Sample records for liquid water paths

  1. Global cloud liquid water path simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, L. [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)] [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Rikus, L. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Martin, C.; Platt, R. [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)] [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new parameterization of cloud liquid water and ice content has been included in the Bureau of Meteorology Global Assimilation and Prediction System. The cloud liquid water content is derived from the mean cloud temperatures in the model using an empirical relationship based on observations. The results from perpetual January and July simulations are presented and show that the total cloud water path steadily decreases toward high latitudes, with two relative maxima at midlatitudes and a peak at low latitudes. To validate the scheme, the simulated fields need to be processed to produce liquid water paths that can be directly compared with the corresponding field derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. This requires the identification of cloud ice water content within the parameterization and a prescription to account for the treatment of strongly precipitating subgrid-scale cloud. The resultant cloud liquid water paths agree qualitatively with the SSM/I data but show some systematic errors that are attributed to corresponding errors in the model`s simulation of cloud amounts. Given that a more quantitative validation requires substantial improvement in the model`s diagnostic cloud scheme, the comparison with the SSM/I data indicates that the cloud water path, derived from the cloud liquid water content parameterization introduced in this paper, is consistent with the observations and can be usefully incorporated in the prediction system. 40 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 1 DECEMBER 1995 Validation of Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Microphysics and Liquid Water Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Quingyuan

    1 DECEMBER 1995 Validation of Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Microphysics and Liquid Water Path Using Observations from FIRE 1, Introduction Q. HAN, * W. Rossow, t R. WELCH, * A. WHITE, * * AND J Cloud effective radii (r) and cloud liquid water path (LWP) are derived from ISCCP spatially sampled

  3. Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey interactions radiative effects, i.e., the cloud cover, liquid water path (LWP) and cloud drop radius (Twomey negative radiative forcing on the global scale, mainly due to the cloud cover effect. © 2013 Elsevier B

  4. VALIDATION OF CLOUD LIQUID WATER PATH RETRIEVALS FROM SEVIRI ON METEOSAT-8 USING CLOUDNET OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    on global cloud statistics and radiation budget #12;(Feijt et al., 2003). With the launch of Meteosat Second effective radius and Cloud Liquid Water Path (CLWP) over Europe. The CloudNET research project, supported forecast models. The radiative behavior of clouds depends predominantly on cloud properties

  5. New Technique for Retrieving Liquid Water Path over Land using Satellite Microwave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deeter, M.N.; Vivekanandan, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new methodology for retrieving liquid water path over land using satellite microwave observations. As input, the technique exploits the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for earth observing plan (EOS) (AMSR-E) polarization-difference signals at 37 and 89 GHz. Regression analysis performed on model simulations indicates that over variable atmospheric and surface conditions the polarization-difference signals can be simply parameterized in terms of the surface emissivity polarization difference ({Delta}{var_epsilon}), surface temperature, liquid water path (LWP), and precipitable water vapor (PWV). The resulting polarization-difference parameterization (PDP) enables fast and direct (noniterative) retrievals of LWP with minimal requirements for ancillary data. Single- and dual-channel retrieval methods are described and demonstrated. Data gridding is used to reduce the effects of instrumental noise. The methodology is demonstrated using AMSR-E observations over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during a six day period in November and December, 2003. Single- and dual-channel retrieval results mostly agree with ground-based microwave retrievals of LWP to within approximately 0.04 mm.

  6. MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

  7. Path Integral Molecular Dynamics within the Grand Canonical-like Adaptive Resolution Technique: Quantum-Classical Simulation of Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Animesh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum effects due to the spatial delocalization of light atoms are treated in molecular simulation via the path integral technique. Among several methods, Path Integral (PI) Molecular Dynamics (MD) is nowadays a powerful tool to investigate properties induced by spatial delocalization of atoms; however computationally this technique is very demanding. The abovementioned limitation implies the restriction of PIMD applications to relatively small systems and short time scales. One possible solution to overcome size and time limitation is to introduce PIMD algorithms into the Adaptive Resolution Simulation Scheme (AdResS). AdResS requires a relatively small region treated at path integral level and embeds it into a large molecular reservoir consisting of generic spherical coarse grained molecules. It was previously shown that the realization of the idea above, at a simple level, produced reasonable results for toy systems or simple/test systems like liquid parahydrogen. Encouraged by previous results, in this ...

  8. ARM - Measurement - Liquid water path

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions . Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions . Abstract: The rates...

  10. Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    reproduces the isotope effect. The heat capacity in the liquid D2O has been calculated to be 10% higher than important in the liquid phase. In fact, in many systems, the heat capacity has an isotope effect, whichCalculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics

  11. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cadeddu, Maria

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  12. Proton Electrodynamics in Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Volkov; V. G. Artemov; A. V. Pronin

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The dielectric spectrum of liquid water, $10^{4} - 10^{11}$ Hz, is interpreted in terms of diffusion of charges, formed as a result of self-ionization of H$_{2}$O molecules. This approach explains the Debye relaxation and the dc conductivity as two manifestations of this diffusion. The Debye relaxation is due to the charge diffusion with a fast recombination rate, $1/\\tau_{2}$, while the dc conductivity is a manifestation of the diffusion with a much slower recombination rate, $1/\\tau_{1}$. Applying a simple model based on Brownian-like diffusion, we find $\\tau_{2} \\simeq 10^{-11}$ s and $\\tau_{1} \\simeq 10^{-6}$ s, and the concentrations of the charge carriers, involved in each of the two processes, $N_{2} \\simeq 5 \\times 10^{26}$ m$^{-3}$ and $N_{1} \\simeq 10^{14}$ m$^{-3}$. Further, we relate $N_{2}$ and $N_{1}$ to the total concentration of H$_{3}$O$^{+}$--OH$^{-}$ pairs and to the pH index, respectively, and find the lifetime of a single water molecule, $\\tau_{0} \\simeq 10^{-9}$ s. Finally, we show that the high permittivity of water results mostly from flickering of separated charges, rather than from reorientations of intact molecular dipoles.

  13. Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although electrokinetic effects are not new, only recently have they been investigated for possible use in energy conversion devices. We have recently reported the electrokinetic generation of molecular hydrogen from rapidly flowing liquid water microjets [Duffin et al. JPCC 2007, 111, 12031]. Here, we describe the use of liquid water microjets for direct conversion of electrokinetic energy to electrical power. Previous studies of electrokinetic power production have reported low efficiencies ({approx}3%), limited by back conduction of ions at the surface and in the bulk liquid. Liquid microjets eliminate energy dissipation due to back conduction and, measuring only at the jet target, yield conversion efficiencies exceeding 10%.

  14. Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) (Presentation) Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport...

  15. II. Properties of Water 1. Ice and Liquid water structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    Heat Capacity 4. Solvent Properties 5. Dissociation: Acids & Bases / pH II. Organic Chemistry A transport in plants #12;Water has a high specific heat capacity specific heat capacity = amount of energyII. Properties of Water 1. Ice and Liquid water structure 2. Cohesion / Surface Tension 3. High

  16. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

  17. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fortier, N.E.; Fritz, J.S.

    1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present. 1 fig.

  18. On the Fluctuations that Order and Frustrate Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limmer, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most nonpolar liquids have heat capacities that range from 8the maximum liquid state heat capacity[173]. ExperimentallyLIQUID AND SOLID WATER (a) Density (b) Compressibility (c) Heat Capacity

  19. A quantitative account of quantum effects in liquid water. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report quantum statistical mechanical simulations of liquid water with the TTM2.1-F flexible, polarizable interaction potential for water. The potential is the first...

  20. The physics of liquid water Bernard Cabane1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with extraordinary properties: it has unusually high melting and boiling temperatures, a huge heat capacity, oneThe physics of liquid water Bernard Cabane1 , Rodolphe Vuilleumier2 1 PMMH, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, France Abstract Liquid water is a liquid with extraordinary properties: it has a very high cohesion

  1. Response functions near the liquid-liquid critical point of ST2 water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    speci¿c heat capacity CP and the isothermal compressibility KT . We use two different methods: (i) fromResponse functions near the liquid-liquid critical point of ST2 water Erik Lascaris , T. A, and for four different system sizes, N = 63, 73, 83, and 93. We locate the liquid-liquid phase transition line

  2. On the Fluctuations that Order and Frustrate Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limmer, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the forces of hydrogen bonds to the properties of liquid andhydrogen bond network couples to the dynamically heterogeneous propertiesproperties of liquid water manifest how the strength of these hydrogen

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Liquid water path

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. An Evaluation of MWR Retrievals of Liquid Water Path

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. Liquid-liquid equilibria of fuel oxygenate + water + hydrocarbon mixtures. 3: Effect of temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, G. [Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik; Sandler, S.I. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Molecular and Engineering Thermodynamics

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have measured the ternary liquid-liquid equilibria of water + ethanol mixtures with, separately, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and toluene at 5 and 40 C, water + tert-amyl alcohol (TAOH) mixtures with, separately, toluene and hexane at 5 and 40 C, and of water + TAOH + pentane mixtures at 5 C. The ethanol-containing systems exhibit type 1 liquid-liquid phase behavior, and the TAOH-containing systems exhibit type 2 behavior. These data, together with the data they have previously reported at 25 C, provide information on how the liquid-liquid equilibria of these systems change as a function of temperature. While the addition of ethanol is found to increase the solubility of hydrocarbons in the aqueous phase, the concentration of the hydrocarbon in the water-rich phase decreases with increasing temperature. With the exception of hydrocarbon in the water-rich phase, the experimental data could be correlated quite well with either the UNIQUAC or NRTL models. For most of the systems considered here the predictions of the phase behavior with the liquid-liquid UNIFAC group-contribution model are only qualitatively correct. However, the liquid-liquid UNIFAC model erroneously predicts type 2 phase behavior to occur for water + ethanol + 2,2,4-trimethylpentane system at 5 C.

  6. Liquid-liquid equilibria of water + methanol + 1-octanol and water + ethanol + 1-octanol at various temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arce, A.; Blanco, A.; Souza, P.; Vidal, I. (Univ. of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is part of a wider program of research on the recovery of light alcohols from dilute aqueous solutions using high molecular weight solvents. The authors report liquid-liquid equilibrium data and binodal curves for the systems water + methanol + 1-octanol and water + ethanol + 1-octanol at 25, 35, and 45 C. The data were fitted to the NRTL and UNIQUAC equations.

  7. New Approach to Modelling Water Paths in Managed Rainforests Nick A CHAPPELL*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    pathways (e.g., pressure and kinematic waves) would require much re-programming and reNew Approach to Modelling Water Paths in Managed Rainforests Nick A CHAPPELL*1 , Wlodek TYCH1 for such forecasts. Limits to catchment models using micro-scale physics: When using catchment models based on soil-water

  8. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water, methanol + water, and ethanol + water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Takeda, Kouichi; Kojima, Kazuo [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry; Minoura, Tsuyoshi [Mitui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system methanol + ethanol + water and its constituent binary systems of methanol + water and ethanol + water at 323.15, 328.15, and 333.15 K. The apparatus that was used made it possible to control the measured temperature and total pressure by computer. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  9. action-based path sampling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matter (arXiv) Summary: We use transition path sampling to study evaporation in the SPCE model of liquid water. Based on thousands of evaporation trajectories, we...

  10. VAPOR + LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM OF WATER, CARBON DIOXIDE, AND THE BINARY SYSTEM WATER + CARBON DIOXIDE FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and their binary mixtures (between 348 and 393 K). The properties of supercritical carbon dioxide were determinedVAPOR + LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM OF WATER, CARBON DIOXIDE, AND THE BINARY SYSTEM WATER + CARBON DIOXIDE the vapor-liquid equilibrium of water (between 323 and 573 K), carbon dioxide (between 230 and 290 K

  11. New Mexico cloud super cooled liquid water survey final report 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavis, Nick; Roskovensky, John K.; Ivey, Mark D.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories are partners in an effort to survey the super-cooled liquid water in clouds over the state of New Mexico in a project sponsored by the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program. This report summarizes the scientific work performed at Sandia National Laboratories during the 2009. In this second year of the project a practical methodology for estimating cloud super-cooled liquid water was created. This was accomplished through the analysis of certain MODIS sensor satellite derived cloud products and vetted parameterizations techniques. A software code was developed to analyze multiple cases automatically. The eighty-one storm events identified in the previous year effort from 2006-2007 were again the focus. Six derived MODIS products were obtained first through careful MODIS image evaluation. Both cloud and clear-sky properties from this dataset were determined over New Mexico. Sensitivity studies were performed that identified the parameters which most influenced the estimation of cloud super-cooled liquid water. Limited validation was undertaken to ensure the soundness of the cloud super-cooled estimates. Finally, a path forward was formulized to insure the successful completion of the initial scientific goals which include analyzing different of annual datasets, validation of the developed algorithm, and the creation of a user-friendly and interactive tool for estimating cloud super-cooled liquid water.

  12. Spectroscopic investigations of hydrogen bond dynamics in liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fecko, Christopher J., 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the remarkable physical and chemical properties of liquid water are due to the strong influence hydrogen bonds have on its microscopic dynamics. However, because of the fast timescales involved, there are relatively ...

  13. Liquid water: A very complex fluid H EUGENE STANLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Liquid water: A very complex fluid H EUGENE STANLEY Center for Polymer Studies and Department, M Canpolat, M Meyer, O Mishima, R Sadr-Lahijany, A Scala and F W Starr. It is also based on earlier

  14. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Starr, Francis W. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related, both being associated with the limit of kinetic stability of LDA (HDA)

  15. Process for blending coal with water immiscible liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heavin, Leonard J. (Olympia, WA); King, Edward E. (Gig Harbor, WA); Milliron, Dennis L. (Lacey, WA)

    1982-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous process for blending coal with a water immiscible liquid produces a uniform, pumpable slurry. Pulverized raw feed coal and preferably a coal derived, water immiscible liquid are continuously fed to a blending zone (12 and 18) in which coal particles and liquid are intimately admixed and advanced in substantially plug flow to form a first slurry. The first slurry is withdrawn from the blending zone (12 and 18) and fed to a mixing zone (24) where it is mixed with a hot slurry to form the pumpable slurry. A portion of the pumpable slurry is continuously recycled to the blending zone (12 and 18) for mixing with the feed coal.

  16. Behavior of Supercooled Aqueous Solutions Stemming from Hidden Liquid-Liquid Transition in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Biddle; Vincent Holten; Mikhail A. Anisimov

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter, to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We suggest an interpretation of the liquid-liquid transition in aqueous solutions of glycerol, recently observed by Murata and Tanaka, elucidating the non-conserved nature of the order parameter, its coupling with density and concentration, and the peculiarity of "spinodal decomposition without phase separation". We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  17. GEOSTAR-II: A PROTOTYPE WATER VAPOR IMAGER/SOUNDER FOR THE PATH Todd Gaier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    GEOSTAR-II: A PROTOTYPE WATER VAPOR IMAGER/SOUNDER FOR THE PATH MISSION Todd Gaier1 , Bjorn the as yet undefined mission requirements. By far the most stringent "requirement" is the recovery. The IF signals are routed to a correlator unit on coaxial cables. The system is not designed to provide full

  18. Structure and Depletion at Fluoro- and Hydro-carbon/Water Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaoru Kashimoto; Jaesung Yoon; Binyang Hou; Chiu-hao Chen; Binhua Lin; Makoto Aratono; Takanori Takiue; Mark L. Schlossman

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of x-ray reflectivity studies of two oil/water (liquid/liquid) interfaces are inconsistent with recent predictions of the presence of a vapor-like depletion region at hydrophobic/aqueous interfaces. One of the oils, perfluorohexane, is a fluorocarbon whose super-hydrophobic interface with water provides a stringent test for the presence of a depletion layer. The other oil, heptane, is a hydrocarbon and, therefore, is more relevant to the study of biomolecular hydrophobicity. These results are consistent with the sub-angstrom proximity of water to soft hydrophobic materials.

  19. Local Structure Analysis in $Ab$ $Initio$ Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswajit Santra; Robert A. DiStasio Jr.; Fausto Martelli; Roberto Car

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyze the local structure in such highly accurate $ab$ $initio$ liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P($I$), was unimodal with most water molecules characterized by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P($I$) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies $among$ water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of the experimentally observed low- (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous phases of ice are present in the IPES of ambient liquid water. Analysis of the LSI autocorrelation function uncovered a persistence time of $\\sim$ 4 ps---a finding consistent with the fact that natural thermal fluctuations are responsible for transitions between these distinct yet transient local aqueous environments in ambient liquid water.

  20. How the Liquid-Liquid Transition Affects Hydrophobic Hydration in Deeply Supercooled Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietmar Paschek

    2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the phase diagram of liquid supercooled water by extensive computer simulations using the TIP5P-E model [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 120}, 6085 (2004)]. We find that the transformation of water into a low density liquid in the supercooled range strongly enhances the solubility of hydrophobic particles. The transformation of water into a tetrahedrally structured liquid is accompanied by a minimum in the hydration entropy and enthalpy. The corresponding change in sign of the solvation heat capacity indicates a loss of one characteristic signature of hydrophobic hydration. The observed behavior is found to be qualitatively in accordance with the predictions of the information theory model of Garde et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 77}, 4966 (1996)].

