Sample records for liquids field production

  1. Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  2. Longevity evaluation for optimum development in a liquid dominated geothermal field; Effects of interaction of reservoir pressure and fluid temperature on steam production at operating conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanano, M.; Takahashi, M. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., 24 Ukai, Takizawa-mura, Iwate 020-01 (JP)); Hirako, Y.; Nakamura, H. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., 8-4 Koami-cho, Nihonbashi, Chuo-ku. Tokyo 103 (JP)); Fuwa, S. (Cosco Co., Ltd., 4-9-12 Takatanobaba, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160 (JP)); Itoi, R. (Geothermal Research Center, Kyushu Univ., 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816 (JP))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steam production rate of a well at fixed operating conditions in a liquid-dominated geothermal field is reduced at first by a decline in reservoir pressure and then by a decrease in fluid temperature, if reinjected water returns to the production well. In many cases, the fluid temperature decrease reduces the steam production rate more than does the reservoir pressure decline. Those effects should therefore be taken into due account in the evaluation of the longevity of an area, because sufficient longevity and recoverable electric energy are the minimum requirements for planning field development.

  3. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA); Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  4. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

  5. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400,Information Administration22)MayŁ661.DataNov-14Liquids

  6. Liquid composition having ammonia borane and decomposing to form hydrogen and liquid reaction product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid compositions of ammonia borane and a suitably chosen amine borane material were prepared and subjected to conditions suitable for their thermal decomposition in a closed system that resulted in hydrogen and a liquid reaction product.

  7. Calculator simplifies field production forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, B.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forecasting future field production from an assumed average well production schedule and drilling schedule has been programmed for the HP-41C hand-held programmable computer. No longer must tedious row summations be made by hand for staggered well production schedules. Details of the program are provided.

  8. Electric field effects in liquid crystals with dielectric dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D. [Kent State University

    2014-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is focused on the experimental and theoretical exploration of the coupling of an externally applied electric field and a nematic liquid crystal.

  9. Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production...

  10. Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Dedicated Wind Power Plant Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind Power Plant This May 2012 study assesses the costs and potential for remote renewable...

  11. Biomass gasification for liquid fuel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najser, Jan, E-mail: jan.najser@vsb.cz, E-mail: vaclav.peer@vsb.cz; Peer, Václav, E-mail: jan.najser@vsb.cz, E-mail: vaclav.peer@vsb.cz [VSB - Technical university of Ostrava, Energy Research Center, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Vantuch, Martin [University of Zilina, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Power Engineering, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In our old fix-bed autothermal gasifier we tested wood chips and wood pellets. We make experiments for Czech company producing agro pellets - pellets made from agricultural waste and fastrenewable natural resources. We tested pellets from wheat and rice straw and hay. These materials can be very perspective, because they do?t compete with food production, they were formed in sufficient quantity and in the place of their treatment. New installation is composed of allothermal biomass fixed bed gasifier with conditioning and using produced syngas for Fischer - Tropsch synthesis. As a gasifying agent will be used steam. Gas purification will have two parts - separation of dust particles using a hot filter and dolomite reactor for decomposition of tars. In next steps, gas will be cooled, compressed and removed of sulphur and chlorine compounds and carbon dioxide. This syngas will be used for liquid fuel synthesis.

  12. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  13. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  14. High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Douglas, Elliot P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  15. High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, M.E.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Douglas, E.P.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  16. Liquid fuels production from biomass. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, P. F.; Sanderson, J. E.; Ashare, E.; Wise, D. L.; Molyneaux, M. S.

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The current program to convert biomass into liquid hydrocarbon fuels is an extension of a previous program to ferment marine algae to acetic acid. In that study it was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation broth by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids via Kolbe electrolysis to aliphatic hydrocarbons, which may be used as a diesel fuel. The specific goals for the current porgram are: (1) establish conditions under which substrates other than marine algae may be converted in good yield to organic acids, here the primary task is methane suppression; (2) modify the current 300-liter fixed packed bed batch fermenter to operate in a continuous mode; (3) change from membrane extraction of organic acids to liquid-liquid extraction; (4) optimize the energy balance of the electrolytic oxidation process, the primary task is to reduce the working potential required for the electrolysis while maintaining an adequate current density; (5) scale the entire process up to match the output of the 300 liter fermenter; and (6) design pilot plant and commercial size plant (1000 tons/day) processes for converting biomass to liquid hydrocarbon fuels and perform an economic analysis for the 1000 ton/day design.

  17. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  18. Process for the production of liquid hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Bharat Lajjaram; Engel, Dirk Coenraad; Heydorn, Edward Clyde; Senden, Matthijis Maria Gerardus

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention concerns a process for the preparation of liquid hydrocarbons which process comprises contacting synthesis gas with a slurry of solid catalyst particles and a liquid in a reactor vessel by introducing the synthesis gas at a low level into the slurry at conditions suitable for conversion of the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbons, the solid catalyst particles comprising a catalytic active metal selected from cobalt or iron on a porous refractory oxide carrier, preferably selected from silica, alumina, titania, zirconia or mixtures thereof, the catalyst being present in an amount between 10 and 40 vol. percent based on total slurry volume liquids and solids, and separating liquid material from the solid catalyst particles by using a filtration system comprising an asymmetric filtration medium (the selective side at the slurry side), in which filtration system the average pressure differential over the filtration medium is at least 0.1 bar, in which process the particle size distribution is such that at least a certain amount of the catalyst particles is smaller than the average pore size of the selective layer of the filtration medium. The invention also comprises an apparatus to carry out the process described above.

  19. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  20. Holographic non-Fermi liquid in a background magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Pallab; He Jianyang; Mukherjee, Anindya; Shieh, Hsien-Hang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of a nonzero magnetic field on a class of 2+1 dimensional non-Fermi liquids, recently found in [Hong Liu, John McGreevy, and David Vegh, arXiv:0903.2477.] by considering properties of a Fermionic probe in an extremal AdS{sup 4} black hole background. Introducing a similar fermionic probe in a dyonic AdS{sup 4} black hole geometry, we find that the effect of a magnetic field could be incorporated in a rescaling of the probe fermion's charge. From this simple fact, we observe interesting effects like gradual disappearance of the Fermi surface and quasiparticle peaks at large magnetic fields and changes in other properties of the system. We also find Landau level like structures and oscillatory phenomena similar to the de-Haas-van Alphen effect.

  1. Second and Fourth Harmonic Frequencies in Electric Field-Induced Liquid Crystal Reorientations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Second and Fourth Harmonic Frequencies in Electric Field-Induced Liquid Crystal Reorientations of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA The second and fourth harmonics of low frequency electric field-optical modulation; liquid crystal; second and fourth harmonics 1. INTRODUCTION Nematic liquid crystal (LC) has been

  2. Cryogenic expander/recompressor control for maximizing liquids production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batson, B.W.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a new method is described to control cryogenic expander/recompressor units to improve natural gas liquid production. This method employs the antisurge valve associated with the recompressor to load the expander without increasing the flow through it. This method can be applied to continuous control or speed limiting control. A crucial aspect of this method of control is the interaction of the two control loops--expander inlet nozzle control and antisurge valve control. These loops are highly coupled, requiring loop decoupling to assure stable control.

  3. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) YearLiquids Production

  4. Particle Production and Dissipative Cosmic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Fujisaki; K. Kumekawa; M. Yamaguchi; M. Yoshimura

    1995-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Large amplitude oscillation of cosmic field that may occur right after inflation and in the decay process of weakly interacting fields gives rise to violent particle production via the parametric resonance. In the large amplitude limit the problem of back reaction against the field oscillation is solved and the energy spectrum of created particles is determined in a semi-classical approximation. For large enough coupling or large enough amplitude the resulting energy spectrum is broadly distributed, implying larger production of high energy particles than what a simple estimate of the reheating temperature due to the Born formula would suggest.

  5. Some convolution products in Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herintsitohaina Ratsimbarison

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to show constructions of scale dependence and interaction on some probabilistic models which may be revelant for renormalization theory in Quantum Field Theory. We begin with a review of the convolution product's use in the Kreimer-Connes formalism of perturbative renormalization. We show that the Wilson effective action can be obtained from a convolution product propriety of regularized Gaussian measures on the space of fields. Then, we propose a natural C*-algebraic framework for scale dependent field theories which may enhance the conceptual approach to renormalization theory. In the same spirit, we introduce a probabilistic construction of interacting theories for simple models and apply it for quantum field theory by defining a partition function in this setting.

  6. Fuel gas production by microwave plasma in liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Tawara, Michinaga; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kenya [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Shikoku Industry and Technology Promotion Center, 2-5 Marunouchi, Takamatsu, Kagawa 760-0033 (Japan)

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to apply plasma in liquid to replace gas-phase plasma because we expect much higher reaction rates for the chemical deposition of plasma in liquid than for chemical vapor deposition. A reactor for producing microwave plasma in a liquid could produce plasma in hydrocarbon liquids and waste oils. Generated gases consist of up to 81% hydrogen by volume. We confirmed that fuel gases such as methane and ethylene can be produced by microwave plasma in liquid.

  7. Production of Oxygen Gas and Liquid Metal by Electrochemical Decomposition of Molten Iron Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    on the moon and on Mars for the generation of oxygen along with the production of structural metalsProduction of Oxygen Gas and Liquid Metal by Electrochemical Decomposition of Molten Iron Oxide) is the electrolytic decomposition of a metal oxide, most preferably into liquid metal and oxygen gas. The successful

  8. HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to “shift” the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700°C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: • 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal consumption by 66% using electrolysis and nuclear power as the hydrogen source. In addition, nuclear integration decreases CO2 emissions by 84% if sequestration is assumed and 96% without sequestration, when compared to conventional CTL. • The preliminary economic assessment indicates that the incorporation of 11 HTGRs and the associated HTSEs impacts the expected return on investment, when compared to conventional CTL with or without sequestration. However, in a carbon constrained scenario, where CO2 emissions are taxed and sequestration is not an option, a reasonable CO2 tax would equate the economics of the nuclear assisted CTL case with the conventional CTL case. The economic results are preliminary, as they do not include economies of scale for multiple HTGRs and are based on an uncertain reactor cost estimate. Refinement of the HTGR cost estimate is currently underway. • To reduce well to wheel (WTW) GHG emissions below baseline (U.S. crude mix) or imported crude derived diesel, integration of an HTGR is necessary. WTW GHG emissions decrease 8% below baseline crude with nuclear assisted CTL. Even with CO2 sequestration, conventional CTL WTW GHG emissions are 24% higher than baseline crude emissions. • Current efforts are underway to investigate the incorporation of nuclear integrated steam methane reforming for the production of hydrogen, in place of HTSE. This will likely reduce the number of HTGRs required for the process.

  9. Schwinger Pair Production in Pulsed Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Hyung Won Lee; Remo Ruffini

    2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically investigate the temporal behavior and the structure of longitudinal momentum spectrum and the field polarity effect on pair production in pulsed electric fields in scalar quantum electrodynamics (QED). Using the evolution operator expressed in terms of the particle and antiparticle operators, we find the exact quantum states under the influence of electric pulses and measure the number of pairs of the Minkowski particle and antiparticle. The number of pairs, depending on the configuration of electric pulses, exhibits rich structures in the longitudinal momentum spectrum and undergoes diverse dynamical behaviors at the onset of the interaction but always either converges to a momentum-dependent constant or oscillates around a momentum-dependent time average after the completion of fields.

  10. On a phase field model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distinct phases. This is the case for solid-liquid mix- tures (e.g. ice-water or alloys duringOn a phase field model for solid-liquid phase transitions S. Benzoni-Gavage , L. Chupin , D. Jamet 3.2 Back to physical variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 4 Well-posedness 17 4

  11. A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces Chi are largely determined by the solid-liquid surface tension. This is especially true for nanoscale systems with high surface area to volume ratios. While experimental techniques can only measure surface tension

  12. Matrix product states for gauge field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boye Buyens; Jutho Haegeman; Karel Van Acoleyen; Henri Verschelde; Frank Verstraete

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix product state formalism is used to simulate Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories. To this end, we define matrix product state manifolds which are manifestly gauge invariant. As an application, we study 1+1 dimensional one flavour quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model, and are able to determine very accurately the ground state properties and elementary one-particle excitations in the continuum limit. In particular, a novel particle excitation in the form of a heavy vector boson is uncovered, compatible with the strong coupling expansion in the continuum. We also study non-equilibrium dynamics by simulating the real-time evolution of the system induced by a quench in the form of a uniform background electric field.

  13. Field-driven dynamics of dilute gases, viscous liquids and polymer chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Aruna, 1981-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is concerned with the exploration of field-induced dynamical phenomena arising in dilute gases, viscous liquids and polymer chains. The problems considered herein pertain to the slip-induced motion of a rigid, ...

  14. A Study of Liquid Metal Film Flow, Under Fusion Relevant Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narula, M.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.A. [UCLA (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of flowing liquid metal streams or 'liquid walls' as a plasma contact surface is a very attractive option and has received considerable attention over the past several years both in the plasma physics and fusion engineering programs. A key issue for the feasibility of flowing liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) systems, lies in their magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) behavior. The spatially varying magnetic field environment, typical of a fusion device can lead to serious flow disrupting MHD forces that hinder the development of a smooth and controllable flow needed for PFC applications. The present study builds up on the ongoing research effort at UCLA, directed towards providing qualitative and quantitative data on liquid metal free surface flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields, to aid in better understanding of flowing liquid metal PFC systems.

  15. Structured catalyst bed and method for conversion of feed materials to chemical products and liquid fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Yong (Richland, WA), Liu; Wei (Richland, WA)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a structured monolith reactor and method that provides for controlled Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The invention controls mass transport limitations leading to higher CO conversion and lower methane selectivity. Over 95 wt % of the total product liquid hydrocarbons obtained from the monolithic catalyst are in the carbon range of C.sub.5-C.sub.18. The reactor controls readsorption of olefins leading to desired products with a preselected chain length distribution and enhanced overall reaction rate. And, liquid product analysis shows readsorption of olefins is reduced, achieving a narrower FT product distribution.

  16. Synthesis gas production by mixed conducting membranes with integrated conversion into liquid products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Russek, Steven Lee (Allentown, PA); Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas or other methane-containing feed gas is converted to a C.sub.5 -C.sub.19 hydrocarbon liquid in an integrated system comprising an oxygenative synthesis gas generator, a non-oxygenative synthesis gas generator, and a hydrocarbon synthesis process such as the Fischer-Tropsch process. The oxygenative synthesis gas generator is a mixed conducting membrane reactor system and the non-oxygenative synthesis gas generator is preferably a heat exchange reformer wherein heat is provided by hot synthesis gas product from the mixed conducting membrane reactor system. Offgas and water from the Fischer-Tropsch process can be recycled to the synthesis gas generation system individually or in combination.

  17. 138 Industrial Productivity Spinoff 2009 Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) tanks. The Agency has used these cryogenic fluids for vehicle propellants, reactants, and life support employees in 1993 now has an ISO 9001:2008 registration and currently employs over 370 people in its Ohio-scale expendable launch vehicle liquid oxygen tank. SLI has also received funding from NASA's Innovative

  18. Collective Excitations of Holographic Quantum Liquids in a Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel K. Brattan; Richard A. Davison; Simon A. Gentle; Andy O'Bannon

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We use holography to study N=4 supersymmetric SU(Nc) Yang-Mills theory in the large-Nc and large-coupling limits coupled to a number Nf > T,\\sqrt{B}. We study the collective excitations of these holographic quantum liquids by computing the poles in the retarded Green's function of the baryon number charge density operator and the associated peaks in the spectral function. We focus on the evolution of the collective excitations as we increase the frequency relative to T, i.e. the hydrodynamic/collisionless crossover. We find that for all B, at low frequencies the tallest peak in the spectral function is associated with hydrodynamic charge diffusion. At high frequencies the tallest peak is associated with a sound mode similar to the zero sound mode in the collisionless regime of a Landau Fermi liquid. The sound mode has a gap proportional to B, and as a result for intermediate frequencies and for B sufficiently large compared to T the spectral function is strongly suppressed. We find that the hydrodynamic/collisionless crossover occurs at a frequency that is approximately B-independent.

  19. Near-field dispersal modeling for liquid fuel-air explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.R.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-field, explosive dispersal of a liquid into air has been explored using a combination of analytical and numerical models. The near-field flow regime is transient, existing only as long as the explosive forces produced by the detonation of the burster charge dominate or are approximately equal in magnitude to the aerodynamic drag forces on the liquid. The near-field model provides reasonable initial conditions for the far-field model, which is described in a separate report. The near-field model consists of the CTH hydrodynamics code and a film instability model. In particular, the CTH hydrodynamics code is used to provide initial temperature, pressure, and velocity fields, and bulk material distribution for the far-field model. The film instability model is a linear stability model for a radially expanding fluid film, and is used to provide a lower bound on the breakup time and an upper and lower bound on the initial average drop diameter for the liquid following breakup. Predictions of the liquid breakup time and the initial arithmetic average drop diameter from the model compare favorably with the sparse experimental data. 26 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Evaluating specific error characteristics of microwave-derived cloud liquid water products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    of cloud LWP products globally using concurrent data from visible/ infrared satellite sensors. The approachEvaluating specific error characteristics of microwave-derived cloud liquid water products Thomas J microwave satellite measurements. Using coincident visible/infrared satellite data, errors are isolated

  1. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  2. 81929 - Fission-Product Separation Based on Room - Temperature Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin D. Rogers

    2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has demonstrated that Sr2+ and Cs+ can be selectively extracted from aqueous solutions into ionic liquids using crown ethers and that unprecedented large distribution coefficients can be achieved for these fission products. The volume of secondary wastes can be significantly minimized with this new separation technology. Through the current EMSP funding, the solvent extraction technology based on ionic liquids has been shown to be viable and can potentially provide the most efficient separation of problematic fission products from high level wastes. The key results from the current funding period are the development of highly selective extraction process for cesium ions based on crown ethers and calixarenes, optimization of selectivities of extractants via systematic change of ionic liquids, and investigation of task-specific ionic liquids incorporating both complexant and solvent characteristics.

  3. Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSS LetterStateDepartment ofEqualityCellulosic Liquid

  4. Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197 14,197 14,1978.Barrels) Liquids,

  5. Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9 2010 2011IndustrialLiquids

  6. Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.W.; Zackro, W.C.; Czajkowski, G. (Allied-Signal, Inc., Des Plaines, IL (USA). Engineered Materials Research Center); Shah, P.P.; Kelly, A.P. (UOP, Inc., Des Plaines, IL (USA))

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force is evaluating various feedstock sources of endothermic fuels. The technical feasibility of producing endothermic fuel from the naphtha by-product from Great Plains Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota was evaluated. The capital and operating costs of deriving the fuel from coal naphtha were also estimated. The coal naphtha from Great Plains was successfully processed to remove sulfur, nitrogen and oxygen contaminants (UOP HD Unibon{reg sign} Hydrotreating) and then to saturate aromatic molecules (UOP AH Unibon{reg sign}). The AH Unibon product was fractionated to yield endothermic fuel candidates with less than 5% aromatics. The major cycloparaffins in the AH Unibon product were cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane. The production of endothermic fuel from the naphtha by-product stream was estimated to be cost competitive with existing technology. 17 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. The effect of electric fields upon liquid extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carleson, T.E.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of mass transfer studies were conducted for the extraction of solute from droplets falling in an electric field. The experiments were planned such that the dispersed phase resistance was controlling. In one series of experiments single drops were formed from a charged nozzle and allowed to fall through a continuous, dielectric phase. The drop size and velocity were correlated by means of a simple force balance. Drop mass transfer coefficients were calculated for the drop free fall period and were compared to predictions based upon literature correlations for an oscillating droplet in-the absence of an electric field. Droplet size and velocity were approximately predicted by a staple force balance whereas the mass transfer coefficient was approximately 25--250% higher than that predicted. Droplet extraction efficiencies Increased about 20--30% in the presence of electric fields up to 2 kv/cm. For the same field, the drop diameter decreased 30--50% and the terminal velocity increased by up to 50%. The enhancements for the toluene-water system can be ascribed to increases in terminal velocity and decreases in drop diameter. The mass transfer model for freely falling drops proposed by Skelland and Wellek roughly predicts the moderate mass transfer efficiency increases (about 18% at 1 kv/cm) for the toluene water system but failed to predict the increases (about 25% at 0.5 kv/cm) for the heptane furfural system. The second series of experiments involved the formation of a swarm of droplets In a three stage sieve tray column. In a separate series of experiments. the effect of the electric field upon mass transfer from drops exhibiting interfacial turbulence was evaluated.

  8. The effect of electric fields upon liquid extraction. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carleson, T.E.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of mass transfer studies were conducted for the extraction of solute from droplets falling in an electric field. The experiments were planned such that the dispersed phase resistance was controlling. In one series of experiments single drops were formed from a charged nozzle and allowed to fall through a continuous, dielectric phase. The drop size and velocity were correlated by means of a simple force balance. Drop mass transfer coefficients were calculated for the drop free fall period and were compared to predictions based upon literature correlations for an oscillating droplet in-the absence of an electric field. Droplet size and velocity were approximately predicted by a staple force balance whereas the mass transfer coefficient was approximately 25--250% higher than that predicted. Droplet extraction efficiencies Increased about 20--30% in the presence of electric fields up to 2 kv/cm. For the same field, the drop diameter decreased 30--50% and the terminal velocity increased by up to 50%. The enhancements for the toluene-water system can be ascribed to increases in terminal velocity and decreases in drop diameter. The mass transfer model for freely falling drops proposed by Skelland and Wellek roughly predicts the moderate mass transfer efficiency increases (about 18% at 1 kv/cm) for the toluene water system but failed to predict the increases (about 25% at 0.5 kv/cm) for the heptane furfural system. The second series of experiments involved the formation of a swarm of droplets In a three stage sieve tray column. In a separate series of experiments. the effect of the electric field upon mass transfer from drops exhibiting interfacial turbulence was evaluated.

  9. Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  10. Productivity index and field behavior: a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Marianne

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) to explain the irrational behavior of the productivity index in a case study presented. The problem has its origin in a field in north Africa, where irrational behavior of the productivity index (PI) has made it difficult to forecast the field performance...

  11. Spontaneous Spin Ordering of a Dirac Spin Liquid in a Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Patrick A.

    The Dirac spin liquid was proposed to be the ground state of the spin-1/2 kagomé antiferromagnets. In a magnetic field B, we show that the state with Fermi pocket is unstable to the Landau level (LL) state. The LL state ...

  12. Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column heights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column that the CO2 is in a dense phase (either liquid or supercritical). Accurate assessment of the storage capacity also requires an estimation of the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored beneath the reservoir seal

  13. Field theory on noncommutative spacetimes: Quasiplanar Wick products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahns, D.; Fredenhagen, K. [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Doplicher, S.; Piacitelli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a definition of admissible counterterms appropriate for massive quantum field theories on the noncommutative Minkowski space, based on a suitable notion of locality. We then define products of fields of arbitrary order, the so-called quasiplanar Wick products, by subtracting only such admissible counterterms. We derive the analogue of Wick's theorem and comment on the consequences of using quasiplanar Wick products in the perturbative expansion.

  14. Gas and liquid fuel system test facilities for research, development, and production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, L.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meeting the challenges associated with the support of both mature product lines and new high flow, high accuracy DLE (dry low emissions) control valves and systems has been complex. This paper deals with the design and capabilities of the gas and liquid test facility at the Woodward Governor Company Turbomachinery Controls in Loveland, Colorado.

  15. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar 12:00 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 Research Review Continued o Investigation of Bio-ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt basedBio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production

  16. Annual report of the origin of natural gas liquids production form EIA-64A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The collection of basic, verifiable information on the Nation`s reserves and production of natural gas liquids (NGL) is mandated by the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (Public Law 93-275) and the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91). Gas shrinkage volumes reported on Form EIA-64A by natural gas processing plant operators are used with natural gas data collected on a {open_quotes}wet after lease separation{close_quotes} basis on Form EIA-23, Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, to estimate {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} natural gas reserves and production volumes regionally and nationally. The shrinkage data are also used, along with the plant liquids production data reported on Form EIA-64A, and lease condensate data reported on Form EIA-23, to estimate regional and national gas liquids reserves and production volumes. This information is the only comprehensive source of credible natural gas liquids data, and is required by DOE to assist in the formulation of national energy policies.

  17. Elucidating the solid, liquid and gaseous products from batch pyrolysis of cotton-gin trash.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquino, Froilan Ludana

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cotton-gin trash (CGT) was pyrolyzed at different temperatures and reaction times using an externally-heated batch reactor. The average yields of output products (solid/char, liquid/bio-oil, and gaseous) were determined. The heating value (HV...

  18. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul2011Dry Production

  19. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.Year JanProduction

  20. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.Year JanProduction(Million

  1. Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear JanProductionSeparation,(Million(Million

  2. Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear JanProductionSeparation,(Million(Million(Million

  3. North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Illinois

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number ofFeet) New FieldU.S.Fuel (Million(Million Cubic

  4. Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Mother-Liquid Radiochemical Production - 13089

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Dvoeglazov, Konstantine; Volk, Vladimir; Zagumenov, Vladimir; Zverev, Dmitriy [JSC VNIINM, 123060, Moscow, Rogova st., 5a (Russian Federation)] [JSC VNIINM, 123060, Moscow, Rogova st., 5a (Russian Federation); Tinin, Vasiliy; Kozyrev, Anatoly; Shamin, Dladimir; Tvilenev, Konstantin [JSC SCC, 636039,Tomsk oblast, Seversk, Kurchatova street 1 (Russian Federation)] [JSC SCC, 636039,Tomsk oblast, Seversk, Kurchatova street 1 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the work is to develop a basic technology of decomposition of ammonium nitrate stock solutions produced in radiochemical enterprises engaged in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel and fabrication of fresh fuel. It was necessary to work out how to conduct a one-step thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, select and test the catalysts for this process and to prepare proposals for recycling condensation. Necessary accessories were added to a laboratory equipment installation decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It is tested several types of reducing agents and two types of catalyst to neutralize the nitrogen oxides. It is conducted testing of modes of the process to produce condensation, suitable for use in the conversion of a new technological scheme of production. It is studied the structure of the catalysts before and after their use in a laboratory setting. It is tested the selected catalyst in the optimal range for 48 hours of continuous operation. (authors)

  5. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+Liquids LeaseAnnual",2014 ,"ReleaseProduction,

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization was done over a two day period in June 2011, and confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

  7. Steamflood production mechanism in an edge pattern Duri field, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuwono, Ipung Punto

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEAMFLOOD PRODUCTION MECHANISM IN AN EDGE PATTERN DURI FIELD, INDONESIA A Thesis by IPUNG PUNTO YUWONO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1998 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering STEAMFLOOD PRODUCTION MECHANISM IN AN EDGE PATTERN DURI FIELD, INDONESIA A Thesis by IPUNG PUNTO YUWONO Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  8. Analysis of the dynamics of saturation and pressure close to the wellbore for condensate reservoirs as a tool to optimize liquid production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra Camargo, Andrea M

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas condensate reservoirs often exhibit a rapid decline in production with depletion. During early production, liquid dropout accumulates in the near wellbore area and this liquid dropout reduces the effective permeability to gas and thereby...

