination operations. (authors)

Faibish, R.S.; Konishi, T.; Gasparini, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, P.O. Box 100, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Breakout of Table 8.11b; Kilowatts) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 8: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2 ...

278

Open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier and hybrid solar/electric absorption refrigeration system. Annual report, January 1993--December 1993. Calendar year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report presents work performed during calendar year 1993 by the Florida Solar Energy Center under contract to the US Department of Energy. Two distinctively different solar powered indoor climate control systems were analyzed: the open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier, and an improved efficiency absorption system which may be fired by flat plate solar collectors. Both tasks represent new directions relative to prior FSEC research in Solar Cooling and Dehumidification.

Nimmo, B.G.; Thornbloom, M.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Modeling and simulation in analyzing geological repositories for high level nuclear waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is very often used to generate electricity. But first the energy must be released from atoms which can be done in two ways: nuclear fusion and nuclear fission. Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission to produce electrical energy. Electrical ... Keywords: modeling, nuclear energy, nuclear waste, nuclear waste storage, simulation

Dietmar P. F. Möller

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

Teitel, R.J.

1959-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

283

Liquid metal hydrogen barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

Grover, George M. (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Thurman G. (Los Alamos, NM); Keddy, Edward S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESSPlanning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination of Accidentnuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . • . . . . .2.2.4.3.

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, ... Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by Census Divison, ...

288

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.6.A. Consumption of Petroleum Liquids for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, September 2013 and September 2012 (Thousand Barrels) ...

289

Materials and design experience in a slurry-fed electric glass melter  

SciTech Connect

The design of a slurry-fed electric gas melter and an examination of the performance and condition of the construction materials were completed. The joule-heated, ceramic-lined melter was constructed to test the applicability of materials and processes for high-level waste vitrification. The developmental Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM) was operated for three years with simulated high-level waste and was subjected to conditions more severe than those expected for a nuclear waste vitrification plant.

Barnes, S.M.; Larson, D.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4.6.A Electricity Generation by State: 4.6.B Generation by State, Year-to-Date: Receipts of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for; 4.7.A Electricity ...

292

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4.6.A Electricity Generation by State: 4.6.B Generation by State, Year-to-Date: Receipts of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for; 4.7.A Electricity ...

293

Lesson 6- Atoms to Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most power plants make electricity by boiling water to make steam that turns a turbine. A nuclear power plant works this way, too. At a nuclear power plant, splitting atoms produce the heat to boil the water. This lesson covers inside the reactor, fission control and electricity generation.

294

Table 8.1 Nuclear Energy Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

"Operable Nuclear Reactors," at end of section. • Nuclear electricity net generation totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

295

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

297

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

298

Fuels Used in Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

trillion kilowatthours 25% 19% 42% 13% 1% Nuclear Oil and other liquids Natural gas Coal Renewables 2011 Projections History 17% 16% 35% 30% 1% 1993 53% 13% 19% 11% 4%...

299

Phases of Nuclear Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and on the density of the nucleons. Thus we may ask what is the equation of state for nuclear matter? In their normal states of lowest energy, nuclei show liquid-like...

300

Geoantineutrino Spectrum, 3He/4He-ratio Distribution in the Earth's Interior and Slow Nuclear Burning on the Boundary of the Liquid and Solid Phases of the Earth's Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The description problem of geoantineutrino spectrum and reactor antineutrino experimental spectrum in KamLAND, which takes place for antineutrino energy \\~2.8 MeV, and also the experimental results of the interaction of uranium dioxide and carbide with iron-nickel and silicaalumina melts at high pressure (5-10 GP?) and temperature (1600-2200C) have motivated us to consider the possible consequences of the assumption made by V.Anisichkin and coauthors that there is an actinid shell on boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core. We have shown that the activation of a natural nuclear reactor operating as the solitary waves of nuclear burning in 238U- and/or 232Th-medium (in particular, the neutron- fission progressive wave of Feoktistov and/or Teller-Ishikawa-Wood) can be such a physical consequence. The simplified model of the kinetics of accumulation and burnup in U-Pu fuel cycle of Feoktistov is developed. The results of the numerical simulation of neutron-fission wave in two-phase UO2/Fe medium on a surface of the Earth's solid core are presented. The georeactor model of 3He origin and the 3He/4He-ratio distribution in the Earth's interior is offered. It is shown that the 3He/4He ratio distribution can be the natural quantitative criterion of georeactor thermal power. On the basis of O'Nions-Evensen-Hamilton geochemical model of mantle differentiation and the crust growth supplied by actinid shell on the boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core as a nuclear energy source (georeactor with power of 30 TW), the tentative estimation of geoantineutrino intensity and geoantineutrino spectrum on the Earth surface are given.

V. D. Rusov; V. N. Pavlovich; V. N. Vaschenko; V. A. Tarasov; T. N. Zelentsova; V. N. Bolshakov; D. A. Litvinov; S. I. Kosenko; O. A. Byegunova

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project 2001-001, Westinghouse Electric Co. Grant Number: DE-FG07-02SF22533, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% versus about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors [LWRs]) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus, the need for a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators, and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies: LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which are also in use around the world. The reference SCWR design for the U.S. program is a direct cycle system operating at 25.0 MPa, with core inlet and outlet temperatures of 280 and 500 C, respectively. The coolant density decreases from about 760 kg/m3 at the core inlet to about 90 kg/m3 at the core outlet. The inlet flow splits with about 10% of the inlet flow going down the space between the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (the downcomer) and about 90% of the inlet flow going to the plenum at the top of the rector pressure vessel, to then flow down through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. Here it mixes with the feedwater from the downcomer and flows upward to remove the heat in the fuel channels. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core. The coolant is heated to about 500 C and delivered to the turbine. The purpose of this NERI project was to assess the reference U.S. Generation IV SCWR design and explore alternatives to determine feasibility. The project was organized into three tasks: Task 1. Fuel-cycle Neutronic Analysis and Reactor Core Design Task 2. Fuel Cladding and Structural Material Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Task 3. Plant Engineering and Reactor Safety Analysis. moderator rods. materials.