  1. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Confined Water: A Monte Carlo Study Martin Meyer and H. Eugene Stanley*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Confined Water: A Monte Carlo Study Martin Meyer and H. Eugene Stanley* Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston UniVersity, Boston, Massachusetts

  2. Local Structure Analysis in $Ab$ $Initio$ Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santra, Biswajit; Martelli, Fausto; Car, Roberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyze the local structure in such highly accurate $ab$ $initio$ liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P($I$), was unimodal with most water molecules characterized by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P($I$) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies $among$ water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of th...

  3. Glass transition in biomolecules and the liquid-liquid critical point of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kumar; Z. Yan; L. Xu; M. G. Mazza; S. V. Buldyrev; S. -H. Chen; S. Sastry; H. E. Stanley

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the relation between the dynamic transitions of biomolecules (lysozyme and DNA) and the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of hydration water. We find that the dynamic transition of the macromolecules, sometimes called a ``protein glass transition'', occurs at the temperature of dynamic crossover in the diffusivity of hydration water, and also coincides with the maxima of the isobaric specific heat $C_P$ and the temperature derivative of the orientational order parameter. We relate these findings to the hypothesis of a liquid-liquid critical point in water. Our simulations are consistent with the possibility that the protein glass transition results from crossing the Widom line, which is defined as the locus of correlation length maxima emanating from the hypothesized second critical point of water.

  4. Liquid-liquid equilibrium of cyclohexane-n-hexane-methanol mixtures; Effect of water content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, P.; Fermeglia, M.; Kikic, I. (Istituto di Chimica Applicata e Industriale, University of Trieste, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (IT))

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for the ternary system cyclohexane-n-hexane-methanol and for the binary systems n-hexane-methanol and cyclohexane-methanol are presented over a temperature range from 284 to 298{Kappa} at pressure of 0.1 MPa. Attention is given to the effect of the purity of methanol as far as the water content is concerned. The data are correlated by means of excess Gibbs energy models (NRTL and UNIQUAC), and the binary interaction parameters are reported.

  5. Measurement of Liquid Water Accumulation in a PEMFC with Dead-Ended Anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Measurement of Liquid Water Accumulation in a PEMFC with Dead-Ended Anode Jason B. Siegel,a, *,z, Maryland 20899, USA The operation and accumulation of liquid water within the cell structure of a polymer, accumulation of liquid water in the anode gas distribution channels was observed in most tested conditions

  6. Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers by Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak Bachelor means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion State University) Abstract Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability

  7. Coupled cluster benchmarks of water monomers and dimers extracted from density-functional theory liquid water: The importance of monomer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    Coupled cluster benchmarks of water monomers and dimers extracted from density-functional theory functionals in simulations of liquid water, water monomers and dimers were extracted from a PBE simulation liquid water: The importance of monomer deformations Biswajit Santra,1 Angelos Michaelides,1,2,a

  8. Isotope effects in water as investigated by neutron diffraction and path integral molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeidler, Anita [University of Bath; Salmon, Phil [University of Bath; Fischer, Henry E [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Simonson, J Michael {Mike} [ORNL; Markland, Thomas [Columbia University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of heavy and light water at 300 K was investigated by using a joint approach in which the method of neutron di raction with oxygen isotope substitution was combined with path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The di raction results, which give intra-molecular O-D and O-H bond distances of 0.985(5) and 0.990(5) A, were found to be in best agreement with those obtained by using the exible anharmonic TTM3-F water model. Both techniques show a di erence of '0.5% between the O-D and O-H intra-molecular bond lengths and the results support a competing quantum e ects model for water in which its structural and dynamical properties are governed by an o set between intra-molecular and inter-molecular quantum contributions. Further consideration of the O-O correlations is needed in order to improve agreement with experiment.

  9. Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    circuitry/power supply Non-galvanic Single material (no electrodes) Ethanol/NG Steam O2- 1/2 O2 + 2e- 1/2 O.C2H5OH + 1/2 O2 2CO + 3H2 Predominant products of ethanol reforming: H2, CO, CO2, CH4, H2O #12Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM

  10. Nuclear quantum effects in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph A. Morrone; Roberto Car

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water is performed. It is found that the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects systematically improves the agreement of first principles simulations of liquid water with experiment. In addition, the proton momentum distribution is computed utilizing a recently developed open path integral molecular dynamics methodology. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with neutron Compton scattering data for liquid water and ice.

  11. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  12. Water vapor, cloud liquid water paths, and rain rates over northern high latitude open seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    longwave radiation caused by differences in cloud cover can produce an JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL-level stratus con- tribute the most to the total Arctic cloud cover of any cloud type according to surface presence during summertime but otherwise the Wentz internal sea-ice screening appears effective

  13. Gas-Liquid Coexistence in the Primitive Model for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Romano; P. Tartaglia; F. Sciortino

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the location of the gas-liquid coexistence line and of the associated critical point for the primitive model for water (PMW), introduced by Kolafa and Nezbeda [J. Kolafa and I. Nezbeda, Mol. Phys. 61, 161 (1987)]. Besides being a simple model for a molecular network forming liquid, the PMW is representative of patchy proteins and novel colloidal particles interacting with localized directional short-range attractions. We show that the gas-liquid phase separation is metastable, i.e. it takes place in the region of the phase diagram where the crystal phase is thermodynamically favored, as in the case of articles interacting via short-range attractive spherical potentials. Differently from spherical potentials, we do not observe crystallization close to the critical point. The region of gas-liquid instability of this patchy model is significantly reduced as compared to equivalent models of spherically interacting particles, confirming the possibility of observing kinetic arrest in an homogeneous sample driven by bonding as opposed to packing.

  14. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  15. Water clusters: Untangling the mysteries of the liquid, one molecule at a time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    to accurately calculate the properties of liquid water (e.g., heat capacity, density, dielectric constantWater clusters: Untangling the mysteries of the liquid, one molecule at a time Frank N. Keutsch- ative hydrogen bonding and promises to lead to a more complete molecular description of the liquid

  16. Selective extraction of copper, mercury, silver and palladium ions from water using hydrophobic ionic liquids.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Lee, Jong-Min; Salminen, Justin; Von Stosch, Moritz; Prausnitz, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for metal-ion extraction from water. All ionic liquids (useful for extraction of cations from water. 9-15 Previoussingle extraction of mercury in water with either [3MOPYR

  17. Liquid-liquid equilibria of the ternary system water + acetic acid + 2-methyl-2-butanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahim, M.A.; Al-Muhtaseb, S.A. [United Arab Emirates Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering] [United Arab Emirates Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary system water + acetic acid + 2-methyl-2-butanol were measured over a temperature range of (288 to 323) K. The results were used to estimate the interaction parameters between each of the three compounds for the NRTL and UNIQUAC models and between each of the main groups of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 2} (paraffinic CH{sub 2}), OH, and COOH for the UJNIFAC model as a function of temperature. The estimated interaction parameters were successfully used to predict the equilibrium compositions by the three models. The NRTL equation was the most accurate model in correlating the overall equilibrium compositions of the studied system. The UNIFAC model satisfactorily predicted the equilibrium compositions.

  18. Liquid-liquid equilibria of the ternary system water + acetic acid + 1-hexanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahim, M.A. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Al-Muhtaseb, S.A.; Al-Nashef, I.M. [U.A.E. Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering] [U.A.E. Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of organic acids from dilute solutions resulting from fermentation processes is important and many solvents have been tried to improve such recovery. Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary system water + acetic acid + 1-hexanol were measured over a temperature range of (288 to 323) K. The results were used to estimate the interaction parameters between each of the three compounds for the NRTL and UNIQUAC models and between each of the main groups of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 2} (paraffinic CH{sub 2}), OH, and COOH for the UNIFAC model as a function of temperature. The estimated interaction parameters were successfully used to predict the equilibrium compositions by the three models. The NRTL equation was the most accurate model in correlating the overall equilibrium compositions of the studied system. The UNIQUAC and UNIFAC models satisfactorily predicted the equilibrium compositions.

  19. Reference Correlations for Thermophysical Properties of Liquid Water Jaroslav Ptek, Jan Hrub,a...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    of sound , viscosity, thermal con- ductivity, and static dielectric constant of liquid water as a function capacity; speed of sound; thermal conductivity; ther- modynamic properties; viscosity; water. CONTENTS 1Reference Correlations for Thermophysical Properties of Liquid Water at 0.1 MPa Jaroslav Pátek, Jan

  20. Combustion of Nano-Aluminum and Liquid Water G.A. Risha, S.F. Son

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Vigor

    1 Combustion of Nano-Aluminum and Liquid Water G.A. Risha, S.F. Son , R.A. Yetter, V. Yang, and B: Supplemental materials submitted #12;2 Combustion of Nano-Aluminum and Liquid Water G.A. Risha, S.F. Son, R of nano-aluminum (nAl) and liquid water has been conducted. In particular, linear and mass-burning rates

  1. Basalt weathering rates on Earth and the duration of liquid water on the plains of Gusev Crater, Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hausrath, E.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basalt weathering rates on Earth and the duration of liquidCarlisle, PA 17013 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrencetime to liquid water: on Earth, mineral persistence times

  2. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liukang, Xu; Dayle, McDermitt; Tyler, Anderson; Brad, Riensche; Anatoly, Komissarov; Julie, Howe

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR�¢����s Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument�¢����s robustness in a real-world situation.

  3. Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid WaterMicrojets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a method for generating molecular hydrogen directly from the charge separation effected via rapid flow of liquid water through a metal orifice, wherein the input energy is the hydrostatic pressure times the volume flow rate. Both electrokinetic currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to follow simple equations derived from the overlap of the fluid velocity gradient and the anisotropic charge distribution resulting from selective adsorption of hydroxide ions to the nozzle surface. Pressure-driven fluid flow shears away the charge balancing hydronium ions from the diffuse double layer and carries them out of the aperture. Downstream neutralization of the excess protons at a grounded target electrode produces gaseous hydrogen molecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currently very low (ca. 10-6) for a single cylindrical jet, but can be improved with design changes.

  4. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water and the three constituent binary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Nakamichi, Mikiyoshi; Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for methanol + ethanol + water and its three constituent binary systems methanol + ethanol, ethanol + water, and methanol + water were measured at 101.3 kPa using a liquid-vapor ebullition-type equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system methanol + ethanol + water was predicted by means of the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  5. Network analysis of proton transfer in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevchuk, Roman; Rao, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.rao@frias.uni-freiburg.de [Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, School of Soft Matter Research, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Agmon, Noam [Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton transfer in macromolecular systems is a fascinating yet elusive process. In the last ten years, molecular simulations have shown to be a useful tool to unveil the atomistic mechanism. Notwithstanding, the large number of degrees of freedom involved make the accurate description of the process very hard even for the case of proton diffusion in bulk water. Here, multi-state empirical valence bond molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with complex network analysis are applied to study proton transfer in liquid water. Making use of a transition network formalism, this approach takes into account the time evolution of several coordinates simultaneously. Our results provide evidence for a strong dependence of proton transfer on the length of the hydrogen bond solvating the Zundel complex, with proton transfer enhancement as shorter bonds are formed at the acceptor site. We identify six major states (nodes) on the network leading from the “special pair” to a more symmetric Zundel complex required for transferring the proton. Moreover, the second solvation shell specifically rearranges to promote the transfer, reiterating the idea that solvation beyond the first shell of the Zundel complex plays a crucial role in the process.

  6. Parameterization of GDL Liquid Water Front Propagation and Channel Accumulation for Anode Purge Scheduling in Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Parameterization of GDL Liquid Water Front Propagation and Channel Accumulation for Anode Purge, and (2) accumulation and transport of liquid water in the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) originally presented experimentally iden- tified parameter to match the rate of liquid water accumulation in the anode channel

  7. Long time fluctuation of liquid water: l/f spectrum of energy fluctuation in hydrogen bond network rearrangement dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaswamy, Ram

    Long time fluctuation of liquid water: l/f spectrum of energy fluctuation in hydrogen bond network of the potential energy fluctuation of liquid water is examined and found to yield so-called l/f frequency of hydrogen bond network relaxations in liquid water. A simple model of cellular dynamics is proposed

  8. MODELING OF LIQUID WATER ON CM PARENT BODIES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR AMINO ACID RACEMIZATION. B. A. Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    the most recent tem- perature-dependent expressions for thermal conductiv- ity, heat capacity, densityMODELING OF LIQUID WATER ON CM PARENT BODIES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR AMINO ACID RACEMIZATION. B. A and duration of a liquid water phase [1]. The characteris- tics of the liquid water phase are critical

  9. On the Fluctuations that Order and Frustrate Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limmer, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative water model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.3 Determining T g for water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Contents 6 Frustrating water at ordered surfaces 6.1

  10. Free energy surface of ST2 water near the liquid-liquid phase transition Peter H. Poole, Richard K. Bowles, Ivan Saika-Voivod, and Francesco Sciortino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciortino, Francesco

    Free energy surface of ST2 water near the liquid-liquid phase transition Peter H. Poole, Richard K://jcp.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 138, 034505 (2013) Free energy surface of ST2 water near umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the free energy surface of the ST2 model of water

  11. Water-saving liquid-gas conditioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Christopher; Zhuang, Ye

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises contacting a process gas with a hygroscopic working fluid in order to remove a constituent from the process gas. A system for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises a hygroscopic working fluid comprising a component adapted to absorb or react with a constituent of a process gas, and a liquid-gas contactor for contacting the working fluid and the process gas, wherein the constituent is removed from the process gas within the liquid-gas contactor.

  12. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno [Grupo de Física Matemática da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Professor Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)] [Grupo de Física Matemática da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Professor Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Cabral, Benedito J. Costa, E-mail: ben@cii.fc.ul.pt [Grupo de Física Matemática da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Professor Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal) [Grupo de Física Matemática da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Professor Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are in good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O–H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.

  13. Polymer formulation for removing hydrogen and liquid water from an enclosed space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention describes a solution to the particular problem of liquid water formation in hydrogen getters exposed to quantities of oxygen. Water formation is usually desired because the recombination reaction removes hydrogen without affecting gettering capacity and the oxygen removal reduces the chances for a hydrogen explosion once free oxygen is essentially removed. The present invention describes a getter incorporating a polyacrylate compound that can absorb up to 500% of its own weight in liquid water without significantly affecting its hydrogen gettering/recombination properties, but that also is insensitive to water vapor.

  14. VALIDATION OF CLOUD LIQUID WATER PATH RETRIEVALS FROM SEVIRI USING ONE YEAR OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    from microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements of two CloudNET stations in Northern Europe. The MWR retrievals from SEVIRI. The daily median LWP values from SEVIRI and MWR are highly correlated (corr. > 0 winter. 1. Introduction Clouds strongly modulate the energy balance of the Earth and its atmosphere

  15. Validation of Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM SGP Microwave Radiometers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidatingCloud Properties

  16. Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation Portal1stEquations

  17. Remote Spectroscopic Sounding of Liquid Water Path in Thick Clouds in Winter Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote AccessSpectrumRemote

  18. Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galle-Bishop, John Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

  19. Solar Water Heater Roadmap Leads Path to Market Expansion (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative strategy to reduce installed cost of solar water heater systems can rival conventional natural gas water heaters in the marketplace.

  20. Spatial association between the locations of roots and water flow paths in highly structured soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardiner, Nathan Thomas

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the smallest (> 1 mm diameter) roots were not randomly distributed. The results did show that the larger roots were not randomly distributed, and evidence pointed to a clustering of roots in and around the dye stained flow paths. However, the data fell short...

  1. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Molinero@utah.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  2. Liquid-liquid equilibria of the ternary systems water + acetic acid + ethyl acetate and water + acetic acid + isophorene (3,5,5-trimethyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, A.; Battilana, P.; Ragaini, V.; Bianchi, C.L. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry] [Milan Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Carvoli, G. [Chemial S.p.A., Cavaglia (Italy)] [Chemial S.p.A., Cavaglia (Italy)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary systems water + acetic acid + ethyl acetate and water + acetic acid + isophorone (3,5,5-trimethyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one) were measured over the temperature range (283 to 313) K. The results were used to estimate the interaction parameters between each of the three compounds of the systems studied for the NRTL and UNIQUAC models. The estimated interaction parameters were successfully used to predict the equilibrium compositions by the two models; experimental data were successfully reproduced. The UNIQUAC model was the most accurate in correlating the overall equilibrium composition of the studied systems. Also the NRTL model satisfactorily predicted the equilibrium composition. Isophorone experimentally resulted in a better extraction capacity for acetic acid and in a lower miscibility with water.

  3. A liquid water management strategy for PEM fuel cell stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nguyen, Trung; Knobbe, M. W.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a PEM fuel cell stack. Previous experimentation had found, and this experimentation confirms, that one very effective method of achieving proper gas and water management is the use...