  9. Surface Light Field Rendering for Virtual Product Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    Surface Light Field Rendering for Virtual Product Design Jan MESETH, Gero MĂ?LLER, Reinhard KLEIN illumination solution including accurate materials, which is stored as an outgoing Surface Light Field (SLF-facto standard in manufacturing industries like the automotive industry. They are used, e.g., for performing

  10. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface.

  11. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal starts with the production of ultra low-ash coal and then converts it to high-vale, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

  12. An Ionic Liquid Reaction and Separation Process for Production of Hydroxymethylfurfural from Sugars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei; Zheng, Feng; Li, Joanne; Cooper, Alan R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been world-wide interest to making plastics out of renewable biomass feedstock for recent years. Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is viewed as an attractive alternate to terephthalic acid (TPA) for production of polyesters (PET) and polyamides. Conversion of sugars into HMF has been studied in numerous publications. In this work, a complete ionic liquid reaction and separation process is presented for nearly stoichiometric conversion of fructose into HMF. Different adsorbent materials are evaluated and silicalite material is demonstrated effective for isolation of 99% pure HMF from actual ionic liquid reaction mixtures and for recovery of the un-converted sugars and reaction intermediate along with the ionic liquid. Membrane-coated silicalite particles are prepared and studied for a practical adsorption process operated at low pressure drops but with separation performances comparable or better than the powder material. Complete conversion of fresh fructose feed into HMF in the recycled ionic liquid is shown under suitable reaction conditions. Stability of HMF product is characterized. A simplified process flow diagram is proposed based on these research results, and the key equipment such as reactor and adsorbent bed is sized for a plant of 200,000 ton/year of fructose processing capacity. The proposed HMF production process is much simpler than the current paraxylene (PX) manufacturing process from petroleum oil, which suggests substantial reduction to the capital cost and energy consumption be possible. At the equivalent value to PX on the molar basis, there can be a large gross margin for HMF production from fructose and/or sugars.

  13. Effect of direct liquid water injection and interdigitated flow field on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D. L.; Yi, Y. S.; Van Nguyen, Trung

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper water management is vital to ensuring successful performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The effectiveness of the direct liquid water injection scheme and the interdigitated flow field design towards providing adequate gas...

  14. Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL...

  15. Semiclassical pair production rate for rotating electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckhard Strobel; She-Sheng Xue

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We semiclassically investigate Schwinger pair production for pulsed rotating electric fields depending on time. To do so we solve the Dirac equation for two-component fields in a WKB-like approximation. The result shows that for two-component fields the spin distribution of produced pairs is generally not $1:1$. As a result the pair creation rates of spinor and scalar quantum electro dynamics (QED) are different even for one pair of turning points. For rotating electric fields the pair creation rate is dominated by particles with a specific spin depending on the sense of rotation for a certain range of pulse lengths and frequencies. We present an analytical solution for the momentum spectrum of the constant rotating field. We find interference effects not only in the momentum spectrum but also in the total particle number of rotating electric fields.

  16. Production of bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids from Utah's tar sands: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Hanson, F.V.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous work done on Utah's tar sands, it had been shown that the fluidized-bed pyrolysis of the sands to produce a bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquid was feasible. The research and development work conducted in the small-scale equipment utilized as feed a number of samples from the various tar sand deposits of Utah elsewhere. The results from these studies in yields and quality of products and the operating experience gained strongly suggested that larger scale operation was in order to advance this technology. Accordingly, funding was obtained from the State of Utah through Mineral Leasing Funds administered by the College of Mines and Earth Sciences of the University of Utah to design and build a 4-1/2 inch diameter fluidized-bed pilot plant reactor with the necessary feeding and recovery equipment. This report covers the calibration and testing studies carried out on this equipment. The tests conducted with the Circle Cliffs tar sand ore gave good results. The equipment was found to operate as expected with this lean tar sand (less than 5% bitumen saturation). The hydrocarbon liquid yield with the Circle Cliffs tar sand was found to be greater in the pilot plant than it was in the small unit at comparable conditions. Following this work, the program called for an extensive run to be carried out on tar sands obtained from a large representative tar sand deposit to produce barrel quantities of liquid product. 10 refs., 45 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Improved Approximations for Fermion Pair Production in Inhomogeneous Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Don N. Page

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reformulating the instantons in a complex plane for tunneling or transmitting states, we calculate the pair-production rate of charged fermions in a spatially localized electric field, illustrated by the Sauter electric field E_0 sech^2 (z/L), and in a temporally localized electric field such as E_0 sech^2 (t/T). The integration of the quadratic part of WKB instanton actions over the frequency and transverse momentum leads to the pair-production rate obtained by the worldline instanton method, including the prefactor, of Phys. Rev. D72, 105004 (2005) and D73, 065028 (2006). It is further shown that the WKB instanton action plus the next-to-leading order contribution in spinor QED equals the WKB instanton action in scalar QED, thus justifying why the WKB instanton in scalar QED can work for the pair production of fermions. Finally we obtain the pair-production rate in a spatially localized electric field together with a constant magnetic field in the same direction.

  18. Progress on detection of liquid explosives using ultra-low field MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schuttz, Larry M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baguisa, Shermiyah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dunkerley, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Owens, Tuba [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandin, Henrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. Over the past several years there has been increasing interest in performing NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime, with measurement field strengths of 10-100 microTesla and pre-polarization fields of 30-50 mTesla. The real-time signal-to-noise ratio for such measurements is about 100. Our group at LANL has built and demonstrated the performance of SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI instrumentation for classification of materials and detection of liquid explosives via their relaxation properties measured at ULF, using T{sub 1}, and T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1} frequency dispersion. We are also beginning to investigate the performance of induction coils as sensors. Here we present recent progress on the applications of ULF MR to the detection of liquid explosives, in imaging and relaxometry.

  19. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, H., E-mail: bai@magnet.fsu.edu; Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32?T, 32?mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32?T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40?mm and an outer diameter of 140?mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15?T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5?T at a current of 200?A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  20. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  1. The Force Field for Amino Acid Based Ionic Liquids: Polar Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fileti, Eudes Eterno

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids (ILs) constitute one of the most active fields of research nowadays. Many organic and inorganic molecules can be converted into ions via relatively simple procedures. These ions can be combined into ILs. Amino acid based ILs (AAILs) represent a specific interest due to solubilization of biological species, participation in enzymatic catalysis, and capturing toxic gases. We develop a new force field (FF) for the seven selected AAILs comprising 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and amino acid anions with polar residues. The anions were obtained via deprotonation of carboxyl group. We account for peculiar interactions between the anion and the cation by fitting electrostatic potential for an ion pair, in contrast to isolated ions. The van der Waals interactions were transferred from the CHARMM36 FF with minor modifications, as suggested by hybrid density functional theory. Compatibility between our parameters and CHARMM36 parameters is preserved. The developed interaction model fosters computation...

  2. Instability of a liquid metal surface in an electromagnetic field and relevance to EMC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kageyama, R.; Evans, J.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In electromagnetic casting (EMC) the surface of the molten metal, at the solidification front around the periphery of the melt pool, is not confirmed by a solid mold (as in, say, direct chill casting) but is free to move. Consequently disturbances of the melt surface are reflected in defects (waviness) in the solid ingot. The present paper examines the dynamics of a liquid metal surface in an electromagnetic field comparable to that of EMC. Numerical calculations of the flow of metal and motion of the melt surface have been accompanied by laboratory experiments in which a laser vibrometer has been used to measure the oscillations of the free surface of a mercury pool. Surface oscillations growth with increasing electromagnetic field strength in both the computations and the experiment, probably originating from the turbulent flow in the melt. The implications for EMC are discussed.

  3. Locally smeared operator product expansions in scalar field theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Monahan, Christopher J. [College of William & Mary; Orginos, Kostas [William and Mary College, JLAB

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new locally smeared operator product expansion to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of smeared operators. The smeared operator product expansion formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements determined numerically using lattice field theory to matrix elements of non-local operators in the continuum. These nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, which significantly complicates calculations of quantities such as the moments of parton distribution functions, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale complicates the connection to the Wilson coefficients of the standard operator product expansion and requires the construction of a suitable formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with examples in real scalar field theory.

  4. Locally smeared operator product expansions in scalar field theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Monahan, Christopher J.; Orginos, Kostas

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new locally smeared operator product expansion to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of smeared operators. The smeared operator product expansion formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements determined numerically using lattice field theory to matrix elements of non-local operators in the continuum. These nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, which significantly complicates calculations of quantities such as the moments of parton distribution functions, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale complicates the connection to the Wilson coefficients of the standardmore »operator product expansion and requires the construction of a suitable formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with examples in real scalar field theory.« less

  5. New concepts used in the Murchison field submerged production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, A.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New concepts were used to install three satellite subsea wells at Conoco's Murchison field, located in 510 feet of water in the North Sea. Originally drilled as exploratory wells, they were re-entered and completed. The sequence of events in bringing the wells to production incorporate the following concepts: Completion with dual 3/one-half/sub d/ouble prime/ tubing retrievable safety valves inside 9 5/8/double prime/-47 pound casing; subsea controllers were not used; flowline bundles were constructed onshore and towed below the surface 264 miles to the field; six high-pressure lines were connected at one time using metal to metal gaskets while the flowline bundle was buoyant nine feet off the seafloor. Production from two satellite subsea wells demonstrated the viability of using exploratory wells for field development.

  6. Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Dempsey, Michael D. (Revere, MA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

  7. The elimination of liquid loading problems in low productivity gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Toby Roy

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed for use on oil wells and the methodology of calculating the gas flow rate was altered to suit the needs of this study. Most correlations calculate the gas flow rate with the following equation: 3 27 E 07 Zg Qo (R Rs) (T + 460) In this study...THE ELIMINATION OF LIQUID LOADING PROBLEMS IN LOW PRODUCTIVITY GAS WELLS A Thesis by TOBY ROY NEVES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  8. Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonnell, Leo W. (Macungie, PA); Perka, Alan T. (Macungie, PA); Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

  9. ,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future ProductionNetPrice (Dollars perPlant

  10. Liquid fuels production from biomass. Progress report No. 10, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, J.E.; Levy, P.F.; Wise, D.L.; Nabor, M.R.; Molyneaux, M.S.; Hughes, C.A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation broth by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids via Kolbe Electrolysis to aliphatic hydrocarbons, which may be used as a diesel fuel. A coenzyme M analogue, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid has been shown to be an effective suppressor of methane in nonsterile anaerobic fermentation of cellulosic substrates. Preliminary experiments have also been completed utilizing corn meal in which 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid and carbon monoxide were both found to be effective methane suppressors. An analysis of the energy outputs and requirements for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuel from corn has been performed. As a means of expanding the number of potential substrates, pretreatment schemes are being investigated. A tapered auger device has been designed and built which has been demonstrated on the bench to be effective for adding substrate and removing residue in a continuous manner from a fixed packed bed fermenter. A solvent extractor system using kerosene as the nonaqueous phase has been constructed and is currently in operation in series with the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermenter. Although additional work is required to optimize the electrolysis process, the electrolytic oxidation of organic acids produced in the 300 liter fixed packed bed fermenter is operating with a favorable energy balance of 6/1 based on the applied potential.

  11. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Professors and graduate students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and hydrocarbon gases and liquids produced from coal. An Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report summarizes the results obtained in this program during the period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2006. The results are presented in detailed reports on 16 research projects headed by professors at each of the five CFFS Universities and an Executive Summary. Some of the highlights from these results are: (1) Small ({approx}1%) additions of acetylene or other alkynes to the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction increases its yield, causes chain initiation, and promotes oxygenate formation. (2) The addition of Mo to Fe-Cu-K/AC F-T catalysts improves catalyst lifetime and activity. (3) The use of gas phase deposition to place highly dispersed metal catalysts on silica or ceria aerogels offers promise for both the F-T and the water-gas shift WGS reactions. (4) Improved activity and selectivity are exhibited by Co F-T catalysts in supercritical hexane. (5) Binary Fe-M (M=Ni, Mo, Pd) catalysts exhibit excellent activity for dehydrogenation of gaseous alkanes, yielding pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes in one reaction. A fluidized-bed/fixed-bed methane reactor was developed for continuous hydrogen and nanotube production. (6) A process for co-production of hydrogen and methyl formate from methanol has been developed. (7) Pt nanoparticles on stacked-cone carbon nanotubes easily strip hydrogen from liquids such as cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, tetralin and decalin, leaving rechargeable aromatic phases. (8) Hydrogen volume percentages produced during reforming of methanol in supercritical water in the output stream are {approx}98%, while CO and CO2 percentages are <2 %.

  12. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

  13. Use of earth field spin echo NMR to search for liquid minerals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoeffl, Wolfgang (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument for measuring the spatial, qualitative and quantitative parameters of an underground nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active liquid mineral deposit, including oil and water. A phased array of excitation and receiver antennas on the surface and/or in a borehole excites the NMR active nuclei in the deposit, and using known techniques from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the spatial and quantitative distribution of the deposit can be measured. A surface array may utilize, for example, four large (50-500 diameter) diameter wire loops laid on the ground surface, and a weak (1.5-2.5 kHz) alternating current (AC) field applied, matching the NMR frequency of hydrogen in the rather flat and uniform earth magnetic field. For a short duration (a few seconds) an additional gradient field can be generated, superimposed to the earth field, by applying direct current (DC) to the grid (wire loops), enhancing the position sensitivity of the spin-echo and also suppressing large surface water signals by shifting them to a different frequency. The surface coil excitation can be combined with downhole receivers, which are much more radio-quiet compared to surface receivers, and this combination also enhances the position resolution of the MRI significantly. A downhole receiver module, for example, may have a 5.5 inch diameter and fit in a standard six inch borehole having a one-quarter inch thick stainless steel casing. The receiver module may include more than one receiver units for improved penetration and better position resolution.

  14. Thermodynamic Relationships for Bulk Crystalline and Liquid Phases in the Phase-Field Crystal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor W. L. Chan; Nirand Pisutha-Arnond; Katsuyo Thornton

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present thermodynamic relationships between the free energy of the phase-field crystal (PFC) model and thermodynamic state variables for bulk phases under hydrostatic pressure. This relationship is derived based on the thermodynamic formalism for crystalline solids of Larch\\'e and Cahn [Larch\\'e and Cahn, Acta Metallurgica, Vol. 21, 1051 (1973)]. We apply the relationship to examine the thermodynamic processes associated with varying the input parameters of the PFC model: temperature, lattice spacing, and the average value of the PFC order parameter, $\\bar{n}$. The equilibrium conditions between bulk crystalline solid and liquid phases are imposed on the thermodynamic relationships for the PFC model to obtain a procedure for determining solid-liquid phase coexistence. The resulting procedure is found to be in agreement with the method commonly used in the PFC community, justifying the use of the common-tangent construction to determine solid-liquid phase coexistence in the PFC model. Finally, we apply the procedure to an eighth-order-fit (EOF) PFC model that has been parameterized to body-centered-cubic ($bcc$) Fe [Jaatinen et al., Physical Review E 80, 031602 (2009)] to demonstrate the procedure as well as to develop physical intuition about the PFC input parameters. We demonstrate that the EOF-PFC model parameterization does not predict stable $bcc$ structures with positive vacancy densities. This result suggests an alternative parameterization of the PFC model, which requires the primary peak position of the two-body direct correlation function to shift as a function of $\\bar{n}$.

  15. Usefulness of effective field theory for boosted Higgs production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson; I. M. Lewis; Mao Zeng

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs + jet channel at the LHC is sensitive to the effects of new physics both in the total rate and in the transverse momentum distribution at high p_T. We examine the production process using an effective field theory (EFT) language and discuss the possibility of determining the nature of the underlying high scale physics from boosted Higgs production. The effects of heavy color triplet scalars and top partner fermions with TeV scale masses are considered as examples and Higgs-gluon couplings of dimension-5 and dimension-7 are included in the EFT. As a by-product of our study, we examine the region of validity of the EFT. Dimension-7 contributions in realistic new physics models give effects in the high p_T tail of the Higgs signal which are so tiny that they are likely to be unobservable.

  16. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruk, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, S?oneczna 54, PL-10710 Olsztyn (Poland); Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A. [Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Rachocki, A. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Pozna? (Poland); Korpa?a, A. [Department of Biophysics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, ?azarza 16, 31-530 Kraków, Poland and Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Singh, R. K. [Ionic Liquid and Solid State Ionics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220–258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF{sub 4}, 243–318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF{sub 6}, 258–323 K). The dispersion of {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate R{sub 1}(?) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by {sup 19}F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF{sub 6} in the corresponding frequency range. From the {sup 1}H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF{sub 4}, and BMIM-PF{sub 6} are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R{sub 1} on square root of frequency. From the {sup 19}F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF{sub 6}. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  17. Topologically Stratified Energy Minimizers in a Product Abelian Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Xiaosen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently developed product Abelian gauge field theory by Tong and Wong hosting magnetic impurities is reformulated into an extended model that allows the coexistence of vortices and anti-vortices. The two Abelian gauge fields in the model induce two species of magnetic vortex-lines resulting from $N_s$ vortices and $P_s$ anti-vortices ($s=1,2$) realized as the zeros and poles of two complex-valued Higgs fields, respectively. An existence theorem is established for the governing equations over a compact Riemann surface $S$ which states that a solution with prescribed $N_1, N_2$ vortices and $P_1,P_2$ anti-vortices of two designated species exists if and only if the inequalities \\[ \\left|N_1+N_2-(P_1+P_2)\\right|area of $S$. The minimum energy of these solutions is shown to assume the explicit value \\...

  18. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  19. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  20. Optimizing the efficiency of cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid separators for field applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adebare, Adedeji

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems associated with the use of compact cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid (CCGL) separators can be attributed to two physical phenomena: gas carry-under and liquid carryover (LCO). Inadequate understanding of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic...

  1. The ENCOAL project: Initial commercialization shipment and utilization of both solid and liquid products. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, T.G.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENCOAL is co-funding a mild gasification project and shipping the products to customers. The ENCOAL Corporation has shipped, to two utility customers, over 500 rail cars (six partial trains and two full trains) of solid product (PDF) from its plant located at Triton Coal Company`s Buckskin Mine near Gillette Wyoming. Shipments span a range of blends from 15% to essentially unblended PDF. Utility handling of these shipments is comparable to that of run-of-mine Buckskin coal. Results related to spontaneous combustion and generation of fugitive dust are particularly favorable. Combustion tests were performed both in a pulverized-fired boiler and in a cyclone-fired boiler. Commercialization utilization of the liquid product (CDL) depends on customer facility capabilities and the source of any blending fuel, as expected. A total of 56 tank cars have been sent to three customers. The 1994 test program met or exceeded ENCOAL`s major objectives of transporting and burning both PDF and CDL in existing customer facilities.

  2. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research.

  3. MODELING LIQUID METAL CORROSION IN A FERRITIC STEEL PbLi SYSTEM WITH AND WITHOUT A MAGNETIC FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    MODELING LIQUID METAL CORROSION IN A FERRITIC STEEL ­ PbLi SYSTEM WITH AND WITHOUT A MAGNETIC FIELD associated with corrosion of ferritic steel in the flowing eutectic alloy lead-lithium (PbLi). New computer to perform more analysis and comparisons against available experimental data on corrosion in various flow

  4. Characterization and utilization of hydrotreated products produced from the Whiterocks (Utah) tar sand bitumen-derived liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.H.; Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Oblad, A.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bitumen-derived liquid produced in a 4-inch diameter fluidized-bed reactor from the mined and crushed ore from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit has been hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor. The purpose was to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variable. A sulfided nickel-molybendum on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in all experiments. Moderately severe operating conditions were employed; that is, high reaction temperature (617--680 K) high reactor pressure (11.0--17.1 MPa) and low liquid feed rate (0.18--0.77 HSV); to achieve the desired reduction in heteroatom content. Detailed chemical structures of the bitumen-derived liquid feedstock and the hydrotreated total liquid products were determined by high resolution gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analyses. The compounds identified in the native bitumen included isoprenoids; bicyclic, tricycle, and tetracyclic terpenoids; steranes; hopanes; and perhydro-{beta}-carotenes. In addition, normal and branched alkanes and alkenes and partially dehydrogenated hydroaromatics were identified in the bitumen-derived liquid. The dominant pyrolysis reactions were: (1) the dealkylation of long alkyl side chains to form {alpha} - and isoolefins; and (2) the cleavage of alkyl chains linking aromatic and hydroaromatic clusters. Olefinic bonds were not observed in the hydrotreated product and monoaromatic hydrocarbons were the predominant aromatic species. The properties of the jet fuel fractions from the hydrotreated products met most of the jet fuel specifications. The cetane indices indicated these fractions would be suitable for use as diesel fuels.

  5. Characterization and utilization of hydrotreated products produced from the Whiterocks (Utah) tar sand bitumen-derived liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.H.; Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Oblad, A.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bitumen-derived liquid produced in a 4-inch diameter fluidized-bed reactor from the mined and crushed ore from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit has been hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor. The purpose was to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variable. A sulfided nickel-molybendum on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in all experiments. Moderately severe operating conditions were employed; that is, high reaction temperature (617--680 K) high reactor pressure (11.0--17.1 MPa) and low liquid feed rate (0.18--0.77 HSV); to achieve the desired reduction in heteroatom content. Detailed chemical structures of the bitumen-derived liquid feedstock and the hydrotreated total liquid products were determined by high resolution gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analyses. The compounds identified in the native bitumen included isoprenoids; bicyclic, tricycle, and tetracyclic terpenoids; steranes; hopanes; and perhydro-{beta}-carotenes. In addition, normal and branched alkanes and alkenes and partially dehydrogenated hydroaromatics were identified in the bitumen-derived liquid. The dominant pyrolysis reactions were: (1) the dealkylation of long alkyl side chains to form {alpha} - and isoolefins; and (2) the cleavage of alkyl chains linking aromatic and hydroaromatic clusters. Olefinic bonds were not observed in the hydrotreated product and monoaromatic hydrocarbons were the predominant aromatic species. The properties of the jet fuel fractions from the hydrotreated products met most of the jet fuel specifications. The cetane indices indicated these fractions would be suitable for use as diesel fuels.

  6. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. These feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Some highlights of the results obtained during the first year of the current research contract are summarized as: (1) Terminal alkynes are an effective chain initiator for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactions, producing normal paraffins with C numbers {ge} to that of the added alkyne. (2) Significant improvement in the product distribution towards heavier hydrocarbons (C{sub 5} to C{sub 19}) was achieved in supercritical fluid (SCF) FT reactions compared to that of gas-phase reactions. (3) Xerogel and aerogel silica supported cobalt catalysts were successfully employed for FT synthesis. Selectivity for diesel range products increased with increasing Co content. (4) Silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) molecular sieve catalysts have been developed for methanol to olefin conversion, producing value-added products such as ethylene and propylene. (5) Hybrid Pt-promoted tungstated and sulfated zirconia catalysts are very effective in cracking n-C{sub 36} to jet and diesel fuel; these catalysts will be tested for cracking of FT wax. (6) Methane, ethane, and propane are readily decomposed to pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes using binary Fe-based catalysts containing Mo, Ni, or Pd in a single step non-oxidative reaction. (7) Partial dehydrogenation of liquid hydrocarbons (cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane) has been performed using catalysts consisting of Pt and other metals on stacked-cone carbon nanotubes. (8) An understanding of the catalytic reaction mechanisms of the catalysts developed in the CFFS C1 program is being achieved by structural characterization using multiple techniques, including XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, NMR, ESR, and magnetometry.

  7. On the cost of lost production from Russian oil fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Russia is now paying heavily for past mismanagement of its major oil fields. Unconventional attempts to maximize short-run extraction, neglect of routine maintenance, and shortages of critical equipment have combined to cause a steep decline in production. This study examines the scope and size of resulting economic losses using an extension of the traditional exponential decline model. Estimates derived from the model indicate that as much as 40% of the potential value of Russian oil reserves has been lost through poor management. 20 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Observational constraints on gauge field production in axion inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meerburg, P.D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Pajer, E., E-mail: meerburg@princeton.edu, E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of axion inflation are particularly interesting since they provide a natural justification for the flatness of the potential over a super-Planckian distance, namely the approximate shift-symmetry of the inflaton. In addition, most of the observational consequences are directly related to this symmetry and hence are correlated. Large tensor modes can be accompanied by the observable effects of a the shift-symmetric coupling ?F F-tilde to a gauge field. During inflation this coupling leads to a copious production of gauge quanta and consequently a very distinct modification of the primordial curvature perturbations. In this work we compare these predictions with observations. We find that the leading constraint on the model comes from the CMB power spectrum when considering both WMAP 7-year and ACT data. The bispectrum generated by the non-Gaussian inverse-decay of the gauge field leads to a comparable but slightly weaker constraint. There is also a constraint from ?-distortion using TRIS plus COBE/FIRAS data, but it is much weaker. Finally we comment on a generalization of the model to massive gauge fields. When the mass is generated by some light Higgs field, observably large local non-Gaussianity can be produced.