Philip E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids Liquids James F. Wishart, Alison M. Funston, and Tomasz Szreder in "Molten Salts XIV" Mantz, R. A., et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2006) pp. 802-813. [Information about the volume (look just above this link)] Abstract: Ionic liquids have potentially important applications in nuclear fuel and waste processing, energy production, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments will require an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of ionic liquid radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material

303

Electric sales and revenue 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Electric sales and revenue 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effect of an electric field on a Leidenfrost droplet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally investigate the effect of an electric field applied between a Leidenfrost droplet and the heated substrate on which it is levitating. We quantify the electro-Leidenfrost effect by imaging the interference fringes between the liquid-vapour and vapour-substrate interfaces. The increase of the voltage induces a decrease of the vapour layer thickness. Above a certain critical voltage the Leidenfrost effect is suppressed and the drop starts boiling. Our study characterizes this way to control and/or to avoid the Leidenfrost effect that is undesirable in many domains such as metallurgy or nuclear reactor safety.

Franck Celestini; G. Kirstetter

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) Nuclear electricity generation remains flat in the IEO99 reference case, representing a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption. Net reductions in nuclear capacity are projected for most industrialized nations. In 1997, a total of 2,276 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated from nuclear power worldwide, providing 17 percent of the worldÂ’s electricity generation. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear power for electricity varies greatly (Figure 53). Ten countries met at least 40 percent of their total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of worldwide electricity generation are uncertain, despite projected growth of

307

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface. The U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec-

308

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to ElectricalRecycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energyenergy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from a nuclear

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Engineering-Scale Liquid Cadmium Cathode Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Recovery of transuranic actinides (TRU) using electrorefining is a process being investigated as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). TRU recovery via electrorefining onto a solid cathode is very difficult as the thermodynamic properties of transuranics are not favourable for them to remain in the metal phase while significant quantities of uranium trichloride exist in the electrolyte. Theoretically, the concentration of transuranics in the electrolyte must be approximately 106 greater than the uranium concentration in the electrolyte to produce a transuranic deposit on a solid cathode. Using liquid cadmium as a cathode contained within a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, the co-deposition of uranium and transuranics is feasible because the activity of the transuranics in liquid cadmium is very small. Depositing transuranics and uranium in a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) theoretically requires the concentration of transuranics to be two to three times the uranium concentration in the electrolyte. Three LCC experiments were performed in an Engineering scale elecdtrorefiner, which is located in the argon hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex on the Idaho National Laboratory. Figure 1 contains photographs of the LCC assembly in the hot cell prior to the experiment and a cadmium ingot produced after the first LCC test. Figure 1. Liquid Cadmium Cathode (left) and Cadmium Ingot (right) The primary goal of the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments was to electrochemically collect kilogram quantities of uranium and plutonium via a LCC. The secondary goal was to examine fission product contaminations in the materials collected by the LCC. Each LCC experiment used chopped spent nuclear fuel from the blanket region of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II loaded into steel baskets as the anode with the LCC containing 26 kg of cadmium metal. In each experiment, between one and two kilograms of heavy metal was collected in the LCC after passing an integrated current over 500 amp hours. Analysis of samples from the liquid cadmium cathode ingots showed detectable amounts of transuranics and rare-earth elements. Acknowledgements K. B. Davies and D. M. Pace for the mechanical and electrical engineering needed to prepare the equipment for the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments.

D Vaden; B. R. Westphal; S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; K. B. Davies; D. M. Pace

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Properties of Liquid Plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Unalloyed polycrystalline Pu displays extreme thermal expansion behavior, i.e., {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} increases by 25% in volume and {delta} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid decreases by 4.5% in volume. Thus, making it difficult to measure density into the liquid state. Dilatometer outfitted with CaF molten metal cell offers a proven capability to measure thermal expansion in molten metals, but has yet to be proven for Pu. Historic data from the liquid nuclear fuels program will prove extremely useful as a guide to future measurements. 3.3at% Ga changes Pu molten metal properties: 50% increase in viscosity and {approx}3% decrease in density. Fe may decrease the density by a small amount assuming an averaging of densities for Pu-Ga and Pu-Fe liquids. More recent Boivineau (2009) work needs some interpretation, but technique is being employed in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} nuclear fuels program (Pu Futures, 2012).

Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

313

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Western Interstate Energy Board Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in

314

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

315

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the nuclear power plant, the Marine Corps base, thePower Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 1975. United States Marine

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NUCLEAR PROPULSION--AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The use of nuclear energy in the space programs is discussed. Nuclear rocket development is reviewed, and the Nevada rocket development station, nuclear electric propulsion and power generation, and advanced research projects are discussed. (J.R.D.)

Finger, H.B.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Two-Phase Liquid Dielectrics - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Industry uses liquid dielectrics for a number of applications. For example, Mineral oil is used extensively inside electrical transformers as a fluid dielectric and ...

318

ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

Marra, J.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquefies them. Cryogenic liquids are kept in the liquid state at very low temperatures. Cryogenic liquids are liquid nitrogen, liquid argon and liquid helium. The different cryogens become liquids under different. In addition, when they vaporize the liquids expand to enormous volumes. For example, liquid nitrogen

320

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen Previous Video (Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Pennies) Shattering Pennies Liquid Nitrogen Cooled...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Diagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. f Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the pointDiagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2007 221 Coal 20.99 Nuclear Electric Power 8.41 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 42

Bensel, Terrence G.

322

The logic behind thick, liquid-walled, fusion concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It may be possible to surround the region where fusion reactions are taking place with a neutronically thick liquid blanket which has penetrations that allow only a few tenths of a percent of the neutrons to leak out. Even these neutrons can be attenuated by adding an accurately placed liquid or solid near the target to shadow-shield the beam ports from line-of-sight neutrons. The logic of such designs are discussed and their evolution is described with examples applied to both magnetic and inertial fusion (HYLIFE-II). These designs with liquid protection are self healing when exposed to pulsed loading and have a number of advantages-over the usual designs with solid first walls. For example, the liquid-protected solid components will last the life of the plant, and therefore the capacity factor is estimated to be approximately 10% higher than for the non-liquid-walled blankets, because no blanket replacement shutdowns are required. The component replacement, operations, and maintenance costs might be half the usual value because no blanket change-out costs or accompanying facilities are required. These combined savings might lower the cost of electricity by 20%. Nuclear-grade construction should not be needed, largely because the liquid attenuates neutrons and results in less activation of materials. Upon decommissioning, the reactor materials should qualify for disposal by shallow burial even when constructed of ordinary 304 stainless steel. The need for a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron test facility to develop first-wall materials is avoided or greatly reduced, saving billions of development dollars. Flowing molten Li, the molten salt Flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), and molten Li{sub l7}Pb{sub 83} have been considered. An advantage of molten salt is that it will not burn and has a low tritium solubility and therefore low tritium inventory.