  4. Liquid Water Dynamics in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Liquid Water Dynamics in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel by Chris Miller in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel by Chris Miller Bachelors of Engineering, University in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is a critical issue in ensuring high cell performance. The water production

  5. Estimate of the global distribution of stratiform supercooled liquid water clouds using the LITE lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    them to generally have a greater effect on the net radiative fluxes than any ice clouds in the profileEstimate of the global distribution of stratiform supercooled liquid water clouds using the LITE layers that have a much larger radiative impact than ice clouds of the same water content because

  6. Liquid-liquid equilibria for water + ethanol + 2-methylpropyl ethanoate and water + ethanol + 1,2-dibromoethane at 298. 15 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solimo, H.N.; Barnes de Arreguez, N.G. (Univ. Nacional de Tucuman, San Miguel de Tucuman (Argentina). Inst. de Fisica)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid equilibrium, distribution coefficients, and selectivities of the systems water + ethanol + 2-methylpropyl ethanoate or + 1,2-dibromoethane have been determined at 298.15 K in order to evaluate their suitability in preferentially extracting ethanol from aqueous solution. Tie-line data were satisfactorily correlated by the Othmer and Tobias method, and the plait point coordinates for the two systems were estimated. The experimental data was compared with the values calculated by the NRTL and UNIQUAC models. The water + ethanol + 2-methylpropyl ethanoate system was also compared with the values predicted by the UNIFAC model. Poor qualitative agreement was obtained with these models. From the experimental results, they can conclude that both solvents are inappropriate for ethanol extraction processes from aqueous solutions.

  7. Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Norman Willis William

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference...

  8. Vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mun, S.Y.; Lee, H.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems were measured at 60, 160, 300, and 760 mmHg at temperatures ranging from 315 to 488 K. The apparatus used in this work is a modified still especially designed for the measurement of low-pressure VLE, in which both liquid and vapor are continuously recirculated. For the analysis of salt-containing solutions, a method incorporating refractometry and gravimetry was used. From the experimental measurements, the effect of lithium bromide on the VLE behavior of water + 1,3-propanediol was investigated. The experimental data of the salt-free system were successfully correlated using the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC models. In addition, the extended UNIQUAC model of Sander et al. was applied to the VLE calculation of salt-containing mixtures.

  9. Effect of direct liquid water injection and interdigitated flow field on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D. L.; Yi, Y. S.; Van Nguyen, Trung

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper water management is vital to ensuring successful performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The effectiveness of the direct liquid water injection scheme and the interdigitated flow field design towards providing adequate gas...

  10. Microphysical Properties of Clouds with Low Liquid Water Paths: An Update from Clouds with Low Optical (Water) Depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.D.; Flynn, C.; Long, C.; McFarlane, S.; Vogelmann, A.; Johnson, K.; Miller, M.; Chiu, C.; Marshak, A.; Wiscombe, W.; Clough, S.A.; Heck, P.; Minnis, P.; Liljegren, J.; Min, Q.; O'Hirok, W.; Wang, Z.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds play a critical role in the modulation of the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and how clouds interact with radiation is one of the primary uncertainties in global climate models (GCMs). To reduce this uncertainty, the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program collects an immense amount of data from its Climate Research Facilities (CRFs); these data include observations of radiative fluxes, cloud properties from active and passive remote sensors, upper atmospheric soundings, and other observations. The program's goal is to use these coincident, longterm observations to improve the parameterization of radiative transfer in clear and cloudy atmospheres in GCMs.

  11. Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpin andInterim DataCooling -INTEGRATINGIntegration

  12. Structure and Dynamics of the Instantaneous Water/Vapor Interface Revisited by Path-Integral and Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Jan; Spura, Thomas; Karhan, Kristof; Partovi-Azar, Pouya; Hassanali, Ali A; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and dynamics of the water/vapor interface is revisited by means of path-integral and second-generation Car-Parrinello ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with an instantaneous surface definition [A. P. Willard and D. Chandler, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954 (2010)]. In agreement with previous studies, we find that one of the OH bonds of the water molecules in the topmost layer is pointing out of the water into the vapor phase, while the orientation of the underlying layer is reversed. Therebetween, an additional water layer is detected, where the molecules are aligned parallel to the instantaneous water surface.

  13. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: the experimental and data analysis perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Taschin; P. Bartolini; R. Eramo; R. Righini; R. Torre

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that permit a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of sample presenting weak signal, e.g. liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models; the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e. over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e. for water in the metastable supercooled phase. Hence this data enable a valid comparison between the model fits. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if is intrinsic hydrodynamic approach hide the molecular information.

  14. Park City/ANS 1 ANALYSIS OF LIQUID CRYOGEN-WATER EXPERIMENTS WITH THE MELCOR CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Park City/ANS 1 ANALYSIS OF LIQUID CRYOGEN-WATER EXPERIMENTS WITH THE MELCOR CODE R.C. Duckworth, J code, MELCOR. Experimental results showed that no large `shock' pressures were observed. Thus, one can to benchmark the code and show its usefulness in determining potential critical issues involving these fusion

  15. Life in the Solar System Assume we need energy, liquid water, and organic materials.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    high pressure, no sunlight, high temperature. Not much chance of life there. Gas Giants #12;The moonsLife in the Solar System Assume we need energy, liquid water, and organic materials. #12;Size N2 Titan Thick atmo Thick atmo Thin atmo #12;Small rocky bodies are unlikely to host life: too hot

  16. Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid Water Microjets Andrew M. Duffin and Richard J. Saykally,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    of natural gas. These thermal methods are relatively cheap, but they do not mitigate difficulties associatedElectrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid Water Microjets Andrew M. Duffin and Richard J, 2007; In Final Form: May 31, 2007 We describe a method for generating molecular hydrogen directly from

  17. Evaluating specific error characteristics of microwave-derived cloud liquid water products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    of cloud LWP products globally using concurrent data from visible/ infrared satellite sensors. The approachEvaluating specific error characteristics of microwave-derived cloud liquid water products Thomas J microwave satellite measurements. Using coincident visible/infrared satellite data, errors are isolated

  18. Path 15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations > Transmission Planning > Path 15 Path 15 Pictures and Videos Jan 04 Feb 04 Mar 04 Apr 04 May 04 Jun 04 Jul 04 Aug 04 Mar 06 Path 15 is an 84-mile stretch of electrical...

  19. Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

  20. Molecular Density Functional Theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. With this correction, molecular density functional theory gives, at a modest computational cost, quantita...

  1. Evaluation of the Daylight Cycle of Model-Predicted Cloud Amount and Condensed Water Path over Europe with Observations from MSG SEVIRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Evaluation of the Daylight Cycle of Model-Predicted Cloud Amount and Condensed Water Path over accurate information on diurnal cycles during daylight hours of cloud properties over land and ocean surfaces. This paper evaluates the daylight cycle of CA and CWP as predicted by the Regional Atmospheric

  2. Effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polka, H.M.; Gmehling, J. (Univ. of Oldenburg (Germany). Chair of Industrial Chemistry)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water was studied using a Swietoslawski ebulliometer. The measurements were performed for two constant salt molalities (1 and 2 mol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1]) under isobaric conditions at 50.66 kPa. Strong salting-out of the alcohol was observed in all cases, leading to a complete elimination of the azeotropic point at relatively low salt concentrations. The results were correlated using an extension of the NRTL equation for mixed solvent electrolyte systems proposed by Mock, Evans, and Chen.

  3. Frequency dependent seismic reflection analysis: a path to new direct hydrocarbon indicators for deep water reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Seung Chul

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ://maps.google.com/). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 4.2 Before and after the radon demultiple of two CMP gathers near target reservoirs. (a) and (b): before and after at the first CMP. (c) and (d): before and after at the second CMP. Free surface multiples interfere with relatively weaker primaries... the Ursa (deep water, GOM) field data set to preserve amplitude and frequency information. We use move-out based method for demultiple (radon method) and prestack time migration equivalent process (NMO + DMO + FK migration) for imaging. We implement a...

  4. Linking Europa's plume activity to tides, tectonics, and liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoden, Alyssa R; Roth, Lorenz; Retherford, Kurt

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the geologic activity preserved on Europa's icy surface has been attributed to tidal deformation, mainly due to Europa's eccentric orbit. Although the surface is geologically young (30 - 80 Myr), there is little information as to whether tidally-driven surface processes are ongoing. However, a recent detection of water vapor near Europa's south pole suggests that it may be geologically active. Initial observations indicated that Europa's plume eruptions are time-variable and may be linked to its tidal cycle. Saturn's moon, Enceladus, which shares many similar traits with Europa, displays tidally-modulated plume eruptions, which bolstered this interpretation. However, additional observations of Europa at the same time in its orbit failed to yield a plume detection, casting doubt on the tidal control hypothesis. The purpose of this study is to analyze the timing of plume eruptions within the context of Europa's tidal cycle to determine whether such a link exists and examine the inferred similarities and...

  5. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Tellier, L. L. (Larry L.); Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  6. A model of vapor-liquid equilibria for acid gas-alkanolamine-water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austgen, D.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A physico-chemical model was developed for representing liquid phase chemical equilibria and vapor-liquid (phase) equilibria of H{sub 2}SCO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water systems. The equilibrium composition of the liquid phase is determined by minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Activity coefficients are represented with the Electrolyte-NRTL equation treating both long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range binary interactions between liquid phase species. Vapor phase fugacity coefficients are calculated using the Redlich-Kwong-Soave Equation of State. Adjustable parameters of the model, binary interaction parameters and carbamate stability constants, were fitted on published binary system alkanolamine-water and ternary system (H{sub 2}S-alkanolamine-water, CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water) VLE data. The Data Regression System of ASPEN PLUS, based upon the Maximum Likelihood Principle, was used to estimate adjustable parameters. Ternary system measurements used in parameter estimation ranged in temperature from 25 to 120{degree}C in alkanolamine concentration from 1 to 5 M, in acid gas loading from 0 to 1.5 moles per mole alkanolamine, and in acid gas partial pressure from 0.1 to 1,000 kPa. Maximum likelihood estimates of ternary system H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} equilibrium partial pressures and liquid phase concentrations were found to be in good agreement with measurements for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diglycolamine (DGA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) indicating that the model successfully represents ternary system data. The model was extended to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in aqueous mixtures of MDEA with MEA or DEA. The solubility was measured at 40 and 80{degree}C over a wide range of CO{sub 2} partial pressures. These measurements were used to estimate additional binary parameters of the mixed solvent systems.

  7. Radiometric Determination of Uranium in Natural Waters after Enrichment and Separation by Cation-Exchange and Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Pashalidis; H. Tsertos

    2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The alpha-radiometric determination of uranium after its pre-concentration from natural water samples using the cation-exchange resin Chelex-100, its selective extraction by tributylphosphate and electrodeposition on stainless steel discs is reported. The validity of the separation procedure and the chemical recoveries were checked by addition of uranium standard solution as well as by tracing with U-232. The average uranium yield was determined to be (97 +- 2) % for the cation-exchange, (95 +- 2) % for the liquid-liquid extraction, and more than 99% for the electrodeposition. Employing high-resolution alpha-spectroscopy, the measured activity of the U-238 and U-234 radioisotopes was found to be of similar magnitude; i.e. ~7 mBq/L and ~35 mBq/L for ground- and seawater samples, respectively. The energy resolution (FWHM) of the alpha-peaks was 22 keV, while the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) was estimated to be 1 mBq/L (at the 95% confidence limit).

  8. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by Quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Zen; Ye Luo; Guglielmo Mazzola; Leonardo Guidoni; Sandro Sorella

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous Density Functional Theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab-initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  9. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by Quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Zen; Ye Luo; Guglielmo Mazzola; Leonardo Guidoni; Sandro Sorella

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in excellent agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous Density Functional Theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab-initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  10. A focused liquid jet formed by a water hammer in a test tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiyama, Akihito; Ando, Keita; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate motion of a gas-liquid interface in a test tube induced by a large acceleration via impulsive force. We conduct simple experiments in which the tube partially filled with a liquid falls under gravity and impacts a rigid floor. A curved gas-liquid interface inside the tube reverses and eventually forms an elongated jet (i.e. the so-called a focused jet). In our experiments, there arises either vibration of the interface or increment in the velocity of a liquid jet accompanied by the onset of cavitation in the liquid column. These phenomena cannot be explained by considering pressure impulse in a classical potential flow analysis, which does not account for finite speeds of sound as well as phase change. Here we model such water-hammer events as a result of one-dimensional pressure wave propagation and its interaction with boundaries through acoustic impedance mismatching. The method of characteristics is applied to describe pressure wave interactions and the subsequent cavitation. The proposed m...

  11. Physica A 257 (1998) 213232 The puzzling statistical physics of liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physica A 257 (1998) 213­232 The puzzling statistical physics of liquid water H.E. Stanley a; , S.V. Buldyrev a , M. Canpolat a; 1 , M. Meyer a , O. Mishima b , M.R. Sadr-Lahijany a , A. Scala a , F.W. Starr-4371(98)00264-7 #12;214 H.E. Stanley et al. / Physica A 257 (1998) 213­232 At a pressure of 1 atm, the maximum density

  12. Analysis and Calibration of CRF Raman Lidar Cloud Liquid Water Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.D.

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Raman lidar (RL), located at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF), is a unique state-of-the-art active remote sensor that is able to measure profiles of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud properties at high temporal and vertical resolution throughout the diurnal cycle. In October 2005, the capability of the RL was extended by the addition of a new detection channel that is sensitive to the Raman scattering of liquid water. This new channel permits the system, in theory, to measure profiles of liquid water content (LWC) by the RL. To our knowledge, the ARM RL is the only operation lidar with this capability. The liquid water Raman backscattering cross-section is a relatively weak and spectrally broad feature, relative to the water vapor Raman backscatter signal. The wide bandpass required to achieve reasonable signal-to-noise in the liquid water channel essentially eliminates the ability to measure LWC profiles during the daytime in the presence of large solar background, and thus all LWC observations are nighttime only. Additionally, the wide bandpass increases the probability that other undesirable signals, such as fluorescence from aerosols, may contaminate the observation. The liquid water Raman cross-section has a small amount of overlap with the water vapor Raman cross-section, and thus there will be a small amount of ‘cross-talk’ between the two signals, with water vapor contributing a small amount of signal to the LWC observation. And finally, there is significant uncertainty in the actual strength of the liquid water Raman cross-section in the literature. The calibrated LWC profiles, together with the coincident cloud backscatter observations also made by the RL, can be used to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius. By combining these profiles of effective radius in the lower portion of the cloud with the aerosol extinction measurements made below the cloud by the RL, the first aerosol indirect effect can be investigated using a single instrument, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with aligning the different sampling periods and fields of view of multiple instruments. We have applied a “first principles” calibration to the LWC profiles. This approach requires that the relative differences in optical efficiency between the water vapor and liquid water channels be known; this relative difference is easily computed using the efficiency values of the beam splitters and interference filters in the lidar that were provided by the vendors of these components. The first principles approach then transfers the calibration from the water vapor mixing ratio to the LWC using the difference in the optical efficiency and an interpolated value of the liquid water Raman cross section from the literature, and the better established water vapor Raman cross section. After accounting for all known error sources, the vertical integral of LWC was compared against a similar value retrieved from a co-located ground-based infrared radiometer. The RL and infrared radiometer have significantly different fields of view; thus to compare the two sensors the data were averaged to 5 min intervals where only cloudy samples were included in the average of each. While there is fair scatter in the data (r=0.47), there is also a clear indication of a positive correlation between the infrared and the RL values. The value of the slope of the regression is 0.49, which indicates a tendency of the RL measurements to underestimate the total liquid amount with respect to the infrared retrieval. Research continues to investigate the source of the bias, but the most likely candidate is the large uncertainty in the liquid water Raman cross-section as there have been no direct measurements made of this parameter at the lidar’s laser wavelength of 355 nm. The calibrated LWC profile was then used together with the cloud backscatter coefficient profile from the RL to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number density. These profiles o

  13. Electronic structure effects in liquid water studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordlund, Dennis; Odelius, Michael; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Nilsson, Anders

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present valence photoelectron emission spectra of liquid water in comparison with gas-phase water, ice close to the melting point, low temperature amorphous and crystalline ice. All aggregation states have major electronic structure changes relative to the free molecule, with rehybridization and development of bonding and anti-bonding states accompanying the hydrogen bond formation. Sensitivity to the local structural order, most prominent in the shape and splitting of the occupied 3a{sub 1} orbital, is understood from the electronic structure averaging over various geometrical structures, and reflects the local nature of the orbital interaction.

  14. Liquid polymorphism, order-disorder transitions and anomalous a Monte Carlo study of the Bell-Lavis model for water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    the lack of consensus concerning the origin of water-like anomalies, it is widely believed of the Bell-Lavis model for water Carlos E. Fiore Departamento de F´isica, Universidade Federal do Paran for liquid water is investigated through numerical simulations. The lattice- gas model on a triangular

  15. Investigating the solid-liquid phase transition of water nanofilms using the generalized replica exchange method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Qing [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E., E-mail: straub@bu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Farrell, James D.; Wales, David J. [University Chemical Laboratories, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) was applied to study a solid-liquid phase transition in a nanoconfined bilayer water system using the monatomic water (mW) model. Exploiting optimally designed non-Boltzmann sampling weights with replica exchanges, gREM enables an effective sampling of configurations that are metastable or unstable in the canonical ensemble via successive unimodal energy distributions across phase transition regions, often characterized by S-loop or backbending in the statistical temperature. Extensive gREM simulations combined with Statistical Temperature Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (ST-WHAM) for nanoconfined mW water at various densities provide a comprehensive characterization of diverse thermodynamic and structural properties intrinsic to phase transitions. Graph representation of minimized structures of bilayer water systems determined by the basin-hopping global optimization revealed heterogeneous ice structures composed of pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons, consistent with an increasingly ordered solid phase with decreasing density. Apparent crossover from a first-order solid-liquid transition to a continuous one in nanoconfined mW water with increasing density of the system was observed in terms of a diminishing S-loop in the statistical temperature, smooth variation of internal energies and heat capacities, and a characteristic variation of lateral radial distribution functions, and transverse density profiles across transition regions.