  9. Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides and overview of field testing of 18 pre-production prototype residential heat pump water heaters

  10. Touch sensors based on planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Jooyeok; Lee, Chulyeon; Han, Hyemi; Lee, Sooyong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Youngkyoo, E-mail: ykimm@knu.ac.kr [Organic Nanoelectronics Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwajeong [Organic Nanoelectronics Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Priority Research Center, Research Institute of Advanced Energy Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon-Hyung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a tactile touch sensor based on a planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistor (LC-g-OFET) structure. The LC-g-OFET touch sensors were fabricated by forming the 10 ?m thick LC layer (4-cyano-4{sup ?}-pentylbiphenyl - 5CB) on top of the 50 nm thick channel layer (poly(3-hexylthiophene) - P3HT) that is coated on the in-plane aligned drain/source/gate electrodes (indium-tin oxide - ITO). As an external physical stimulation to examine the tactile touch performance, a weak nitrogen flow (83.3 ?l/s) was employed to stimulate the LC layer of the touch device. The LC-g-OFET device exhibited p-type transistor characteristics with a hole mobility of 1.5 cm{sup 2}/Vs, but no sensing current by the nitrogen flow touch was measured at sufficiently high drain (V{sub D}) and gate (V{sub G}) voltages. However, a clear sensing current signal was detected at lower voltages, which was quite sensitive to the combination of V{sub D} and V{sub G}. The best voltage combination was V{sub D} = ?0.2 V and V{sub G} = ?1 V for the highest ratio of signal currents to base currents (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio). The change in the LC alignment upon the nitrogen flow touch was assigned as the mechanism for the present LC-g-OFET touch sensors.

  11. ,"Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production

  12. Achieving a production goal of 1 million B/D of coal liquids by 1990. [Impediments and constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Charles; LaRosa, Dr., P. J.; Coles, E. T.; Fein, H. L.; Petros, J. J.; Iyer, R. S.; Merritt, R. T.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this contract, Bechtel analyzed the resource requirements and reviewed major obstacles to the daily production of several million barrels of synthetic coal liquids. Further, the study sought to identify the industry infrastructure needed to support the commercial readiness of the coal liquefaction process. A selected list of critical resource items and their domestic/international availability was developed and examined, and the impact of their supply on the various synthetic coal liquids programs was evaluated. The study approach was to develop representative, or generic, direct and indirect coal liquefaction conceptual designs from available technology and costs data. The generic processes were to employ technology that would be considered commercial by the mid- or late-1980s. The size of the generic construction mobilization was considered reasonable at the outset of the program. The product slate was directed toward unrefined liquid fuels rather than diesel oil or gasoline. The generic processes were to use a wide range of coals to permit siting in most coal-producing regions across the country. Because of the dearth of conceptual design data in the literature, Bechtel developed generic plant designs by using in-house design expertise. Bechtel assumed that because it is first generation technology, the indirect process will be used at the outset of the liquids program, and the direct process will be introduced two to four years later as a second generation technology. The products of either of these processes will be limited to boiler fuels and/or other liquid products which require further upgrading. Cost estimates were developed from equipment lists, as well as material and labor estimates, which enabled the determination of an order-of-magnitude cost estimate and target plant construction schedule for both processes.

  13. Axion inflation with gauge field production and primordial black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar Bugaev; Peter Klimai

    2014-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the process of primordial black hole (PBH) formation at the beginning of radiation era for the cosmological scenario in which the inflaton is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (axion) and there is a coupling of the inflaton with some gauge field. In this model inflation is accompanied by the gauge quanta production and a strong rise of the curvature power spectrum amplitude at small scales (along with non-Gaussianity) is predicted. We show that data on PBH searches can be used for a derivation of essential constraints on the model parameters in such an axion inflation scenario. We compare our numerical results with the similar results published earlier, in the work by Linde et al.

  14. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the first six months of the subject contract (DE-FC26-02NT-4159), from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003.

  15. Free radially expanding liquid sheet in air: time- and space-resolved measurement of the thickness field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clara Vernay; Laurence Ramos; Christian Ligoure

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The collision of a liquid drop against a small target results in the formation of a thin liquid sheet that extends radially until it reaches a maximum diameter. The subsequent retraction is due to the air-liquid surface tension. We have used a time- and space-resolved technique to measure the thickness field of this class of liquid sheet, based on the grey level measurement of the image of a dyed liquid sheet recorded using a fast camera. This method enables a precise measurement of the thickness in the range $(10-450) \\, \\mathrm{\\mu m}$, with a temporal resolution equal to that of the camera. We have measured the evolution with time since impact, $t$, and radial position, $r$, of the thickness, $h(r,t)$, for various drop volumes and impact velocities. Two asymptotic regimes for the expansion of the sheet are evidenced. The scalings of the thickness with $t$ and $r$ measured in the two regimes are those that were predicted in \\citet{Rozhkov2004} fort the short-time regime and \\citet{Villermaux2011} for the long time regime, but never experimentally measured before. Interestingly, our experimental data also evidence the existence of a maximum of the film thickness $h_{\\rm{max}}(r)$ at a radial position $r_{\\rm{h_{max}}}(t)$ corresponding to the crossover of these two asymptotic regimes. The maximum moves with a constant velocity of the order of the drop impact velocity, as expected theoretically. Thanks to our visualization technique, we also evidence an azimuthal thickness modulation of the liquid sheets.

  16. ,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

  17. A liquid-helium-free superconducting coil system forming a flat minimum-magnetic-field distribution of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi, E-mail: yoshida.kennichi71@jaea.go.jp; Nara, Takayuki; Saitoh, Yuichi; Yokota, Watalu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat distribution of the minimum magnetic field (flat-B{sub min}) of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is expected to perform better in highly charged ion production than classical B{sub min}. To form a flat-B{sub min} structure with a liquid helium-free superconducting device, a coil system of seven coils with four current leads has been designed. The lead number was reduced by connecting the plural coils in series to maintain the flat-B{sub min} structure even when the coil currents are changed for adjustment. This coil system can be operated with a helium-free cryostat, since the estimation of heat from the leads to the coils is nearly equivalent to the existing superconducting ECRIS of a similar type.

  18. Study of fusion product effects in field-reversed mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driemeyer, D.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of fusion products (fps) on Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) reactor concepts has been evaluated through the development of two new computer models. The first code (MCFRM) treats fps as test particles in a fixed background plasma, which is represented as a fluid. MCFRM includes a Monte Carlo treatment of Coulomb scattering and thus provides an accurate treatment of fp behavior even at lower energies where pitch-angle scattering becomes important. The second code (FRMOD) is a steady-state, globally averaged, two-fluid (ion and electron), point model of the FRM plasma that incorporates fp heating and ash buildup values which are consistent with the MCFRM calculations. These codes have been used extensively in the development of an advanced-fuel FRM reactor design (SAFFIRE). A Catalyzed-D version of the plant is also discussed along with an investigation of the steady-state energy distribution of fps in the FRM. User guides for the two computer codes are also included.

  19. Production of Oxygen Gas and Liquid Metal by Electrochemical Decomposition of Molten Iron Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dihua

    Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is the electrolytic decomposition of a metal oxide, most preferably into liquid metal and oxygen gas. The successful deployment of MOE hinges upon the existence of an inert anode capable of ...

  20. A note on the ultracold neutrons production by neutron deceleration on clusters in liquid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Pokotilovski

    2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of slow neutrons deceleration through their interaction with nanoclusters in liquid helium is performed. It is shown that process is strongly suppresed if the clusters are bound by the van der Waals interaction.

  1. Environmentally Benign Production of Ionic Liquids in CO2-Expanded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nwosu, Sylvia Ogechi

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to reduce air pollution in chemical manufacturing processes continues to drive the search for alternative solvents. Ionic Liquids (ILs) have emerged in recent years as a promising solution. In contrast to traditional ...

  2. Liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter with density-dependent relativistic mean-field models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang-Hua Zhang; Wei-Zhou Jiang

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is studied within density-dependent relativistic mean-field models where the density dependence is introduced according to the Brown-Rho scaling and constrained by available data at low densities and empirical properties of nuclear matter. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is obtained to be 15.7 MeV in symmetric nuclear matter falling on the lower edge of the small experimental error bars. In hot asymmetric matter, the boundary of the phase-coexistence region is found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The critical pressure and the area of phase-coexistence region increases clearly with the softening of the symmetry energy. The critical temperature of hot asymmetric matter separating the gas phase from the LG coexistence phase is found to be higher for the softer symmetry energy.

  3. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNG StorageConsumptionPlant Liquids, Expected

  4. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNGCoalbed Methane ProvedNetGas,Liquids

  5. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+Liquids LeaseAnnual",2014

  6. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,DryPlant Liquids, Expected Future

  7. Liquid fuels production from biomass. Final report, for period ending June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, P. F.; Sanderson, J. E.; Ashare, E.; Wise, D. L.; Molyneaux, M. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current program to convert biomass into liquid hydrocarbon fuels is an extension of a previous program to ferment marine algae to acetic acid. In that study it was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation broth by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids via Kolbe electrolysis to aliphatic hydrocarbons, which may be used as a diesel fuel. The specific goals for the current program are: (1) establish conditions under which substrates other than marine algae may be converted in good yield to organic acids, here the primary task is methane suppression; (2) modify the current 300-liter fixed packed bed batch fermenter to operate in a continuous mode; (3) change from membrane extraction of organic acids to liquid-liquid extraction; (4) optimize the energy balance of the electrolytic oxidation process, the primary task is to reduce the working potential required for the electrolysis while maintaining an adequate current density; (5) scale the entire process up to match the output of the 300 liter fermenter; and (6) design pilot plant and commercial size plant (1000 tons/day) processes for converting biomass to liquid hydrocarbon fuels and perform an economic analysis for the 1000 ton/day design.

  8. Electron-Positron Pair Production in Space- or Time-Dependent Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagen Kleinert; Remo Ruffini; She-Sheng Xue

    2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Treating the production of electron and positron pairs by a strong electric field from the vacuum as a quantum tunneling process we derive, in semiclassical approximation, a general expression for the pair production rate in a $z$-dependent electric field $E(z)$ pointing in the $z$-direction. We also allow for a smoothly varying magnetic field parallel to $E(z)$. The result is applied to a confined field $E(z)\

  9. Numerical study of liquid metal film flows in a varying spanwise magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    coordinate may lead to large difference of flow behavior, and an increase in back wall electrical conductance design concept being proposed by Nelson[2] in the APEX project is to use large drain duct that does dual services as a liquid drain and particle pumping port. The flow must go through a very strong toroidal

  10. Uranium hexafluoride liquid thermal expansion, elusive eutectic with hydrogen fluoride, and very first production using chlorine trifluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutledge, G.P. [Central Environmental, Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three unusual incidents and case histories involving uranium hexafluoride in the enrichment facilities of the USA in the late 1940`s and early 1950`s are presented. The history of the measurements of the thermal expansion of liquids containing fluorine atoms within the molecule is reviewed with special emphasis upon uranium hexafluoride. A comparison is made between fluorinated esters, fluorocarbons, and uranium hexafluoride. The quantitative relationship between the thermal expansion coefficient, a, of liquids and the critical temperature, T{sub c} is presented. Uranium hexafluoride has an a that is very high in a temperature range that is used by laboratory and production workers - much higher than any other liquid measured. This physical property of UF{sub 6} has resulted in accidents involving filling the UF{sub 6} containers too full and then heating with a resulting rupture of the container. Such an incident at a uranium gaseous diffusion plant is presented. Production workers seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} uranium hexafluoride. The movement of UF{sub 6} from one container to another is usually trailed by weight, not sight. Even laboratory scientists seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} solid or liquid UF{sub 6} and this can be a problem at times. This inability to {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} the UF{sub 6}-HF mixtures in the 61.2{degrees}C to 101{degrees}C temperature range caused a delay in the understanding of the phase diagram of UF{sub 6}-HF which has a liquid - liquid immiscible region that made the eutectic composition somewhat elusive. Transparent fluorothene tubes solved the problem both for the UF{sub 6}-HF phase diagram as well as the UF{sub 6}-HF-CIF{sub 3} phase diagram with a miscibility gap starting at 53{degrees}C. The historical background leading to the first use of CIF{sub 3} to produce UF{sub 6} in both the laboratory and plant at K-25 is presented.

  11. Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Fluid Hyphenated Techniques for Dissolution and Separation of Lanthanides, Actinides, and Fission Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Bruce Mincher

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating techniques involving ionic liquids (IL) and supercritical (SC) fluids for dissolution and separation of lanthanides, actinides, and fission products. The research project consists of the following tasks: Study direct dissolution of lanthanide oxides, uranium dioxide and other actinide oxides in [bmin][Tf{sub 2}N] with TBP(HNO{sub 3}){sub 1.8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.6} and similar types of Lewis acid-Lewis base complexing agents; Measure distributions of dissolved metal species between the IL and the sc-CO{sub 2} phases under various temperature and pressure conditions; Investigate the chemistry of the dissolved metal species in both IL and sc-CO{sub 2} phases using spectroscopic and chemical methods; Evaluate potential applications of the new extraction techniques for nuclear waste management and for other projects. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) and ionic liquids are considered green solvents for chemical reactions and separations. Above the critical point, CO{sub 2} has both gas- and liquid-like properties, making it capable of penetrating small pores of solids and dissolving organic compounds in the solid matrix. One application of sc-CO{sub 2} extraction technology is nuclear waste management. Ionic liquids are low-melting salts composed of an organic cation and an anion of various forms, with unique properties making them attractive replacements for the volatile organic solvents traditionally used in liquid-liquid extraction processes. One type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based on the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cation [bmin] with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion [Tf{sub 2}N] is of particular interest for extraction of metal ions due to its water stability, relative low viscosity, high conductivity, and good electrochemical and thermal stability. Recent studies indicate that a coupled IL sc-CO{sub 2} extraction system can effectively transfer trivalent lanthanide and uranyl ions from nitric acid solutions. Advantages of this technique include operation at ambient temperature and pressure, selective extraction due to tunable sc-CO{sub 2} solvation strength, no IL loss during back-extraction, and no organic solvent introduced into the IL phase.

  12. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production from Biomass via Hot-Vapor-Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydroprocessing of the Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; French, Richard; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot-vapor filtered bio-oils were produced from two different biomass feedstocks, oak and switchgrass, and the oils were evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. Hot-vapor filtering reduced bio-oil yields and increased gas yields. The yields of fuel carbon as bio-oil were reduced by ten percentage points by hot-vapor filtering for both feedstocks. The unfiltered bio-oils were evaluated alongside the filtered bio-oils using a fixed bed catalytic hydrotreating test. These tests showed good processing results using a two-stage catalytic hydroprocessing strategy. Equal-sized catalyst beds, a sulfided Ru on carbon catalyst bed operated at 220°C and a sulfided CoMo on alumina catalyst bed operated at 400°C were used with the entire reactor at 100 atm operating pressure. The products from the four tests were similar. The light oil phase product was fully hydrotreated so that nitrogen and sulfur were below the level of detection, while the residual oxygen ranged from 0.3 to 2.0%. The density of the products varied from 0.80 g/ml up to 0.86 g/ml over the period of the test with a correlated change of the hydrogen to carbon atomic ratio from 1.79 down to 1.57, suggesting some loss of catalyst activity through the test. These tests provided the data needed to assess the suite of liquid fuel products from the process and the activity of the catalyst in relationship to the existing catalyst lifetime barrier for the technology.

  13. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+Liquids LeaseAnnual",2014 ,"Release

  14. Electric Field-Modulated Non-Ohmic Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Fibers in Polar Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrones, Jeronimo; Elliott, James A.; Vilatela, Juan J.; Windle, Alan H.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    as high-performance multifunctional composites,6–11 sensors and actuators,8,12–15 or energy transmission and storage.16–19 In previous work,5 we reported the effects of several penetrant liquids on the structure and electrical properties of direct... .5 Figure 1. The hierarchical structure of direct-spun carbon nanotube fibers: (a) optical microscopy image showing the macroscopic appearance fibers used in this work; (b) scanning 5 electron microscopy (SEM) image of the same fiber showing...

  15. Asymmetric neutrino production in magnetized proto-neutron stars in fully relativistic mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki [College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa 252-8510 (Japan); Kajino, Toshitaka; Hidaka, Jun; Takiwaki, Tomoya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yasutake, Nobutoshi [Department of Physics, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino 275-0023 (Japan); Kuroda, Takami [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul, 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chung-Yeol [General Education Curriculum Center, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, Grant J. [Center of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the neutrino production cross-section in the proto-neutron-star matter under a strong magnetic field in the relativistic mean-field approach. We introduce a new parameter-set which can reproduce the 1.96 solar mass neutron star. We find that the production process increases emitted neutrinos along the direction parallel to the magnetic field and decrease those along its opposite direction. It means that resultant asymmetry due to the neutrino absorption and scattering process in the magnetic field becomes larger by the addition of the neutrino production process.

  16. Engineering scale development of the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollar, W.E. Jr. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.; Mills, W.H. [BP America, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)SiC fibrils are used as reinforcement in ceramic matrix composites (CMC). A program has been completed for determining process scaleup parameters and to produce material for evaluation in a CMC. The scaleup is necessary to lower production cost and increase material availability. Scaleup parameters were evaluated in a reactor with a vertical dimension twice that of the LANL reactor. Results indicate that the scaleup will be possible. Feasibility of recycling process gas was demonstrated and the impact of postprocessing on yields determined.

  17. Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles Dudley Stark School.S.A. would occur between 1965 and 1970. Oil production in the U.S.A. actually peaked in 1970 and has been declining since then. Hubbert used a logistic curve to approximate the rate of oil production. Deffeyes [2

  18. Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular-dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular defect production efficiencies obtained by FIM are a consequence of a surface effect, which greatly enhances defect production compared to that in the crystal interior. Comparison of clustering of vacancies

  19. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel) [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel)] [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)] [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ?200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ?2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ?4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  20. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, andPrice (DollarsSummary"CoalbedLiquids

  1. ,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per+ Lease Condensate ProvedLiquids

  2. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (DollarsVolume (MMcf)"Liquids Lease

  3. ,"Louisiana--North Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas, WetGas,Plant Liquids,

  4. ,"Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas,CoalbedPlant Liquids,

  5. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated NaturalCoalbedLNGLNGCoalbedLiquidsPlant

  6. Techno-Economic Analysis of Liquid Fuel Production from Woody Biomass via Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experimental work was conducted to convert woody biomass to gasoline and diesel range products via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydroprocessing. Based on the best available test data, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) was developed for a large scale woody biomass based HTL and upgrading system to evaluate the feasibility of this technology. In this system, 2000 dry metric ton per day woody biomass was assumed to be converted to bio-oil in hot compressed water and the bio-oil was hydrotreated and/or hydrocracked to produce gasoline and diesel range liquid fuel. Two cases were evaluated: a stage-of-technology (SOT) case based on the tests results, and a goal case considering potential improvements based on the SOT case. Process simulation models were developed and cost analysis was implemented based on the performance results. The major performance results included final products and co-products yields, raw materials consumption, carbon efficiency, and energy efficiency. The overall efficiency (higher heating value basis) was 52% for the SOT case and 66% for the goal case. The production cost, with a 10% internal rate of return and 2007 constant dollars, was estimated to be $1.29 /L for the SOT case and $0.74 /L for the goal case. The cost impacts of major improvements for moving from the SOT to the goal case were evaluated and the assumption of reducing the organics loss to the water phase lead to the biggest reduction in the production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the final products yields had the largest impact on the production cost compared to other parameters. Plant size analysis demonstrated that the process was economically attractive if the woody biomass feed rate was over 1,500 dry tonne/day, the production cost was competitive with the then current petroleum-based gasoline price.

  7. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreatingmore »the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.« less

  8. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rover, Majorie [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Whitmer, Lysle [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Smith, Ryan [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  9. Particle production of vector fields: Scale invariance is attractive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagstaff, Jacques M.; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a model of an Abelian vector boson with a Maxwell kinetic term and non-negative mass-squared it is demonstrated that, under fairly general conditions during inflation, a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations for the components of a vector field, massive or not, whose kinetic function (and mass) is modulated by the inflaton field is an attractor solution. If the field is massless, or if it remains light until the end of inflation, this attractor solution also generates anisotropic stress, which can render inflation weakly anisotropic. The above two characteristics of the attractor solution can source (independently or combined together) significant statistical anisotropy in the curvature perturbation, which may well be observable in the near future.

  10. Conformal field theory approach to Fermi liquids and other highly entangled states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swingle, Brian Gordon

    The Fermi surface may be usefully viewed as a collection of (1+1)-dimensional chiral conformal field theories. This approach permits straightforward calculation of many anomalous ground-state properties of the Fermi gas, ...

  11. Syngas production from heavy liquid fuel reforming in inert porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastore, Andrea

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -up), but it will still show a significant efficiency advantage [2]. Eventually, when fuel cells and hydrogen demand will build up, a switch can be made to central hydrogen production, by using fossil sources with CO2 sequestration and finally by the use of low carbon... requirements: • Hydrogen production levels smaller than those in chemical plants; • Severe constraints on size and weight; • Ability to cycle through frequent start-ups and shutdowns; • Hydrogen production rate should be responsive to changes in demand...

  12. Fermion production by a dependent of time electric field in de Sitter universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosmin Crucean

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermion production by the electric field of a charge on de Sitter expanding universe is analyzed. The amplitude and probability of pair production are computed. We obtain from our calculations that the modulus of the momentum is no longer conserved and that there are probabilities for production processes where the helicity is no longer conserved. The rate of pair production in an electric field is found to be important in the early universe when the expansion factor was large comparatively with the particle mass.

  13. New Mexico--East Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels) Liquids Lease Condensate,

  14. New Mexico--West Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels) Liquids LeaseBarrels)

  15. ,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlantGross WithdrawalsMarketed

  16. ,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural GasU.S.Plant Liquids, Expected Future

  17. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, andPrice (Dollars perPlant Liquids, Expected Future

  18. Texas--RRC District 1 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected(Million Barrels) Liquids

  19. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellhead PricePrice (Dollars perPlant Liquids,

  20. ,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDry NaturalCrudePlant Liquids,

  1. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (DollarsVolumeCoalbed Methane ProvedPlant Liquids,

  2. Texas--RRC District 8 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,Production (Billion CubicProvedProductionProduction(Million

  3. ,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"forUsers, Total

  4. Optimal Simultaneous Production of Hydrogen and Liquid Fuels from Glycerol: Integrating the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    . Keywords: Energy, Biofuels, Hydrogen, Alternative fuels, Diesel, Fisher ­ Tropsch 1 Corresponding author of oil (vegetal, cooking oil or the one obtained from microalgae (Martín & Grossmann, 2012), glycerol, biodiesel production requires energy (Martín & Grossmann, 2012). Therefore, this is another incentive

  5. Aboveground biomass production in an irrigation and fer-tilization field experiment with Eucalyptus globulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aboveground biomass production in an irrigation and fer- tilization field experiment). To assess optimum biomass production of Eucalyp- tus globulus in Portugal and to study the physiological in March 1986 (Pereira et al., 1988). In this paper, we present the results of aboveground biomass

  6. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF POROUS MEDIA TO GAS-WETTING FOR IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY AND INJECTIVITY IN GAS-LIQUID FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wettability alteration to intermediate gas-wetting in porous media by treatment with FC-759, a fluoropolymer polymer, has been studied experimentally. Berea sandstone was used as the main rock sample in our work and its wettability before and after chemical treatment was studied at various temperatures from 25 to 93 C. We also studied recovery performance for both gas/oil and oil/water systems for Berea sandstone before and after wettability alteration by chemical treatment. Our experimental study shows that chemical treatment with FC-759 can result in: (1) wettability alteration from strong liquid-wetting to stable intermediate gas-wetting at room temperature and at elevated temperatures; (2) neutral wetting for gas, oil, and water phases in two-phase flow; (3) significant increase in oil mobility for gas/oil system; and (4) improved recovery behavior for both gas/oil and oil/water systems. This work reveals a potential for field application for improved gas-well deliverability and well injectivity by altering the rock wettability around wellbore in gas condensate reservoirs from strong liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting.

  7. On the kinetic equation approach to pair production by time-dependent electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Fedotov; E. G. Gelfer; K. Yu. Korolev; S. A. Smolyansky

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum kinetic approach to pair production from vacuum by time-dependent electric field. Equivalence between this approach and the more familiar S-matrix approach is explicitly established for both scalar and fermion cases. For the particular case of a constant electric field exact solution for kinetic equations is provided and the accuracy of low-density approximation is estimated.

  8. Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

  10. Niobium-based sputtered thin films for Corrosion Protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for [18F] production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skliarova, H; Dousset, O; Johnson, R R; Palmieri, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemically inert Coatings on Havar entrance foils of the targets for [18F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar. In order to find the most effective protective coatings, the Nb-based coating microstructure and barrier properties have been correlated with deposition parameters as: substrate temperature, applied bias, deposition rate and sputtering gas pressure. Aluminated quartz used as a substrate allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. Pure Niobium coatings have been found less effective barriers than Niobium-titanium coatings. But Niobium oxide films, according to the corrosion tests performed, showed superior barrier properties. Therefore Multi-layered Niobium-Niobium oxide films have been suggested, since they...

  11. Electron-Positron Pair Production by an Electron in a Magnetic Field Near the Process Threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. P. Novak; R. I. Kholodov; P. I. Fomin

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron-positron pair production by an electron in a strong magnetic field near the process threshold is considered. The process is shown to be more probable if the spin of the initial electron is oriented along the field. In this case, the probability of the process is $\\sim10^{13} s^{-1}$ when the magnetic field strength is $H=4\\cdot 10^{12}$ G.

  12. Analysis and optimization of gas pipeline networks and surface production facilities for the Waskom Field--Harrison County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Jason Ui-Yong

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in these simulation Surface facilities for the Waskom field include pipelines of varying, sizes, separators, compressors, valves, and production manifolds. After creating and verifying the field model, we determined that the field possesses greater compressor...

  13. Texas--RRC District 5 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation, ProvedProcessedReservesProductionProduction(Million

  14. Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,Production (Billion Cubic Feet)ProvedProduction

  15. Texas--RRC District 7C Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,Production (Billion CubicProved ReservesProduction

  16. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,ProductionMarketed Production (Million Cubic

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayBarrels) New Field

  18. FIELD-DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of aqueous spent fuel storage basins and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials were developed to assess the corrosion potential of a basin. this assessment can then be used to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to ascertain if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations and assist in evaluating general storage basin operations. The test kit was developed based on the identification of key physical, chemical and microbiological parameters identified using a review of the scientific and basin operations literature. The parameters were used to design bench scale test cells for additional corrosion analyses, and then tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters. The tools were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The sampling kit consisted of a total organic carbon analyzer, an YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

  19. Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R&D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have 5 additional invitations for invited papers at upcoming conferences, we attracted collaborators who had SBIR funding, we are collaborating with scientists at CERN and GSI Darmstadt on gas desorption physics for submission to Physical Review Letters, and another PRL on absolute measurements of electron cloud density and Phys. Rev. ST-AB on electron emission physics are also being readied for submission.