Moir, R.W.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Out-Of-Drum Grout Mixer Testing With Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2003, alternatives were evaluated for grout formulation development and associated mixing for the Sodium-Bearing Waste cesium ion exchange process. The neutralization agents calcium or sodium hydroxide and the solidification agents Portland cement, with or without blast furnace slag were evaluated. A desired uniform formulation was pursued to develop a grout waste form without any bleed liquid and solidify within a reasonable period of about twenty-eight days. This testing evaluates the out-of-drum alternative of mixing the effluent with solidification agents prior to being poured into drums versus the in-drum alternative of mixing them all together after being poured into the drums. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout using the Autocon continuous mixer within the range of 66 to 72 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 30 weight percent NWCF scrubber simulant also produced an acceptable grout waste form.

B. A. Scholes; A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; S. H. Hinckley

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Impulse breakdown delay in liquid dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical images of streamers, revealing the mechanisms behind impulse breakdown in liquid dielectrics, are presented. Streamers lead to electrical breakdown by forming paths, capable of carrying large current amplitudes ...

Jadidian, Jouya

325

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors Simulated three-dimensional fission power distribution of a single 17x17 rod PWR fuel assembly. | Photo courtesy of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). A two-year update on the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors and the progress being made in overcoming barriers to national

326

Method of foaming a liquid metal  

SciTech Connect

A method for promoting the formation of a foam and for improving bubble retention and foam lifetimes in liquid metal NaK or sodium used to generate power in two-phase liquid metal MHD generators is described. In a two-phase liquid metal MHD generator, a compressed, hot, inert gas is used as the thermodynamic working fluid to electrically drive a conductive liquid metal such as NaK, sodium or tin through the generator channel. The gas and liquid are mixed together just as the mixture enters the generator channel so that the expansion of the gas drives the conductive liquid across the magnetic field, generating electrical power. The two phases are then separated and returned to the mixer through different loops.

Fischer, A.K.; Johnson, C.E.

1978-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

DeLuchi, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

329

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plants. WASH~1400 (NUREG 75/014). October 1975. S.Power Plants -LWR Edison." NUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRCof Fixed Nuclear Facilities, NUREG-75/l1l (Reprint of WASH-

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-and RelatedStandards for Fossil-Fuel and Geothermal Power

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20555. u. S. Nuclear U. S. NRC. Reactor Safety Study: AnNUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRC Regulatory Guide 1. 101. "Report on Current Activities NRC and the Federal Interagency

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Economic Assessment of a Conceptual Biomass to Liquids Bio-Syntrolysis Plant  

SciTech Connect

A series of assessments evaluated the economic efficiency of integrating a nuclear electric power plant with a biomass to SynFuel plant under three market scenarios. Results strongly suggest that a nuclear assisted-BioSyntrolysis Process would be as cost competitive as other carbon feedstock to liquid fuels concepts while having significant advantages regarding CO2 greenhouse gas production. This concept may also be competitive for those energy markets where energy dense, fossil fuels are scarce while wind, hydroelectric, or other renewable energy sources can be produced at a relatively low cost. At this time, a realistic vision of this technology’s deployment of a biomass to synfuel plants powered by a nuclear 1100 MWe reactor. Accompanying an area of 25 miles by 25 miles, this integrated Enterprise could produce 24,000 BBLs of SynFuel daily; or 0.2% of the U.S.’s imported oil.

M. M. Plum; G. L. Hawkes

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1995-1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saladin5, and C.H. Yu6 Nuclear Science Division, LawrenceMoretto, G.J. Wozniak, Nuclear Science Division, LawrenceComment on “Probing the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition”

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Dynamic simulation of nuclear hydrogen production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear hydrogen production processes have been proposed as a solution to rising CO 2 emissions and low fuel yields in the production of liquid transportation fuels. In these processes, the heat of a nuclear reactor is ...

Ramírez Muñoz, Patricio D. (Patricio Dario)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nuclear Fission Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and about 250 kg of 239Pu. Some 40% of the energy produced in the course of a nuclear fuel cycle comes from 239Pu. Since about 20% of the electricity generated in the United...

337

Liquid ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For 350 million years, fish have breathed liquid through gills. Mammals evolved lungs to breathe air. Rarely, circumstances can occur when a mammal needs to `turn back the clock' to breathe through a special liquid medium. This is particularly true if surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung is increased, as in acute lung injury. In this condition, surface tension increases because the pulmonary surfactant system is damaged, causing alveolar collapse, atelectasis, increased right-to-left shunt and hypoxaemia. 69 The aims of treatment are: (i) to offset increased forces causing lung collapse by applying mechanical ventilation with PEEP; (ii) to decrease alveolar surface tension with exogenous surfactant; (iii) to eliminate the air-liquid interface by filling the lung with a fluid in

U. Kaisers; K. P. Kelly; T. Busch

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electrical aspects of rainout  

SciTech Connect

Rainout commonly denotes the aggregate of phenomena associated with precipitation scavenging of radioactivity from a cloud of nuclear debris that is within a natural rain cloud. (In contrast, the term, washout, is applicable when the nuclear cloud is below the rain cloud and the term, fallout, commonly denotes the direct gravitational settling of contaminated solid material from a nuclear cloud.) Nuclear debris aerosols may be scavenged within natural clouds by a variety of different physical processes which may involve diffusion, convection, impaction, nucleation, phoresis, turbulence, and/or electricity among others. Processes which involve electrical aspects are scrutinized for their susceptibility to the intimate presence of the radioactive-cloud environment. This particular choice of electrical processes is not accidental. Nearly all of the listed processes were examined earlier by Williams. His rough estimates suggested that electrical effects, and to a lesser extent turbulence, could enhance the scavenging of those submicron aerosols which reside in the size-range that bridges the minimum in the scavenging rate coefficient which is commonly called the Greenfield gap. This minimum in the scavenging-rate coefficient is created by the simultaneous reduction of scavenging via diffusion and the reduction of scavenging via inertial impaction. However, Williams omitted the specific influence of a radioactive environment. This report aims to remedy this omission.

Rosenkilde, C.E.

1981-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Nuclear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear Power Nuclear Power picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Nuclear power is projected to represent a growing share of the developing worldÂ’s electricity consumption from 1999 through 2020. New plant construction and license extensions for existing plants are expected to produce a net increase in world nuclear capacity. Nuclear power plants generated electricity in 29 countries in 1999. A total of 433 nuclear power reactors were in operation (Figure 61), including 104 in the United States, 59 in France, and 53 in Japan. The largest national share of electricity from nuclear power was in France, at 75 percent (Figure 62). Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Lithuania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Ukraine, and South Korea depended on nuclear power for at least 40

342

Electric power monthly, April 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electric power monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, ...