  16. Crystalline, liquid crystalline, and isotropic phases of sodium deoxycholate in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Ziyang; Luthra, Suman; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F.; Agra-Kooijman, Dena M.; Kumar, Satyendra; Byrn, Stephen R.; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y. (Pfizer); (Purdue); (Kent)

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) is an important example of bile salts, representing systems with complex phase behavior involving both crystalline and mesophase structures. In this study, properties of NaDC-water mixtures were evaluated as a function of composition and temperature via X-ray diffraction with synchrotron (sXRD) and laboratory radiation sources, water sorption, polarized light, hot-stage microscopy, and freezing-point osmometry. Several phases were detected depending on the composition and temperature, including isotropic solution phase, liquid crystalline (LC) phase, crystalline hydrate, and ice. The LC phase was identified as hexagonal structure by sXRD, with up to 14 high-order reflections detected. The crystalline phase was found to be nonstoichiometric hydrate, based on XRD and water sorption data. The phase diagram of NaDC-water system has been refined based on both results of this study and other reports in literature.

  17. Estimating Entropy of Liquids from Atom-Atom Radial Distribution Functions: Silica, Beryllium Fluoride and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruchi Sharma; Manish Agarwal; Charusita Chakravarty

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of water, liquid beryllium fluoride and silica melt are used to study the accuracy with which the entropy of ionic and molecular liquids can be estimated from atom-atom radial distribution function data. All three systems are known to display similar liquid-state thermodynamic and kinetic anomalies due to a region of anomalous excess entropy behaviour where entropy rises on isothermal compression. The pair correlation entropy is demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate that the density-temperature regime of anomalous behaviour as well as the strength of the entropy anomaly can be predicted reliably for both ionic melts as well as different rigid-body pair potentials for water. Errors in the total thermodynamic entropy for ionic melts due to the pair correlation approximation are of the order of 10% or less for most state points but can be significantly larger in the anomalous regime at very low temperatures. In the case of water, as expected given the rigid-body constraints for a molecular liquids, the pair correlation approximation causes significantly larger errors, between 20 and 30%, for most state points. Comparison of the excess entropy, Se, of ionic melts with the pair correlation entropy, S2, shows that the temperature dependence of Se is well described by T ??2=5 scaling across both the normal and anomalous regimes, unlike in the case of S2. As a function of density, the Se(rho) curves shows only a single maximum while the S2(rho) curves show both a maximum and a minimum. These differences in the behaviour of S2 and Se are due to the fact that the residual multiparticle entropy, delta(S) = Se - S2, shows a strong negative correlation with tetrahedral order in the anomalous regime.

  18. Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

  19. Nanoparticle enhanced evaporation of liquids: A case study of silicone oil and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenbin Zhang; Rong Shen; Kunquan Lu; Ailing Ji; Zexian Cao

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaporation is a fundamental physical phenomenon, of which many challenging questions remain unanswered. Enhanced evaporation of liquids in some occasions is of enormous practical significance. Here we report the enhanced evaporation of the nearly permanently stable silicone oil by dispersing with nanopariticles including CaTiO3, anatase and rutile TiO2. The results can inspire the research of atomistic mechanism for nanoparticle enhanced evaporation and exploration of evaporation control techniques for treatment of oil pollution and restoration of dirty water.

  20. Journal of Power Sources 164 (2007) 189195 Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Power Sources 164 (2007) 189­195 Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol management in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is very critical and complicated because of many interacting rights reserved. Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell; Water transport; Mathematical modeling; Three

  1. Probing Properties of Glassy Water and Other Liquids with Site Selective Spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nhan Chuong Dang

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard non-photochemical hole burning (NPHB) mechanism, which involves phonon-assisted tunneling in the electronically excited state, was originally proposed to explain the light-induced frequency change of chemically stable molecules in glassy solids at liquid helium temperatures by this research group more than two decades ago. The NPHB mechanism was then further elucidated and the concept of intrinsic to glass configurational relaxation processes as pre-mediating step to the hole burning process was introduced. The latter provided the theoretical basis for NPHB to evolve into a powerful tool probing the dynamics and nature of amorphous media, which aside from ''simple'' inorganic glasses may include also ''complex'' biological systems such as living cells and cancerous/normal tissues. Presented in this dissertation are the experimental and theoretical results of hole burning properties of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate (APT) in several different matrices: (1) hyperquenched glassy water (HGW); (2) cubic ice (I{sub c}); and (3) water confined into poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (poly-HEMA). In addition, results of photochemical hole burning (PHB) studies obtained for phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate (PcT) in HGW and free base phthalocyanine (Pc) in ortho-dichlorobenzene (DCB) glass are reported. The goal of this dissertation was to provide further evidence supporting the NPHB mechanism and to provide more insight that leads to a better understanding of the kinetic events (dynamics) in glasses, and various dynamical processes of different fluorescent chromorphores in various amorphous solids and the liquid that exist above the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). The following issues are addressed in detail: (1) time evolution of hole being burned under different conditions and in different hole burning systems; (2) temperature dependent hole profile; and (3) the structure/dynamics of water in confined space, which has been studied, in part because of the importance of non-freezable water in biological systems.

  2. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 1-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabaldon, C.; Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for the water + 1-propanol system are reported at 30, 60, and 100 kPa. The results were found to be thermodynamically consistent according to Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs, Kojima, and Wisniak methods. The system shows a minimum boiling azeotrope, and the azeotropic composition is scarcely shifted with pressure. Results were compared with literature values. The data were correlated with Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC liquid-phase activity coefficient models.

  3. TOWARDS A STATISTICAL CLIMATOLOGY OF THE RELATIONSHIP OF BETWEEN UPDRAFT VELOCITY, LIQUID WATER PATH, AND CLOUD DROPLET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Germany provided numerous measurements of thin (Radiometer are in the process of decaying and evaporating, may be insufficient to support the nucleation of aerosols in highly of Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy

  4. Evaluation of the aerosol indirect effect in marine stratocumulus clouds: Droplet number, size, liquid water path, and radiative impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Evaluation of the aerosol indirect effect in marine stratocumulus clouds: Droplet number, size stratocumulus clouds in the northeastern Pacific Ocean were analyzed to determine the effect of aerosol particles on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. Seven nighttime and two daytime cases were

  5. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks; A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson l. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Clay Cooper

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts atypical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could for ce flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contract angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tens ion of imbibing solutions can enhance vertical fingered flow, this phenomenon was not observed in the field. Field tests showed that the fingered flow behavior was overwhelmed by the variability in texture resulting from differences in the depositional environment. Field plumes were characterized by lateral spreading with an average width to depth aspect ratio of 4. For both vertical fingers and lateral flow, the high ionic strength contributed to the vapor phase dilution of the waste, which increased waste volume and pushed the wetting from well beyond what would have occurred if the volume of material had remained unchanged from that initially released into the system. It was also observed that following significant vapor-phase dilution of this waste simulants that streams of colloids were ejected from the sediment surfaces. It was shown that due to the high-sodium content of the tank wastes the colloids were deflocculated below a critical salt concentration in Hanford sediments. Th e released colloids, which at the site would be expected to carry the bulk of the sorbed heavy metals and radioisotopes, were mobile though coarse Hanford sediments, but clogged finer layers. The developments resulting from this study are already being applied at Hanford in the nonisothermal prediction of the hypersaline, high pH waste migration in tank farms and in the development of inverse methods for history matching under DOE's Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project at Hanford.

  6. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks: A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson L. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Caly Cooper

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts a typical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could force flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contact angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tension of imbibing solutions can enhance vertical fingered flow, this phenomenon was not observed in the field. Field tests of showed that the fingered flow behavior was overwhelmed by the variability in texture resulting from differences in the depositional environment. Field plumes were characterized by lateral spreading with an average width to depth aspect ratio of 4. For both vertical fingers and lateral flow, the high ionic strength contributed to the vapor phase dilution of the waste, which increased waste volume and pushed the wetting from well beyond what would have occurred if the volume of material had remained unchanged from that initially released into the system. It was also observed that following significant vapor-phase dilution of the waste simulants that streams of colloids were ejected from the sediment surfaces. It was shown that due to the high-sodium content of the tank wastes the colloids were deflocculated below a critical salt concentration in Hanford sediment s. The released colloids, which at the site would be expected to carry the bulk of the sorbed heavy metals and radioisotopes, were mobile though coarse Hanford sediments, but clogged finer layers. The developments resulting from this study are already being applied at Hanford in the nonisothermal prediction of the hypersaline, high pH waste migration in tank farms and in the development of inverse methods for history matching under DOE's Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project at Hanford.

  7. A Passive Probe for Subsurface Oceans and Liquid Water in Jupiter's Icy Moons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3,000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the Jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the ice shell thickness along with its dielectric properties. The interferometric reflectometer provides a simple solution to sub-Jovian radio sounding of ice shells that is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements better suited to measurements in the anti-Jovian hemisphere that shadows Jupiter's strong decametric emission. The passive nature of this technique also serves as risk reduction in case of radar transmi...

  8. NEW VIEW of the young earth covered in oceans of liquid water as early as 4.4 billion years ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Anders

    sun. Averaging 75 times the speed of sound, each impactor scorched the surface--shattering, meltingNEW VIEW of the young earth covered in oceans of liquid water as early as 4.4 billion years ago into a crust, before continents could form, be- fore the dense, steamy atmosphere could pool as liquid water

  9. Visualization of Liquid Water Transport in a PEFC X. G. Yang,* F. Y. Zhang, A. L. Lubawy, and C. Y. Wang*,z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electrolyte fuel cell PEFC , the mechanics of liquid water transport, starting from droplet emergence and methanol PEFCs. Neutron beams can penetrate through a metal fuel cell to image the real-time liquid water to achieve high performance and lon- gevity of polymer electrolyte fuel cells PEFCs . At high current density

  10. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for water + 2-aminoethanol + dimethyl sulfoxide and its constituent three binary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tochigi, Katsumi; Akimoto, Kentarou; Ochi, Kenji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry] [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry; Liu, Fangyhi; Kawase, Yasuhito [Nippon Refine Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Nippon Refine Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system water + 2-aminoethanol + dimethyl sulfoxide and its three constituent binary mixtures at 363.15 K. The apparatus used was a modified Rogalski-Malanoski equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  11. Quantification of Liquid Water Saturation in a PEM Fuel Cell Diffusion Medium Using X-ray Microtomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , at shutdown, may freeze under subzero tem- peratures and makes cold start of a PEM fuel cell difficult conditions. MRI is used to visualize the transport of liquid water across a polymer electrolyte membrane opportunities for imaging pore-scale flow and multiphase transport in porous me- dia. In recent years, X

  12. Sudden structural change at ati air/binary liquid interface: Sum frequency study of the air/acetonitrile-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    Sudden structural change at ati air/binary liquid interface: Sum frequency study of the air/acetonitrile change in an air/acetonitrile-water interface as the solution composition varies; the abruptness of which and in the polarization of the signal from the acetonitrile molecules in the interface observed using infrared + visible

  13. Liquid chromatographic method for determination of water in soils and the optimization of anion separations by capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, N.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid chromatographic method for the determination of water in soil or clay samples is presented. In a separate study, the optimization of electrophoretic separation of alkylated phenolate ions was optimized by varying the pH and acetonitrile concentration of the buffer solutions.

  14. Near-Global Survey of Effective Droplet Radii in Liquid Water Clouds Using ISCCP Data 1 . Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Quingyuan

    VOLUME 7 Near-Global Survey of Effective Droplet Radii in Liquid Water Clouds Using ISCCP Data 1 indicate the magnitude ofaerosol effects on clouds. A method, based on a complete radiative transfer model the radiative effects ofwater vapor and clouds and the hydrological cycle, and create several important cloud

  15. Charge transfer effects of ions at the liquid water/vapor interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W., E-mail: srick@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge transfer (CT), the movement of small amounts of electron density between non-bonded pairs, has been suggested as a driving force for a variety of physical processes. Herein, we examine the effect of CT on ion adsorption to the water liquid-vapor interface. Using a CT force field for molecular dynamics, we construct a potential of mean force (PMF) for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cl{sup ?}, and I{sup ?}. The PMFs were produced with respect to an average interface and an instantaneous interface. An analysis of the PMF relative to the instantaneous surface reveals that the area in which the anions experience a free energy minimum is quite narrow, and the cations feel a steeply repulsive free energy near the interface. CT is seen to have only minor effects on the overall free energy profiles. However, the long-ranged effects of ions are highlighted by the CT model. Due to CT, the water molecules at the surface become charged, even when the ion is over 15 Å away from the surface.

  16. Preferential Path Profiling: Compactly Numbering Interesting Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilimbi, Trishul

    preferential path profiling (PPP), that reduces the overhead of path profiling. PPP leverages the observation that most consumers of path profiles are only inter- ested in a subset of all program paths. PPP achieves produced by PPP. This compact path numbering enables our PPP implementation to record path information

  17. The Individual and Collective Effects of Exact Exchange and Dispersion Interactions on the Ab Initio Structure of Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. DiStasio Jr.; Biswajit Santra; Zhaofeng Li; Xifan Wu; Roberto Car

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we report the results of a series of density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of ambient liquid water using a hierarchy of exchange-correlation (XC) functionals to investigate the individual and collective effects of exact exchange (Exx), via the PBE0 hybrid functional, non-local vdW/dispersion interactions, via a fully self-consistent density-dependent dispersion correction, and approximate nuclear quantum effects (aNQE), via a 30 K increase in the simulation temperature, on the microscopic structure of liquid water. Based on these AIMD simulations, we found that the collective inclusion of Exx, vdW, and aNQE as resulting from a large-scale AIMD simulation of (H$_2$O)$_{128}$ at the PBE0+vdW level of theory, significantly softens the structure of ambient liquid water and yields an oxygen-oxygen structure factor, $S_{\\rm OO}(Q)$, and corresponding oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function, $g_{\\rm OO}(r)$, that are now in quantitative agreement with the best available experimental data. This level of agreement between simulation and experiment as demonstrated herein originates from an increase in the relative population of water molecules in the interstitial region between the first and second coordination shells, a collective reorganization in the liquid phase which is facilitated by a weakening of the hydrogen bond strength by the use of the PBE0 hybrid XC functional, coupled with a relative stabilization of the resultant disordered liquid water configurations by the inclusion of non-local vdW/dispersion interactions.

  18. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 2-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distillation is perhaps the separation process most widely used in the chemical processing industry. The correct design of distillation columns requires the availability of accurate and, if possible, thermodynamically consistent vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) data. The present work is part of a project studying the effect of pressure on the behavior of the azeotropic point in mixtures in which at least one component is an alcohol. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were obtained for the water + 2-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa. The activity coefficients were found to be thermodynamically consistent by the methods of Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs, Kojima, and Wisniak. The data were correlated with five liquid phase activity coefficient models (Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC).

  19. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Miller III, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling di?usive transition paths Thomas F. Miller III ?the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for thedynamics I. INTRODUCTION Transition path sampling (TPS) is a

  20. Boson Peak in Deeply Cooled Confined Water: A Possible Way to Explore the Existence of the Liquid-to-Liquid Transition in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhe

    The boson peak in deeply cooled water confined in nanopores is studied with inelastic neutron scattering. We show that in the (P, T) plane, the locus of the emergence of the boson peak is nearly parallel to the Widom line ...

  1. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  2. Pore-scale simulation of liquid CO2 displacement of water using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this model is first validated by two benchmark tests: a layered two-phase flow with a viscosity ratio, and a dynamic capillary intrusion. This model is then used to simulate liquid...

  3. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

  4. Apparatus and method for pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in coal derived, water immiscible liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Carl D. (Olympia, WA)

    1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for and method of pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in a coal derived, water immiscible liquid to higher pressure involves the use of a motive fluid which is miscible with the liquid of the slurry. The apparatus includes a pump 12, a remote check valve 14 and a chamber 16 between and in fluid communication with the pump 12 and check valve 14 through conduits 18,20. Pump 12 exerts pressure on the motive fluid and thereby on the slurry through a concentration gradient of coal solids within chamber 16 to alternately discharge slurry under pressure from the outlet port of check valve 14 and draw slurry in through the inlet port of check valve 14.