  20. Geometric Origin of Pair Production by Electric Field in de Sitter Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle production in a de Sitter space provides an interesting model to understand the curvature effect on Schwinger pair production by a constant electric field or Schwinger mechanism on the de Sitter radiation. For that purpose, we employ the recently introduced complex analysis method, in which the quantum evolution in the complex time explains the pair production via the geometric transition amplitude and gives the pair-production rate as the contour integral. We compare the result by the contour integral with that of the phase-integral method.

  1. A nuclear wind/solar oil-shale system for variable electricity and liquid fuels production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 012139 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recoverable reserves of oil shale in the United States exceed the total quantity of oil produced to date worldwide. Oil shale contains no oil, rather it contains kerogen which when heated decomposes into oil, gases, and a carbon char. The energy required to heat the kerogen-containing rock to produce the oil is about a quarter of the energy value of the recovered products. If fossil fuels are burned to supply this energy, the greenhouse gas releases are large relative to producing gasoline and diesel from crude oil. The oil shale can be heated underground with steam from nuclear reactors leaving the carbon char underground - a form of carbon sequestration. Because the thermal conductivity of the oil shale is low, the heating process takes months to years. This process characteristic in a system where the reactor dominates the capital costs creates the option to operate the nuclear reactor at base load while providing variable electricity to meet peak electricity demand and heat for the shale oil at times of low electricity demand. This, in turn, may enable the large scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for electricity production because the base-load nuclear plants can provide lower-cost variable backup electricity. Nuclear shale oil may reduce the greenhouse gas releases from using gasoline and diesel in half relative to gasoline and diesel produced from conventional oil. The variable electricity replaces electricity that would have been produced by fossil plants. The carbon credits from replacing fossil fuels for variable electricity production, if assigned to shale oil production, results in a carbon footprint from burning gasoline or diesel from shale oil that may half that of conventional crude oil. The U.S. imports about 10 million barrels of oil per day at a cost of a billion dollars per day. It would require about 200 GW of high-temperature nuclear heat to recover this quantity of shale oil - about two-thirds the thermal output of existing nuclear reactors in the United States. With the added variable electricity production to enable renewables, additional nuclear capacity would be required. (authors)

  2. Liquid phase low temperature method for production of methanol from synthesis gas and catalyst formulations therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a homogenous catalyst for the production of methanol from purified synthesis gas at low temperature and low pressure which includes a transition metal capable of forming transition metal complexes with coordinating ligands and an alkoxide, the catalyst dissolved in a methanol solvent system, provided the transition metal complex is not transition metal carbonyl. The coordinating ligands can be selected from the group consisting of N-donor ligands, P-donor ligands, O-donor ligands, C-donor ligands, halogens and mixtures thereof.

  3. ARM - Evaluation Product - MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi1-min (NAVBE1M)DopplerProductsKAZR andfor

  4. New Mexico--West Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion CubicProduction (Billion Cubic(Million(Million

  5. ARM - PI Product - MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummergovFieldgovDataPI Data ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud

  6. Texas--RRC District 5 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProduction (Million Barrels)(Million

  7. Texas--RRC District 6 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProduction (Million(Million Barrels)

  8. Texas--RRC District 8 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShale Proved Reserves

  9. Texas--RRC District 9 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShale ProvedA Shale

  10. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShale ProvedA(Million Barrels)

  11. Texas--RRC District 1 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation, ProvedProcessed (Million CubicProvedProduction(Million

  12. Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation, ProvedProcessed (MillionProduction(Million Barrels)

  13. Texas--RRC District 6 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade(Million Barrels)

  14. Texas--RRC District 8A Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,Production (BillionProved Reserves(Million Barrels)

  15. Texas--RRC District 9 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,Production (BillionProved(Million

  16. A novel approach to particle production in an uniform electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Srinivasan; T. Padmanabhan

    1999-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline a different method of describing scalar field particle production in a uniform electric field. In the standard approach, the (analytically continued) harmonic oscillator paradigm is important in describing particle production. However, there is another gauge in which the particle production process has striking similarities with the one used to describe Hawking radiation in black holes. The gauge we use to describe the electric field in is the lightcone gauge, so named because the mode functions for a scalar field are found to be singular on the lightcone. We use these modes in evaluating the effective Lagrangian using the proper time technique. The key feature of this analysis is that these modes can be explicitly "normalized" by using the criterion that they reduce to the usual flat space modes in the limit of the electric field tending to zero. We find that the proper time kernel is not the same as the analytically continued oscillator kernel though the effective Lagrangian is the standard result as it should be. We also consider an example of a confined electric field system using the lightcone gauge modes. Our analysis indicates that the Bogolubov coefficients, in taking the limit to the uniform electric field case, are multiplied by energy dependent boundary factors that have not been taken into account before.

  17. North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in North Dakota

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number ofFeet) New FieldU.S.Fuel (Million(Million

  18. Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

    2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

  19. Recent developments in the production of liquid fuels via catalytic conversion of microalgae: experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi,Fan; Wang, Pin; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize ‘‘food versus fuel’’ concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

  20. A multiscale variational approach to the kinetics of viscous classical liquids: The coarse-grained mean field approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Ortoleva, Peter J., E-mail: ortoleva@indiana.edu [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed kinetic equation for the single-particle density of a viscous simple liquid is derived using a variational method for the Liouville equation and a coarse-grained mean-field (CGMF) ansatz. The CGMF ansatz is based on the notion that during the characteristic time of deformation a given particle interacts with many others so that it experiences an average interaction. A trial function for the N-particle probability density is constructed using a multiscale perturbation method and the CGMF ansatz is applied to it. The multiscale perturbation scheme is based on the ratio of the average nearest-neighbor atom distance to the total size of the assembly. A constraint on the initial condition is discovered which guarantees that the kinetic equation is mass-conserving and closed in the single-particle density. The kinetic equation has much of the character of the Vlasov equation except that true viscous, and not Landau, damping is accounted for. The theory captures condensation kinetics and takes much of the character of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the weak-gradient short-range force limit.

  1. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  2. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  3. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  4. ,"Texas--RRC District 8 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids,Liquids

  5. ,"Texas--RRC District 8A Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids,LiquidsLiquids LeasePlant

  6. ,"Texas--RRC District 9 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids,LiquidsLiquidsPlant

  7. Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

  8. Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

  9. Mass shift effects in nonperturbative multiphoton pair production for arbitrary polarized electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. L. Li; D. Lu; B. F. Shen; L. B. Fu; J. Liu; B. S. Xie

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass shift effects in multiphoton pair production of a nonperturbative nature for arbitrary polarized electric fields are investigated numerically by employing the real-time Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism, and theoretically by proposing an effective energy concept. It is found that the theoretical results are agreement with the numerical ones very well. It is the first time to consider the roles of the momenta of created particles and the polarizations of external fields played in the mass shift effects. These results can deepen the understanding of pair production in the nonperturbative threshold regime. Moreover, the distinct mass shift effects are observable in the forthcoming experiments and can be used as a probe to distinguish the electron-positron pair production from other background events.

  10. Schwinger Mechanism for Fermion Pair Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Background Electric Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Cooper; Gouranga C. Nayak

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Schwinger mechanism for the pair production of fermions in the presence of an arbitrary time-dependent background electric field E(t) by directly evaluating the path integral. We obtain an exact non-perturbative result for the probability of fermion-antifermion pair production per unit time per unit volume per unit transverse momentum (of the fermion or antifermion) from the arbitrary time dependent electric field E(t) via Schwinger mechanism. We find that the exact non-perturbative result is independent of all the time derivatives d^nE(t)/dt^n, where n=1,2,....\\infty. This result has the same functional dependence on E as the Schwinger's constant electric field E result with the replacement: E -> E(t).

  11. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. [Quarterly] report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first step in the integrated, mufti-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal is the production of ultra low-ash coal. Subsequent steps convert low-ash coal to high-value, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

  12. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal starts with the production of ultra low-ash coal and then converts it to high-vale, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

  13. Axion production and CMB spectral distortion in cosmological tangled magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damian Ejlli

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion production due to photon-axion mixing in tangled magnetic field(s) prior to recombination epoch and magnetic field damping can generate cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. In particular, contribution of both processes to CMB $\\mu$ distortion in the case of resonant photon-axion mixing is studied. Assuming that magnetic field power spectrum is approximated by a power law $P_B(k)\\propto k^n$ with spectral index $n$, it is shown that for magnetic field cut-off scales $172.5$ pc $\\leq \\lambda_B\\leq 4\\times 10^3$ pc, axion contribution to CMB $\\mu$ distortion is subdominant in comparison with magnetic field damping in the cosmological plasma. Using COBE upper limit on $\\mu$ and for magnetic field scale $\\lambda_B\\simeq 415$ pc, weaker limit in comparison with other studies on the magnetic field strength ($B_0\\leq 8.5\\times 10^{-8}$ G) up to a factor 10 for the DFSZ axion model and axion mass $m_a\\geq 2.6\\times 10^{-6}$ eV is found. A forecast for the expected sensitivity of PIXIE/PRISM on $\\mu$ is also presented.

  14. Axion production and CMB spectral distortion in cosmological tangled magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejlli, Damian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion production due to photon-axion mixing in tangled magnetic field(s) prior to recombination epoch and magnetic field damping can generate cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. In particular, contribution of both processes to CMB $\\mu$ distortion in the case of resonant photon-axion mixing is studied. Assuming that magnetic field power spectrum is approximated by a power law $P_B(k)\\propto k^n$ with spectral index $n$, it is shown that for magnetic field cut-off scales $172.5$ pc $\\leq \\lambda_B\\leq 4\\times 10^3$ pc, axion contribution to CMB $\\mu$ distortion is subdominant in comparison with magnetic field damping in the cosmological plasma. Using COBE upper limit on $\\mu$ and for magnetic field scale $\\lambda_B\\simeq 415$ pc, weaker limit in comparison with other studies on the magnetic field strength ($B_0\\leq 8.5\\times 10^{-8}$ G) up to a factor 10 for the DFSZ axion model and axion mass $m_a\\geq 2.6\\times 10^{-6}$ eV is found. A forecast for the expected sensitivity of PIXIE/PRISM on...

  15. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime, the operator product expansion, and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hollands; R. M. Wald

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To make sense of quantum field theory in an arbitrary (globally hyperbolic) curved spacetime, the theory must be formulated in a local and covariant manner in terms of locally measureable field observables. Since a generic curved spacetime does not possess symmetries or a unique notion of a vacuum state, the theory also must be formulated in a manner that does not require symmetries or a preferred notion of a ``vacuum state'' and ``particles''. We propose such a formulation of quantum field theory, wherein the operator product expansion (OPE) of the quantum fields is elevated to a fundamental status, and the quantum field theory is viewed as being defined by its OPE. Since the OPE coefficients may be better behaved than any quantities having to do with states, we suggest that it may be possible to perturbatively construct the OPE coefficients--and, thus, the quantum field theory. By contrast, ground/vacuum states--in spacetimes, such as Minkowski spacetime, where they may be defined--cannot vary analytically with the parameters of the theory. We argue that this implies that composite fields may acquire nonvanishing vacuum state expectation values due to nonperturbative effects. We speculate that this could account for the existence of a nonvanishing vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of a quantum field occurring at a scale much smaller than the natural scales of the theory.

  16. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between...

  17. Vacuum pair production of charged scalar bosons in time-dependent electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-Liang Li; Ding Lu; Bai-Song Xie

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the quantum mechanical scattering model, the dynamical assist effect and the multiple-slit interference effect in electron-positron pair production from vacuum are generalized to vacuum pair production of charged scalar bosons. For the former effect some combinations of a strong but slowly varying electric field and a weak but rapidly varying one with different time delay are studied. Results indicate that the oscillation intensity of momentum spectrum and the number density of created bosons reduce with increasing of the time delay. Obviously, they achieve the maximum if the time delay equals zero. For the latter effect, it is shown that this effect does not exist for equal-sign $N$-pulse electric field in contrast to its existence for alternating-sign $N$-pulse. An approximate solution of boson momentum spectrum is got and it is agreeable well with the exact numerical one in alternating-sign $N$-pulse electric field, especially for $2$-pulse field and for small longitudinal momentum. The difference of vacuum pair production between bosons and fermions are also compared for their longitudinal momentum spectra.

  18. MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

  19. Uniqueness of Herndon's Georeactor: Energy Source and Production Mechanism for Earth's Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herndon's georeactor at the center of Earth is immune to meltdown, which is not the case for recently published copy-cat georeactors, which would necessarily be subject to hot nuclear fuel, prevailing high temperature environments, and high confining pressures. Herndon's georeactor uniquely is expected to be self-regulating through establishing a balance between heat production and actinide settling out. The seven decade old idea of convection in the Earth's fluid core is refuted because thermal expansion cannot overcome the 23 percent higher density at the core's bottom than at its top. Some implications of geomagnetic field production within Herndon's georeactor are briefly described.

  20. ,"Texas--RRC District 6 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids, ExpectedLiquids LeasePlant

  1. ,"Texas--RRC District 7C Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids,Liquids Lease

  2. On P_T-distribution of gluon production rate in constant chromoelectric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. G. Pak

    2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete expression for the p_T-distribution of the gluon production rate in the homogeneous chromoelectric field has been obtained. Our result contains a new additional term proportional to the singular function \\delta(p_T^2). We demonstrate that the presence of this term is consistent with the dual symmetry of QCD effective action and allows to reproduce the known result for the total imaginary part of the effective action after integration over transverse momentum.

  3. ,"Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids,

  4. Electrically Deformable Liquid Marbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Bormashenko; Roman Pogreb; Tamir Stein; Gene Whyman; Marcelo Schiffer; Doron Aurbach

    2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid marbles, which are droplets coated with a hydrophobic powder, were exposed to a uniform electric field. It was established that a threshold value of the electric field, 15 cgse, should be surmounted for deformation of liquid marbles. The shape of the marbles was described as a prolate spheroid. The semi-quantitative theory describing deformation of liquid marbles in a uniform electric field is presented. The scaling law relating the radius of the contact area of the marble to the applied electric field shows a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Matrix product states and variational methods applied to critical quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley Milsted; Jutho Haegeman; Tobias J. Osborne

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the second-order quantum phase-transition of massive real scalar field theory with a quartic interaction ($\\phi^4$ theory) in (1+1) dimensions on an infinite spatial lattice using matrix product states (MPS). We introduce and apply a naive variational conjugate gradient method, based on the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP) for imaginary time, to obtain approximate ground states, using a related ansatz for excitations to calculate the particle and soliton masses and to obtain the spectral density. We also estimate the central charge using finite-entanglement scaling. Our value for the critical parameter agrees well with recent Monte Carlo results, improving on an earlier study which used the related DMRG method, verifying that these techniques are well-suited to studying critical field systems. We also obtain critical exponents that agree, as expected, with those of the transverse Ising model. Additionally, we treat the special case of uniform product states (mean field theory) separately, showing that they may be used to investigate non-critical quantum field theories under certain conditions.

  6. Quantitative photoacoustic depth profilometry of magnetic field-induced thermal diffusivity inhomogeneity in the liquid crystal octylcyanobiphenyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    be present in these liquid crys- tals and the variation in the nematic value of the heat capacity may of the static Quantities enthalpy and heat capacity have been carried out by adiabatic scanning calorimetry-*0 namely the thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity, especially across the region

  7. Fusion in conformal field theory as the tensor product of the symmetry algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gaberdiel

    1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a recent proposal of Richard Borcherds to regard fusion as the ring-like tensor product of modules of a {\\em quantum ring}, a generalization of rings and vertex operators, we define fusion as a certain quotient of the (vector space) tensor product of representations of the symmetry algebra ${\\cal A}$. We prove that this tensor product is associative and symmetric up to equivalence. We also determine explicitly the action of ${\\cal A}$ on it, under which the central extension is preserved. \\\\ Having given a precise meaning to fusion, determining the fusion rules is now a well-posed algebraic problem, namely to decompose the tensor product into irreducible representations. We demonstrate how to solve it for the case of the WZW- and the minimal models and recover thereby the well-known fusion rules. \\\\ The action of the symmetry algebra on the tensor product is given in terms of a comultiplication. We calculate the $R$-matrix of this comultiplication and find that it is triangular. This seems to shed some new light on the possible r\\^{o}le of the quantum group in conformal field theory.

  8. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

  9. Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

  10. Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO[sub 2] flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

  11. ,"Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDryCoalbedCoalbedLiquids

  12. ,"Texas--RRC District 5 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids, Expected FuturePlant

  13. ,"New Mexico--East Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,DryPlant Liquids,VolumeGas,CrudePlant

  14. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  15. Neutron production using a pyroelectric driven target coupled with a gated field ionization source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellsworth, J. L.; Tang, V.; Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Naranjo, B.; Putterman, S. [University of California Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A palm sized, portable neutron source would be useful for widespread implementation of detection systems for shielded, special nuclear material. We present progress towards the development of the components for an ultracompact neutron generator using a pulsed, meso-scale field ionization source, a deuterated (or tritiated) titanium target driven by a negative high voltage lithium tantalate crystal. Neutron production from integrated tests using an ion source with a single, biased tungsten tip and a 3 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm, vacuum insulated crystal with a plastic deuterated target are presented. Component testing of the ion source with a single tip produces up to 3 nA of current. Dielectric insulation of the lithium tantalate crystals appears to reduce flashover, which should improve the robustness. The field emission losses from a 3 cm diameter crystal with a plastic target and 6 cm diameter crystal with a metal target are compared.

  16. Massless scalar free Field in 1+1 dimensions I: Weyl algebras Products and Superselection Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Ciolli

    2009-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first of two papers on the superselection sectors of the conformal model in the title, in a time zero formulation. A classification of the sectors of the net of observables as restrictions of solitonic (twisted) and non-solitonic (untwisted) sector automorphisms of proper extensions of the observable net is given. All of them are implemented by the elements of a field net in a non-regular vacuum representation and the existence of a global compact Abelian gauge group is proved. A non-trivial center in the fixed-point net of this gauge group appears, but in an unphysical representation and reducing to the identity in the physical one. The completeness of the described superselection structure, to which the second paper is devoted, is shown in terms of Roberts' net cohomology. Some general features of physical field models defined by twisted cross products of Weyl algebras in non-regular representations are also presented.

  17. Twisted noncommutative field theory with the Wick-Voros and Moyal products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galluccio, Salvatore; Lizzi, Fedele; Vitale, Patrizia [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Sezione di Napoli Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comparison of the noncommutative field theories built using two different star products: Moyal and Wick-Voros (or normally ordered). For the latter we discuss both the classical and the quantum field theory in the quartic potential case and calculate the Green's functions up to one loop, for the two- and four-point cases. We compare the two theories in the context of the noncommutative geometry determined by a Drinfeld twist, and the comparison is made at the level of Green's functions and S matrix. We find that while the Green's functions are different for the two theories, the S matrix is the same in both cases and is different from the commutative case.

  18. Fermion Pair Production From an Electric Field Varying in Two Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Seger; A. B. Balantekin

    1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hamiltonian describing fermion pair production from an arbitrarily time-varying electric field in two dimensions is studied using a group-theoretic approach. We show that this Hamiltonian can be encompassed by two, commuting SU(2) algebras, and that the two-dimensional problem can therefore be reduced to two one-dimensional problems. We compare the group structure for the two-dimensional problem with that previously derived for the one-dimensional problem, and verify that the Schwinger result is obtained under the appropriate conditions.

  19. Study of fully developed, liquid-metal, open-channel flow in a nearly coplanar magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, N.B.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully developed, gravity-driven flow in an open channel of arbitrary electrical conductance and orientation to an applied magnetic field is investigated. The formulation of the model equations and the numerical solution methodology are described in detail. Numerical solutions of the model equations for the flow velocity profile, induced magnetic field profile, and the uniform film height as a function of Hartmann number, field angle, flow rate, and channel conductivity are presented and discussed. The parameter ranges explored are those most representative of tokamak divertor surface protection schemes, where the field is predominantly coplanar in orientation. The formation of jets in velocity and the occurrence of abrupt jumps in uniform film height are seen as the wall conductance increases. Regimes where the flow is dominated by the smaller transverse field component instead of the larger coplanar field are also observed. Simple analytic relations predicting the film height are given for the different flow regimes. 13 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  20. ,"Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold to ElectricLNGLiquids Lease

  1. ,"Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit:1996..........Region Natural GasPlant Liquids, Expected

  2. ,"Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit:1996..........RegionTotalPriceShare ofPlant Liquids,

  3. ,"Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas,CoalbedPlantLiquids

  4. ,"New Mexico--West Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,DryPlantCoalbed Methane

  5. BIOENERGY PROGRAM Agronomics is the science of soil management and the production of field crops. Key ele-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Processing To meet United States Department of Energy projections, 110, 000 truckloads per day of feedstocksAgronomics BIOENERGY PROGRAM Agronomics is the science of soil management and the production of field crops. Key ele- ments of a production and delivery system include high-tonnage feedstocks, proven

  6. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

  7. ,"Texas--RRC District 1 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDryCoalbed Methane

  8. ,"Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDryCoalbed

  9. ,"Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDryCoalbedCoalbed MethanePlant

  10. ,"Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per ThousandLiquids Lease Condensate,Plant

  11. ,"Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per ThousandLiquids LeaseNaturalPlant

  12. Uniqueness of Herndon's Georeactor: Energy Source and Production Mechanism for Earth's Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Herndon's georeactor at the center of Earth is immune to meltdown, which is not the case for recently published copy-cat georeactors, which would necessarily be subject to hot nuclear fuel, prevailing high temperature environments, and high confining pressures. Herndon's georeactor uniquely is expected to be self-regulating through establishing a balance between heat production and actinide settling out. The seventy year old idea of convection in the Earth's fluid core is refuted because thermal expansion cannot overcome the 23 percent higher density at the core's bottom than at its top. The dimensionless Rayleigh Number is an inappropriate indicator of convection in the Earth's core and mantle as a consequence of the assumptions under which it was derived. Implications bearing on the origin of the geomagnetic field, the physical impossibility of mantle convection, and the concomitant refutation of plate tectonics theory are briefly described.

  13. Magnetic field induced phase transition in multiferroic BiFe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3} ceramics prepared by rapid liquid phase sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, K. L. [Smart Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Single phase BiFe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3} (BFTO) ceramics with varying x up to 0.35 were prepared by a rapid liquid phase sintering method to study the influence of Ti doping on their crystal structure, morphology, and magnetic behavior. Rhombohedral to orthorhombic phase was observed above x{>=}0.33. The BFTO ceramics were highly resistive and with uniform morphology. Magnetic measurements revealed an increase in magnetization with the increase in Ti content and was maximum for x=0.2 ceramic. Surprisingly, a magnetic field induced phase transition from weak ferromagnetic to diamagnetic above 50 kOe was observed for x=0.30 and 0.315 ceramics.

  14. Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nathan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensate blockage negatively impacts large natural gas condensate reservoirs all over the world; examples include Arun Field in Indonesia, Karachaganak Field in Kazakhstan, Cupiagua Field in Colombia,Shtokmanovskoye Field in Russian Barents Sea...

  15. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+Liquids Lease

  16. Rapid field testing of low-emittance coated glazings for product verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Brent; Kohler, Christian; Goudey, Howdy; Turler, Daniel; Arasteh, Dariush

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes prospects for developing a test device suitable for field verification of the types of low-emittance (low-e) coatings present on high-performance window products. Test devices are currently available that can simply detect the presence of low-e coatings and that can measure other important characteristics of high-performance windows, such as the thickness of glazing layers or the gap in dual glazings. However, no devices have yet been developed that can measure gas concentrations or distinguish among types of coatings. This paper presents two optical methods for verification of low-e coatings. The first method uses a portable, fiber-optic spectrometer to characterize spectral reflectances from 650 to 1,100 nm for selected surfaces within an insulated glazing unit (IGU). The second method uses an infrared-light-emitting diode and a phototransistor to evaluate the aggregate normal reflectance of an IGU at 940 nm. Both methods measure reflectance in the near (solar) infrared spectrum and are useful for distinguishing between regular and spectrally selective low-e coatings. The infrared-diode/phototransistor method appears promising for use in a low-cost, hand-held field test device.

  17. Help cut pollution with vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woinsky, S.G.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators are common in chemical process industries plants. In addition to separating phases, these devices can aid in reducing pollution in the plant. Two-phase separators achieve pollution prevention via recycling of intermediates and final products. It is doubtful that most vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators are used specifically for pollution prevention projects. They may have another purpose yet provide pollution prevention as a bonus. The first step in achieving pollution prevention by design is for operating companies to be aware of vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators as potential pollution prevention devices. Then, likely applications need to be investigated. Since the quantities of material recovered are relatively small, higher value products are the most likely targets, especially for liquid/liquid separators. However, for vapor/liquid separators, the costs involved are usually relatively low since only the cost of a separator pad is normally involved, and more moderately valued products can be targets.

  18. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Paul, M., E-mail: paul@vms.huji.ac.il; Tessler, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (?2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ?27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  19. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  20. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburt, Corinne

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

  1. Agenda for the Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review Agenda for the Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed...

  2. Towards In situ extraction of fine chemicals and biorenewable fuels from fermentation broths using Ionic liquids and the Intensification of contacting by the application of Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangu, Satya Aravind

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    and design new ionic liquids for task specific needs. Solvent selection for in situ fermentation is depended on high solute partitioning and their biocompatibility with the microorganisms. Such information for these new set of solvents, ionic liquids...

  3. Soft-Gluon Production Due to a Gluon Loop in a Constant Chromo-Electric Background Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C. Nayak; Peter van Nieuwenhuizen

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain an exact result for the soft gluon production and its p_T distribution due to a gluon loop in a constant chromo-electric background field E^a with arbitrary color. Unlike Schwinger's result for e^+e^- pair production in QED which depends only on one gauge invariant quantity, the Electric field E, we find that the p_T distribution of the gluons depend on two gauge invariant quantities, E^aE^a and [d_{abc}E^aE^bE^c]^2.