345

Georgia Nuclear Energy Financing Act (Georgia) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Financing Act (Georgia) Georgia Nuclear Energy Financing Act (Georgia) Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility...

346

A Concept for A Dark Matter Detector Using Liquid Helium-4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct searches for light dark matter particles (mass $<10$ GeV) are especially challenging because of the low energies transferred in elastic scattering to typical heavy nuclear targets. We investigate the possibility of using liquid Helium-4 as a target material, taking advantage of the favorable kinematic matching of the Helium nucleus to light dark matter particles. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to calculate the charge, scintillation, and triplet helium molecule signals produced by recoil He ions, for a variety of energies and electric fields. We show that excellent background rejection can be achieved based on the ratios between different signal channels. We also present some concepts for a liquid-helium-based dark matter detector. Key to the proposed approach is the use of a large electric field to extract electrons from the event site, and the amplification of this charge signal, through proportional scintillation, liquid electroluminescence, or roton emission. The sensitivity of the proposed detector to light dark matter particles is estimated for various electric fields and light collection efficiencies.

Wei Guo; Daniel N. McKinsey

2013-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

The future of nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

Present conditions and future prospects for the nuclear power industry in the United States are discussed. The presentation includes a review of trends in electrical production, the safety of coal as compared to nuclear generating plants, the dangers of radiation, the economics of nuclear power, the high cost of nuclear power in the United States, and the public fear of nuclear power. 20 refs. (DWL)

Zeile, H.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government incentives or subsidies in the near future. Companies active in the electric automobile area There are no companies directly active in the electric automobile...

349

Electricity Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lines and bar graph Electricity Reliability The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) conducts research, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools,...

350

Nuclear rockets  

SciTech Connect

A systems analysis is made of a class of nuclear-propelled rockets in combination with chemical boosters. Various missions are considered including the delivery of 5000-lb payload 5500 nautical miles, the placement of a satellite in an orbit about the earth and the delivery of a payload to escape velocity. The reactors considered are of the heterogeneous type utilizing graphite fuel elements in a matrix of Be or hydrogenous moderator. Liquid hydrogen and ammonia are considered as propellants. Graphical results are presented which show the characteristics and performance of the nuclear rockets as the design parameters are varied. It should be emphasized that this report is not in any sense intended as a handbook of rocket parameters; it is intended only as a guide for determining areas of interest.

York, H.F.; Biehl, A.T.

1955-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear Energy-Depend On It Helping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-Depend On It Helping to Power America for More Than Five Decades Past, Present, and Future ... The United States introduced nuclear energy into our domestic electricity production in 1957 and now produces approximately 20 percent of our total electricity and 70 percent of our low-carbon electricity from nuclear energy, according to the Energy Information Administration. More than 100 U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors provide reliable, affordable electricity in 31 states. Nuclear energy can help meet our Nation's need for dependable electricity into the future. The use of nuclear power is increasing around the world: z 29 countries worldwide operate a total of 437 nuclear reactors for electricity generation, with 55 new nuclear reactors under construction in 14 countries.

352

Solidification of Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, FY-03 Report  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the mechanism and methods of fixation of acidic waste effluents in grout form are explored. From the variations in the pH as a function of total solids addition to acidic waste effluent solutions, the stages of gellation, liquefaction, slurry formation and grout development are quantitatively revealed. Experimental results indicate the completion of these reaction steps to be significant for elimination of bleed liquid and for setting of the grout to a dimensionally stable and hardened solid within a reasonable period of about twenty eight days that is often observed in the cement and concrete industry. The reactions also suggest increases in the waste loading in the direction of decreasing acid molarity. Consequently, 1.0 molar SBW-180 waste is contained in higher quantity than the 2.8 molar SBW-189, given the same grout formulation for both effluents. The variations in the formulations involving components of slag, cement, waste and neutralizing agent are represented in the form of a ternary formulation map. The map in turn graphically reveals the relations among the various formulations and grout properties, and is useful in predicting the potential directions of waste loading in grouts with suitable properties such as slurry viscosity, Vicat hardness, and mechanical strength. A uniform formulation for the fixation of both SBW-180 and SBW-189 has emerged from the development of the formulation map. The boundaries for the processing regime on this map are 100 wt% cement to 50 wt% cement / 50 wt% slag, with waste loadings ranging from 55 wt% to 68 wt%. Within these compositional bounds all the three waste streams SBW-180, SBW-189 and Scrub solution are amenable to solidification. A large cost advantage is envisaged to stem from savings in labor, processing time, and processing methodology by adopting a uniform formulation concept for fixation of compositionally diverse waste streams. The experimental efforts contained in this report constitute the first attempt at developing a uniform methodology.

S. V. Raman; A. K. Herbst; B. A. Scholes; S. H. Hinckley; R. D. Colby

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience forResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OUTAGES COMPONENT NUCLEAR REACTOR General Primary CoolingAsh Disposal Trouble NUCLEAR REACTOR COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESconsisting of a Nuclear units use a reactor in which burner

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availableissues impor tant to nuclear reactor safety. This report wasstudies of overall nuclear reactor safety have been

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been restricted core. Nuclear tests are not scheduled untilnuclear NRC, the non-nuclear tests are proceedingInstitute test reactor - megawatts - megawatts - Nuclear

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NP-263, October 1976. Edison Electric Institute, "Report onREGULATION Data from the Edison Electric Institute annualpower plants. However, the Edison Electric Institute, in its

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although electrokinetic effects are not new, only recently have they been investigated for possible use in energy conversion devices. We have recently reported the electrokinetic generation of molecular hydrogen from rapidly flowing liquid water microjets [Duffin et al. JPCC 2007, 111, 12031]. Here, we describe the use of liquid water microjets for direct conversion of electrokinetic energy to electrical power. Previous studies of electrokinetic power production have reported low efficiencies ({approx}3%), limited by back conduction of ions at the surface and in the bulk liquid. Liquid microjets eliminate energy dissipation due to back conduction and, measuring only at the jet target, yield conversion efficiencies exceeding 10%.

Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

362

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

363

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

364

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

365

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

366

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

367

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

368

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

369

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

370

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

371

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

372

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

King, L.D.P.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

376

Nuclear quantum effects in water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water is performed. It is found that the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects systematically improves the agreement of first principles simulations of liquid water with experiment. In addition, the proton momentum distribution is computed utilizing a recently developed open path integral molecular dynamics methodology. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with neutron Compton scattering data for liquid water and ice.