  5. Stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the2 determination of pesticides in water samples: method validation and measurement uncertainty3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    carry-over between consecutive extractions with the same stir21 bar. Pesticide quantification in water1 Title :1 Stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the2 determination of pesticides in water samples: method validation and measurement uncertainty3

  6. The Hydrated Proton at the Water Liquid/Vapor Interface Matt K. Petersen, Srinivasan S. Iyengar, Tyler J. F. Day, and Gregory A. Voth*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    The Hydrated Proton at the Water Liquid/Vapor Interface Matt K. Petersen, Srinivasan S. Iyengar ReceiVed: July 23, 2004; In Final Form: August 22, 2004 The hydrated proton was studied at the water the migration of the excess proton to and about the interface through the fluctuating bond topology described

  7. A Fixed Point Charge Model for Water Optimized to the Vapor-Liquid Coexistence Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the temperature range of the liquid. Results were compared to the SPC, SPC/E, and MSPC/E models, vapor pressures, critical parameters, and the second virial coefficient. It is inferior to the SPC interactions. Models of this type include the Bernal-Fowler1 , ST22 , TIPS23 , TIP4P4 , SPC5 , SPC/E6

  8. 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

  9. Decontamination of Nuclear Liquid Wastes Status of CEA and AREVA R and D: Application to Fukushima Waste Waters - 12312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournel, B.; Barre, Y.; Lepeytre, C.; Peycelon, H. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Grandjean, A. [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257 CEA-CNRS-UM2-ENSCM, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Prevost, T.; Valery, J.F. [AREVA NC, Paris La Defense (France); Shilova, E.; Viel, P. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid wastes decontamination processes are mainly based on two techniques: Bulk processes and the so called Cartridges processes. The first technique has been developed for the French nuclear fuel reprocessing industry since the 60's in Marcoule and La Hague. It is a proven and mature technology which has been successfully and quickly implemented by AREVA at Fukushima site for the processing of contaminated waters. The second technique, involving cartridges processes, offers new opportunities for the use of innovative adsorbents. The AREVA process developed for Fukushima and some results obtained on site will be presented as well as laboratory scale results obtained in CEA laboratories. Examples of new adsorbents development for liquid wastes decontamination are also given. A chemical process unit based on co-precipitation technique has been successfully and quickly implemented by AREVA at Fukushima site for the processing of contaminated waters. The asset of this technique is its ability to process large volumes in a continuous mode. Several chemical products can be used to address specific radioelements such as: Cs, Sr, Ru. Its drawback is the production of sludge (about 1% in volume of initial liquid volume). CEA developed strategies to model the co-precipitation phenomena in order to firstly minimize the quantity of added chemical reactants and secondly, minimize the size of co-precipitation units. We are on the way to design compact units that could be mobilized very quickly and efficiently in case of an accidental situation. Addressing the problem of sludge conditioning, cementation appears to be a very attractive solution. Fukushima accident has focused attention on optimizations that should be taken into account in future studies: - To better take account for non-typical aqueous matrixes like seawater; - To enlarge the spectrum of radioelements that can be efficiently processed and especially short lives radioelements that are usually less present in standard effluents resulting from nuclear activities; - To develop reversible solid adsorbents for cartridge-type applications in order to minimize wastes. (authors)

  10. ARM - Measurement - Ice water path

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particleSize Distributiontypespath ARM

  11. Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Haidan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manifesting in fewer/weaker hydrogen bonds and structuralstructures with weaker hydrogen-bonding is recorded viais characteristic of the hydrogen bond network in water. The

  12. The influence of irrigation water salinity on optimal nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium liquid fertilizer rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos Nu?n?ez, Ricardo

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of poor quality water (high in soluble salts) and high concentrations of water-soluble fertilizers can induce salt damage in plants. The objective of this work was to investigate the effects of salinity in irrigation water on optimal fertilization rates... in salt-sensitive tropical foliage. Spafhiphyllum 'Petite' and Dieffenbachia 'Camille' were grown using 9 levels of water-soluble fertilizers (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200 mg I N in a 3-1-2 ratio of N-P205-K20), and two levels of salinity...

  13. NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES MEASUREMENTS IN DRINKING WATER BY LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING. METHODS AND RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procedure, standardized by International Standard Organization.4 On the contrary, total indicative dose in view of a large scale monitoring program. World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water

  14. Measurements of the Distribution of Solutes between Liquid Water and Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.; Ho, P.C.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct measurements of the concentration of solutes in both liquid and steam phases in equilibrium with each other have been made in a static mode utilizing a platinum-lined autoclave to a maximum of 350 deg C. Partitioning constants were derived from these measurements based on existing experimental or estimated values of the stoichiometric mean activity coefficients for the solutes in the liquid phase. Independent measurements of the conductance of some of the solutes in dilute aqueous solutions to 600 deg C and 300MPa were also made. The combined results are discussed in terms of a speciated model and the implications of these results to industrial and natural hydrothermal processes are presented. PARTITIONING CONSTANT, ION-ASSOCIATION, CONDUCTIVITY, SPECIATION, CORROSION.

  15. On the Existence of Two-Phase Fluid in Good Communication with Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, Malcolm A.

    1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been argued that wells of high discharge enthalpy (two-phase wells) at Baca must be isolated from communication with an extensive liquid reservoir. It is shown that such communication has existed, and been maintained, during the history of Wairakei and Broadlands fields. Interpretation of downhole measurements in two-phase fields, and the nature of the two-phase reservoir fluid, is also treated.

  16. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Water- Soluble Organic Aerosols Collected with a Particle into Liquid Sampler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work demonstrates the utility of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) a technique traditionally used for identification of inorganic ions present in ambient or laboratory aerosols for the analysis of water soluble organic aerosol (OA) using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from 0.5 ppm mixing ratios of limonene and ozone in a 5 m3 Teflon chamber. SOA was collected simultaneously using a traditional filter sampler and a PILS. The filter samples were later extracted with either water or acetonitrile, while the aqueous PILS samples were analyzed directly. In terms of peak intensities, types of detectable compounds, average O:C ratios, and organic mass to organic carbon ratios, the resulting high resolution mass spectra were essentially identical for the PILS and filter based samples. SOA compounds extracted from both filter/acetonitrile extraction and PILS/water extraction accounted for >95% of the total ion current in ESI mass spectra. This similarity was attributed to high solubility of limonene SOA in water. In contrast, significant differences in detected ions and peak abundances were observed for pine needle biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) collected with PILS and filter sampling. The water soluble fraction of BBOA is considerably smaller than for SOA, and a number of unique peaks were detectable only by the filter/acetonitrile method. The combination of PILS collection with HR-ESI-MS analysis offers a new approach for molecular analysis of the water-soluble organic fraction in biogenic SOA, aged photochemical smog, and BBOA.

  17. Liquid-phase and vapor-phase dehydration of organic/water solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Ly, Jennifer (San Jose, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes for dehydrating an organic/water solution by pervaporation or vapor separation using fluorinated membranes. The processes are particularly useful for treating mixtures containing light organic components, such as ethanol, isopropanol or acetic acid.

  18. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquid–liquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  19. Advanced Scintillator Detector Concept (ASDC): A Concept Paper on the Physics Potential of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, J R; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bignell, L; Blucher, E; Calaprice, F; Conrad, J M; Descamps, F B; Diwan, M V; Dwyer, D A; Dye, S T; Elagin, A; Feng, P; Grant, C; Grullon, S; Hans, S; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S H; Klein, J R; Lande, K; Learned, J G; Luk, K B; Maricic, J; Marleau, P; Mastbaum, A; McDonough, W F; Oberauer, L; Gann, G D Orebi; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Sanchez, M C; Shaevitz, M H; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Strait, M; Svoboda, R; Tolich, N; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Viren, B; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Winslow, L; Wonsak, B; Worcester, E T; Wurm, M; Yeh, M; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS), and the concurrent development of high-efficiency and high-precision-timing light sensors, has opened up the possibility for a new kind of large-scale detector capable of a very broad program of physics. The program would include determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and observation of CP violation with long-baseline neutrinos, searches for proton decay, ultra-precise solar neutrino measurements, geo- and supernova neutrinos including diff?use supernova antineutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay. We outline here the basic requirements of the Advanced Scintillation Detector Concept (ASDC), which combines the use of WbLS, doping with a number of potential isotopes for a range of physics goals, high efficiency and ultra-fast timing photosensors, and a deep underground location. We are considering such a detector at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) far site, where the ASDC could operate in conjunction with the liquid argon t...

  20. Advanced Scintillator Detector Concept (ASDC): A Concept Paper on the Physics Potential of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Alonso; N. Barros; M. Bergevin; A. Bernstein; L. Bignell; E. Blucher; F. Calaprice; J. M. Conrad; F. B. Descamps; M. V. Diwan; D. A. Dwyer; S. T. Dye; A. Elagin; P. Feng; C. Grant; S. Grullon; S. Hans; D. E. Jaffe; S. H. Kettell; J. R. Klein; K. Lande; J. G. Learned; K. B. Luk; J. Maricic; P. Marleau; A. Mastbaum; W. F. McDonough; L. Oberauer; G. D. Orebi Gann; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; M. C. Sanchez; M. H. Shaevitz; T. M. Shokair; M. B. Smy; A. Stahl; M. Strait; R. Svoboda; N. Tolich; M. R. Vagins; K. A. van Bibber; B. Viren; R. B. Vogelaar; M. J. Wetstein; L. Winslow; B. Wonsak; E. T. Worcester; M. Wurm; M. Yeh; C. Zhang

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS), and the concurrent development of high-efficiency and high-precision-timing light sensors, has opened up the possibility for a new kind of large-scale detector capable of a very broad program of physics. The program would include determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and observation of CP violation with long-baseline neutrinos, searches for proton decay, ultra-precise solar neutrino measurements, geo- and supernova neutrinos including diffuse supernova antineutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay. We outline here the basic requirements of the Advanced Scintillation Detector Concept (ASDC), which combines the use of WbLS, doping with a number of potential isotopes for a range of physics goals, high efficiency and ultra-fast timing photosensors, and a deep underground location. We are considering such a detector at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) far site, where the ASDC could operate in conjunction with the liquid argon tracking detector proposed by the LBNE collaboration. The goal is the deployment of a 30-100 kiloton-scale detector, the basic elements of which are being developed now in experiments such as WATCHMAN, ANNIE, SNO+, and EGADS.

  1. Niobium-based sputtered thin films for Corrosion Protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for [18F] production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skliarova, H; Dousset, O; Johnson, R R; Palmieri, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemically inert Coatings on Havar entrance foils of the targets for [18F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar. In order to find the most effective protective coatings, the Nb-based coating microstructure and barrier properties have been correlated with deposition parameters as: substrate temperature, applied bias, deposition rate and sputtering gas pressure. Aluminated quartz used as a substrate allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. Pure Niobium coatings have been found less effective barriers than Niobium-titanium coatings. But Niobium oxide films, according to the corrosion tests performed, showed superior barrier properties. Therefore Multi-layered Niobium-Niobium oxide films have been suggested, since they...

  2. Task 15 -- Remediation of organically contaminated soil using hot/liquid (subcritical) water. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This activity involves a pilot-scale demonstration of the use of hot/liquid water for the removal of organic contaminants from soil at the pilot (20 to 40 kg) scale. Lab-scale studies are being performed to determine the optimum temperature, contact time, and flow rates for removal of the organic contaminants. Initial investigations into using carbon sorbents to clean the extractant water for recycle use and to concentrate the extracted contaminants in a small volume for disposal are also being performed. Liquid water is normally considered to be too polar a solvent to be effective for removal of organic contaminants from contaminated soils and sludges. However, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that the polarity of liquid water can be changed from that of a very polar solvent at ambient conditions to that of an organic solvent (e.g., ethanol or acetonitrile) by simply raising the temperature. The EERC has exploited this unique property of liquid water to obtain highly selective extractions of polar (at lower temperatures) to nonpolar (at 200 to 250 C) organics from contaminated soils and sludges. Only moderate pressures (a maximum of about 45 atm at 250 C and lower pressures at lower temperatures) are required. With this procedure, all detectable hazardous organics were removed from the sludge, thus making the remaining material (about 99% of the original mass) a nonhazardous material. The present understanding of hot/liquid water extraction for the removal of hazardous organics from contaminated soils and sludges is being used to develop the engineering parameters needed to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the remediation technology. Progress during the report period is summarized.

  3. Life in the Solar System Assume we need energy, liquid water, and organic materials.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    wells up and spreads over the surface. A potential mission to Europa would land on the ice pack, use in the last few years! #12;Mars PHOENIX Lander digs up apparent water ice which evaporates Ice chunks Gone, with surface ice. Callisto is heavily cratered, but may also have a deep buried ocean. #12;Enceladus ­ An Icy

  4. Life in the Solar System Assume we need energy, liquid water, and organic materials.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    ;Small rocky bodies are unlikely to host life: too hot or cold for water, no protective atmosphere so too. #12;Venus is hot (molten lead can exist on its surface!), high pressure (90 atmospheres), toxic, no sunlight, high temperature. Not much chance of life there. Gas Giants #12;The moons of the giant planets

  5. Liquid Water Storage, Distribution, and Removal from Diffusion Media in PEFCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    . Turhan,* K. Heller, J. Brenizer, and M. M. Mench**,z Fuel Cell Dynamics and Diagnostics Laboratory media DM of polymer electrolyte fuel cells PEFCs is a function of design geometry, surface geometry. Available electronically August 28, 2006. The management of water within a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

  6. The Role of Confined Water in Ionic Liquid Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    for improving the performance of IL DSSC by replacing water with additives that would play the same role Structure, Quantum Chemistry,General Theory The dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) proposed by Gratzel et al.1, and nonflammable. However, with current ILs, the DSSC performance is degraded due to decreased reductant rates

  7. Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

  8. Pore-scale simulation of liquid CO2 displacement of water using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.; Kang, Oinjun; Oostrom, Martinus

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lattice Boltzmann color-fluid model, which was recently proposed by Liu et al. [H. Liu, A.J. Valocchi, and Q. Kang. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible two-phase flow simulations. Phys. Rev. E, 85:046309, 2012.] based on a concept of continuum surface force, is improved to simulate immiscible two-phase flows in porous media. The new improvements allow the model to account for different kinematic viscosities of both fluids and to model fluid-solid interactions. The capability and accuracy of this model is first validated by two benchmark tests: a layered two-phase flow with a viscosity ratio, and a dynamic capillary intrusion. This model is then used to simulate liquid CO2 (LCO2) displacing water in a dual-permeability pore network. The extent and behavior of LCO2 preferential flow (i.e., fingering) is found to depend on the capillary number (Ca), and three different displacement patterns observed in previous micromodel experiments are reproduced. The predicted variation of LCO2 saturation with Ca, as well as variation of specific interfacial length with LCO2 saturation, are both in good agreement with the experimental observations. To understand the effect of heterogeneity on pore-scale displacement, we also simulate LCO2 displacing water in a randomly heterogeneous pore network, which has the same size and porosity as the dual-permeability pore network. In comparison to the dual-permeability case, the transition from capillary fingering to viscous fingering occurs at a higher Ca, and LCO2 saturation is higher at low Ca but lower at high Ca. In either pore network, the LCO2-water specific interfacial length is found to obey a power-law dependence on LCO2 saturation.

  9. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for binary and ternary systems composed of water, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol at 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabaldon, C.; Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria data were obtained for the 2-propanol + 1-propanol binary system and the water + 1-propanol + 2-propanol ternary system at 100 kPa. The data were found to be thermodynamically consistent according to the Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs method for the binary system and according to the McDermott-Ellis method for the ternary one. The binary system is well represented by assuming ideal behavior. The binary interaction parameters obtained from this and previous work are used to predict the vapor-liquid equilibrium for the ternary system using the UNIQUAC, NRTL, and Wilson models. The ternary system is well predicted from binary data.

  10. A system to test the effects of materials on the electron drift lifetime in liquid argon and observations on the effect of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, R.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab; ,

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A materials test system (MTS) has been developed at FNAL to assess the suitability of materials for use in a large liquid argon time projection chamber. During development of the MTS, it was noted that controlling the cryostat pressure with a 'raining' condenser reduced the electron drift lifetime in the liquid argon. The effect of condensing has been investigated using a series of passive materials to filter the condensate. We report the results of these studies and of tests on different candidate materials for detector construction. The inferred reduction of electron drift lifetime by water concentrations in the parts per trillion is of particular interest.

  11. Diffusive transport of light in a two-dimensional disordered packing of disks: Analytical approach to transport-mean-free path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeinab Sadjadi; MirFaez Miri; M. Reza Shaebani; Sareh Nakhaee

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study photon diffusion in a two-dimensional random packing of monodisperse disks as a simple model of granular media and wet foams. We assume that the intensity reflectance of disks is a constant. We present an analytic expression for the transport-mean-free path in terms of the velocity of light in the disks and host medium, radius and packing fraction of the disks, and the intensity reflectance. For the glass beads immersed in the air or water, we estimate transport-mean-free paths about half the experimental ones. For the air bubbles immersed in the water, transport-mean-free paths is an inverse function of liquid volume fraction of the model wet foam. This throws new light on the empirical law of Vera et. al, and promotes more realistic models.