  4. Non-Perturbative Quark-Antiquark Production From a Constant Chromo-Electric Field via the Schwinger Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C. Nayak

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain an exact result for the non-perturbative quark (antiquark) production rate and its p_T distribution from a constant SU(3) chromo-electric field E^a with arbitary color index $a$ by directly evaluating the path integral. Unlike the WKB tunneling result, which depends only on one gauge invariant quantity |E|, the strength of the chromo-electric field, we find that the exact result for the p_T distribution for quark (antiquark) production rate depends on two independent Casimir (gauge) invariants, E^aE^a and [d_{abc}E^aE^bE^c]^2.

  5. The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco, Ersan Demiralp, Tahir Cagin, and William A. Goddard, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çagin, Tahir

    The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco inhibitor oil production chemical. 1. Introduction Molecular modeling studies of clay and related zeolite of water, hydrocarbons, and polar organic compounds such as oil field production chemicals on clay mineral

  6. Production Analysis of a Niobrara Field Using Intelligent Top-Down S. Alireza Haghighat, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Vida Gholami, David Moreno, West Virginia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 169573 Production Analysis of a Niobrara Field Using Intelligent Top-Down Modeling S. Alireza data, well logs, cores, well tests, production history, etc.) to build comprehensive full field, producing from Niobrara. The TDM was built using data from more than 145 wells. Well logs, production

  7. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  8. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  9. Measurements of the ion fraction and mobility of alpha and beta decay products in liquid xenon using EXO-200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, J B; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Belov, V; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Davis, C G; Davis, J; Delaquis, S; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Jiang, X S; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; Ling, J; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Nelson, R; O'Sullivan, K; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Robinson, A; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Wright, J D; Wood, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha decays in the EXO-200 detector are used to measure the fraction of charged $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ and $^{214}\\mathrm{Bi}$ daughters created from alpha and beta decays, respectively. $^{222}\\mathrm{Rn}$ alpha decays in liquid xenon (LXe) are found to produce $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}^{+}$ ions $50.3 \\pm 3.0\\%$ of the time, while the remainder of the $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ atoms are neutral. The fraction of $^{214}\\mathrm{Bi}^{+}$ from $^{214}\\mathrm{Pb}$ beta decays in LXe is found to be $76.4 \\pm 5.7\\%$, inferred from the relative rates of $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ and $^{214}\\mathrm{Po}$ alpha decays in the LXe. The average velocity of $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ ions is observed to decrease for longer drift times. Initially the ions have a mobility of $0.390 \\pm 0.006~\\mathrm{cm}^2/(\\mathrm{kV}~\\mathrm{s})$, and at long drift times the mobility is $0.219 \\pm 0.004~\\mathrm{cm}^2/(\\mathrm{kV}~\\mathrm{s})$. Time constants associated with the change in mobility during drift of the $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}^{+}$ ions are found to be propor...

  10. Measurements of the ion fraction and mobility of alpha and beta decay products in liquid xenon using EXO-200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Albert; D. J. Auty; P. S. Barbeau; D. Beck; V. Belov; M. Breidenbach; T. Brunner; A. Burenkov; G. F. Cao; C. Chambers; B. Cleveland; M. Coon; A. Craycraft; T. Daniels; M. Danilov; S. J. Daugherty; C. G. Davis; J. Davis; S. Delaquis; A. Der Mesrobian-Kabakian; R. DeVoe; T. Didberidze; A. Dolgolenko; M. J. Dolinski; M. Dunford; W. Fairbank Jr.; J. Farine; W. Feldmeier; P. Fierlinger; D. Fudenberg; R. Gornea; K. Graham; G. Gratta; C. Hall; M. Hughes; M. J. Jewell; X. S. Jiang; A. Johnson; T. N. Johnson; S. Johnston; A. Karelin; L. J. Kaufman; R. Killick; T. Koffas; S. Kravitz; A. Kuchenkov; K. S. Kumar; D. S. Leonard; C. Licciardi; Y. H. Lin; J. Ling; R. MacLellan; M. G. Marino; B. Mong; D. Moore; R. Nelson; K. O'Sullivan; A. Odian; I. Ostrovskiy; A. Piepke; A. Pocar; C. Y. Prescott; A. Robinson; P. C. Rowson; J. J. Russell; A. Schubert; D. Sinclair; E. Smith; V. Stekhanov; M. Tarka; T. Tolba; R. Tsang; K. Twelker; J. -L. Vuilleumier; A. Waite; J. Walton; T. Walton; M. Weber; L. J. Wen; U. Wichoski; J. D. Wright; J. Wood; L. Yang; Y. -R. Yen; O. Ya. Zeldovich

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha decays in the EXO-200 detector are used to measure the fraction of charged $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ and $^{214}\\mathrm{Bi}$ daughters created from alpha and beta decays, respectively. $^{222}\\mathrm{Rn}$ alpha decays in liquid xenon (LXe) are found to produce $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}^{+}$ ions $50.3 \\pm 3.0\\%$ of the time, while the remainder of the $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ atoms are neutral. The fraction of $^{214}\\mathrm{Bi}^{+}$ from $^{214}\\mathrm{Pb}$ beta decays in LXe is found to be $76.4 \\pm 5.7\\%$, inferred from the relative rates of $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ and $^{214}\\mathrm{Po}$ alpha decays in the LXe. The average velocity of $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ ions is observed to decrease for longer drift times. Initially the ions have a mobility of $0.390 \\pm 0.006~\\mathrm{cm}^2/(\\mathrm{kV}~\\mathrm{s})$, and at long drift times the mobility is $0.219 \\pm 0.004~\\mathrm{cm}^2/(\\mathrm{kV}~\\mathrm{s})$. Time constants associated with the change in mobility during drift of the $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}^{+}$ ions are found to be proportional to the electron lifetime in the LXe.

  11. Effective field theory analysis of double Higgs production via gluon fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Panico, Giuliano; Son, Minho

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a detailed study of double Higgs production via gluon fusion in the Effective Field Theory (EFT) framework where effects from new physics are parametrized by local operators. Our analysis provides a perspective broader than the one followed in most of the previous analyses, where this process was merely considered as a way to extract the Higgs trilinear coupling. We focus on the $hh \\to b\\bar b\\gamma\\gamma$ channel and perform a thorough simulation of signal and background at the 14 TeV LHC and a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider. We make use of invariant mass distributions to enhance the sensitivity on the EFT coefficients and give a first assessment of the impact of jet substructure techniques on the results. The range of validity of the EFT description is estimated, as required to consistently exploit the high-energy range of distributions, pointing out the potential relevance of dimension-8 operators. Our analysis contains a few important improvements over previous studies and identifies so...

  12. Photon production from the scattering of axions out of a solenoidal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Shilon, Idan [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Cantatore, Giovanni [Universitŕ and INFN Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Zioutas, Konstantin, E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: silon@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: cantatore@trieste.infn.it, E-mail: Konstantin.Zioutas@cern.ch [Physics Department, University of Patras, Rio, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the total cross section for the production of photons from the scattering of axions by a strong inhomogeneous magnetic field in the form of a 2D ?-function, a cylindrical step function and a 2D Gaussian distribution, which can be approximately produced by a solenoidal current. The theoretical result is used to estimate the axion-photon conversion probability which could be expected in a reasonable experimental situation. Comparison between the 2D conversion probabilities for QCD inspired axions and those derived by applying the celebrated 1D calculation of the (inverse) coherent Primakoff effect is made using an averaging prescription procedure of the 1D case. We also consider scattering at a resonance E{sub axion} ? m{sub axion}, which corresponds to the scattering from a ?-function and gives the most enhanced results. Finally, we analyze the results of this work in the astrophysical extension to suggest a way in which they may be directed to a solution to some basic solar physics problems and, in particular, the coronal heating problem.

  13. Quenched crystal-field disorder and magnetic liquid ground states in Tb?Sn2-xTixO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaulin, B. D.; Kermarrec, E.; Dahlberg, M. L.; Matthews, M. J.; Bert, F.; Zhang, J.; Mendels, P.; Fritsch, K.; Granroth, G. E.; Jiramongkolchai, P.; et al

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid solutions of the “soft” quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnets Tb?B?O? with B = Ti and Sn display a novel magnetic ground state in the presence of strong B-site disorder, characterized by a low susceptibility and strong spin fluctuations to temperatures below 0.1 K. These materials have been studied using ac susceptibility and ?SR techniques to very low temperatures, and time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering techniques to 1.5 K. Remarkably, neutron spectroscopy of the Tbł? crystal-field levels appropriate to high B-site mixing (0.5 2-xTixO?) reveal that the doublet ground and first excited states present as continuamore »in energy, while transitions to singlet excited states at higher energies simply interpolate between those of the end members of the solid solution. The resulting ground state suggests an extreme version of a random-anisotropy magnet, with many local moments and anisotropies, depending on the precise local configuration of the six B sites neighboring each magnetic Tbł? ion.« less

  14. Quenched crystal-field disorder and magnetic liquid ground states in Tb?Sn2-xTixO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaulin, B. D.; Kermarrec, E.; Dahlberg, M. L.; Matthews, M. J.; Bert, F.; Zhang, J.; Mendels, P.; Fritsch, K.; Granroth, G. E.; Jiramongkolchai, P.; Amato, A.; Baines, C.; Cava, R. J.; Schiffer, P.

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid solutions of the “soft” quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnets Tb?B?O? with B = Ti and Sn display a novel magnetic ground state in the presence of strong B-site disorder, characterized by a low susceptibility and strong spin fluctuations to temperatures below 0.1 K. These materials have been studied using ac susceptibility and ?SR techniques to very low temperatures, and time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering techniques to 1.5 K. Remarkably, neutron spectroscopy of the Tbł? crystal-field levels appropriate to high B-site mixing (0.5 2-xTixO?) reveal that the doublet ground and first excited states present as continua in energy, while transitions to singlet excited states at higher energies simply interpolate between those of the end members of the solid solution. The resulting ground state suggests an extreme version of a random-anisotropy magnet, with many local moments and anisotropies, depending on the precise local configuration of the six B sites neighboring each magnetic Tbł? ion.

  15. Effects of NaCl, sucrose, and storage on rheological parameters of heat induced gels of liquid egg products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brough, Joan

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 27 H t~tt t The samples were heated either for 2, 5, 10, 15, or 30 minutes in an 80 C water bath and then immediately tested on an Instron Universal Testing Machine (model 1122). Rheological Measurements M~th ohio The heat treated samples were... products heated at 80 C for 2 to 30 minutes. Addition of sucrose had a protective effect on albumen and yolk against the deleterious effects of frozen storage and on blended whole egg samples against the deleterious effects of refrigeration. Addition...

  16. Engineering scale development of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohnsorg, R.W.; Hollar, W.E. Jr.; Lau, S.K. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.; Ko, F.K.; Schatz, K. [Advanced Product Development, Bristol, PA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As reinforcements for composites, VLS SiC fibrils have attractive mechanical properties including high-strength, high modulus, and excellent creep resistance. To make use of their excellent mechanical properties in a composite, a significant volume fraction (>10%) of aligned, long fibrils (>2 mm) needs to be consolidated in the ceramic matrix. The fibrils must be processed into an assembly that will allow for composite fabrication while maintaining fibril alignment and length. With Advanced Product Development (APD) as the yam fabrication subcontractor, Carborundum investigated several approaches to achieve this goaL including traditional yam-forming processes such as carding and air-vortex spinning and nontraditional processes such as tape forming and wet casting. Carborundum additionally performed an economic analysis for producing 500 and 10,000 pounds of SiC fibrils annually using both conservative and more aggressive processing parameters. With the aggressive approach, the projected costs for SiC fibril production for 500 and 10,000 pounds per year are $1,340/pound and $340/pound, respectively.

  17. Turning Bacteria into Biofuel: Development of an Integrated Microbial Electrocatalytic (MEC) System for Liquid Biofuel Production from CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: LBNL is improving the natural ability of a common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to use hydrogen and carbon dioxide for biofuel production. First, LBNL is genetically modifying the bacteria to produce biofuel at higher concentrations. Then, LBNL is using renewable electricity obtained from solar, wind, or wave power to produce high amounts of hydrogen in the presence of the bacteria—increasing the organism’s access to its energy source and improving the efficiency of the biofuel-creation process. Finally, LBNL is tethering electrocatalysts to the bacteria’s surface which will further accelerate the rate at which the organism creates biofuel. LBNL is also developing a chemical method to transform the biofuel that the bacteria produce into ready-to-use jet fuel.

  18. Schwinger Mechanism for Gluon Pair Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Chromo-Electric Field in Arbitrary Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C Nayak

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study non-perturbative gluon pair production from arbitrary time dependent chromo-electric field E^a(t) with arbitrary color index a =1,2,...8 via Schwinger mechanism in arbitrary covariant background gauge \\alpha. We show that the probability of non-perturbative gluon pair production per unit time per unit volume per unit transverse momentum \\frac{dW}{d^4xd^2p_T} is independent of gauge fixing parameter \\alpha. Hence the result obtained in the Fynman-'t Hooft gauge, \\alpha=1, is the correct gauge invariant and gauge parameter \\alpha independent result.

  19. A STUDY OF LIQUID METAL FILM FLOW, UNDER FUSION RELEVANT MAGNETIC FIELDS M. Narula, A. Ying and M.A. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    of some liquid metals, like lithium to pump hydrogen and getter impurities and hence act as an active on the plasma facing components and alleviate the very serious problem of melting and erosion, inevitably.5%) and is preferred over lithium because of safety issues and ease of handling and operation. The liquid metal

  20. Neutrino absorption by W production in the presence of a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaushik Bhattacharya; Sarira Sahu

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we calculate the decay rate of the electron type neutrinos into $W$ bosons and electrons in presence of an external uniform magnetic field. The decay rate is calculated from the imaginary part of the $W$ exchange neutrino self-energy diagram but in the weak field limit and compare our result with the existing one.

  1. Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

  2. Application of molecular simulations: Insight into liquid bridging and jetting phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Nezbeda; J. Jirsák; F. Mou?ka; W. R. Smith

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on pure liquid water, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, and polymer solutions exposed to a strong external electric field with the goal to gain molecular insight into the structural response to the field. Several simulation methodologies have been used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the processes leading to the formation of liquid bridges and jets (in the production of nanofibers). It is shown that in the established nanoscale structures, the molecules form a chain with their dipole moments oriented parallel to the applied field throughout the entire sample volume. The presence of ions may disturb this structure leading to its ultimate disintegration into droplets; the concentration dependence of the threshold field required to stabilize a liquid column has been determined. Conformational changes of the polymer in the jetting process have also been observed.

  3. The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    1 The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers-school (FFS) program on farmers' knowledge of integrated pest management (IPM) practices related to potato practices has the potential to significantly improve productivity in potato production. U.S. General

  4. Spin polarized electron-positron pair production via elliptical polarized laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wöllert, Anton; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study nonperturbative multiphoton electron-positron pair creation in ultra-strong electromagnetic fields formed by two counterpropagating pulses with elliptic polarization. Our numerical approach allows us to take into account the temporal as well as the spatial variation of the standing electromagnetic field. The spin and momentum resolved pair creation probabilities feature characteristic Rabi oscillations and resonance spectra. Therefore, each laser frequency features a specific momentum distribution of the created particles. We find that depending on the relative polarization of both pulses the created electrons may be spin polarized along the direction of field propagation.

  5. Spin polarized electron-positron pair production via elliptical polarized laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Wöllert; Heiko Bauke; Christoph H. Keitel

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study nonperturbative multiphoton electron-positron pair creation in ultra-strong electromagnetic fields formed by two counterpropagating pulses with elliptic polarization. Our numerical approach allows us to take into account the temporal as well as the spatial variation of the standing electromagnetic field. The spin and momentum resolved pair creation probabilities feature characteristic Rabi oscillations and resonance spectra. Therefore, each laser frequency features a specific momentum distribution of the created particles. We find that depending on the relative polarization of both pulses the created electrons may be spin polarized along the direction of field propagation.

  6. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  7. Natural Gas Liquids Estimated Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,960 3,958,315storage

  8. On the Vlasov equation for Schwinger pair production in a time-dependent electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolfo Huet; Sang Pyo Kim; Christian Schubert

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Schwinger pair creation in a purely time-dependent electric field can be described through a quantum Vlasov equation describing the time evolution of the single-particle momentum distribution function. This equation exists in two versions, both of which can be derived by a Bogoliubov transformation, but whose equivalence is not obvious. For the spinless case, we show here that the difference between these two evolution equations corresponds to the one between the "in-out" and "in-in" formalisms. We give a simple relation between the asymptotic distribution functions generated by the two Vlasov equations. As examples we discuss the Sauter and single-soliton field cases.

  9. Properties of Field Manufactured Cast-Concrete Products Utilizing Recycled Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in appropriate concrete mixtures, thus reducing the need to landfill or otherwise dispose it. Fly ash from coal, coal-combustion bottom ash, and used foundry sand. A total of 18 mixture proportions with and without for these products or even improving these properties. Although coal- combustion fly ash, bottom ash, and used

  10. Apparatus and method for ultrasonic treatment of a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus for ultrasonically treating a liquid to generate a product. The apparatus is capable of treating a continuously-flowing, or intermittently-flowing, liquid along a line segment coincident with the flow path of the liquid. The apparatus has one or more ultrasonic transducers positioned asymmetrically about the line segment. The ultrasonic field encompasses the line segment and the ultrasonic energy may be concentrated along the line segment. Lysing treatments have been successfully achieved with efficiencies of greater than 99% using ultrasound at MHz frequencies without erosion or heating problems and without the need for chemical or mechanical pretreatment, or contrast agents. The present invention overcomes drawbacks of current ultrasonic treatments beyond lysing and opens up new sonochemical and sonophysical processing opportunities.

  11. Apparatus and method for ultrasonic treatment of a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Darrell P [Richland, WA; Posakony, Gerald J [Richland, WA; Bond, Leonard J [Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA

    2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for ultrasonically treating a liquid to generate a product. The apparatus is capable of treating a continuously-flowing, or intermittently-flowing, liquid along a line segment coincident with the flow path of the liquid. The apparatus has one or more ultrasonic transducers positioned asymmetrically about the line segment. The ultrasonic field encompasses the line segment and the ultrasonic energy may be concentrated along the line segment. Lysing treatments have been successfully achieved with efficiencies of greater than 99% using ultrasound at MHz frequencies without erosion or heating problems and without the need for chemical or mechanical pretreatment, or contrast agents. The present invention overcomes drawbacks of current ultrasonic treatments beyond lysing and opens up new sonochemical and sonophysical processing opportunities.

  12. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  13. Production of large volume, strongly magnetized laser-produced plasmas by use of pulsed external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albertazzi, B. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Beard, J.; Billette, J.; Portugall, O. [LNCMI, UPR 3228, CNRS-UFJ-UPS-INSA, 31400 Toulouse (France); Ciardi, A. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 8112, Paris (France); Vinci, T.; Albrecht, J.; Chen, S. N.; Da Silva, D.; Hirardin, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnagni, L.; Simond, S.; Veuillot, E.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Burris-Mog, T.; Dittrich, S.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Kroll, F.; Nitsche, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); and others

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of strongly magnetized laser plasmas, of interest for laboratory astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion studies, is presented. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system, which generates a magnetic field by means of a split coil, with the ELFIE laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique. In order to influence the plasma dynamics in a significant manner, the system can generate, repetitively and without debris, high amplitude magnetic fields (40 T) in a manner compatible with a high-energy laser environment. A description of the system and preliminary results demonstrating the possibility to magnetically collimate plasma jets are given.

  14. Schwinger Mechanism for Quark-Antiquark Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Chromo-Electric Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C. Nayak

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Schwinger mechanism in QCD in the presence of an arbitrary time-dependent chromo-electric background field $E^a(t)$ with arbitrary color index $a$=1,2,...8 in SU(3). We obtain an exact result for the non-perturbative quark (antiquark) production from an arbitrary $E^a(t)$ by directly evaluating the path integral. We find that the exact result is independent of all the time derivatives $\\frac{d^nE^a(t)}{dt^n}$ where $n=1,2,...\\infty$. This result has the same functional dependence on two Casimir invariants $[E^a(t)E^a(t)]$ and $[d_{abc}E^a(t)E^b(t)E^c(t)]^2$ as the constant chromo-electric field $E^a$ result with the replacement: $E^a \\rightarrow E^a(t)$. This result relies crucially on the validity of the shift conjecture, which has not yet been established.

  15. Non-Perturbative Gluon pair production from a Constant Chromo-Electric Field via the Schwinger Mechanism in Arbitrary Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Cooper; Gouranga C. Nayak

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the non-perturbative production of gluon pairs from a constant SU(3) chromo-electric background field via the Schwinger mechanism. We fix the covariant background gauge with an arbitrary gauge parameter \\alpha. We determine the transverse momentum distribution of the gluons, as well as the total probability of creating pairs per unit space time volume. We find that the result is independent of the covariant gauge parameter \\alpha used to define arbitrary covariant background gauges. We find that our non-perturbative result is both gauge invariant and gauge parameter \\alpha independent.

  16. Characterization of gas condensate reservoirs using pressure transient and production data - Santa Barbara Field, Monagas, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina Tarrazzi, Trina Mercedes

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Test Date: 09O1-2001j. . . . . . IV INTEGRATION OF ANALYSIS RESULTS. Maps of Reservoir Properdes. Origimd Gas-in-Place (OGIP) and Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) . . . . . . Flow Properiies (k, tt, s) . Well Interference Effects . . . . . 13... . . . . . . . . . ?. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . ?. .. . . . . . . . . 52 4. 2 4. 4 4. 5 4. 6 4. 7 4. 8 Computed Estimated Ultimate Recovery versus Well Completion Date ? Block A, Santa Barbara Field. . Comparison of Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) versus Computed Origmal Gas- in-Place (OIGP) ? Block A, Santa...

  17. UV finite field theories on noncommutative spacetimes: The quantum Wick product and time independent perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kossow, Marcel [I. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 9, D - 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy correction is calculated in the time-independent perturbation setup using a regularized ultraviolet finite Hamiltonian on the noncommutative Minkowski space. The correction to the energy is invariant under rotation and translation but is not Lorentz covariant, and this leads to a distortion of the dispersion relation. In the limit where the noncommutativity vanishes, the common quantum field theory on the commutative Minkowski space is reobtained. The calculations are restricted to the regularized cubic interaction.

  18. Causes of variable production rates of Pottsville Formation Coalbed Gas Wells, Virginia Mine Field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, W.B. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., College Station, TX (United States)); Ferguson, P.A. (Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, 27 coalbed gas wells were drilled, creating Virginia Mines field. In early 1993, average production rate was 55 Mcf/d per well, less than the geometric mean of 63 Mcf/d for wells in this region of the Warrior Basin. To clarify controls on gas production rates, we evaluated the production trends and the geologic setting. Strata on the southeast side of the project dip steeply northwestward off the Birmingham Anticlinorium toward the synclinal axis of the basin, which plunges approximately 2[degrees] southwestward. Northeast-trending normal faults having throws as great as 115 ft divide the project area into horsts and graben. Virginia Mines coalbed gas wells are completed in 13 to 16 ft of coal in 2 coal groups. Closure pressure (minimum stress) varies with structural setting and is 1,500 to 2,300 psi in the Black Creek group and 950 to 1,900 psi in overlying the Mary Lee group. Fracture gradient is greatest (commonly > 1.0 psi/ft) on the southeast of the project, along basin margin, suggesting that induced fractures have complex (T-shaped) geometries. Peak gas production at Virginia Mines occurred within the first 2 months and ranged from 40 to 180 Mcf/d; production rates fell sharply to 30 to 80 Mcf/d in the 18th month. Gas production rates are highest in the northern part of the project and lowest on the southeast side of the project and in one major fault block. Water production rates were 95 to 330 b/d initially but decreased an average of less than 40 b/d by the 18th month. Rapid gas and water decline rates are attributed to ineffective stimulations due to high fracture gradients and to low permeability caused by high in-situ stress. In-situ stress differences, in turn, reflect a highly variable structural setting. To improve production from low-rate wells will require new completion and stimulation techniques. Such techniques could have far-reaching implications, because coal beds in many other areas have high in-situ stresses.

  19. Causes of variable production rates of Pottsville Formation Coalbed Gas Wells, Virginia Mine Field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, W.B. Jr. [S.A. Holditch & Associates, Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Ferguson, P.A. [Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, 27 coalbed gas wells were drilled, creating Virginia Mines field. In early 1993, average production rate was 55 Mcf/d per well, less than the geometric mean of 63 Mcf/d for wells in this region of the Warrior Basin. To clarify controls on gas production rates, we evaluated the production trends and the geologic setting. Strata on the southeast side of the project dip steeply northwestward off the Birmingham Anticlinorium toward the synclinal axis of the basin, which plunges approximately 2{degrees} southwestward. Northeast-trending normal faults having throws as great as 115 ft divide the project area into horsts and graben. Virginia Mines coalbed gas wells are completed in 13 to 16 ft of coal in 2 coal groups. Closure pressure (minimum stress) varies with structural setting and is 1,500 to 2,300 psi in the Black Creek group and 950 to 1,900 psi in overlying the Mary Lee group. Fracture gradient is greatest (commonly > 1.0 psi/ft) on the southeast of the project, along basin margin, suggesting that induced fractures have complex (T-shaped) geometries. Peak gas production at Virginia Mines occurred within the first 2 months and ranged from 40 to 180 Mcf/d; production rates fell sharply to 30 to 80 Mcf/d in the 18th month. Gas production rates are highest in the northern part of the project and lowest on the southeast side of the project and in one major fault block. Water production rates were 95 to 330 b/d initially but decreased an average of less than 40 b/d by the 18th month. Rapid gas and water decline rates are attributed to ineffective stimulations due to high fracture gradients and to low permeability caused by high in-situ stress. In-situ stress differences, in turn, reflect a highly variable structural setting. To improve production from low-rate wells will require new completion and stimulation techniques. Such techniques could have far-reaching implications, because coal beds in many other areas have high in-situ stresses.