Joseph A. Morrone; Roberto Car

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Photoferroelectric solar to electrical conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a charge pump which converts solar energy into DC electricity. It is based on cyclic changes in the spontaneous electric polarization of a photoferroelectric material, which allows a transfer of charge from a low to a high voltage. To estimate the power efficiency we use a photoferroelectric liquid crystal as the working substance. For a specific choice of material, an efficiency of $2\\%$ is obtained.

Milos Knezevic; Mark Warner

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Electric Power Annual 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

379

XNJ140E Nuclear Turbojet, Section. 4 Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company.

Layman, D.C.

1962-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Nuclear - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear ... as well as financial and environmental ... Demand-Side Management ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Philippines is still interested in nuclear power generation as a means of coping with its acute electricity

Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases and thus reduce three temperature losses in the system associated with (1) heat transfer from the fuel to the reactor coolant, (2) temperature rise across the reactor core, and (3) heat transfer across the heat exchangers between the reactor and H2 production plant. Lowering the peak reactor temperatures and thus reducing the high-temperature materials requirements may make the AHTR the enabling technology for low-cost nuclear hydrogen production.

Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electric power monthly, August 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

384

Electric power monthly, September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

386

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

387

Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 8: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2 ...

388

Reference: Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station- Preconditioning of Emergency Diesel Generator Air Start Systems, Fuel Systems, and other Engine and Electrical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is twofold. First, to inform the NRC that Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station will not dispute the Non-Cited Violation (50-254/01-05-04; 50-265/01-05-04) of 10 CFR 50 Appendix B, Criterion XI, "Test Control, " described in the referenced NRC report. The station similarly concurs that the risk significance was very low (Green). Senior station management and station personnel understand the importance of scheduling and performing Technical Specifications required surveillances such that unacceptable preconditioning does not occur. The instances identified in the referenced NRC report have been entered into the station's corrective action program and corrective actions have been implemented or are scheduled for implementation. Second, given the importance of this subject and based upon our review of the NRC integrated inspection report, the station is providing an update on several of the issues discussed in section three, "Units 1 and 2 Emergency Diesel Generator Timed Test Preconditioning Concerns. " This is intended to update the NRC and supplement our shared understanding of the issues. The following specific points are provided: August 8, 2001 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

SRS - Programs - Liquid Waste Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Waste Disposition Liquid Waste Disposition This includes both the solidification of highly radioactive liquid wastes stored in SRS's tank farms and disposal of liquid low-level waste generated as a by-product of the separations process and tank farm operations. This low-level waste is treated in the Effluent Treatment Facility. High-activity liquid waste is generated at SRS as by-products from the processing of nuclear materials for national defense, research and medical programs. The waste, totaling about 36 million gallons, is currently stored in 49 underground carbon-steel waste tanks grouped into two "tank farms" at SRS. While the waste is stored in the tanks, it separates into two parts: a sludge that settles on the bottom of the tank, and a liquid supernate that resides on top of the sludge. The waste is reduced to about 30 percent of its original volume by evaporation. The condensed evaporator "overheads" are transferred to the Effluent Treatment Project for final cleanup prior to release to the environment. As the concentrate cools a portion of it crystallizes forming solid saltcake. The concentrated supernate and saltcake are less mobile and therefore less likely to escape to the environment in the event of a tank crack or leak.

392

Liquid electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Material properties of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride crystals and their relationship to nuclear detector performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: CZT, etching, gamma-ray response, internal electric fields, microstructural properties, nuclear detectors, photoluminescence, precipitates

R. B. James; B. Brunett; J. Heffelfinger; J. Van Scyoc; J. Lund; F. P. Doty; C. L. Lingren; R. Olsen; E. Cross; H. Hermon; H. Yoon; N. Hilton; M. Schieber; E. Y. Lee; J. Toney; T. E. Schlesinger; M. Goorsky; W. Yao; H. Chen; A. Burger

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Today, nuclear energy is the largest...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Today, nuclear energy is the largest non-carbon electricity production method in use, but the nation must effectively address economic and waste management concerns to enable its...

397

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this work. Today, nuclear energy represents the single largest source of, carbon-free baseload energy, accounting for nearly 20% of the electricity generated in the United...

398

The Prospects for Coal-To-Liquid Conversion: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the economics of coal-to-liquid (CTL) conversion, a polygeneration technology that produces liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity by coal gasification and Fischer-Tropsch process. CTL is more expensive ...

Chen, Y.-H. Henry

399

Charge transport and breakdown physics in liquid/solid insulation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid dielectrics provide superior electrical breakdown strength and heat transfer capability, especially when used in combination with liquid-immersed solid dielectrics. Over the past half-century, there has been extensive ...

Jadidian, Jouya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

California Electric Energy Crisis - Electricity Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Information Available Formats; Status of Electric Industry Restructuring Activity in California: html: California State Electricity Profil ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Subject Areas. Electrical ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Electric trade in the United States 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Trade in the United States 1990 (ELECTRA) is the third in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data. The second report contained data for 1988. This report provides information on the industry during 1990.

Not Available

1992-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Savings Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate...

405

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prevent serious damage to the nuclear fuel, since it is thetransportation: for nuclear plants, fuel handling is carriedSpecific Fossil Fuel Geothermal Nuclear Solid Waste Disposal

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Liquid electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data Section 1. Commentary Data for:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During March 2007, the contiguous U.S. experienced the second warmest March over the 1895-2007 time period. Heating degree days were 15.7 percent lower than normal, as measured over the 1971-2000 time period, and 16.7 percent lower than March 2006. Despite the unseasonably warm March, retail sales of electricity increased 0.8 percent compared to March 2006, while March 2007 generation of electric power increased 0.9 percent over March 2006. These increases were primarily due to economic growth, evident by a 2.1-percent increase in the real gross domestic product for the U.S. in the first quarter of 2007 over the first quarter of 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for March 2007 showed a 5.0-percent increase from March 2006. For the twelve month period ending March 2007, the U.S. average retail price increased by 7.2 percent over the previous twelve month period ending March 2006. Electricity generation in March 2007 from all major fuel categories saw little change from March 2006. The exception was petroleum liquids which increased 79.3 percent, as petroleum liquid-fired generators drew on reserves that were purchased at lower prices than current petroleum liquid prices. Coal generation in March 2007 decreased 0.9 percent from the previous year, natural gas generation increased 4.4 percent, nuclear generation increased 0.9 percent, and hydroelectric generation was down 2.2 percent from the prior year. In the electric power sector, March 2007 coal stocks were up 5.9 percent from February 2007. The February 2007-to-

Key Indicators Of Generation

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Electricity World electricity generation increases by 87 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Non-OECD countries account for 61 percent of world electricity use in 2035. Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2030. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030.