  12. Acidic Ionic Liquid/Water Solution as Both Medium and Proton Source for Electrocatalytic H2 Evolution by [Ni(P2N2)2]2+ Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, Douglas H.; Stewart, Michael P.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrocatalytic reduction of protons to H2 by [Ni(PPh2NC6H4-hex2)2](BF4)2 (where PPh2NC6H4-hex2 = 1,5-di(4-n-hexylphenyl)-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane) in the highly acidic ionic liquid dibutylformamidium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide shows a strong dependence on added water. A turnover frequency of 43,000-53,000 s-1 has been measured for hydrogen production at 25 °C when the mole fraction of water (?H2O) is 0.72. The same catalyst in acetonitrile with added dimethylformamidium trifluoromethanesulfonate and water has a turnover frequency of 720 s?1. Thus the use of an ionic liquid/aqueous solution enhances the observed catalytic rates by more than a factor of 50 compared to acids in traditional organic solvents such as acetonitrile. Complexes [Ni(PPh2NC6H4X2)2](BF4)2 (X = H, OMe, CH2P(O)(OEt)2, Br) are also catalysts in the ionic liquid/water mixture, and the observed catalytic rates correlate with the hydrophobicity of X. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal Solar ThermalJul 13 1 2 3

  14. Comparison of Cloud Fraction and Liquid Water Path between ECMWF simulations and ARM long-term Observations at the NSA Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1CompactComparison ofposter,

  15. Solute retention in column liquid chromatography. X. Determination of solute infinite-dilution activity coefficients in methanol, water, and their mixtures, by combined gas-liquid and liquid-liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djerki, R.A.; Laub, R.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Raoult's-law activity coefficients of 3- to 7-carbon aliphatic aldehyde, ketone, ester, and alcohol solutes at infinite dilution in methanol, water, and mixtures of the two and in polydimethysiloxane, all at 293-308 K, have been determined for the first time by appropriate combination of GLC and LLC retention data. The latter data are reported in terms of mole factions, while the former are given in concentration units of molality. However, interpretation of the data is difficult because of the multiplicity of the retention mechanisms. Nevertheless, the combined GLC/LLC technique, which had been applied previously only to pure solvents, is said to offer a number of advantages over static techniques for the determination of solute infinite-dilution activity coefficients with volatile solvents, especially with mixtures of solvents.

  16. Liquid Phase Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordt, E. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature Water (HTW) central district heating systems are far superior to steam systems in large, spread out installations such as airports, universities and office complexes. Water, pressurized to keep it in the liquid state, is distributed at 400o...

  17. Systems and methods for analyzing liquids under vacuum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Li; Cowin, James P.; Iedema, Martin J.; Zhu, Zihua

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for supporting a liquid against a vacuum pressure in a chamber can enable analysis of the liquid surface using vacuum-based chemical analysis instruments. No electrical or fluid connections are required to pass through the chamber walls. The systems can include a reservoir, a pump, and a liquid flow path. The reservoir contains a liquid-phase sample. The pump drives flow of the sample from the reservoir, through the liquid flow path, and back to the reservoir. The flow of the sample is not substantially driven by a differential between pressures inside and outside of the liquid flow path. An aperture in the liquid flow path exposes a stable portion of the liquid-phase sample to the vacuum pressure within the chamber. The radius, or size, of the aperture is less than or equal to a critical value required to support a meniscus of the liquid-phase sample by surface tension.

  18. Synthesis of Ag-deionized water nanofluids using multi-beam laser ablation in liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, P.X.; Soong, Yee; Chyu, M.K.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-pulse laser ablation of silver in deionized water was studied. The laser beams were arranged in a cross-beam configuration. In our experiments, two single-mode, Q-switched Nd-Yag lasers operating at 1064 nm, pulse duration of 5.5 ns and 10 Hz rep rate were used. The laser fluence of the second beam was 0.265 J/cm2 for all tests. Two levels of the laser fluences were used for the ablating beam: 0.09 and 0.265 J/cm2 (11,014 and 33,042 J/cm2 at the focal point, respectively). The silver target was at 50mm from the cell window and 10mm deep. The second beam was aligned parallelly with the silver target and focused at 2mm in front of the focal point of the ablating beam. For all cases, the delay time between the ablating beam and the cross-beam was 40 ms. In general, the ablated particles were almost all spherical. For fluence of 0.09 J/cm 2 and single-beam approach, the mean particle size was about 29 nm. The majority of the particles, however, were in 19–35nm range and there were some big ones as large as 50–60nm in size. For double-beam approach, the particles were smaller with the average size of about 18nm and the majority of the particles were in 9–21nm range with few big one as large as 40 nm. For the beam fluence of 0.265 J/cm2 and single-beam configuration, the particle sizes were smaller, the mean particles size was about 18nm and the majority of the particles were in the range of 10–22nm with some big one as large as 40 nm. For double-beam approach, the mean particle size was larger (24.2 nm) and the majority of the particle were distributed from 14 to 35nm with some big particles can be found with sizes as big as 70 nm. Preliminary measurements of the thermal conductivity and viscosity of the produced samples showed that the thermal conductivity increased about 3–5% and the viscosity increased 3.7% above the base fluid viscosity even with the particle volume concentration as low as 0.01%.

  19. Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly...

  20. Interpreting the drying kinetics of a soil using a macroscopic thermodynamic non-equilibrium of water between the liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by diffusion mechanisms within the material [1]. When modelling this second phase, the state variable chosen about liquid-gas phase change in porous media that suggest that the establishment of equilibrium, 9]. Vapour diffusion and liquid-vapour phase change are considered as the main phenomena

  1. An Investigation of Ammonia Extraction from Liquid Manure Using a Gas-Permeable Membrane Pollution of air, soil and water caused by excessive ammonia (NH3) emission and deposition from animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    An Investigation of Ammonia Extraction from Liquid Manure Using a Gas-Permeable Membrane Summary Pollution of air, soil and water caused by excessive ammonia (NH3) emission and deposition from animal by extracting it from liquid manure and potentially using the recovered NH3 as fertilizer. For this purpose, lab

  2. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  3. Characterization of water-based liquid scintillator response to gammas and neutrons at varying scintillator-surfactant concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilton, Lauren (Lauren M.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large scale solar neutron and neutrino flux experiments require many tons of bulk liquid organic scintillator to take spectroscopic data of these energetic particles. However, material and chemical concerns make such ...

  4. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between...

  5. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  6. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes: Theory, experiment, and examples of water and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    ­311 1971 formulation, which predicts the phase speed of propagating axisymmetric modes inside a liquid speed, of the modes as a function of frequency. Measurements of the sound speeds and the attenuations investigated and the measured sound speeds and the damping of the modes were compared with the theoretical

  7. NORIA-SP: A finite element computer program for analyzing liquid water transport in porous media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, P.L.; Eaton, R.R.; Bixler, N.E.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of finite element computer programs has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) most recently, NORIA-SP. The original NORIA code solves a total of four transport equations simultaneously: liquid water, water vapor, air, and energy. Consequently, use of NORIA is computer-intensive. Since many of the applications for which NORIA is used are isothermal, we decided to ``strip`` the original four-equation version, leaving only the liquid water equation. This single-phase version is NORIA-SP. The primary intent of this document is to provide the user of NORIA-SP an accurate user`s manual. Consequently, the reader should refer to the NORIA manual if additional detail is required regarding the equation development and finite element methods used. The single-equation version of the NORIA code (NORIA-SP) has been used most frequently for analyzing various hydrological scenarios for the potential underground nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in western Nevada. These analyses are generally performed assuming a composite model to represent the fractured geologic media. In this model the material characteristics of the matrix and the fractures are area weighted to obtain equivalent material properties. Pressure equilibrium between the matrix and fractures is assumed so a single conservation equation can be solved. NORIA-SP is structured to accommodate the composite model. The equations for water velocities in both the rock matrix and the fractures are presented. To use the code for problems involving a single, nonfractured porous material, the user can simply set the area of the fractures to zero.

  8. Influence of wettability on liquid water transport in gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza Chraibi; L. Ceballos; M. Prat; Michel Quintard; Alexandre Vabre

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water management is a key factor that limits PEFC's performance. We show how insights into this problem can be gained from pore-scale simulations of water invasion in a model fibrous medium. We explore the influence of contact angle on the water invasion pattern and water saturation at breakthrough and show that a dramatic change in the invasion pattern, from fractal to compact, occurs as the system changes from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Then, we explore the case of a system of mixed wettability, i.e. containing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores. The saturation at breakthrough is studied as a function of the fraction of hydrophilic pores. The results are discussed in relation with the water management problem, the optimal design of a GDL and the fuel cell performance degradation mechanisms. We outline how the study could be extended to 3D systems, notably from binarised images of GDLs obtained by X ray microtomography.

  9. Flight Path 5 - About

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path(ER1)

  10. Flight Path 5 - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path(ER1)-

  11. DNA Computing Hamiltonian path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagiya, Masami

    2014 DNA DNA #12;DNA Computing · Feynman · Adleman · DNASIMD · ... · · · · · DNADNA #12;DNA · DNA · · · · DNA · · #12;2000 2005 2010 1995 Hamiltonian path DNA tweezers DNA tile DNA origami DNA box Sierpinski DNA tile self assembly DNA logic gates Whiplash PCR DNA automaton DNA spider MAYA

  12. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  13. Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

  14. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA); Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  15. Molecular Mechanism of the Adsorption Process of an Iodide Anion into Liquid-Vapor Interfaces of Water-Methanol Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ion adsorption to the interface of mixtures, we systematically carried out a free energy calculations study involving the transport of an iodide anion across the interface of a water-methanol mixture. Many body affects are taken into account to describe the interactions among the species. The surface propensities of I- at interfaces of pure water and methanol are well understood. In contrast, detailed knowledge of the molecular level adsorption process of I- at aqueous mixture interfaces has not been reported. In this paper, we explore how this phenomenon will be affected for mixed solvents with varying compositions of water and methanol. Our potential of mean force study as function of varying compositions indicated that I- adsorption free energies decrease from pure water to pure methanol but not linearly with the concentration of methanol. We analyze the computed density profiles and hydration numbers as a function of concentrations and ion positions with respect to the interface to further explain the observed phenomenon. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  16. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldmann, Maximilian; West, Adam H C; Yoder, Bruce L; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. Firstly, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Secondly, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  17. Flight Path 15R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R is a

  18. Flight Path 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R is05

  19. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R90L .2

  20. Flight Paths at WNR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path

  1. Flight Path 15R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14Publications H.Y.R

  2. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL -

  3. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - -

  4. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - -

  5. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - - -

  6. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  7. Shortest Path Algorithms: A Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Bruce L., 1950-

    In this note we present some computational evidence to suggest that a version of Bellman's shortest path algorithm outperforms Treesort- Dijkstra's for a certain class of networks.

  8. Collabortive Authoring of Walden's Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuanling, Dr. Li [Texas A& M University; Bogen, Paul Logasa [ORNL; Pogue, Daniel [Halliburton Energy Services; Furuta, Dr. Richard Keith [Texas A& M University; ShipmanIII, Dr. Frank Major [Texas A& M University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative Authoring of Walden's Paths. Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries. Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences 2012.Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences 2012

  9. Erasing no-man's land by thermodynamically stabilizing the liquid-liquid transition in tetrahedral particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    compressibility KT and the isobaric heat capacity CP . In the LLCP hypothesis, the density anomalies of waterErasing no-man's land by thermodynamically stabilizing the liquid-liquid transition in tetrahedral, Sapienza, Universit´a di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185, Roma, Italy. EFFECTS OF THE LIQUID-LIQUID

  10. Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  11. Rough Paths Theory Fabrice Baudoin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Let p > 2. If xn : [0,1] ? Rd is a sequence of bounded variation paths ... The fundamental theorem of Lyons is the following: ... Brownian motion (B(t))t?0.

  12. Survivable paths in multilayer networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parandehgheibi, Marzieh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of protection in multilayer networks. In single-layer net- works, a pair of disjoint paths can be used to provide protection for a source-destination pair. However, this approach cannot be directly ...

  13. COMPUTER SCIENCE: MISCONCEPTIONS, CAREER PATHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristidis, Vagelis

    COMPUTER SCIENCE: MISCONCEPTIONS, CAREER PATHS AND RESEARCH CHALLENGES School of Computing Undergraduate Student) #12;Computer Science Misconceptions Intro to Computer Science - Florida International University 2 Some preconceived ideas & stereotypes about Computer Science (CS) are quite common

  14. Scattering theory with path integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfelder, R. [Particle Theory Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Particle Theory Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from well-known expressions for the T-matrix and its derivative in standard nonrelativistic potential scattering, I rederive recent path-integral formulations due to Efimov and Barbashov et al. Some new relations follow immediately.

  15. Morse theory in path space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Seung Cho; Soon-Tae Hong

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the path space of a curved manifold on which a point particle is introduced in a conservative physical system with constant total energy to formulate its action functional and geodesic equation together with breaks on the path. The second variation of the action functional is exploited to yield the geodesic deviation equation and to discuss the Jacobi fields on the curved manifold. We investigate the topology of the path space using the action functional on it and its physical meaning by defining the gradient of the action functional, the space of bounded flow energy solutions and the moduli space associated with the critical points of the action functional. We also consider the particle motion on the $n$-sphere $S^{n}$ in the conservative physical system to discuss explicitly the moduli space of the path space and the corresponding homology groups.

  16. ARM - Measurement - Liquid water content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,icegovMeasurementsLightning stroke ARM

  17. Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1 , Xiaorong media, and to measure oil and water saturation. Although this technique has great advantages compared14. Using15 MRI, the oil secondary migration paths are scanned to measure the saturation distribution during

  18. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage. Power towers capture energy from the sun reflectedtower where water or molten salt is flowing to absorb the solar energy.towers or ponds). For liquid fuels, increased reliance on bioenergy will increase the correlation of water and energy

  19. Crack Path Selection Fatigue crack path imaged via SEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Crack path selects secondary phases and interface Conclusions ·Nb-Si Alloys tested exhibited toughness phases fail in a brittle manner Fatigue Crack Growth ABSTRACT Advanced aerospace materials continue at high temperatures. An important property of any high temperature aerospace engineering material is its

  20. Abstract--To study the lung water clearance in vivo at the time of the birth, MR experiments were conducted on newborn lamb immediately after uterine incision deliverance. Images obtained with a fast spin echo sequence enable to quantify lung liquid each

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract-- To study the lung water clearance in vivo at the time of the birth, MR experiments were echo sequence enable to quantify lung liquid each 5 minutes during 30 minutes then each 10 minutes for 1.5 hour. From the lung contours, pulmonary volume, pulmonary water, and spatial gradient

  1. IEEE International Conference on Dielectric Liquids (ICDL-2008), Poitiers, June 30-July 4, 2008 Drop-on-demand Extraction from a Water Meniscus by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Drop-on-demand Extraction from a Water Meniscus by a High Field Pulse P. Atten, A. Ouiguini, J. Raisin of a small drop electrically neutral. The experimental results of water drops extraction in oil are presented, France Abstract- As a part of a study of electrocoalescence of water droplets in oil, the controlled

  2. Path Integration on Darboux Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Grosche

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the Feynman path integral technique is applied to two-dimensional spaces of non-constant curvature: these spaces are called Darboux spaces $\\DI$--$\\DIV$. We start each consideration in terms of the metric and then analyze the quantum theory in the separable coordinate systems. The path integral in each case is formulated and then solved in the majority of cases, the exceptions being quartic oscillators where no closed solution is known. The required ingredients are the path integral solutions of the linear potential, the harmonic oscillator, the radial harmonic oscillator, the modified P\\"oschl--Teller potential, and for spheroidal wave-functions, respectively. The basic path integral solutions, which appear here in a complicated way, have been developed in recent work and are known. The final solutions are represented in terms of the corresponding Green's functions and the expansions into the wave-functions, respectively. We also sketch some limiting cases of the Darboux spaces, where spaces of constant negative and zero curvature emerge.

  3. NPRE at Illinois Three Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    and power systems · Thermal hydraulics and reactor safety · Alternate energy systems · Plasma modeling production; Nuclear power operations and control · Plasma sciences; Applied plasma physics; Nuclear fusionNPRE at Illinois Three Paths Students choose from three concentrations: · Plasma and Fusion · Power

  4. SEPARATION OF COPPER FROM METALS IN AN ALLOY BY LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    /L. Extraction. The extraction procedure is the same for the sample, standards and blank (water between sample extractions with water. The chloroform extracts at this point will normally be cloudySEPARATION OF COPPER FROM METALS IN AN ALLOY BY LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION Background Reading: Harris

  5. Graphene-based battery electrodes having continuous flow paths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jiguang; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Xu, Wu; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Deyu

    2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Some batteries can exhibit greatly improved performance by utilizing electrodes having randomly arranged graphene nanosheets forming a network of channels defining continuous flow paths through the electrode. The network of channels can provide a diffusion pathway for the liquid electrolyte and/or for reactant gases. Metal-air batteries can benefit from such electrodes. In particular Li-air batteries show extremely high capacities, wherein the network of channels allow oxygen to diffuse through the electrode and mesopores in the electrode can store discharge products.