  20. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy(trihexyl)phosphonium dicyanamide as the RTIL. It was determined that it has good absorption properties for methanol and ?-pinene, is thermally stable, and is relatively easy to synthesize. It has a density of 0.89 g/mL at 20°C and a molecular weight of 549.9 g/mol. Trials were conducted with a small absorption system and a larger absorption system. Methanol, formaldehyde, and other HAPs were absorbed well, nearly 100%. Acetaldehyde was difficult to capture. Total VOC capture, while satisfactory on methanol and ?-pinene in a lab system, was less than expected in the field, 60-80%. The inability to capture the broad spectrum of total organics is likely due to difficulties in cleaning them from the ionic liquid rather than the ability of the ionic liquid to absorb. It’s likely that a commercial system could be constructed to remove 90 to 100% of the gas contaminates. Selecting the correct ionic liquid would be key to this. Absorption may not be the main selection criterion, but rather how easily the ionic liquid can be cleaned is very important. The ionic liquid absorption system might work very well in a system with a limited spectrum of pollutants, such as a paint spray line, where there are not very high molecular weight, non volatile, compounds in the exhaust.

  1. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

  2. Self-field quench behavior of multifilamentary MgB2 wires in liquid helium X. Wang a,b,c,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    behavior of both multifilamen- tary MgB2 tapes with a ferromagnetic matrix and coils wound by similar January 2008 Received in revised form 19 June 2008 Accepted 24 June 2008 Available online xxxx Keywords. Samples are bath cooled in liquid helium at 4.2 K. A normal zone is initiated by a heater wound around

  3. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

  4. Method and apparatus for the removal of bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

  5. Method and apparatus for the removal or bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.; Scott, C.D.

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 1 fig.

  6. 44.3 / S. Valyukh 44.3: A Liquid Crystal Lens with Non-uniform Anchoring Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and eyeglasses applications. Due to the property to be controlled with an external electrical field, liquid

  7. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

    1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

  8. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  9. AGING EFFECTS ON THE PROPERTIES OF IMIDAZOLIUM, QUATERNARY AMMONIUM, PYRIDINIUM AND PYRROLIDINIUM-BASED IONIC LIQUIDS USED IN FUEL AND ENERGY PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, E.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids are often cited for their excellent thermal stability, a key property for their use as solvents and in the chemical processing of biofuels. However, there has been little supporting data on the long term aging effect of temperature on these materials. Imizadolium, quaternary ammonium, pyridinium, and pyrrolidnium-based ionic liquids with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide anions were aged for 2520 hours (15 weeks) at 200?C in air to determine the effects of an oxidizing environment on their chemical structure and thermal stability over time. It was found that the minor changes in the cation chemistry could greatly affect the properties of the ILs over time.

  10. Schrodinger Fermi Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Juven

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a class of strongly interacting many-body fermionic systems in 2+1D non-relativistic conformal field theory via holography. The 5D charged black hole with asymptotic Schrodinger isometry in the bulk gravity side introduces parameters of background density and finite particle number into the boundary field theory. We propose the holographic dictionary, and realize a quantum phase transition of this fermionic liquid with fixed particle number by tuning the background density $\\beta$ at zero temperature. On the larger $\\beta$ side, we find the signal of a sharp quasiparticle pole on the spectral function A(k,w), indicating a well-defined Fermi surface. On the smaller $\\beta$ side, we find only a hump with no sharp peak for A(k,w), indicating the disappearance of Fermi surface. The dynamical exponent $z$ of quasiparticle dispersion goes from being Fermi-liquid-like $z\\simeq1$ scaling at larger $\\beta$ to a non-Fermi-liquid scaling $z\\simeq 3/2$ at smaller $\\beta$. By comparing the structure of Green's fu...

  11. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  12. Early Events in Ionic Liquid Radiation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wishart, J.F.; Cook, A.; Rimmer, R.D.; Gohdo, M.

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids are interesting and useful materials whose solvation time scales are up to thousands of times longer than in conventional solvents. The extended lifetimes of pre-solvated electrons and other energetic species in ionic liquids has profound consequences for the radiolytic product distributions and reactivity patterns. We use a newly developed, multiplexed variation of pulse-probe spectroscopy to measure the kinetics of the early dynamical and reactive events in ionic liquids.

  13. Using Flue Gas Huff 'n Puff Technology and Surfactants to Increase Oil Production from the Antelope Shale Formation of the Railroad Gap Oil Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, Michael

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was designed to test cyclic injection of exhaust flue gas from compressors located in the field to stimulate production from Antelope Shale zone producers. Approximately 17,000 m{sup 3} ({+-}600 MCF) of flue gas was to be injected into each of three wells over a three-week period, followed by close monitoring of production for response. Flue gas injection on one of the wells would be supplemented with a surfactant.

  14. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxall, B.; Vasco, D.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    site and the Okuaizu geothermal field, Japan", Geothermics,at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California,and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County,

  15. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

  16. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  17. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  18. Future of Liquid Biofuels for APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated by APEC Energy Working Group (EWG) to maximize the energy sector's contribution to the region's economic and social well-being through activities in five areas of strategic importance including liquid biofuels production and development.

  19. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group (BILIWG), Hydrogen Separation and Purification Working Group (PURIWG) & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming...

  20. Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although electrokinetic effects are not new, only recently have they been investigated for possible use in energy conversion devices. We have recently reported the electrokinetic generation of molecular hydrogen from rapidly flowing liquid water microjets [Duffin et al. JPCC 2007, 111, 12031]. Here, we describe the use of liquid water microjets for direct conversion of electrokinetic energy to electrical power. Previous studies of electrokinetic power production have reported low efficiencies ({approx}3%), limited by back conduction of ions at the surface and in the bulk liquid. Liquid microjets eliminate energy dissipation due to back conduction and, measuring only at the jet target, yield conversion efficiencies exceeding 10%.

  1. Nonconventional Liquid Fuels (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher prices for crude oil and refined petroleum products are opening the door for nonconventional liquids to displace petroleum in the traditional fuel supply mix. Growing world demand for diesel fuel is helping to jump-start the trend toward increasing production of nonconventional liquids, and technological advances are making the nonconventional alternatives more viable commercially. Those trends are reflected in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 projections.

  2. Liquid membrane purification of biogas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.; Guha, A.K.; Lee, Y.T.; Papadopoulos, T.; Khare, S. (Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional gas purification technologies are highly energy intensive. They are not suitable for economic removal of CO{sub 2} from methane obtained in biogas due to the small scale of gas production. Membrane separation techniques on the other hand are ideally suited for low gas production rate applications due to their modular nature. Although liquid membranes possess a high species permeability and selectivity, they have not been used for industrial applications due to the problems of membrane stability, membrane flooding and poor operational flexibility, etc. A new hollow-fiber-contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) technique has been developed recently. This technique overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional immobilized liquid membrane technology. A new technique uses two sets of hydrophobic, microporous hollow fine fibers, packed tightly in a permeator shell. The inter-fiber space is filled with an aqueous liquid acting as the membrane. The feed gas mixture is separated by selective permeation of a species through the liquid from one fiber set to the other. The second fiber set carries a sweep stream, gas or liquid, or simply the permeated gas stream. The objectives (which were met) of the present investigation were as follows. To study the selective removal of CO{sub 2} from a model biogas mixture containing 40% CO{sub 2} (the rest being N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}) using a HFCLM permeator under various operating modes that include sweep gas, sweep liquid, vacuum and conventional permeation; to develop a mathematical model for each mode of operation; to build a large-scale purification loop and large-scale permeators for model biogas separation and to show stable performance over a period of one month.

  3. Controlled Rapid Pressurization Using Liquid Propellants for EGS Well Stimulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Investigate the use of Ťnon-toxic? or negligible environmental impact liquid propellants for the stimulation of geothermal fields.

  4. Liquid foams of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

  5. Electrohydrodynamically driven large-area liquid ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pregenzer, Arian L. (Corrales, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-area liquid ion source comprises means for generating, over a large area of the surface of a liquid, an electric field of a strength sufficient to induce emission of ions from a large area of said liquid. Large areas in this context are those distinct from emitting areas in unidimensional emitters.

  6. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. Interim final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.; Carlson, S.L. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Fatemi, M. [Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (United States); Snoeyink, V.L.; Feizoulof, C.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Klavetter, E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate objective of this project is to attain high-value, coal-derived products, especially varieties of char, from Illinois coal. The chars (carbons) made in this study, because of their special properties, could become the marketable materials having the highest value in the product set. Tests this quarter followed up on an unexpected correlation of surface properties of a variety of oxidized carbons with adsorption phenomena. Additional oxidized carbons were made at the ISGS and tests to establish the reproducibility of results were begun. Work will be continued through December on a no-cost extension.

  7. Shearing Flows in Liquid Crystal Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Timothy

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . The director field is the realization of local averaging to de- scribe the natural state in a nematic liquid crystal, Figure 1.1. For any natural alignment of the liquid crystal, n?, one prescribes that W (n?,?n?) = 0. Since the director field is used... derivative of h by the formula D Dt h(t,x) = ?h? t +(u · ~?)h. The acceleration is of the liquid crystal material through the point x is given by a(t,x) = Du Dt . Following the classical approach one assumes that for every open subset Wt ??, trav- eling along...

  8. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

  9. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. Technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.; Carlson, S.L. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Snoeyink, V.L.; Feizoulof, C.; Assanis, D.N.; Syrimis, M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Fatemi, S.M. [Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first step in the envisioned integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal is the production of ultra low-ash coal. Subsequent steps would convert low-ash coal to high-value products through mild gasification, char activation, and oxidation reactions. Approximately eight pounds of low-ash coal has been obtained from the crude reactor slurry produced for us at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). After treatment to remove the remaining meta-cresol, this material will be subjected to mild gasification. Low-ash mild gasification char will be activated and a catalyst surface will be added by oxidation. A 20% coal: 80% diesel fuel slurry was tested in cylinder two of a two-cylinder, diesel engine after the necessary modifications in the engine`s fuel injection system were made. Four tests indicated that the coal successfully substitutes for diesel fuel in the slurry. The fuel burns in the cylinder, with slightly improved thermal and combustion efficiency. The tests were performed at 1800 rpm and 2200 rpm and 75% load. The change in the surface properties of Calgon F-400 commercial activated carbon caused by several treatments were examined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).

  10. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, Stirling [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Jui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finn, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pariev, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beckley, Howard [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH; Si, Jiahe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Martinic, Joe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westpfahl, David [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Slutz, James [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westrom, Zeb [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Klein, Brianna [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  11. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production...

  12. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  13. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  14. Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

  15. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

  16. Liquid soap film generates electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed that a rotating liquid soap film generates electricity when placed between two non-contact electrodes with a sufficiently large potential difference. In our experiments suspended liquid film (water + soap film) is formed on the surface of a circular frame, which is forced to rotate in the $x-y$ horizontal plane by a motor. This system is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply an external electric voltage difference in the $x-$direction. The produced electric current is collected from the liquid film using two conducting electrodes that are separated in the $y-$direction. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this paper we report a novel technique, in which a similar device can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to electrical energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed similarly in very small scales like micro scales with different applications. Although the device is comparable to commercial electric motors or electric generators, there is a significant difference in their working principles. Usually in an electric motor or generator the magnetic field causes the driving force, while in a LFM or LFEG the Coulomb force is the driving force. This fact is also interesting from the Bio-science point of view and brings a similarity to bio motors. Here we have investigated the electrical characteristics of such a generator for the first time experimentally and modelled the phenomenon with electroconvection governing equations. A numerical simulation is performed using the local approximation for the charge-potential relation and results are in qualitative agreement with experiments.

  17. Global Assessments and Guidelines for Sustainable Liquid Biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Assessments and Guidelines for Sustainable Liquid Biofuel Production in Developing Countries Biofuel Production in Developing Countries FINAL REPORT A GEF Targeted Research Project Organized by Bernd for Sustainable Liquid Biofuels. A GEF Targeted Research Project. Heidelberg/Paris/Utrecht/Darmstadt, 29 February

  18. Engineering scale development of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils and linear fibril assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenhover, M.; Biernacki, J. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Schatz, K.; Ko, F. [Advanced Product Development, Inc., Bristol, PA (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to exploit the superior thermomechanical properties of the VLS fibril, the feasibility of scaled-up production of the SiC fibril is demonstrated in this study. Through time series study and computer simulation, the parameters affecting the growth process and properties of the fibrils were examined. To facilitate translation of the superior mechanical properties into higher level preform structures, conventional and unconventional processing methods were evaluated. As revealed by scanning electron microscopic examination and X-ray diffractometry, high level alignment of the fibrils was achieved by the wet-laid process.

  19. Production of High-Quality Syngas via Biomass Gasification for Catalytic Synthesis of Liquid Fuels Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ Report Presentation:in the U.S. by6 (AprilProduction and

  20. Production of solar grade (SoG) silicon by refining liquid metallurgical grade (MG) silicon: Annual Report: June 10 1998--October 19, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khattak, C.P.; Joyce, D.B.; Schmid, F.

    1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyro-metallurgical refining techniques are being developed for use with molten metallurgical-grade (MG) silicon so that directionally solidified refined MG silicon can be used as solar-grade (SoG) silicon feedstock for photovoltaic applications. The most problematic impurity elements are B and P because of their high segregation coefficients. Refining processes such as evacuation, formation of impurity complexes, oxidation of impurities, and slagging have been effective in removal of impurities from MG silicon. Charge sizes have been scaled up to 60 kg. Impurity analysis of 60-kg charges after refining and directional solidification has shown reduction of most impurities to <1 ppma and B and P to the 10-ppma level. It has been demonstrated that B and P, as well as other impurities, can be reduced from MG silicon. Further reduction of impurities will be necessary for use as SoG silicon. The procedures developed are simple and scaleable to larger charge sizes and carried out in a foundry or MG silicon production plant. Therefore, SoG silicon production using these procedures should be at low cost.

  1. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  2. Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Ting

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    basin, Alabama. It considered the injection and production rate, the components of injected gas, coal dewatering, permeability anisotropy, various CO2 soak times, completion of multiple reservoir layers and pressure constraints at the injector...

  3. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.; Carlson, S.L. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Snoeyink, V.L.; Feizoulof, C.; Assanis; Syrimis, M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana (United States); Fatemi, S.M. [Amoco, Naperville, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to invert the conventional scale of values for products of coal utilization processes by making coal chars (carbons) that, because of their unique properties, are the most valuable materials in the product slate. A unique type of coal-derived carbon studied in this project is oxidized activated coal char having both adsorptive and catalyst properties. Major program elements were (a) preparation and characterization of materials (b) characterization of carbons and catalyst testing (c) completion of diesel engine testing of low-ash coal and (d) initiation of a two-year adsorption study. Materials prepared were (a) two low-ash coal samples one via ChemCoal processing of IBC-109 and the other by acid dissolution of IBC-109`s mineral matter, (b) coal char (MG char), (c) activated low-ash carbon (AC), (d) oxidized activated carbon (OAC). Amoco continued its support with state-of-the art analytical capabilities and development of catalyst testing procedures. Diesel engine tests were made with low ash coal dispersed in diesel fuel at solid loadings of 20% and 35%. The slurry was successfully burned in cylinder 2 of a two-cylinder diesel engine, after modifications of the engine`s fuel injection system. The higher speed proved to be more favorable but the slurry burned with a slightly improved thermal and combustion efficiency at both speeds with respect to diesel fuel alone. Adsorption studies included preparation of seven base-line carbon samples and their characterization, including their N{sub 2} BET surface areas and apparent densities. Paranitrophenol (PNP) adsorption isotherms were determined for the six controls. Oxidation of carbon with nitric acid decreases activated carbon`s PNP adsorption capacity while air oxidation increases adsorption capacity.

  4. Liquid crystal variable retarders in atomic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furst, J.E.; Yu, D.H.; Hayes, P.A.; DSouza, C.M.; Williams, J.F. [Physics Department, Centre for Atomic, Molecular, and Surface Physics, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands. WA. 6907 (Australia)] [Physics Department, Centre for Atomic, Molecular, and Surface Physics, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands. WA. 6907 (Australia)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applications of liquid crystal variable retarders in the production of spin-polarized electrons and in the determination of the polarization of optical radiation from atoms excited by polarized electrons are discussed. The advantages of using liquid crystal variable retarders in the measurement of Stokes parameters are insensitivity to the incident photon direction, large transmission diameter, variable retardation over large wavelength range without mechanical movement, and {ital in} {ital situ} calibration. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Light Collection in Liquid Noble Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinsey, Dan [Yale University

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid noble gases are increasingly used as active detector materials in particle and nuclear physics. Applications include calorimeters and neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, direct dark matter, muon electron conversion, and the neutron electric dipole moment. One of the great advantages of liquid noble gases is their copious production of ultraviolet scintillation light, which contains information about event energy and particle type. I will review the scintillation properties of the various liquid noble gases and the means used to collect their scintillation light, including recent advances in photomultiplier technology and wavelength shifters.

  6. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

  7. A cooperation model and demand-oriented ICT Infrastructure for SME Development and Production Networks in the field of Microsystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A cooperation model and demand-oriented ICT Infrastructure for SME Development and Production of Small Medium Enterprises (SME) in this branch refers to organizational issues, arising from the specific SME´s lack of sufficient human resources and an effective management of cross company knowledge about

  8. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change heat exchanger with Na as the heat exchanger coolant. In order to design a very efficient and effective heat exchanger one must optimize the design such that we have a high heat transfer and a lower pressure drop, but there is always a trade-off between them. Based on NGNP operational parameters, a heat exchanger analysis with the sodium phase change will be presented to show that the heat exchanger has the potential for highly effective heat transfer, within a small volume at reasonable cost.

  9. Production management teachniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 3. Offshore gulf coast normally pressured, dry gas reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Uttley, S.J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoir, the study conducted on an offshore, normally pressured, dry gas reservoir is reported. The strategies that were particularly effective in increasing both the ultimate recovery and the net present value of the field are high volume water production from strategically located downdip wells and the recompletion of an upstructure well to recover trapped attic gas. High volume water production lowered the average reservoir pressure, which liberated residual gas trapped in the invaded region. Recompleting a new well into the reservoir also lowered the pressure and improved the volumetric displacement efficiency by recovering trapped attic gas. Ultimate recovery is predicted to increase 5-12% of the original gas-in-place.

  10. Equation for liquid density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Yang, H.C.; Hopper, J.R.; Cawley, W.A. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturated liquid densities for organic chemicals are given as functions of temperature using a modified Rackett equation.

  11. Reservoir analysis study, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 3 report, economic development and production plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jerry R. Bergeson and Associates, Inc. (Bergeson) has completed Phase 3 of the Reservoir Analysis, Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1, Elk Hills Oilfield, California. The objective of this phase of the study was to establish the economic potential for the field by determining the optimum economic plan for development and production. The optimum economic plan used net cash flow analysis to evaluate future expected Department of Energy revenues less expenses and investments for proved developed, proved undeveloped, probable, possible and possible-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) reserves assigned in the Phase 2 study. The results of the Phase 2 study were used to define future production flowstreams. Additional production scheduling was carried out to evaluate accelerated depletion of proved developed reserves in the 29R, 31 C/D Shale and Northwest Stevens T Sand/N Shale Reservoirs. Production, cost and investment schedules were developed for the enhanced oil recovery projects identified in Phase 2. Price forecasts were provided by the Department of Energy. Operating costs and investment requirements were estimated by Bergeson. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  12. Reservoir-Wellbore Coupled Simulation of Liquid Loaded Gas Well Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riza, Muhammad Feldy

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid loading of gas wells causes production difficulty and reduces ultimate recovery from these wells. In 1969, Turner proposed that existence of annular two-phase flow at the wellhead is necessary for the well to avoid liquid loading...

  13. Liquid detection circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Thomas O. (North Aurora, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  14. Stiffening solids with liquid inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Style; Rostislav Boltyanskiy; Benjamin Allen; Katharine E. Jensen; Henry P. Foote; John S. Wettlaufer; Eric R. Dufresne

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    From bone and wood to concrete and carbon fibre, composites are ubiquitous natural and engineering materials. Eshelby's inclusion theory describes how macroscopic stress fields couple to isolated microscopic inclusions, allowing prediction of a composite's bulk mechanical properties from a knowledge of its microstructure. It has been extended to describe a wide variety of phenomena from solid fracture to cell adhesion. Here, we show experimentally and theoretically that Eshelby's theory breaks down for small liquid inclusions in a soft solid. In this limit, an isolated droplet's deformation is strongly size-dependent with the smallest droplets mimicking the behaviour of solid inclusions. Furthermore, in opposition to the predictions of conventional composite theory, we find that finite concentrations of small liquid inclusions enhance the stiffness of soft solids. A straight-forward extension of Eshelby's theory, accounting for the surface tension of the solid-liquid interface, explains our experimental observations. The counterintuitive effect of liquid-stiffening of solids is expected whenever droplet radii are smaller than an elastocapillary length, given by the ratio of the surface tension to Young's modulus of the solid matrix.

  15. Natural Gas Liquids New Field Discoveries

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,960 3,958,315storage35 26 32 16

  16. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  17. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  18. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  19. Rapid production of large-area deep sub-wavelength hybrid structures by femtosecond laser light-field tailoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi-Dai, E-mail: chenqd@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: hbsun@jlu.edu.cn; Yang, Rui; Xu, Bin-Bin; Wang, Hai-Yu [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Yang, Hai; Huo, Cheng-Song; Tu, Hai-Ling [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Sun, Hong-Bo, E-mail: chenqd@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: hbsun@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); College of Physics, Jilin University, 119 Jiefang Road, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of creation of large-area deep sub-wavelength nanostructures by femtosecond laser irradiation onto various materials is being hindered by the limited coherence length. Here, we report solution of the problem by light field tailoring of the incident beam with a phase mask, which serves generation of wavelets. Direct interference between the wavelets, here the first-order diffracted beams, and interference between a wavelet and its induced waves such as surface plasmon polariton are responsible for creation of microgratings and superimposed nanogratings, respectively. The principle of wavelets interference enables extension of uniformly induced hybrid structures containing deep sub-wavelength nanofeatures to macro-dimension.

  20. Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

  1. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  2. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential, Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes part of the work done to fulfill a contract awarded to Gruy Federal, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) on Feburary 12, 1979. The work includes pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report details the second such project. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques incorporating the a, m, and n values obtained from Core Laboratories analysis did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations and production data confirmed the validity of oil saturation determinations. Residual oil saturation, for the perforated and tested intervals were 259 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 4035 to 4055 feet, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 3692 to 3718 feet. Nine BOPD was produced from the interval 4035 to 4055 feet and no oil was produced from interval 3692 to 3718 feet, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations as calculated. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log, and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood.

  3. Ultra-Deepwater Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken L. Smith; Marc E. Leveque

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report herein is a summary of the work performed on three projects to demonstrate hydrocarbon drilling and production methods applicable to deep and ultra deepwater field developments in the Gulf of Mexico and other like applications around the world. This work advances technology that could lead to more economic development and exploitation of reserves in ultra-deep water or remote areas. The first project is Subsea Processing. Its scope includes a review of the ''state of the art'' in subsea components to enable primary production process functions such as first stage liquids and gas separation, flow boosting, chemical treatment, flow metering, etc. These components are then combined to allow for the elimination of costly surface production facilities at the well site. A number of studies were then performed on proposed field development projects to validate the economic potential of this technology. The second project involved the design and testing of a light weight production riser made of composite material. The proposed design was to meet an actual Gulf of Mexico deepwater development project. The various engineering and testing work is reviewed, including test results. The third project described in this report encompasses the development and testing of a close tolerance liner drilling system, a new technology aimed at reducing deepwater drilling costs. The design and prototype testing in a test well are described in detail.

  4. Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

  5. Comparative laboratory selection and field testing of polymers for selective control of water production in gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranjbar, M. [Technical Univ., Clausthal (Germany); Czolbe, P. [DBI-GUT, Freiberg (Germany); Kohler, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive comparative feasibility studies were performed in different laboratories in order to select the most promising polymer based technology for water control in gas production and storage wells exhibiting low matrix permeability, high temperature and high produced brine salinity. Core flow experiments performed under reservoir conditions with different commercially available chemical systems have pointed to the superiority of two relatively low-molecular-weight vinyl sulfonated/vinyl amide/acrylamide terpolymers over other polymers to decrease selectively and effectively the water permeability without affecting the gas flow. These polymers have excellent compatibility with all types of reservoir brines and good thermal stability up to 150 C. Furthermore, because of their high shear resistance, and excellent injectability even in low permeability cores, solutions of these polymers can be pumped at high injection rates with a moderate wellhead pressure.

  6. Liquid targets for isotope production Jerry Nolen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Li) 4 High-Q 8B and 8Li will not be considered for the time being We will not explore the lowW E-beam-on-Target Test at ANL MCNPX : for RIA, 200-kW uranium beam on Li peak energy deposition = 2

  7. Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desert SouthwestofDepartmentCellulosic

  8. Liquid Fuels and Natural Gas in the Americas

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Liquid Fuels and Natural Gas in the Americas report, published today, is a Congressionally-requested study examining the energy trends and developments in the Americas over the past decade. The report focuses on liquid fuels and natural gas—particularly reserves and resources, production, consumption, trade, and investment—given their scale and significance to the region.

  9. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  10. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  11. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

  12. Calculation of Vapor-Liquid-Liquid Equilibria for the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor Effluents using Modified Peng-Robinson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Calculation of Vapor-Liquid-Liquid Equilibria for the Fischer- Tropsch Reactor Effluents using equilibrium in Fischer­Tropsch synthesis products. A group contribution method allowing the estimation the Fischer­Tropsch method is used to produce high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons from synthesis gas (syngas

  13. Renormalization group flow for noncommutative Fermi liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrada-Jimenez, Sendic [Centro de Estudios en Fisica y Matematicas Basicas y Aplicadas, Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, Calle 4a Oriente Norte 1428 Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Garcia-Compean, Hugo [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN P.O. Box 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Wu Yongshi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent studies of the AdS/CFT correspondence for condensed matter systems involve the Fermi liquid theory as a boundary field theory. Adding B-flux to the boundary D-branes leads in a certain limit to the noncommutative Fermi liquid, which calls for a field theory description of its critical behavior. As a preliminary step to more general consideration, the modification of the Landau's Fermi liquid theory due to noncommutativity of spatial coordinates is studied in this paper. We carry out the renormalization of interactions at tree level and one loop in a weakly coupled fermion system in two spatial dimensions. Channels ZS, ZS' and BCS are discussed in detail. It is shown that while the Gaussian fixed-point remains unchanged, the BCS instability is modified due to the space noncommutativity.