409

REGULATION AND SYSTEM INTERDEPENDENCE: EFFECTS ON THE SITING OF CALIFORNIA ELECTRICAL ENERGY FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Going to SQecific End Uses Hydroelectricity 100% electricity58% transportation Hydroelectricity ! Nuclear Geothermalsupply relied on hydroelectricity, the severe droughts,

Kooser, J.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analysis of Hybrid Liquid Desiccant Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dehumidification technology is being investigated for potential savings in building air conditioning systems. The potential for savings lies in separating the sensible and latent cooling loads to more efficiently address the combined conditioning needs of the space. Two DuCool liquid desiccant systemsDuTreat and DuHandlingwere tested in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Knoxville, Tennessee psychrometric chambers. The DuCool uses an internal vapor compression system to regenerate a liquid desi...

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which steam is raised. nuclear fuel generates heat that isattention to nuclear and fossil-fuel plants, and these areFor all the fossil-fuel and nuclear (However, categories,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed

Hideo Harada

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

nuclear | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nuclear nuclear Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world nuclear energy. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Source Earth Policy Institute Date Released January 12th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EU nuclear nuclear electricity world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Summary nuclear energy consumption data (xls, 68.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment "Reuse of our data is permitted. We merely ask that wherever it is listed, it be appropriately cited" Rate this dataset

414

Liquid-permeable electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

Folser, George R. (Lower Burrell, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Liquid-permeable electrode  

SciTech Connect

Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

Folser, G.R.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

416

DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive transformers; and electrical test components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Evaluation of Peak Heat Release Rates in Electrical Cabinet Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to reanalyze the peak heat release rates (HRRs) from fires occurring in electrical cabinets of nuclear power plants.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

420

Challenges of Electric Power Industry Restructuring for Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Restructuring for Fuel Suppliers ... Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels Office of Oil and Gas ... Risk management will become an ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Japanese power companies using more LNG to generate electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... which led to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and subsequent outages at other plants.

422

Electrical Cable Testing by Pulse-Arrested Spark Discharge ...  

... useful to determine the location of defect sites in critical but inaccessible electrical cabling systems in aging aircraft, ships, nuclear power ...

423

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

424

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electric sales and revenue: 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Electric machine  

SciTech Connect

An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

Nuclear & Uranium - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net Find statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net generation, nuclear share of electricity net generation, and capacity factor. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional Formats Nuclear Overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net generation, nuclear share of electricity net generation, and capacity factor. PDFXLS Annual statistics on nuclear generating units, power plants operations, and uranium. › Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2010 › PDF XLS Nuclear Power Plant Operations, 1957-2010 › PDF XLS Uranium Overview, 1949-2010 › PDF XLS Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Additional Formats U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates › Release Date: July 2010 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has updated its estimates of uranium reserves for year-end 2008. This represents the first revision of the estimates since 2004. PDF

428

System for removing liquid waste from a tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tank especially suited for nuclear applications is disclosed. The tank comprises a tank shell for protectively surrounding the liquid contained therein; an inlet positioned on the tank for passing a liquid into the tank; a sump positioned in an interior portion of the tank for forming a reservoir of the liquid; a sloped incline for resting the tank thereon and for creating a natural flow of the liquid toward the sump; a pump disposed adjacent the tank for pumping the liquid; and a pipe attached to the pump and extending into the sump for passing the liquid therethrough. The pump pumps the liquid in the sump through the pipe and into the pump for discharging the liquid out of the tank.

Meneely, Timothy K. (Penn Hills, PA); Sherbine, Catherine A. (N. Versailles Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

System for removing liquid waste from a tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tank especially suited for nuclear applications is disclosed. The tank comprises a tank shell for protectively surrounding the liquid contained therein; an inlet positioned on the tank for passing a liquid into the tank; a sump positioned in an interior portion of the tank for forming a reservoir of the liquid; a sloped incline for resting the tank thereon and for creating a natural flow of the liquid toward the sump; a pump disposed adjacent the tank for pumping the liquid; and a pipe attached to the pump and extending into the sump for passing the liquid there through. The pump pumps the liquid in the sump through the pipe and into the pump for discharging the liquid out of the tank. 2 figures.

Meneely, T.K.; Sherbine, C.A.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

Liquid foams of graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Glossary Term - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lepton Previous Term (Lepton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Mercury) Mercury Liquid Nitrogen Liquid nitrogen boils in a frying pan on a desk. The liquid state of the element...

432

Use of Chemical Pretreatment to Enhance Liquid Waste of Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details unique chemical pretreatment and processing techniques presently used by utilities in their nuclear plant liquid radwaste treatment programs. It presents specific utility experience from a number of plants employing these processing alternatives.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

433

Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784, South Korea h i g h l i g h t s &21; Uranium forms various complexes with ionic liquids. &21; Uranium...

434

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Basics Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), which include both plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and all-electric vehicles, use electricity as either their primary fuel or to improve efficiency. Commonly Used PEV Terms All-electric vehicle (AEV) - A vehicle with plug-in capability; driving energy comes entirely from its battery. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) - A vehicle with plug-in capability; driving energy can come from either its battery or a liquid fuel like gasoline, diesel, or biofuels. Plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) - Any vehicle with plug-in capability. This includes AEVs and PHEVs. Hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) - A vehicle that has an electric drive system and battery but does not have plug-in capability; driving energy comes only from liquid fuel.

435

Waste Logic™ Liquid Waste Manager (WL-LWM) Software, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to continuing industry efforts to reduce operating expenditures, EPRI developed the Waste Logic&trade: Liquid Waste Manager code to analyze costs associated with liquid waste processing and the disposition of its resultant solid waste. EPRI's Waste Logic: Liquid Waste Manager software for windows-based PC computers provides a detailed economic and performance view of liquid waste processing activities. The software will help nuclear utilities evaluate the costs associated with liquid radwaste...