  6. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  7. THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin Nobel Prize lecture

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Path ot Carbon in Photosynthesis. Science" l2J. , 476 (48 THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Nobel8-A Fig. 1. Elementary photosynthesis scheme. DES IOU OF THE

  8. THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassham, J.A.; Calvin, Melvin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis, Prentice-Hall, Ino. ,to StUdy the Products of Photosynthesis as Depending on the48 THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS J. A. Bassham and

  9. Orifice mixing of immiscible liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonough, Joseph Aloysius

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solution (7). The present study of orif1ce mixing is a continuation of previous research on this project which yielded a relationship explaining the effect of operating conditions upon the format1on of 1nterfacial area for the system water-kerosene.... The experimental technique evolved by Helch (18), Vesselhoff (19), McNair (8), and Scott (IA) was changed only slightly. Their work on water-kerosene was repeated for the liquid pairs trichloroethylene-water, heptanol-water, 20 per oent aqueous sucrose-kerosene...

  10. Investigating Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    substances. It covers most of the earth?s surface, sometimes to a depth of more than a mile. It exists as a colorless gas in the atmosphere. It caps the poles with ice and occurs in the snows of winter. Liquid water fills brooks, streams, rivers, lakes, ponds...

  11. Grabbing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

  12. A numerical method for the simulation of low Mach number liquid-gas flows.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    consisting of the air bubbles and the liquid water are investigated. They are driven by a heat supply

  13. High-precision gigahertz-to-terahertz spectroscopy of aqueous salt solutions as a probe of the femtosecond-to-picosecond dynamics of liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinh, N Q; Allen, S James; George, D K; Rahmani, A J; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because it is sensitive to fluctuations occurring over femtoseconds to picoseconds, gigahertz-to-terahertz dielectric relaxation spectroscopy can provide a valuable window into water's most rapid intermolecular motions. In response, we have built a vector network analyzer dielectric spectrometer capable of measuring absorbance and index of refraction in this frequency regime with unprecedented precision. Using this to determine the complex dielectric response of water and aqueous salt solutions from 5.9 GHz to 1.12 THz (which we provide in the SI), we have obtained strong new constraints on theories of water's collective dynamics. For example, while the salt-dependencies we observe for water's two slower relaxations (8 and 1 ps) are easily reconciled with suggestions that they arise due to rotations of fully and partially hydrogen bonded molecules, respectively, the salt-dependence of the fastest relaxation (180 fs) appears difficult to reconcile with its prior assignment to liberations of single hydrogen bon...

  14. aux interfaces liquide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (81 C), its relative safety (compared to liquids such as benzene and toluene of graphite under water and under cyclohexane will be discussed. From the results of this...

  15. Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory's Advanced Light Source, scientists observed a surprisingly dense form of water that remained liquid well beyond its typical freezing point. Researchers applied a...

  16. Flight Path 60R - GEANIE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R

  17. Flight Path 90L - TPC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R90L .

  18. Flight Path 14 - About DANCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14 (1FP14) utilizes

  19. Flight Path 14 - About DANCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14 (1FP14) utilizes

  20. Flight Path 14 - About DANCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14 (1FP14) utilizes

  1. Flight Path 15L - Collaborators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14

  2. Flight Path 15L - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14Publications H.Y.

  3. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  4. Liquid-state polaron theory of the hydrated electron revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. Donley; David R. Heine; Caleb A. Tormey; David T. Wu

    2014-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum path integral/classical liquid-state theory of Chandler and co-workers, created to describe an excess electron in solvent, is re-examined for the hydrated electron. The portion that models electron-water density correlations is replaced by two equations: the range optimized random phase approximation (RO-RPA), and the DRL approximation to the "two-chain" equation, both shown previously to describe accurately the static structure and thermodynamics of strongly charged polyelectrolyte solutions. The static equilibrium properties of the hydrated electron are analyzed using five different electron-water pseudopotentials. The theory is then compared with data from mixed quantum/classical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations using these same pseudopotentials. It is found that the predictions of the RO-RPA and DRL-based polaron theories are similar and improve upon previous theory, with values for almost all properties analyzed in reasonable quantitative agreement with the available simulation data. Also, it is found using the Larsen, Glover and Schwartz pseudopotential that the theories give values for the solvation free energy that are at least three times larger than that from experiment.

  5. Path integral evaluation of Dbrane amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    1999-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend Polchinski's evaluation of the measure for the one-loop closed string path integral to open string tree amplitudes with boundaries and crosscaps embedded in Dbranes. We explain how the nonabelian limit of near-coincident Dbranes emerges in the path integral formalism. We give a careful path integral derivation of the cylinder amplitude including the modulus dependence of the volume of the conformal Killing group.

  6. Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Performance Characterization under Freezing Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandlikar, S.G.; Lu, Z.; Rao, N.; Sergi, J.; Rath, C.; Dade, C.; Trabold, T.; Owejan, J.; Gagliardo, J.; Allen, J.; Yassar, R.S.; Medici, E.; Herescu, A.

    2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this program, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), General Motors (GM) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) have focused on fundamental studies that address water transport, accumulation and mitigation processes in the gas diffusion layer and flow field channels of the bipolar plate. These studies have been conducted with a particular emphasis on understanding the key transport phenomena which control fuel cell operation under freezing conditions. Technical accomplishments are listed below: • Demonstrated that shutdown air purge is controlled predominantly by the water carrying capacity of the purge stream and the most practical means of reducing the purge time and energy is to reduce the volume of liquid water present in the fuel cell at shutdown. The GDL thermal conductivity has been identified as an important parameter to dictate water accumulation within a GDL. • Found that under the normal shutdown conditions most of the GDL-level water accumulation occurs on the anode side and that the mass transport resistance of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) thus plays a critically important role in understanding and optimizing purge. • Identified two-phase flow patterns (slug, film and mist flow) in flow field channel, established the features of each pattern, and created a flow pattern map to characterize the two-phase flow in GDL/channel combination. • Implemented changes to the baseline channel surface energy and GDL materials and evaluated their performance with the ex situ multi-channel experiments. It was found that the hydrophilic channel (contact angle ? ? 10?) facilitates the removal of liquid water by capillary effects and by reducing water accumulation at the channel exit. It was also found that GDL without MPL promotes film flow and shifts the slug-to-film flow transition to lower air flow rates, compared with the case of GDL with MPL. • Identified a new mechanism of water transport through GDLs based on Haines jump mechanism. The breakdown and redevelopment of the water paths in GDLs lead to an intermittent water drainage behavior, which is characterized by dynamic capillary pressure and changing of breakthrough location. MPL was found to not only limit the number of water entry locations into the GDL (thus drastically reducing water saturation), but also stabilizes the water paths (or morphology). • Simultaneously visualized the water transport on cathode and anode channels of an operating fuel cell. It was found that under relatively dry hydrogen/air conditions at lower temperatures, the cathode channels display a similar flow pattern map to the ex-situ experiments under similar conditions. Liquid water on the anode side is more likely formed via condensation of water vapor which is transported through the anode GDL. • Investigated the water percolation through the GDL with pseudo-Hele-Shaw experiments and simulated the capillary-driven two-phase flow inside gas diffusion media, with the pore size distributions being modeled by using Weibull distribution functions. The effect of the inclusion of the microporous layer in the fuel cell assembly was explored numerically. • Developed and validated a simple, reliable computational tool for predicting liquid water transport in GDLs. • Developed a new method of determining the pore size distribution in GDL using scanning electron microscope (SEM) image processing, which allows for separate characterization of GDL wetting properties and pore size distribution. • Determined the effect of surface wettability and channel cross section and bend dihedral on liquid holdup in fuel cell flow channels. A major thrust of this research program has been the development of an optimal combination of materials, design features and cell operating conditions that achieve a water management strategy which facilitates fuel cell operation under freezing conditions. Based on our various findings, we have made the final recommendation relative to GDL materials, bipolar design and surface properties, and the combination of materials, design featur

  7. Microfluidics Transport and Path Control via Programmable Electrowetting on Dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore W. Von Bitner, Ph.D.

    2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted in collaboration with Professor Chang-Jin Kim of the University of California, Los Angeles. In phase I, the IOS-UCLA collaboration demonstrated the transport and manipulation of insulting liquid droplets using the principles of EWOD. A postage stamp sized array of electronically addressable Teflon pads, whose surface tension characteristics could be altered on command through computer algorithms, was developed and tested using deionized water as the liquid. Going beyond the tasks originally proposed for Phase I, droplet manipulation was achieved and droplet stability in the EWOD device was examined.

  8. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

  9. Robust constrained shortest path problems under budgeted ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the robust constrained shortest path problem under resource uncertainty. .... they assess the effectiveness of the label-setting algorithm based on the ...

  10. Critical function and success path summary display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of and hierarchical access to three levels of display pages containing information on critical function monitoring and success path monitoring.

  11. Methodology for Augmenting Existing Paths with Additional Parallel Transects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, John E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual Sample Plan (VSP) is sample planning software that is used, among other purposes, to plan transect sampling paths to detect areas that were potentially used for munition training. This module was developed for application on a large site where existing roads and trails were to be used as primary sampling paths. Gap areas between these primary paths needed to found and covered with parallel transect paths. These gap areas represent areas on the site that are more than a specified distance from a primary path. These added parallel paths needed to optionally be connected together into a single path—the shortest path possible. The paths also needed to optionally be attached to existing primary paths, again with the shortest possible path. Finally, the process must be repeatable and predictable so that the same inputs (primary paths, specified distance, and path options) will result in the same set of new paths every time. This methodology was developed to meet those specifications.

  12. Optical absorption of pure water in the blue and ultraviolet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zheng

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of the Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter (ICAM) is that it produces an isotropic illumination of the liquid sample and thereby dramatically minimizes scattering effects. The ICAM can produce an effective optical path...

  13. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greminger, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Water Treatment by Solvent Extraction," Canadian J.A.F. Preuss, "Extraction of Phenol from Water with a Liquid1980 SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER LP,WRENCE BERv

  15. Targeted Path Profiling: Lower Overhead Path Profiling for Staged Dynamic Optimization Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    , their technique leaves a sizable fraction of paths unaccounted for. While a number of techniques have been

  16. Transition Path Theory E. Vanden-Eijnden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    Transition Path Theory E. Vanden-Eijnden Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University New York, NY 10012 eve2cims.nyu.edu Eric Vanden-Eijnden E. Vanden-Eijnden: Transition Path Theory of the Current and Transition Tubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451 5 Comparison with Transition

  17. Variable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Thomas

    length path coupling theorem, we im- prove the upper bound on the mixing time of the Glauber dynamics . By a "coupling" for this chain, we will mean a joint stochastic process (Xt, Yt) on × such that eachVariable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes Eric Vigoda July 17, 2006 Abstract We present a new

  18. Evaluation of Calcine Disposition Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birrer, S.A.; Heiser, M.B.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

  19. Evaluation of Calcine Disposition - Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Birrer

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

  20. Creaming and breaking of liquid emulsions: a free boundary problem 1 / 48 Creaming and breaking of liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Fabio

    , as opposite to the other case called instead a water-in-oil emulsion. #12;Creaming and breaking of liquid emulsions: a free boundary problem 4 / 48 What is an emulsion? Everyday life examples (a) water-in-oil of the model 5 A priori estimates 6 Existence and uniqueness #12;Creaming and breaking of liquid emulsions

  1. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1994, 28, 1331-1340 Semlempirical Thermodynamic Modeling of Liquid-Liquid Phase Equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    -Liquid Phase Equilibria: Coal Tar Dissolutionin Water-Miscible Solvents Catherine A. Peters'it and Richard 0 coaltar, solvent,and water using the nonrandom, two-liquid (NRTL) equation, a semi- empiricalexcessfreeenergyequation. Coaltar,a complex mixtureofpolycyclicaromatichydrocarbons(PAHs),was represented

  2. Liquid foams of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

  3. WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

  4. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng [School of Resources and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Li Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  5. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the heat capacity of the ice mass and liquid water mass.all the ice (liquid) is melted (frozen). Heat capacities are

  6. Compiling Path Expressions into VLSI Circuits `I`. S. Annntharaman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Edmund M.

    -timed. Ncvcrthdcss. UK circuits produced by our construction have area propordonal to N slog(N) whcrc N is the total expression: path R, + Wend, path R, + Wend. `fhc first path cxprcssion prohibits a read operation

  7. Alien liquid detector and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an energizing circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. For this purpose an electronic circit controls a flow of heating current to the monitoring element. The presence of an alien liquid is detected by sensing a predetermined change in heating current flow to the monitoring element, e.g., to distinguish between water and oil. In preferred embodiments the monitoring element is a thermistor whose resistance is compared with a reference resistance and heating current through the thermistor is controlled in accordance with the difference. In one embodiment a bridge circuit senses the resistance difference; the difference may be sensed by an operational amplifier arrangement. Features of the invention include positioning the monitoring element at the surface of water, slightly immersed, so that the power required to maintain the thermistor temperature substantially above ambient temperature serves to detect presence of oil pollution at the surface.

  8. Liquid Cooling in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cader, Tahir; Sorell,, Vali; Westra, Levi; Marquez, Andres

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor manufacturers have aggressively attacked the problem of escalating microprocessor power consumption levels. Today, server manufacturers can purchase microprocessors that currently have power consumption levels capped at 100W maximum. However, total server power levels continue to increase, with the increase in power consumption coming from the supportin chipsets, memory, and other components. In turn, full rack heat loads are very aggressivley climbing as well, and this is making it increasingly difficult and cost-prohibitive for facility owners to cool these high power racks. As a result, facilities owners are turning to alternative, and more energy efficient, cooling solutions that deploy liquids in one form or another. The paper discusses the advent of the adoption of liquid-cooling in high performance computing centers. An overview of the following competing rack-based, liquid-cooling, technologies is provided: in-row, above rack, refrigerated/enclosed rack, rear door heat exchanger, and device-level (i.e., chip-level). Preparation for a liquid-cooled data center, retroft and greenfield (new), is discussed, with a focus on the key issues that are common to all liquid-cooling technologies that depend upon the delivery of water to the rack (or in some deployments, a Coolant Distribution Unit). The paper then discusses, in some detail, the actual implementation and deployment of a liquid device-level cooled (spray cooled) supercomputer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Initial results from a successful 30 day compliance test show excellent hardware stability, operating system (OS) and software stack stability, application stability and performance, and an availability level that exceeded expectations at 99.94%. The liquid-cooled supercomputer achieved a peak performance of 9.287 TeraFlops, which placed it at number 101 in the June 2007 Top500 fastest supercomputers worldwide. Long-term performance and energy efficiency testing is currently underway, and detailed results will be reported in upcoming publications.

  9. TRANSPORT AND DYNAMICS IN SUPERCOOLED CONFINED WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Systems B. The Water Heat Capacity VIII. The NMR and the Configurational Heat Capacity IX. Concluding Remarks References Liquid Polymorphism: Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 152, First Edition. Edited, inside this stable phase, water can also exist in liquid form. When this occurs, water is said

  10. Vapor-liquid equilibrium of water-acetone-air at ambient temperatures and pressures. An analysis of different VLE-fitting methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichtenbelt, J.H.; Schram, B.J.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of accurate equilibrium data is of high importance in chemical engineering practice both for design and research purposes. It appeared that for the gas absorption system water-acetone-air in the range of special interest for absorption and desorption operations, neither literature data nor calculations following UNIFAC gave a sufficient accuracy. An experimental program was set up to determine equilibrium data with an accuracy within 2% for low acetone concentrations (up to 7 wt % gas phase) at ambient temperature (16-30/sup 0/C) and atmospheric pressure (740-860 mmHg). From experiments the activity coefficient at infinite dilution of acetone ..gamma.. is found to be 6.79 (0.01) at 20/sup 0/C and 7.28 (0.01) at 25/sup 0/C, while the total error in ..gamma.. is 1.5%. The equilibrium constant can be calculated from ..gamma.. and shows the same error. The experimental data-fitting with procedures of Margules (two parameters) and Van Laar were successful, but NRTL, Wilson, and UNIQUAC failed, probably because of the small concentration range used.

  11. Linear water waves with vorticity: rotational features and particle paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnstrom; Gabriele Villari

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady linear gravity waves of small amplitude travelling on a current of constant vorticity are found. For negative vorticity we show the appearance of internal waves and vortices, wherein the particle trajectories are not any more closed ellipses. For positive vorticity the situation resembles that of Stokes waves, but for large vorticity the trajectories are affected.

  12. Modeling of thermal processes in very high pressure liquid chromatography for column immersed in a water bath: Application of the selected models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof [University of Tennessee and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, chromatographic analyses are carried out by operating columns packed with sub-2 {micro}m particles under very high pressure gradients, up to 1200 bar for 5 cm long columns. This provides the high flow rates that are necessary for the achievement of high column efficiencies and short analysis times. However, operating columns at high flow rates under such high pressure gradients generate a large amount of heat due to the viscous friction of the mobile phase stream that percolates through a low permeability bed. The evacuation of this heat causes the formation of significant or even large axial and radial gradients of all the physico-chemical parameters characterizing the packing material and the mobile phase, eventually resulting in a loss of column efficiency. We previously developed and successfully applied a model combining the heat and the mass balances of a chromatographic column operated under very high pressure gradients (VHPLC). The use of this model requires accurate estimates of the dispersion coefficients at each applied mobile phase velocity. This work reports on a modification of the mass balance model such that only one measurement is now necessary to accurately predict elution peak profiles in a wide range of mobile phase velocities. The conditions under which the simple equilibrium-dispersive (ED) and transport-dispersive (TD) models are applicable in VHPLC are also discussed. This work proves that the new combination of the heat transfer and the ED model discussed in this work enables the calculation of accurate profiles for peaks eluted under extreme conditions, like when the column is thermostated in a water bath.