  14. A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass feedstocks were utilized to identify optimized process conditions and selective HDO catalyst for high yield production of hydrocarbons from biomass. In addition to these experimental efforts, in Tasks D and E, we have developed a mathematical optimization framework to identify carbon and energy efficient biomass-to-liquid fuel process designs that integrate the use of different primary energy sources along with biomass (e.g. solar, coal or natural gas) for liquid fuel production. Using this tool, we have identified augmented biomass-to-liquid fuel configurations based on the fast-hydropyrolysis/HDO pathway, which was experimentally studied in this project. The computational approach used for screening alternative process configurations represents a unique contribution to the field of biomass processing for liquid fuel production.

  15. (Ionization in liquids)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes charge transport following ionization of model liquids and how this process may be important in carcinogenesis. 15 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs. (MHB)

  16. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  17. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  18. Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galle-Bishop, John Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

  19. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in a study to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids is reported.

  20. Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids (HGL): Recent Market Trends and Issues

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past five years, rapid growth in U.S. onshore natural gas and oil production has led to increased volumes of natural gas plant liquids (NGPL) and liquefied refinery gases (LRG). The increasing economic importance of these volumes, as a result of their significant growth in production, has revealed the need for better data accuracy and transparency to improve the quality of historical data and projections for supply, demand, and prices of these liquids, co-products, and competing products. To reduce confusion in terminology and improve its presentation of data, EIA has worked with industry and federal and state governments to clarify gas liquid terminology and has developed the term Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids, or HGL.

  1. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

  2. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Webster, I.A. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecules comprising coal liquids can range from less than 10 to several hundred [angstrom] in diameter. Their size is, therefore, comparable to the average pore size of most hydroprocessing catalysts. Thus, during processing, transport of these molecules into the catalyst occurs mainly by configurational'' or hindered diffusion,'' which is the result of two phenomena occurring in the pores; the distribution of solute molecules in the pores is affected by the pores and the solute molecules experience an increased hydrodynamic drag. The field of hindered diffusion has been reviewed by Deen [16]. The earliest studies in the filed were by Renkin et al. [17].

  3. Meeting Action Items and Highlights from the Bio-Derived Liquids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review Meeting Action Items and Highlights...

  4. Lipid extraction from microalgae using a single ionic liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-step process for the lysis of microalgae cell walls and separation of the cellular lipids for use in biofuel production by utilizing a hydrophilic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium. The hydrophilic ionic liquid both lyses the microalgae cell walls and forms two immiscible layers, one of which consists of the lipid contents of the lysed cells. After mixture of the hydrophilic ionic liquid with a suspension of microalgae cells, gravity causes a hydrophobic lipid phase to move to a top phase where it is removed from the mixture and purified. The hydrophilic ionic liquid is recycled to lyse new microalgae suspensions.

  5. Fabrication of fiber supported ionic liquids and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luebke, David R; Wickramanayake, Shan

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more embodiments relates to the production of a fabricated fiber having an asymmetric polymer network and having an immobilized liquid such as an ionic liquid within the pores of the polymer network. The process produces the fabricated fiber in a dry-wet spinning process using a homogenous dope solution, providing significant advantage over current fabrication methods for liquid-supporting polymers. The fabricated fibers may be effectively utilized for the separation of a chemical species from a mixture based on the selection of the polymer, the liquid, and the solvent utilized in the dope.

  6. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquid–liquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  7. Keer electro-optic measurements in liquid dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xuewei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kerr electro-optic technique has been used to measure the electric field distribution in high voltage stressed dielectric liquids, where the difference between refractive indices for light polarized parallel and perpendicular ...

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, M.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

  9. Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

    1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  10. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  11. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  12. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  13. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  14. Global cloud liquid water path simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, L. [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)] [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Rikus, L. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Martin, C.; Platt, R. [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)] [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new parameterization of cloud liquid water and ice content has been included in the Bureau of Meteorology Global Assimilation and Prediction System. The cloud liquid water content is derived from the mean cloud temperatures in the model using an empirical relationship based on observations. The results from perpetual January and July simulations are presented and show that the total cloud water path steadily decreases toward high latitudes, with two relative maxima at midlatitudes and a peak at low latitudes. To validate the scheme, the simulated fields need to be processed to produce liquid water paths that can be directly compared with the corresponding field derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. This requires the identification of cloud ice water content within the parameterization and a prescription to account for the treatment of strongly precipitating subgrid-scale cloud. The resultant cloud liquid water paths agree qualitatively with the SSM/I data but show some systematic errors that are attributed to corresponding errors in the model`s simulation of cloud amounts. Given that a more quantitative validation requires substantial improvement in the model`s diagnostic cloud scheme, the comparison with the SSM/I data indicates that the cloud water path, derived from the cloud liquid water content parameterization introduced in this paper, is consistent with the observations and can be usefully incorporated in the prediction system. 40 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Electromagnetic induction pump for pumping liquid metals and other conductive liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic induction pump in which an electrically conductive liquid is made to flow by means of a force created by interaction of a permanent magnetic field and a DC current. The pump achieves high efficiency through combination of: powerful permanent magnet materials which provide a high strength field that is uniform and constant; steel tubing formed into a coil which is constructed to carry conducting liquids with minimal electrical resistance and heat; and application of a voltage to induce a DC current which continuously produces a force in the direction of the desired flow.

  16. Electromagnetic induction pump for pumping liquid metals and other conductive liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, R.K.

    1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic induction pump is described in which an electrically conductive liquid is made to flow by means of a force created by interaction of a permanent magnetic field and a DC current. The pump achieves high efficiency through combination of: powerful permanent magnet materials which provide a high strength field that is uniform and constant; steel tubing formed into a coil which is constructed to carry conducting liquids with minimal electrical resistance and heat; and application of a voltage to induce a DC current which continuously produces a force in the direction of the desired flow.

  17. Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

  18. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  19. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  20. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  1. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  2. Dynamic simulation of nuclear hydrogen production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramírez Muńoz, Patricio D. (Patricio Dario)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear hydrogen production processes have been proposed as a solution to rising CO 2 emissions and low fuel yields in the production of liquid transportation fuels. In these processes, the heat of a nuclear reactor is ...

  3. Particle production and energy deposition studies for the Neutrino Factory target station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Back, John J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present FLUKA and MARS simulation studies of the pion production and energy deposition in the Neutrino Factory baseline target station, which consists of a 4 MW proton beam interacting with a liquid mercury jet target within a 20 T solenoidal magnetic field. We show that a substantial increase in the shielding is needed to protect the superconducting coils from too much energy deposition. Investigations reveal that it is possible to reduce the magnetic field in the solenoid capture system without adversely affecting the pion production efficiency. We show estimates of the amount of concrete shielding that will be required to protect the environment from the high radiation doses generated by the target station facility. We also present yield and energy deposition results for alternative targets: gallium liquid jet, tungsten powder jet and solid tungsten bars.

  4. Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

  5. Liquid Phase Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordt, E. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature Water (HTW) central district heating systems are far superior to steam systems in large, spread out installations such as airports, universities and office complexes. Water, pressurized to keep it in the liquid state, is distributed at 400o...

  6. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicolás

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  7. Final Report_Production Hydrualic Packer Test.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CENTER Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test i DOERMOTC020120 PRODUCTION HYDRAULIC PACKER FIELD TEST Field Report for the period of October 21, 1999 - November 01, 1999 Date...

  8. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  9. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  10. CdS MINERALIZATION OF HEXAGONAL, LAMELLAR, AND CUBIC LYOTROPIC LIQUID CRYSTALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    a nanostructure with hexagonal symmetry, a lamellar liquid crystal yielded a lamellar nano- structure, and a cubic liquid crystal (consisting of spherical micelles) yielded a hollow, spherical product. The product grown of the cubic phase yielded hollow spheres of CdS, 20­100 nm in diameter, 1­5 times the diameter of the micelles

  11. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of power consumption by ALCWs allows for on-board power electronics for automatic matching of transmission through windows to varying climate conditions without drawing the power from the power grid. ALCWs are capable of transmitting more sunlight in winters to assist in heating and less sunlight in summers to minimize overheating. As such, they can change the window from being a source of energy loss to a source of energy gain. In addition, the scalable AMI’s roll-to-roll process, proved by making 1ft × 1ftALCW prototype panels, allows for cost-effective production of large-scale window panels along with capability to change easily their color and shape. In addition to architectural glazing in houses and commercial buildings, ALCWs can be used in other applications where control of sunlight is needed, such as green houses, used by commercial produce growers and botanical gardens, cars, aircrafts, etc.

  12. POWER-GEN '91 conference papers: Volume 7 (Non-utility power generation) and Volume 8 (New power plants - Gas and liquid fuels/combustion turbines). [Independent Power Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is book 4 of papers presented at the Fourth International Power Generation Exhibition and Conference on December 4-6, 1991. The book contains Volume 7, Non-Utility Power Generation and Volume 8, New Power Plants - Gas and Liquid Fuels/Combustion Turbines. The topics of the papers include PUHCA changes and transmission access, financing and economics of independent power projects, case histories, combustion turbine based technologies, coal gasification, and combined cycle.

  13. Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; H.L. Rappaport

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

  14. Polarization fields: dynamic light field display using multi-layer LCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanman, Douglas

    We introduce polarization field displays as an optically-efficient design for dynamic light field display using multi-layered LCDs. Such displays consist of a stacked set of liquid crystal panels with a single pair of ...

  15. Beneficial effects of groundwater entry into liquid-dominated geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In all active liquid-dominated geothermal systems there is continuous circulation of mass and transfer of heat, otherwise they would slowly cool and fade away. In the natural state these systems are in dynamic equilibrium with the surrounding colder groundwater aquifers. The ascending geothermal fluids cool conductively, boil, or mix with groundwaters, and ultimately may discharge at the surface as fumaroles or hot springs. With the start of fluid production and the lowering of reservoir pressure, the natural equilibrium is disrupted and cooler groundwater tends to enter the reservoir. Improperly constructed or damaged wells, and wells located near the margins of the geothermal system, exhibit temperature reductions (and possibly scaling from mixing of chemically distinct fluids) as the cooler-water moves into the reservoir. These negative effects, especially in peripheral wells are, however, compensated by the maintenance of reservoir pressure and a reduction in reservoir boiling that might result in mineral precipitation in the formation pores and fractures. The positive effect of cold groundwater entry on the behavior of liquid-dominated system is illustrated by using simple reservoir models. The simulation results show that even though groundwater influx into the reservoir causes cooling of fluids produced from wells located near the cold-water recharge area, it also reduces pressure drawdown and boiling in the exploited zone, and sweeps the heat stored in the reservoir rocks toward production wells, thus increasing the productive life of the wells and field. 9 refs.

  16. The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids: a review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Wishart, James F.

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids have received increasing attention as media for radiochemical separations. Recent literature includes examinations of the efficiencies and mechanisms of the solvent extraction of lanthanides, actinides and fission products into ionic liquid solutions. For radiochemical applications, including as replacement solvents for nuclear fuel reprocessing, a thorough understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids will be required. Such an understanding can be achieved based upon a combination of steady-state radiolysis experiments coupled with post-irradiation product identification and pulse-radiolysis experiments to acquire kinetic information. These techniques allow for the elucidation of radiolytic mechanisms. This contribution reviews the current ionic liquid radiation chemistry literature as it affects separations, with these considerations in mind.

  17. Operational Challenges in Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) Transportation Through Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu; Santanu Khataniar; Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil production from Alaskan North Slope oil fields has steadily declined. In the near future, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level (200,000 to 400,000 bbl/day) that maintaining economic operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) will require pumping alternative products through the system. Heavy oil deposits in the West Sak and Ugnu formations are a potential resource, although transporting these products involves addressing important sedimentation issues. One possibility is the use of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) technology. Estimated recoverable gas reserves of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) on the North Slope of Alaska can be converted to liquid with GTL technology and combined with the heavy oils for a product suitable for pipeline transport. Issues that could affect transport of this such products through TAPS include pumpability of GTL and crude oil blends, cold restart of the pipeline following a prolonged winter shutdown, and solids deposition inside the pipeline. This study examined several key fluid properties of GTL, crude oil and four selected blends under TAPS operating conditions. Key measurements included Reid Vapor Pressure, density and viscosity, PVT properties, and solids deposition. Results showed that gel strength is not a significant factor for the ratios of GTL-crude oil blend mixtures (1:1; 1:2; 1:3; 1:4) tested under TAPS cold re-start conditions at temperatures above - 20 F, although Bingham fluid flow characteristics exhibited by the blends at low temperatures indicate high pumping power requirements following prolonged shutdown. Solids deposition is a major concern for all studied blends. For the commingled flow profile studied, decreased throughput can result in increased and more rapid solid deposition along the pipe wall, resulting in more frequent pigging of the pipeline or, if left unchecked, pipeline corrosion.

  18. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raj, Rishi (Ithaca, NY); Baik, Sunggi (Ithaca, NY)

    1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  19. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  20. Ultrasonic, Non-Invasive Classification/Discrimination of Liquid Explosives (LEs) and Threat Liquids from Non-Threat Liquids in Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Tucker, Brian J.; Samuel, Todd J.; Morales, Romarie

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Government agencies and homeland security organizations are searching for more effective approaches for dealing with the increasing demand for inspections involving potential threat liquids and hazardous chemicals, including liquid explosives (LEs). The quantity and variability of hand-held and cargo-sized containers being shipped worldwide drives the need for rapid and effective ways for conducting non-intrusive inspections of liquid-filled containers of a diverse range of types, shapes and sizes. Such inspections need to quickly classify/discriminate between liquids within containers and also ascertain the presence of unexpected objects within a container. The science base, methodology and prototype device for classification/discrimination between classes of liquids has been developed. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a methodology and prototype device for classification/discrimination of a wide variety of liquids (including threat liquids and their precursors), providing noninvasive liquid classification/discrimination capabilities using a nondestructive ultrasonic measurement approach for inspecting sealed containers. The Container Screening Device (CSD) employs frequency-modulated (FM) chirp excitation and pulse-compression signal processing techniques to measure ultrasonic velocity and a relative attenuation value for liquids within a container, and is capable of determining other acoustic properties from through-transmission, contact measurements over a wide frequency range. Recent algorithm developments are beginning to address the issues of container wall variations and thickness. A description of the basic science, measurement approach and sources of variability in the measurement will be presented and laboratory measurements acquired from a suite of commercial products and precursor liquids used in the manufacturing of Homemade Explosives (HMEs) will be given.

  1. Ultrasonic characterization of solid liquid suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panetta, Paul D.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an ultrasonic field, properties of a solid liquid suspension such as through-transmission attenuation, backscattering, and diffuse field are measured. These properties are converted to quantities indicating the strength of different loss mechanisms (such as absorption, single scattering and multiple scattering) among particles in the suspension. Such separation of the loss mechanisms can allow for direct comparison of the attenuating effects of the mechanisms. These comparisons can also indicate a model most likely to accurately characterize the suspension and can aid in determination of properties such as particle size, concentration, and density of the suspension.

  2. liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving Christopher D. Carroll ccarroll to the optimal consumption/saving problem under uncertainty have long known that there are quantitatively important in- teractions between liquidity constraints and precautionary saving behavior. This paper

  3. Conversion of olefins to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY); Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and/or branched claim C.sub.2 to C.sub.12 olefins are converted to hydrocarbon mixtures suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a catalyst capable of ensuring the production of desirable products with only a relatively minor amount of heavy products boiling beyond the diesel oil range. The catalyst having desirable stability during continuous production operations, comprises a steam stabilized zeolite Y catalyst of hydrophobic character, desirably in aluminum-extracted form. The olefins such as propylene, may be diluted with inerts, such as paraffins or with water, the latter serving to moderate the acidity of the catalyst, or to further moderate the activity of the aluminum-extracted catalyst, so as to increase the effective life of the catalyst.

  4. Properties of Liquid Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Unalloyed polycrystalline Pu displays extreme thermal expansion behavior, i.e., {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} increases by 25% in volume and {delta} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid decreases by 4.5% in volume. Thus, making it difficult to measure density into the liquid state. Dilatometer outfitted with CaF molten metal cell offers a proven capability to measure thermal expansion in molten metals, but has yet to be proven for Pu. Historic data from the liquid nuclear fuels program will prove extremely useful as a guide to future measurements. 3.3at% Ga changes Pu molten metal properties: 50% increase in viscosity and {approx}3% decrease in density. Fe may decrease the density by a small amount assuming an averaging of densities for Pu-Ga and Pu-Fe liquids. More recent Boivineau (2009) work needs some interpretation, but technique is being employed in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} nuclear fuels program (Pu Futures, 2012).

  5. Breakup of Liquid Filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Hutchings, I.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , including the dispersion of liquid drugs into res- pirable droplets, microfluidics, crop- and paint-spraying, and ink-jet printing [2–4]. There are also biological sys- tems in which either long filaments remain intact, or many droplets are formed [5, 6...

  6. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  7. Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation) Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation) Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen...

  8. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko; David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  9. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  10. Experimental studies of steam and steam-propane injection using a novel smart horizontal producer to enhance oil production in the San Ardo field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    is the use of propane as a steam additive with the purpose of increasing recovery and accelerating oil production. The second process involves the use of a novel production configuration that makes use of a vertical injector and a smart horizontal producer...

  11. Risks to global biodiversity from fossil-fuel production exceed those from biofuel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential global biodiversity impacts from near-term gasoline production are compared to biofuel, a renewable liquid transportation fuel expected to substitute for gasoline in the near term (i.e., from now until c. 2030). Petroleum exploration activities are projected to extend across more than 5.8 billion ha of land and ocean worldwide (of which 3.1 billion is on land), much of which is in remote, fragile terrestrial ecosystems or off-shore oil fields that would remain relatively undisturbed if not for interest in fossil fuel production. Future biomass production for biofuels is projected to fall within 2.0 billion ha of land, most of which is located in areas already impacted by human activities. A comparison of likely fuel-source areas to the geospatial distribution of species reveals that both energy sources overlap with areas with high species richness and large numbers of threatened species. At the global scale, future petroleum production areas intersect more than double the area and higher total number of threatened species than future biofuel production. Energy options should be developed to optimize provisioning of ecosystem services while minimizing negative effects, which requires information about potential impacts on critical resources. Energy conservation and identifying and effectively protecting habitats with high-conservation value are critical first steps toward protecting biodiversity under any fuel production scenario.

  12. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Abstract:...

  13. Analysis & Simulation of Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmatad, Yael Sarah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moreover, the heat capacity of that liquid is also higherthe intensive heat capacities of the liquid and the crystal,

  14. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2009 (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The oil prices reported in Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO) represent the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil in 2007 dollars. Projections of future supply and demand are made for "liquids," a term used to refer to those liquids that after processing and refining can be used interchangeably with petroleum products. In AEO2009, liquids include conventional petroleum liquids -- such as conventional crude oil and natural gas plant liquids -- in addition to unconventional liquids, such as biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil.

  15. Experimental studies of steam and steam-propane injection using a novel smart horizontal producer to enhance oil production in the San Ardo field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    in an attempt to mitigate the effects of steam override. The experimental model was scaled using the conditions in the San Ardo field in California and crude oil from the same field was used for the tests. Superheated steam at 190 â�� 200�ºC was injected...

  16. Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC different excess Gibbs free energy models are evaluated: the NRTL, UNIQUAC and electrolyte- NRTL (eNRTL) models. In the case of eNRTL, a new formulation of the model is used, based on a symmetric reference

  17. Issues and design concepts for high-activity liquid packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinert, N.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Riley, D. [Walla Walla College of Engineering, Walla Walla, WA (United States); Wells, A.H. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tank waste pretreatment process involves the separation of low-level and high-level constituents. The liquid high-level defense production waste will be vitrified into thousands of glass logs at the US DOE sites and then transported to a high-level repository for final disposal. Pretreatment and vitrification technology will need to be developed and tested to assess cost-effectiveness. The appropriate pretreatment strategy for complex high-activity liquid will depend on proving a competent process. As technology development matures, actual liquid will be substituted for simulants, and pilot scale plants will replace laboratory scale process demonstrations. Development of this strategy depends on tank waste sample analyses and a high-activity liquid supply for process testing. However, high-activity liquid transportation beyond DOE site boundaries is limited to Type B quantities in volumes less than 50 mL; no licensed packaging exists for greater than 50 mL quantities. The following paper summarizes the need for a high-activity liquid packaging, and identifies the agencies effecting packaging design and transportation. The high-activity liquid packaging concept retrofits licensed spent fuel casks by replacing the spent fuel basket with a sturdy containment vessel appropriate for the chemical nature of the liquid. A Nuclear Packaging (Pacific Nuclear`s NuPat{trademark} 125-B) spent fuel cask was hypothetically retrofitted with a containment vessel filled with liquid source term, the radionuclide inventory contained in the liquid. The structural, thermal, dose rate, and criticality consequences of retrofitting the cask body were evaluated based on data in the 125-B Cask Safety Analysis Report for Packaging. In addition, future packaging development work is discussed.

  18. Comparison study of solid-liquid separation techniques for oilfield pit closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtanowicz, A.C.; Field, S.D.; Osterman, M.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive bench-scale and full-scale experiments were conducted at the LSU Solids Control Environmental Laboratory in order to evaluate application of the solids-liquid separation technology to oilfield waste pit volume reduction. The experiments addressed chemical conditioning of various pit slurries such as water-base and oil-base mud reserve pit slurries, mixed sludge from offshore operations, and oil production pit slurry. Effective treatment was found for the majority of the waste samples with pH adjustment and with nonionic and low-charge anionic, high molecular weight polymers. Ultimate dewaterability of various samples was determined by use of the belt press bench simulator. Bench simulators of belt press filtration, vacuum filtration and centrifuge sedimentation were used for design and optimization of the full-scale tests. Alternative solid-liquid separation techniques such as vacuum filtration, belt press filtration, screw press filtration and centrifuging were pilot-tested using field-size equipment and 200 bbls samples of water-base mud, reserve pit slurry and production pit sludge. The test data were analyzed at various operating conditions using a new graphical technique. Also, four typical oilfield solid-bowl centrifuges and a modern solid-bowl dewatering decanter were compared in a series of full-scale tests. Finally a preliminary process study on the mechanism of centrifuge separation of flocculated sludges was performed.

  19. Liquid filtration simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corey, I.; Bergman, W.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have a developed a computer code that simulates 3-D filtration of suspended particles in fluids in realistic filter structures. This code, being the most advanced filtration simulation package developed to date, provides LLNL and DOE with new capabilities to address problems in cleaning liquid wastes, medical fluid cleaning, and recycling liquids. The code is an integrated system of commercially available and LLNL-developed software; the most critical are the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver and the particle transport program. For the CFD solver, we used a commercial package based on Navier-Stokes equations and a LLNL-developed package based on Boltzman-lattice gas equations. For the particle transport program, we developed a cod based on the 3-D Langevin equation of motion and the DLVO theory of electrical interactions. A number of additional supporting packages were purchased or developed to integrate the simulation tasks and to provide visualization output.

  20. Dehydrogenation of liquid fuel in microchannel catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toseland, Bernard Allen (Coopersburg, PA); Pez, Guido Peter (Allentown, PA); Puri, Pushpinder Singh (Emmaus, PA)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improved process for the storage and delivery of hydrogen by the reversible hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of an organic compound wherein the organic compound is initially in its hydrogenated state. The improvement in the route to generating hydrogen is in the dehydrogenation step and recovery of the dehydrogenated organic compound resides in the following steps: introducing a hydrogenated organic compound to a microchannel reactor incorporating a dehydrogenation catalyst; effecting dehydrogenation of said hydrogenated organic compound under conditions whereby said hydrogenated organic compound is present as a liquid phase; generating a reaction product comprised of a liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound and gaseous hydrogen; separating the liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound from gaseous hydrogen; and, recovering the hydrogen and liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound.

  1. Engineering-Scale Liquid Cadmium Cathode Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Vaden; B. R. Westphal; S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; K. B. Davies; D. M. Pace

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery of transuranic actinides (TRU) using electrorefining is a process being investigated as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). TRU recovery via electrorefining onto a solid cathode is very difficult as the thermodynamic properties of transuranics are not favourable for them to remain in the metal phase while significant quantities of uranium trichloride exist in the electrolyte. Theoretically, the concentration of transuranics in the electrolyte must be approximately 106 greater than the uranium concentration in the electrolyte to produce a transuranic deposit on a solid cathode. Using liquid cadmium as a cathode contained within a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, the co-deposition of uranium and transuranics is feasible because the activity of the transuranics in liquid cadmium is very small. Depositing transuranics and uranium in a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) theoretically requires the concentration of transuranics to be two to three times the uranium concentration in the electrolyte. Three LCC experiments were performed in an Engineering scale elecdtrorefiner, which is located in the argon hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex on the Idaho National Laboratory. Figure 1 contains photographs of the LCC assembly in the hot cell prior to the experiment and a cadmium ingot produced after the first LCC test. Figure 1. Liquid Cadmium Cathode (left) and Cadmium Ingot (right) The primary goal of the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments was to electrochemically collect kilogram quantities of uranium and plutonium via a LCC. The secondary goal was to examine fission product contaminations in the materials collected by the LCC. Each LCC experiment used chopped spent nuclear fuel from the blanket region of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II loaded into steel baskets as the anode with the LCC containing 26 kg of cadmium metal. In each experiment, between one and two kilograms of heavy metal was collected in the LCC after passing an integrated current over 500 amp hours. Analysis of samples from the liquid cadmium cathode ingots showed detectable amounts of transuranics and rare-earth elements. Acknowledgements K. B. Davies and D. M. Pace for the mechanical and electrical engineering needed to prepare the equipment for the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments.

  2. Liquid class predictor for liquid handling of complex mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seglke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA); Lekin, Timothy P. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of establishing liquid classes of complex mixtures for liquid handling equipment. The mixtures are composed of components and the equipment has equipment parameters. The first step comprises preparing a response curve for the components. The next step comprises using the response curve to prepare a response indicator for the mixtures. The next step comprises deriving a model that relates the components and the mixtures to establish the liquid classes.