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

436

Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Capacity Planning submodule  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The NEMS produces integrated forecasts for energy markets in the United States by achieving a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand. Currently, for each year during the period from 1990 through 2010, the NEMS describes energy supply, conversion, consumption, and pricing. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The supply of electricity is a conversion activity since electricity is produced from other energy sources (e.g., fossil, nuclear, and renewable). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. The EMM consists of four main submodules: Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP), Electricity Fuel Dispatching (EFD), Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP), and Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM). The ECP evaluates changes in the mix of generating capacity that are necessary to meet future demands for electricity and comply with environmental regulations. The EFD represents dispatching (i.e., operating) decisions and determines how to allocate available capacity to meet the current demand for electricity. Using investment expenditures from the ECP and operating costs from the EFD, the EFP calculates the price of electricity, accounting for state-level regulations involving the allocation of costs. The LDSM translates annual demands for electricity into distributions that describe hourly, seasonal, and time-of-day variations. These distributions are used by the EFD and the ECP to determine the quantity and types of generating capacity that are required to insure reliable and economical supplies of electricity. The EMM also represents nonutility suppliers and interregional and international transmission and trade. These activities are included in the EFD and the ECP.

1994-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

437

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data Section 1. Commentary Data for:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.84ºF (1.02ºC) below the 20th century mean of 34.7ºF (1.5ºC), making it the 34th coldest February in the 1895-2007 record. For the month, heating degree days were 18.6 percent higher than February 2006, and 15.7 percent higher than normal, as measured over the 1971-2000 time period. In February 2007, increased demand for winter heating resulted in a 5.3-percent growth in electricity generation compared to February 2006. February 2007 retail sales of electricity increased 7.6 percent when compared to February 2006. The higher growth rate for sales of electricity relative to generation is influenced by the fact that the utility billing cycles tend to lag electricity production in many areas. The average U.S. retail price of electricity in February 2007 showed a 3.7-percent jump from February 2006, and a 0.2-percent increase from January 2006 Electricity generation in February 2007 from all major fuel categories was up from February 2006, with the exception of hydroelectric generation, which was down 25.7 percent due to significantly lower than normal precipitation observed in the northeastern and northwestern regions of the country. Coal generation increased 2.8 percent, natural gas generation increased 24.0 percent, petroleum liquids generation increased 136.0 percent, and nuclear generation was up 4.2 percent. The significantly higher generation for both natural gas and petroleum liquids, normally associated with peaking generators, can be attributed to the below normal temperatures that were observed in February 2007.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Microsoft PowerPoint - Why Nuclear Energy New Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Nuclear Energy? Why Nuclear Energy? Why Nuclear Energy? Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the world's energy needs * There are 441 nuclear reactors in operation in 31 countries * These plants generate electricity for nearly a billion people, and account for 17% of the world's electricity production * The U.S. has 103 operating reactors producing 20% of the nation's electricity * Illinois leads all states with the highest share of nuclear (51%) * Technology significantly developed at Argonne forms the basis of all nuclear energy systems used worldwide Nuclear power is reliable and economical * In 2001, U.S. nuclear plants produced electricity for 1.68 cents per kilowatt-hour on average, second only to hydroelectric power among baseload generation options * U.S. nuclear power plant performance has steadily

439

Breathing liquid oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

question is interesting though because it would be desirable to breath liquid instead of gas under certain conditions. Special liquids are being designed to carry dissolved...

440

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream If you have access to liquid nitrogen and the proper safety equipment and training, try this in place of your normal cryogenics demonstration Download...

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441

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company`s petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director`s decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Nuclear regulation and safety  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

Hendrie, J.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nuclear reactor overflow line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

Severson, Wayne J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electric moped  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two electrically powered mopeds were designed and built. These vehicles offer single-person transportation which is convenient, quiet, low-cost, smooth, and pollution-free. The first moped has a 12 volt electrical system. The second has a 24 volt electrical system. They both have top speeds of about 20 miles per hour. They both use transistorized speed controls and deep-discharge, lead-acid batteries. These mopeds were put through a 750 mile test program. In this program, the 12 volt bike had an average range of nine miles. The 24 volt bike, with a smaller battery capacity, had an average range of six miles.

Ferschl, M.S.

1981-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Centrifugal contactor with liquid mixing and flow control vanes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to an improvement in centrifugal contactors of a type used for solvent extraction systems in nuclear reactor fuel reprocessing. The centrifugal contactor is vertically oriented and is provided with an annular vertically oriented mixing chamber between the rotor housing and the rotor wherein the mixing of the process liquids such as the aqueous and organic phases of the solvent extraction process used for nuclear fuel reprocessing takes place. A set of helically disposed vanes carried by the housing is positioned in the lower region of the mixing chamber at a location below the inlets of the process liquids for the purpose of urging the liquids in an upward direction. The upper region of the mixing vessel above the inlets for the process liquids is also provided with a helically disposed vane set carried by the housing which urges the liquid in a downward direction when the liquid flow rates through the inlets are relatively high and liquid contacts the vane set in the upper region. The use of these opposing vane sets in the mixing zone within a desirable level while providing a greater degree of mixing of the process liquids which generates more liquid surface area for contact and improves the mass transfer between the process liquids. The van set in the lower region also significantly reduces or eliminates the formation of vortices which induces cavitation and air entrainment in the process liquids which detract from the efficiency of the centrifugal contactor. 2 figs.

Jubin, R.T.; Randolph, J.D.

1989-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

446

World nuclear outlook 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

World nuclear outlook 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In 1998, a total of 2,291 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated by nuclear power worldwide, providing 16 percent of the worldÂ’s total generation[1]. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear energy for electricity varies greatly. Nine countries met at least 40 percent of total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. Figure 68. Nuclear Shares of National Electricity Generation, 1998 [Sources] The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of

449

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

450

Simulations of liquid ribidium expanded to the critical density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum molecular dynamic simulations were used to examine the change in atomic and electronic structure in liquid rubidium along its liquid-vapor coexistence curve. Starting from the liquid at the triple point, with increasing expansion we observe a continuous increase in the electron localization leading to ion clustering near the metal-nonmetal transition at about twice the critical density, in agreement with electrical measurements, and to the presence of dimers near and below the critical density.

Ross, M; Yang, L H; Pilgrim, W

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

451

Advanced Intermediate Heat Transport Loop Design Configurations for Hydrogen Production Using High Temperature Nuclear Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view.

Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Rober Barner; Paul Pickard

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Oxygen vs. Liquid Nitrogen - Liquid Oxygen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Paramagnetism) Paramagnetism Liquid Oxygen and Fire! What happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a test tube of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a test tube of liquid oxygen! Joanna: Let's see what happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire. Steve: Fire?! Joanna: Yeah! Steve: Really?! Joanna: Why not! Steve: Okay! Joanna: As nitrogen boils, it changes into nitrogen gas. Because it's so cold, it's denser than the air in the room. The test tube fills up with

453

Case Study: Darlington Nuclear Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Darlington is a four-reactor nuclear plant east of Toronto. It is operated by Ontario Hydro. Each reactor has two independent shutdown systems: SDS1 drops neutron-absorbing rods into the core, while SDS2 injects liquid poison into the moderator. Both ... Keywords: Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada, Canada, Darlington nuclear generating station, Ontario Hydro, case study, certification, code quality, decision-making logic, documentation, fission reactor core control and monitoring, fission reactor safety, formal methods, formal model-based inspection, formal specification, licensing, liquid poison injection, neutron-absorbing rods, nuclear engineering computing, nuclear plant, safety, safety-critical systems, software driven shutdown systems, software reliability, specifications

Dan Craigen; Susan Gerhart; Ted Ralston

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Advances in gas-liquid flows 1990  

SciTech Connect

Gas-liquid two-phase flows commonly occur in nature and industrial applications. Rain, clouds, geysers, and waterfalls are examples of natural gas-liquid flow phenomena, whereas industrial applications can be found in nuclear reactors, steam generators, boilers, condensers, evaporators, fuel atomization, heat pipes, electronic equipment cooling, petroleum engineering, chemical process engineering, and many others. The household-variety phenomena such as garden sprinklers, shower, whirlpool bath, dripping faucet, boiling tea pot, and bubbling beer provide daily experience of gas-liquid flows. The papers presented in this volume reflect the variety and richness of gas-liquid two-phase flow and the increasing role it plays in modern technology. This volume contains papers dealing with some recent development in gas-liquid flow science and technology, covering basic gas-liquid flows, measurements and instrumentation, cavitation and flashing flows, countercurrent flow and flooding, flow in various components and geometries liquid metals and thermocapillary effects, heat transfer, nonlinear phenomena, instability, and other special and general topics related to gas-liquid flows.

Kim, J.M. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Rohatgi, U.S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hashemi, A. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Impacts of Cooling Technology on Solder Fatigue for Power Modules in Electric Traction Drive Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Describes three power module cooling topologies for electric traction drive vehicles: two advanced options using jet impingement cooling and one option using pin-fin liquid cooling.

O' Keefe, M.; Vlahinos, A.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Louisiana Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and...

457

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Nebraska Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,363 63.8 Hydro and...

458

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Trade and Reliability; All Reports ‹ See all Electricity Reports State Electricity Profiles. ... Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010:

459

Steam electric plant factors, 1978. [48 states  

SciTech Connect

Fossil-fuel steam electric generation increased 5.8% in 1977 to 1,612.2 million MWh as compared to 1976. Thirty-four new fossil-fuel steam electric units and 7 new nuclear units became operational in 1977. Detailed data are reported for 748 plants, accounting for more than 99% of the total steam generation capacity, in the contiguous US.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to “shift” the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700°C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: • 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal consumption by 66% using electrolysis and nuclear power as the hydrogen source. In addition, nuclear integration decreases CO2 emissions by 84% if sequestration is assumed and 96% without sequestration, when compared to conventional CTL. • The preliminary economic assessment indicates that the incorporation of 11 HTGRs and the associated HTSEs impacts the expected return on investment, when compared to conventional CTL with or without sequestration. However, in a carbon constrained scenario, where CO2 emissions are taxed and sequestration is not an option, a reasonable CO2 tax would equate the economics of the nuclear assisted CTL case with the conventional CTL case. The economic results are preliminary, as they do not include economies of scale for multiple HTGRs and are based on an uncertain reactor cost estimate. Refinement of the HTGR cost estimate is currently underway. • To reduce well to wheel (WTW) GHG emissions below baseline (U.S. crude mix) or imported crude derived diesel, integration of an HTGR is necessary. WTW GHG emissions decrease 8% below baseline crude with nuclear assisted CTL. Even with CO2 sequestration, conventional CTL WTW GHG emissions are 24% higher than baseline crude emissions. • Current efforts are underway to investigate the incorporation of nuclear integrated steam methane reforming for the production of hydrogen, in place of HTSE. This will likely reduce the number of HTGRs required for the process.

Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquids nuclear electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydrogen--electric power drives  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen--electric power drives would consist of most or all of these: chilled hydrogen gas tank, liquid oxygen tank, a bank of fuel cells, dc/ac inverter, ac drive motors, solid state ac speed control, dc sputter-ion vacuum pumps, steam turbine generator set and steam condenser. Each component is described. Optional uses of low pressure extraction steam and warm condensate are listed. Power drive applications are listed. Impact on public utilities, fuel suppliers, and users is discussed.

Hall, F.F.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.Fuel and Geo- thermal Power Plants," by G.D. Case, T.A.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power Reactors PROTECTION AGAINST SABOTAGE Protection Against Industrial Sabotage I1C-4 Decominarion and Decommissioning

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of growth of population around power plant These arenuclear power plants (3000 MWt electrical). of growth in

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Nuclear Power PROS -`No' greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power PROS -`No' greenhouse gas emissions -Fuel is cheep -High energy density (1 ton U = 16 abundant elements found in natural crustal rocks) Nuclear Power CONS -High capital cost due to meeting if there is a movement towards electric cars? -What if the high capital costs of a nuclear power plant were invested

Toohey, Darin W.

466

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

467

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

468

Publications: Other Resources - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

469

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

470

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

471

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

472

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

473

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

474

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

475

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

476

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

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477

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

478

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

479

Electricity 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 EIA announces the proposal of Form EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report Released: August 15, 2011 Background On August 11, 2011, a Federal Register Notice was published soliciting comments for the new EIA-111 survey form. The EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report will replace the OE-781R, Monthly Electricity Imports and Exports Report. The OE-781R has been suspended and will be terminated upon the approval of the EIA-111. The OE-781R administered from July 2010 through May 2011, proved complex and confusing for the repondents. As a result, the EIA-111 was developed to more effectively and efficiently collect more accurate and meaningful data. The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 requires that each Federal agency obtains approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before undertaking to collect information from ten or more persons, or continuing a collection for which the OMB approval and the OMB control number are about to expire. The approval process, which is popularly known as the "OMB clearance process," is extensive. It requires two Federal Register notices and a detailed application ("supporting statement") to OMB. The first Federal Register Notice was published on August 11, 2011. EIA is prepared to address the comments submitted by each individual.

480

DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z