  3. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Liquid Nitrogen Packed Column Distributor Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    concepts for a liquid nitrogen distributor for a packed distillation column. The design team at Penn State distillation column design. Approach The design team first gathered customer specifications from Air ProductsPENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Liquid Nitrogen Packed Column

  4. The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids: a review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Wishart, James F.

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids have received increasing attention as media for radiochemical separations. Recent literature includes examinations of the efficiencies and mechanisms of the solvent extraction of lanthanides, actinides and fission products into ionic liquid solutions. For radiochemical applications, including as replacement solvents for nuclear fuel reprocessing, a thorough understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids will be required. Such an understanding can be achieved based upon a combination of steady-state radiolysis experiments coupled with post-irradiation product identification and pulse-radiolysis experiments to acquire kinetic information. These techniques allow for the elucidation of radiolytic mechanisms. This contribution reviews the current ionic liquidmore »radiation chemistry literature as it affects separations, with these considerations in mind.« less

  5. Three Essays on Bioenergy Production in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodarz, Marta

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    competitive, considering both production and market penetration costs. Second, the potential effect of mandate relaxations and carbon market related payments on liquid fuel production potential. Third, the effects of ignoring or considering asset fixity...

  6. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  7. Double layer electric fields aiding the production of energetic flat-top distributions and superthermal electrons within the exhausts from magnetic reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan; Le, Ari; Borg, Anette L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a kinetic simulation of magnetic reconnection it was recently shown that magnetic-field-aligned electric fields (E||) can be present over large spatial scales in reconnection exhausts. The largest values of E|| are observed within double layers. The existence of double layers in the Earth's magnetosphere is well documented. In our simulation their formation is triggered by large parallel streaming of electrons into the reconnection region. These parallel electron fluxes are required for maintaining quasi-neutrality of the reconnection region and increase with decreasing values of the normalized electron pressure upstream of the reconnection region. A threshold normalized pressure is derived for strong double layers to develop. We also document how the electron confinement, provided in part by the structure in E||, allows sustained energization by perpendicular electric fields. The energization is a consequence of the confined electrons' chaotic orbital motion that includes drifts aligned with the reconn...

  8. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  9. Evolution of microstructure during shape memory cycling of a main-chain liquid crystalline elastomer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Evolution of microstructure during shape memory cycling of a main-chain liquid crystalline Available online 28 March 2013 Keywords: Liquid crystalline elastomer Shape memory polymer Polymer microstructure a b s t r a c t The field of shape memory polymers (SMPs) has been dominated by polymeric systems

  10. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

  11. UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills, 26R Reservoir, Elk Hills oil and gas field, Kern County, California: Management Review: Surface operations and measurements of production and injection volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evans, Carey and Crozier was given the task to conduct a Management Review of the Surface Operations of the 26R Reservoir in UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California. The MER strategy for this reservoir is to maintain pressure, and toward this end, gas injection volumes are scheduled to amount to 110% of calculated withdrawals. In spite of this, however, reservoir pressure continues to decline. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine if, and to what extent, field operating practices and accounting procedures may be contributing to this dilemma and to make appropriate recommendations pertaining to correcting any deficiencies which may have been found.

  12. Process for preparing liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing radioactive and other hazardous liquid wastes for treatment by the method of vitrification or melting is provided for.

  13. Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    .........................................39 3.1.2 Open-hole Logs..................................................................................40 3.1.3 Core Data............................................................................................41 3.1.4 Geological Maps... and Well Locations ................................................41 3.1.5 Production Data..................................................................................41 vii Page 3.2 Log Data Preparation...

  14. Field-to-Fuel Performance Testing of Various Biomass Feedstocks: Production and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil to Refinery Blendstocks (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, D.; Westover, T.; Howe, D.; Evans, R.; French, R.; Kutnyakov, I.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale, cost-competitive deployment of thermochemical technologies to replace petroleum oil with domestic biofuels will require inclusion of high volumes of low-cost, diverse biomass types into the supply chain. However, a comprehensive understanding of the impacts of feedstock thermo-physical and chemical variability, particularly inorganic matter (ash), on the yield and product distribution

  15. Possible effects of reinjection at Wairakei goethermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allis, R.G.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the two-phase zone of Wairakei Field is in mass flow equilibrium, there is a net heat flow loss (approx. 700 MW) at present. Apart from the heat drawoff from the production borefield (approx. = 1600 MW), the major contributing factor appears to be natural steam flow through thermal areas (approx. = 600 MW). Reinjection of all waste water from the borefield would cause an additional heat flow loss of 400 to 500 MW. In the short-term, reinjection will improve the output of the borefield due to repressuring of the two-phase zone. However, in the long-term (> 5 years), substantial repressuring will reduce the hot, liquid inflow from depth. This inflow has provided most of the heat extracted from the field to date.

  16. Applying Decline Curve Analysis in the Liquid-rich Shales: Eagle Ford Shale Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indras, Purvi

    2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    With the emergence of liquid rich shale (LRS) plays like Eagle Ford and Northern Barnett, the petroleum industry needs a simple, easily applied technique that provides reliable estimates of future production rates in this kind of reservoir...

  17. A Management Tool for Analyzing CHP Natural Gas Liquids Recovery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, C.; Kozman, T. A.; Lee, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to develop a management tool for analyzing combined heat and power (CHP) natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery systems. The methodology is developed around the central ideas of product recovery, possible recovery...

  18. Evaluation of a New Liquid Breaker for Polymer Based In-Situ Gelled Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksoy, Gamze

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    resulting in a less than desirable productivity. Therefore, an effective liquid breaker that is based on tetrafluoroboric acid was developed. This study was conducted to evaluate this new breaker system under the following conditions: breaker...

  19. A Management Tool for Analyzing CHP Natural Gas Liquids Recovery System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, C.; Kozman, T. A.; Lee, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to develop a management tool for analyzing combined heat and power (CHP) natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery systems. The methodology is developed around the central ideas of product recovery, possible recovery...

  20. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb2009FieldNatural

  1. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field number 1, onshore gulf coast over-pressured, high yield condensate reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoirs, the study conducted on an overpressured high yield gas condensate reservoir is reported. The base recovery factor for the field was projected to be only 47.8%, due to high residual gas saturation and a relatively strong aquifer which maintained reservoir pressure.

  2. Semiclassical pair production rate for time-dependent electrical fields with more than one component: -WKB-approach and world-line instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckhard Strobel; She-Sheng Xue

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analytic calculation of the semiclassical electron-positron pair creation rate by time-dependent electrical fields. We use two methods, first the imaginary time method in the WKB-approximation and second the world-line instanton approach. The analytic tools for both methods are generalized to time-dependent electric fields with more than one component. For the WKB method an expansion of the momentum spectrum of produced pairs around the canonical momentum $\\vec{P}=0$ is presented which simplifies the computation of the pair creation rate. We argue that the world-line instanton method of [Dunne et al., Phys. Rev. D73, 065028 (2006)] implicitly performs this expansion of the momentum spectrum around $\\vec{P}=0$. Accordingly the generalization to more than one component is shown to agree with the WKB result obtained via this expansion. However the expansion is only a good approximation for the cases where the momentum spectrum is peaked around $\\vec{P}=0$. Thus the expanded WKB result and the world-line instanton method of [Dunne et al., Phys. Rev. D73, 065028 (2006)] as well as the generalized method presented here are only applicable in these cases. We study the two component case of a rotating electric field and find a new analytic closed form for the momentum spectrum using the generalized WKB method. The momentum spectrum for this field is not peaked around $\\vec{P}=0$.

  3. Specialty Cellular Glass Products and Their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rostoker, D.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . One such field of application, the Alcoa Smelting Process, involves the use of molten salts which tend to impregnate materials which are porous to either salt vapors or to the liquid phase. Such impregnation of ordinary insulating materials causes a...

  4. Fermionic Luttinger liquids from a microscopic perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Valiente; Lawrence G. Phillips; Nikolaj T. Zinner; Patrik Ohberg

    2015-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider interacting one-dimensional, spinless Fermi gases, whose low-energy properties are described by Luttinger liquid theory. We perform a systematic, in-depth analysis of the relation between the macroscopic, phenomenological parameters of Luttinger liquid effective field theory, and the microscopic interactions of the Fermi gas. In particular, we begin by explaining how to model effective interactions in one dimension, which we then apply to the main forward scattering channel -- the interbranch collisions -- common to these systems. We renormalise the corresponding interbranch phenomenological constants in favour of scattering phase shifts. Interestingly, our renormalisation procedure shows (i) how Luttinger's model arises in a completely natural way -- and not as a convenient approximation -- from Tomonaga's model, and (ii) the reasons behind the interbranch coupling constant remaining unrenormalised in Luttinger's model. We then consider the so-called intrabranch processes, whose phenomenological coupling constant is known to be fixed by charge conservation, but whose microscopic origin is not well understood. We show that, contrary to general belief and common sense, the intrabranch interactions appearing in Luttinger liquid theory do not correspond to an intrabranch scattering channel, nor an energy shift due to intrabranch interactions, in the microscopic theory. Instead, they are due to interbranch processes. We finally apply our results to a particular example of an exactly solvable model, namely the fermionic dual to the Lieb-Liniger model in the Tonks-Girardeau and super-Tonks-Girardeau regimes.

  5. Stochastic analysis of dense nonaqueous phase liquid dissolution in naturally heterogeneous subsurface systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xin, 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field-scale Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) dissolution in three-dimensional heterogeneous subsurface systems is investigated using a stochastic approach that treats the variability of flow properties as three-dimensional ...

  6. Nuclear symmetry energy effects on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharat K. Sharma; Subrata Pal

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated within relativistic mean-field model using the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy constrained from the measured neutron skin thickness of finite nuclei. We find symmetry energy has a significant influence on several features of liquid-gas phase transition. The boundary and area of the liquid-gas coexistence region, the maximal isospin asymmetry and the critical values of pressure and isospin asymmetry all of which systematically increase with increasing softness in the density dependence of symmetry energy. The critical temperature below which the liquid-gas mixed phase exists is found higher for a softer symmetry energy.

  7. Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Arnold Barry; Williams, Ryan (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Drennen, Thomas E.; Klotz, Richard (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY)

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production costs, carbon dioxide emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL) and coal (coal to liquid, or CTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion efficiency, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the preliminary results from the model. For the base cases, CTL and cellulosic ethanol are the least cost fuel options, at $1.60 and $1.71 per gallon, respectively. Base case assumptions do not include tax or other credits. This compares to a $2.35/gallon production cost of gasoline at September, 2007 crude oil prices ($80.57/barrel). On an energy content basis, the CTL is the low cost alternative, at $12.90/MMBtu, compared to $22.47/MMBtu for cellulosic ethanol. In terms of carbon dioxide emissions, a typical vehicle fueled with cellulosic ethanol will release 0.48 tons CO{sub 2} per year, compared to 13.23 tons per year for coal to liquid.

  8. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Hoyt, Andrea E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides (1) curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 where R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are radicals selected from the group consisting of maleimide, substituted maleimide, nadimide, substituted naimide, ethynyl, and (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 where R.sup.3 is hydrogen with the proviso that the two carbon atoms of (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 are bound on the aromatic ring of A.sup.1 or A.sup.3 to adjacent carbon atoms, A.sup.1 and A.sup.3 are 1,4-phenylene and the same where said group contains one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, or propyl, alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, A.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of 1,4-phenylene, 4,4'-biphenyl, 2,6-naphthylene and the same where said groups contain one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro, lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, and propyl, lower alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl or fluoroalkoxy, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, and B.sup.1 and B.sup.2 are selected from the group consisting of --C(O)--O-- and --O--C(O)--, (2) thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions comprised of heat-cured segments derived from monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 as described above, (3) curable blends of at least two of the polyester monomers and (4) processes of preparing the curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers.

  9. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Kesanli, Banu (Mersin, TR); Neal, John S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  10. Withdrawal of gases and liquids from an in situ oil shale retort

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Martin M. (Broken Arrow, OK)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed within a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. A production level drift extends below the fragmented mass, leaving a lower sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the production level drift and the fragmented mass. During retorting operations, liquid and gaseous products are recovered from a lower portion of the fragmented mass. A liquid outlet line extends from a lower portion of the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar for conducting liquid products to a sump in the production level drift. Gaseous products are withdrawn from the fragmented mass through a plurality of gas outlet lines distributed across a horizontal cross-section of a lower portion of the fragmented mass. The gas outlet lines extend from the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar and into the production level drift. The gas outlet lines are connected to a gas withdrawal manifold in the production level drift, and gaseous products are withdrawn from the manifold separately from withdrawal of liquid products from the sump in the production level drift.

  11. Photorefractivity in polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiederrecht, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer-stabilized liquid crystals, consisting of low concentrations of a polymeric electron acceptor, are shown to exhibit significantly enhanced photorefractive properties. The charge generation and transport properties of these composite systems are strongly modified from nematic liquid crystals doped with electron donors and acceptors. The new composites are produced by polymerizing a small quantity of a 1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide electron acceptor functionalized with an acrylate group in an aligned nematic liquid crystal. Photopolymerization creates an anisotropic gel-like medium in which the liquid crystal is free to reorient in the presence of a space charge field, while maintaining charge trapping sites in the polymerized regions of the material. The presence of these trapping sites results in the observation of longer lived, higher resolution holographic gratings in the polymer-stabilized liquid crystals than observed in nematic liquid crystals alone. These gratings display Bragg regime diffraction. Asymmetric beam coupling, photo-conductivity, and four-wave mixing experiments are performed to characterize the photophysics of these novel materials.

  12. Method for treating liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Singh, P.; Ketring, A.R.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering {sup 99}Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of {sup 99}Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester {sup 99}Tc from those liquids. 6 figs.

  13. Method for treating liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering .sup.99 Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of .sup.99 TcO.sub.4.sup.- from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of .sup.99 Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester .sup.99 Tc from those liquids.

  14. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W. Jr. (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA)); Cochran, H.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Process for hydrocracking carbonaceous material in liquid carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Dennis A. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid carbonaceous material is hydrocracked to provide aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons for use as gaseous and liquid fuels or chemical feed stock. Particulate carbonaceous material such as coal in slurry with recycled product oil is preheated in liquid state to a temperature of 600.degree.-1200.degree. F. in the presence of hydrogen gas. The product oil acts as a sorbing agent for the agglomerating bitumins to minimize caking within the process. In the hydrocracking reactor, the slurry of oil and carbonaceous particles is heated within a tubular passageway to vaporize the oil and form a gas-solid mixture which is further heated to a hydropyrolysis temperature in excess of 1200.degree. F. The gas-solid mixture is quenched by contact with additional oil to condense normally liquid hydrocarbons for separation from the gases. A fraction of the hydrocarbon liquid product is recycled for quenching and slurrying with the carbonaceous feed. Hydrogen is recovered from the gas for recycle and additional hydrogen is produced by gasification of residual char.

  16. Electrohydrodynamic instabilities in thin liquid trilayer films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roberts, Scott A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kumar, Satish [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments by Dickey et al. [Langmuir, 22, 4315 (2006)] and Leach et al. [Chaos, 15, 047506 (2005)] show that novel pillar shapes can be generated from electrohydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of thin polymer/polymer/air trilayer films. In this paper, we use linear stability analysis to investigate the effect of free charge and ac electric fields on the stability of trilayer systems. Our work is also motivated by our recent theoretical study [J. Fluid Mech., 631, 255 (2009)] which demonstrates how ac electric fields can be used to increase control over the pillar formation process in thin liquid bilayer films. For perfect dielectric films, the effect of an AC electric field can be understood by considering an equivalent DC field. Leaky dielectric films yield pillar configurations that are drastically different from perfect dielectric films, and AC fields can be used to control the location of free charge within the trilayer system. This can alter the pillar instability modes and generate smaller diameter pillars when conductivities are mismatched. The results presented here may be of interest for the creation of complex topographical patterns on polymer coatings and in microelectronics.

  17. Electrohydrodynamic instabilities in thin liquid trilayer films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roberts, Scott A.; Kumar, Satish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments by Dickey and Leach show that novel pillar shapes can be generated from electrohydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of thin polymer/polymer/air trilayer films. In this paper, we use linear stability analysis to investigate the effect of free charge and ac electric fields on the stability of trilayer systems. Our work is also motivated by our recent theoretical study which demonstrates how ac electric fields can be used to increase control over the pillar formation process in thin liquid bilayer films. For perfect dielectric films, the effect of an AC electric field can be understood by considering an equivalent DCmore »field. Leaky dielectric films yield pillar configurations that are drastically different from perfect dielectric films, and AC fields can be used to control the location of free charge within the trilayer system. This can alter the pillar instability modes and generate smaller diameter pillars when conductivities are mismatched. The results presented here may be of interest for the creation of complex topographical patterns on polymer coatings and in microelectronics.« less

  18. Singular Limits in Polymer Stabilized Liquid Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-31-00T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate equilibrium configurations for a polymer stabilized liquid crys- tal material ... eling the cross section of the liquid crystal-polymer fiber composite.

  19. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface...

  20. Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Targets, barriers and...

  1. Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

  2. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  3. Catalysts for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY); Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst composition capable of ensuring the production of only relatively minor amounts of heavy products boiling beyond the diesel oil range. The catalyst composition, having desirable stability during continuous production operation, employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component. The latter component is a steam-stabilized zeolite Y catalyst of hydrophobic character, desirably in acid-extracted form.

  4. Solid-Liquid Interfacial Premelting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yang; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian Bostian

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid-liquid miscibility gap, negligible solubility of Pb in the Al solid phase, and a large melting point separa- tion (600 K for Pb and 933 K for Al). We have previously reported results from MD simulations on this system at 625 K, a temperature just... undergoes a roughening transition about 100 K below the melting point of Al. Simulation details.—In our simulations of the Al-Pb solid-liquid interface, we employ a classical many-body potential developed by Landa et al. [42] to model the inter- atomic...

  5. Liquid-liquid equilibria for hydrogen fluoride + 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane at {minus}20 and 20 C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Y.W.; Lee, Y.Y. [KIST, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). CFC Alternatives Technology Center

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1,1-Dichloro-1-fluoroethane is presently under consideration as a replacement for trichlorofluoromethane, which is widely used as a foam blowing agent. 1-Chloro-1,1-difluoroethane is the major raw material for the production of poly(vinylidene fluoride). These two materials are normally manufactured by the fluorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane or vinylidene chloride with hydrogen fluoride. A phase separator is normally used to retrieve hydrogen fluoride from the product stream. To design the phase separator, liquid-liquid equilibrium data are required. Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary system (hydrogen fluoride + 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) have been measured at {minus}20 and 20 C. The results are correlated with the NRTL model, and the relevant parameters are presented.

  6. Electrolyte creepage barrier for liquid electrolyte fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (Alberta, CA); Farooque, Mohammad (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A dielectric assembly for electrically insulating a manifold or other component from a liquid electrolyte fuel cell stack wherein the dielectric assembly includes a substantially impermeable dielectric member over which electrolyte is able to flow and a barrier adjacent the dielectric member and having a porosity of less than 50% and greater than 10% so that the barrier is able to measurably absorb and chemically react with the liquid electrolyte flowing on the dielectric member to form solid products which are stable in the liquid electrolyte. In this way, the barrier inhibits flow or creepage of electrolyte from the dielectric member to the manifold or component to be electrically insulated from the fuel cell stack by the dielectric assembly.

  7. Method of driving liquid flow at or near the free surface using magnetic microparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snezhko, Oleksiy (Woodridge, IL); Aronson, Igor (Darien, IL); Kwok, Wai-Kwong (Evanston, IL); Belkin, Maxim V. (Woodridge, IL)

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of driving liquid flow at or near a free surface using self-assembled structures composed of magnetic particles subjected to an external AC magnetic field. A plurality of magnetic particles are supported at or near a free surface of liquid by surface tension or buoyancy force. An AC magnetic field traverses the free surface and dipole-dipole interaction between particles produces in self-assembled snake structures which oscillate at the frequency of the traverse AC magnetic field. The snake structures independently move across the free surface and may merge with other snake structures or break up and coalesce into additional snake structures experiencing independent movement across the liquid surface. During this process, the snake structures produce asymmetric flow vortices across substantially the entirety of the free surface, effectuating liquid flow across the free surface.

  8. Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

  9. Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

  10. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  11. Feasibility of Steam Hydrogasification of Microalgae for Production of Synthetic Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suemanotham, Amornrat

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and second generation biofuels: A comprehensive review.Production of liquid biofuels from renewable resources.al. , Second Generation Biofuels: High-Efficiency Microalgae

  12. Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen-from- Ethanol: A Distributed Production System Presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Meeting Laurel, Maryland Tuesday,...

  13. Liquid measurement - Techniques and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, B.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a few liquid measurement techniques and their associated problems. In measuring liquid petroleum gas, the first obstacle to overcome is accomodating some form of volumetric measurement. This is usually accomplished by orifice, positive displacement, or turbine meters. Each of the three established methods is covered extensively by industry standards in the API Manual of Petroleum Standards. If the operator follows these standards, very accurate results can be achieved.

  14. Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery -- Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. First quarterly technical progress report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baroni, M.R.

    1993-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    For work during the first quarter of 1993, American Oil Recovery, Inc. targeted completion of the following specific objectives: Convene meetings of Mattoon Project subcontractors in order to plan and coordinate Project activities. Confirm organizational arrangements and plans for implementation of Mattoon Project. Complete most work on detailed analysis of reservoir geology of productive leases in the Mattoon Project. Identify first Facies Defined Subunit for initial injectivity testing to be commenced near the beginning of the second quarter. Identify additional Facies Defined Subunits for injectivity testing and characterization during the second and third quarters. Award subcontract to the Illinois State Geological Survey and commence work on preparation of a geostatistical model (STRATAMODEL) of more than 100 wells on 1,000 acres within the Mattoon Project Area. Obtain oil samples from wells in the identified Facies Subunit for reservoir rock, fluid, and CO{sub 2} compatibility testing by the Illinois State Geological Survey. Design CO{sub 2} injection pumps and injection monitoring equipment configuration. Obtain bids for required pumps and diesel motor. Accomplishments for this quarter are reported.

  15. Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, March 30, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D. [Long Beach City Dept. of Oil Properties, CA (United States); Ershaghi, I. [Southern California, CA (United States); Davies, D. [Davies (David K.) and Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Phillips, C.; Mondragon, J. [Tidelands Oil Production Company (United States)

    1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project. Although the contract was awarded on March 30, 1995 and Pre-Award Approval was given on January 26, 1995, the partners of this project initiated work on October 1, 1994. As such, this progress report summarizes the work performed from project inception. The production and injection data, reservoir engineering data, and digitized and normalized log data were all completed sufficiently by the end of the quarter to start work on the basic reservoir engineering and geologic stochastic models. Basic reservoir engineering analysis began June 1 and will continue to March, 1996. Design work for the 5 observation/core holes, oil finger printing of the cored oil sands, and tracers surveys began in January, 1995. The wells will be drilled from July--August, 1995 and tracer injection work is projected to start in October, 1995. A preliminary deterministic 3-D geologic model was completed in June which is sufficient to start work on the stochastic 3-D geologic model. The four proposed horizontal wells (two injectors and two producers) have been designed, equipment has been ordered, and the wells will be drilled from mid-August through September. Four existing steam injection wells were converted to hot water injection in March, 1995. Initial rates were kept low to minimize operational problems. Injection rates will be increased significantly in July.

  16. Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

  17. Interaction of a Liquid Gallium Jet with ISTTOK Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Porugal (Portugal); Sarakovskis, A.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I. [Association EURATOM/University of Latvia, Institute of Solid State Physics, 8 Kengaraga Str., LV-1063 Riga (Latvia)

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of liquid metals as plasma facing components in tokamaks has recently experienced a renewed interest stimulated by their advantages in the development of a fusion reactor. Liquid metals have been proposed to solve problems related to the erosion and neutronic activation of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing an efficient heat exhaust from fusion devices. Presently the most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state range when compared, for example, with gallium that has essentially better thermal properties and lower vapor pressure. To explore further these properties, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying, fully formed liquid gallium jet with the plasma. The interacting, 2.3 mm diameter, jet is generated by hydrostatic pressure and has a 2.5 m/s flow velocity. The liquid metal injector has been build to allow the positioning of the jet inside the tokamak chamber, within a 13 mm range. This paper presents the first obtained experimental results concerning the liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction. A stable jet has been obtained, which was not noticeably affected by the magnetic field transients. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with the gallium jet without degradation of the discharge or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. This observation is supported by spectroscopic measurements showing that gallium radiation is limited to the region around the jet. Furthermore, the power deposited on the jet has been evaluated at different radial locations and the surface temperature increase estimated.

  18. Hydrogen Production From Metal-Water Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Hydrogen Production From Metal-Water Reactions Why Hydrogen Production? Hydrogen is a critical. Current methods of hydrogen storage in automobiles are either too bulky (large storage space for gas phase) or require a high input energy (cooling or pressurization systems for liquid hydrogen), making widespread use

  19. Novel Fluctuations at a Constrained Liquid-Solid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chaudhuri; Debasish Chaudhuri; Surajit Sengupta

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the interface between a solid trapped within a bath of liquid by a suitably shaped non-uniform external potential. Such a potential may be constructed using lasers, external electric or magnetic fields or a surface template. We study a two dimensional case where a thin strip of solid, created in this way, is surrounded on either side by a bath of liquid with which it can easily exchange particles. Since height fluctuations of the interface cost energy, this interface is constrained to remain flat at all length scales. However, when such a solid is stressed by altering the depth of the potential; beyond a certain limit, it responds by relieving stress by novel interfacial fluctuations which involve addition or deletion of entire lattice layers of the crystal. This ``layering'' transition is a generic feature of the system regardless of the details of the interaction potential. We show how such interfacial fluctuations influence mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface. Tiny momentum impulses produce weak shock waves which travel through the interface and cause the spallation of crystal layers into the liquid. Kinetic and energetic constraints prevent spallation of partial layers from the crystal, a fact which may be of some practical use. We also study heat transport through the liquid-solid interface and obtain the resistances in liquid, solid and interfacial regions (Kapitza resistance) as the solid undergoes such layering transitions. Heat conduction, which shows strong signatures of the structural transformations, can be understood using a free volume calculation.

  20. STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.