  13. The Path of the Blind Watchmaker: A Model of Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Andrew Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    path of the blind watchmaker. This thesis presents a novelBlind WatchMaker Path (BWMPath) BWMPath contains the bulk of the software written for this thesis,

  14. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy Futures Study Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy...

  15. 2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dor Ben-Amotz

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

  16. Three Paths to Energy Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, V. N.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engine Test Facility, Grove City, PA; and a computerized boiler control and power generation module, Erie, PA. The RECO outline specifications are periodically reviewed (at least bi-yearly) to include the latest energy design features for all... are flexible manufacturing and computerized boiler controls in the Locomotive Business, industrial heat p~ps in the Plastics Business, thermal water storag at the Research and Development Laboratory, utilities improvements in the Turbine Busin sses...

  17. SPEEDING UP DYNAMIC SHORTEST PATH ALGORITHMS Finding ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 19, 2003 ... ... and Reps algorithm for updating a shortest path tree, which is a revision of ... tree, although it can be easily specialized for updating a tree [5].

  18. Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, D. R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits include the ability to identify areas of performance degradation during a turbine outage. Repair priorities can then be set...

  19. Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, A.A.; Calvin, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIIE PAT3 OF C R O IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS A B K A. A. Benson andin the early products of photosynthesis, we Stepka, W. , inP THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS. 111. BY A. A. Benson

  20. PATH-RELINKING INTENSIFICATION METHODS FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    user

    Apr 1, 2010 ... We consider in this paper a combinatorial optimization problem (COP), defined by a finite ... decreases, the system moves to a ground state of minimum energy. Finding ... Path-relinking, metaheuristics, hybrid metaheurisics. 1 ...

  1. Shortest Paths, Network Design and Associated Polyhedra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnanti, Thomas L.

    We study a specialized version of network design problems that arise in telecommunication, transportation and other industries. The problem, a generalization of the shortest path problem, is defined on an undirected network ...

  2. Multi-objective stochastic path planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Sumantra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of multiple objectives and stochastic edge parameters. 2. Identify candidate constraints where clustering based multi-level programming can be applied to eliminate infeasible edges. 3. Provide an exact O (V.E) algorithm for building redundant shortest paths. 4...

  3. Non-classical paths in interference experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Sawant; Joseph Samuel; Aninda Sinha; Supurna Sinha; Urbasi Sinha

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption which is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from non-classical paths in quantum interference experiments which provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these non-classical paths is hard. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence.

  4. Multi-objective stochastic path planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Sumantra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research formulates the path planning as an optimization problem with multiple objectives and stochastic edge parameters. The first section introduces different variants of the PP problem and discusses existing ...

  5. Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

  6. Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, D. R.

    in sellable power output as a result of improved turbine efficiency. The Lyondell facility is a combined cycle power plant where a gas turbine: heat recovery system supplies steam to the steam turbine. Since this steam is a bypropuct of the gas turbine...steam Path Audits on Industrial steam Turbines DOUGLAS R. MITCHELL. ENGINEER. ENCOTECH, INC., SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK ABSTRACT The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits...

  7. Asymptotic properties of path integral ideals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogojevic, A.; Balaz, A.; Belic, A. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and analyze an interesting quantity, the path integral ideal, governing the flow of generic discrete theories to the continuum limit and greatly increasing their convergence. The said flow is classified according to the degree of divergence of the potential at spatial infinity. Studying the asymptotic behavior of path integral ideals we isolate the dominant terms in the effective potential that determine the behavior of a generic theory for large discrete time steps.

  8. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electric and gas water heaters, both of which areMEPS revisions. For gas water heaters, the energy factor islevel. For electric water heaters, continued efficiency

  9. Growth of flower-like CdSe dendrites from a Brnsted acidbase ionic liquid precursor{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    solution of water, ethanol and ionic liquid based on formic acid and N,N-dimethylformamide. Experimental, ethanol, an ionic liquid based on formic acid and N,N-dimethylformamide, cadmium chloride and sel

  10. Theory of extreme correlations using canonical Fermions and path integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shastry, B. Sriram, E-mail: sriram@physics.ucsc.edu

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The  t–J  model is studied using a novel and rigorous mapping of the Gutzwiller projected electrons, in terms of canonical electrons. The mapping has considerable similarity to the Dyson–Maleev transformation relating spin operators to canonical Bosons. This representation gives rise to a non Hermitian quantum theory, characterized by minimal redundancies. A path integral representation of the canonical theory is given. Using it, the salient results of the extremely correlated Fermi liquid (ECFL) theory, including the previously found Schwinger equations of motion, are easily rederived. Further, a transparent physical interpretation of the previously introduced auxiliary Greens function and the ‘caparison factor’, is obtained. The low energy electron spectral function in this theory, with a strong intrinsic asymmetry, is summarized in terms of a few expansion coefficients. These include an important emergent energy scale ?{sub 0} that shrinks to zero on approaching the insulating state, thereby making it difficult to access the underlying very low energy Fermi liquid behavior. The scaled low frequency ECFL spectral function, related simply to the Fano line shape, has a peculiar energy dependence unlike that of a Lorentzian. The resulting energy dispersion obtained by maximization is a hybrid of a massive and a massless Dirac spectrum E{sub Q}{sup ?}??Q??(?{sub 0}{sup 2}+Q{sup 2}), where the vanishing of Q, a momentum type variable, locates the kink minimum. Therefore the quasiparticle velocity interpolates between (??1) over a width ?{sub 0} on the two sides of Q=0, implying a kink there that strongly resembles a prominent low energy feature seen in angle resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) of cuprate materials. We also propose novel ways of analyzing the ARPES data to isolate the predicted asymmetry between particle and hole excitations. -- Highlights: •Spectral function of the Extremely Correlated Fermi Liquid theory at low energy. •Electronic origin of low energy kinks in energy dispersion. •Non Hermitian representation of Gutzwiller projected electrons. •Analogy with Dyson–Maleev representation of spins. •Path integral formulation of extremely correlated electrons.

  11. Statistical analysis of liquid seepage in partially saturated heterogeneous fracture systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liou, T.S.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field evidence suggests that water flow in unsaturated fracture systems may occur along fast preferential flow paths. However, conventional macroscale continuum approaches generally predict the downward migration of water as a spatially uniform wetting front subjected to strong inhibition into the partially saturated rock matrix. One possible cause of this discrepancy may be the spatially random geometry of the fracture surfaces, and hence, the irregular fracture aperture. Therefore, a numerical model was developed in this study to investigate the effects of geometric features of natural rock fractures on liquid seepage and solute transport in 2-D planar fractures under isothermal, partially saturated conditions. The fractures were conceptualized as 2-D heterogeneous porous media that are characterized by their spatially correlated permeability fields. A statistical simulator, which uses a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, was employed to generate synthetic permeability fields. Hypothesized geometric features that are expected to be relevant for seepage behavior, such as spatially correlated asperity contacts, were considered in the SA algorithm. Most importantly, a new perturbation mechanism for SA was developed in order to consider specifically the spatial correlation near conditioning asperity contacts. Numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport were then performed in these synthetic fractures by the flow simulator TOUGH2, assuming that the effects of matrix permeability, gas phase pressure, capillary/permeability hysteresis, and molecular diffusion can be neglected. Results of flow simulation showed that liquid seepage in partially saturated fractures is characterized by localized preferential flow, along with bypassing, funneling, and localized ponding. Seepage pattern is dominated by the fraction of asperity contracts, and their shape, size, and spatial correlation. However, the correlation structure of permeability field is less important than the spatial correlation of asperity contacts. A faster breakthrough was observed in fractures subjected to higher normal stress, accompanied with a nonlinearly decreasing trend of the effective permeability. Interestingly, seepage dispersion is generally higher in fractures with intermediate fraction of asperity contacts; but it is lower for small or large fractions of asperity contacts. However, it may become higher if the ponding becomes significant. Transport simulations indicate that tracers bypass dead-end pores and travel along flow paths that have less flow resistance. Accordingly, tracer breakthrough curves generally show more spreading than breakthrough curves for water. Further analyses suggest that the log-normal time model generally fails to fit the breakthrough curves for water, but it is a good approximation for breakthrough curves for the tracer.

  12. Removal of tropospheric path length variations in very long baseline interferometry with measurement of tropospheric emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, Geoffrey

    through the atmosphere by measuring the water vapor content through its emissivity. Two epochs of 3­mm Creek and Kitt Peak Observatories can be used to reduce the rms interferometer phase when liquid water components of the at­ mosphere [Bean and Dutton, 1966; Thompson et al., 1991]. Variability in this delay

  13. Liquid soap film generates electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed that a rotating liquid soap film generates electricity when placed between two non-contact electrodes with a sufficiently large potential difference. In our experiments suspended liquid film (water + soap film) is formed on the surface of a circular frame, which is forced to rotate in the $x-y$ horizontal plane by a motor. This system is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply an external electric voltage difference in the $x-$direction. The produced electric current is collected from the liquid film using two conducting electrodes that are separated in the $y-$direction. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this paper we report a novel technique, in which a similar device can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to electrical energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed similarly in very small scales like micro scales with different applications. Although the device is comparable to commercial electric motors or electric generators, there is a significant difference in their working principles. Usually in an electric motor or generator the magnetic field causes the driving force, while in a LFM or LFEG the Coulomb force is the driving force. This fact is also interesting from the Bio-science point of view and brings a similarity to bio motors. Here we have investigated the electrical characteristics of such a generator for the first time experimentally and modelled the phenomenon with electroconvection governing equations. A numerical simulation is performed using the local approximation for the charge-potential relation and results are in qualitative agreement with experiments.

  14. Maximizing Crosstalk-Induced Slowdown During Path Delay Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gope, Dibakar

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in path delay for c5315 .................................................................... 57 Figure 11 Increase in path delay for c2670 .................................................................... 60 Figure 12 Increase in path delay for c... for critical paths considering single aggressor crosstalk effect with due consideration to the timing alignment and direction. This method has similar CPU efficiency to that of [17] and [18]. However, they did not take into account the possible impact...

  15. Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis Tom Fricker University discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (logSPM, Kuczera et al., 2006). The purpose). 1 #12;3 The Saturated Path Hydrology Model We consider the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (log

  16. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Chaplin

    2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

  17. PATHS: Analysis of PATH Duration Statistics and their Impact on Reactive MANET Routing Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    PATHS: Analysis of PATH Duration Statistics and their Impact on Reactive MANET Routing Protocols Department of Electrical Engineering University of Southern California {narayans,fbai,bkrishna,helmy}@usc.edu ABSTRACT We develop a detailed approach to study how mobility im- pacts the performance of reactive MANET

  18. A Continuous-State Version of Discrete Randomized Shortest-Paths, with Application to Path Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    . It is shown that the continuous-state counterpart requires the solution of two partial differential equations, namely the backward variable. These partial differential equations are the so- called steady-state Bloch entropy [23]. The introduced path randomization allows balancing the load (number of packages) per path

  19. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

  20. Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

  1. Water: A Complex Liquid Marcia C. Barbosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, I-Shih

    and Entropy (S - S )(V - V ) #12;Diffusion - SPC/E Berendsen, Grigera, Straatsma, JCP 91, 6269 (87) #12;Diffusion - SPC/E Netz, Starr, Stanley, Barbosa JCP 115, 344 (01) #12;Rotation Diffusion - SPC/E Netz, Starr) Particles make four bonds BUT they have five neighbors!!! #12;Frequency - SPC/E Netz, Starr, MCB and Stanley

  2. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alban Sauret; François Boulogne; Jean Cappello; Emilie Dressaire; Howard A. Stone

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

  3. Flight Path 30R - About ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path of WNR.

  4. Flight Path 30R - About ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path of

  5. Flight Path 30R - ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path ofLinks

  6. Flight Path 30R - ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path

  7. Predictions of Dynamic Behavior under Pressure for Two Scenarios to Explain Water Anomalies Pradeep Kumar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franzese, Giancarlo

    of maximum correlation length in the (T, P) plane. Response functions, such as the isobaric heat capacity CP crossover is independent of whether water at very low temperature is characterized by a ``liquid-liquid scenarios are commonly used to interpret the anomalies of water [1,2]: (i) The liquid-liquid critical point

  8. Equation for liquid density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Yang, H.C.; Hopper, J.R.; Cawley, W.A. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturated liquid densities for organic chemicals are given as functions of temperature using a modified Rackett equation.

  9. Measuring optical absorption coefficient of pure water in UV using the integrating cavity absorption meter. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ling

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of the instrument is only several centimeters. The long effective total path length ensures a high sensitivity that enables the ICAM to measure liquid mediums with low absorption. Compared to the conventional transmission type of instruments that were used...

  10. aux interfaces solide-liquide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (81 C), its relative safety (compared to liquids such as benzene and toluene of graphite under water and under cyclohexane will be discussed. From the results of this...

  11. OIL DROPLET MANIPULATION USING LIQUID DIELECTROPHORESIS ON ELECTRET WITH SUPERLYOPHOBIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    OIL DROPLET MANIPULATION USING LIQUID DIELECTROPHORESIS ON ELECTRET WITH SUPERLYOPHOBIC SURFACES flow friction for water and oil. Charge stability of electret in liquid is much improved with new hysteresis of SLS for oil droplets are experimentally demonstrated, indicating low motion resistance

  12. Liquid detection circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Thomas O. (North Aurora, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  13. WATER INFLOW INTO BOREHOLES DURING THE STRIPA HEATER EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is plotted against water extraction rate with temper­ aturei^ H 2 _ -i I Liquid water extraction rate (liters/day) XBLholi? s due to water extraction was negligible because the

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, M.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

  15. Boiling and condensation in a liquid-filled enclosure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Cohen Avram

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of boiling and condensation in a liquid-filled enclosure, with water and Freon- 113 as the working fluids, is described. The operating characteristics of a boiling system, ...

  16. Designing liquid repellent surfaces for fabrics, feathers and fog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhatre, Shreerang S. (Shreerang Sharad)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Omniphobicity refers to a property of surfaces which are not wetted by water, oils, alcohols and other low surface tension liquids. Robust omniphobic surfaces can be applied in many areas including fabrics with chemical / ...

  17. Activation Energies from Transition Path Sampling Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellago, Christoph

    unavailable for processes occurring in complex systems. Since in this method activation energies diatomic immersed in a bath of repulsive soft particles. Keywords: Activation energy; Computer simulation on the transition path sampling methodology, our approach to determine activation energies does not require full

  18. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Earl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rougier, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  19. FESAC Fusion Development Path Rob Goldston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploration/Proof of Principle IFE IREs MFE PE Exp'ts Engineering Science/ Technology Development ComponentFESAC Fusion Development Path Rob Goldston Graduate Student Seminar March 21, 2005 #12;Panel Power Associates · Robert Goldston (Chair), Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory · Amanda Hubbard, MIT

  20. Feasible Path Synthesis for Automated Guided Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Feasible Path Synthesis for Automated Guided Vehicles Reijer Idema 2005 TU Delft FROG Navigation for Automated Guided Vehicles Author: Reijer Idema Supervisors: prof.dr.ir. P. Wesseling (TU Delft) dr.ir. Kees is a manufacturer of Automated Guided Vehicles. They have developed a multitude of vehicles that transport products

  1. Clearance Based Path Optimization for Motion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Abstract Many motion planning techniques, like the probabilistic roadmap method (PRM), gen- erate low] and humanoid robot planning [13]. A commonly used technique for planning paths is the Probabilistic Roadmap. 1.1 Probabilistic Roadmap Method The probabilistic roadmap method consists of two phases

  2. Clearance Based Path Optimization for Motion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Abstract Many motion planning techniques, like the probabilistic roadmap method (PRM), gen­ erate low] and humanoid robot planning [13]. A commonly used technique for planning paths is the Probabilistic Roadmap.1 Probabilistic Roadmap Method The probabilistic roadmap method consists of two phases: a construction and a query

  3. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  4. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Wright, David D. (Vershire, VT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  5. New Paths to Retirement Joseph F. Quinn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    -war early retirement trend -- the fact that older men were leaving the labor force earlier and earlierNew Paths to Retirement April 1998 Joseph F. Quinn Department of Economics Boston College Chestnut will be presented at the Pension Research Council conference on "Forecasting Retirement Needs and Retirement Wealth

  6. Asymmetrical Path Interference Test of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mei Xiaochun

    2006-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The asymmetrical path interference test of light is put forward in the paper. In the test, two different results would arise under the same experimental conditions if light is regarded as wave or particle. Therefore, the test can help us to comprehend which concept, wave or particle, is more essential for micro-particles.

  7. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  8. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  9. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  10. The Use of Path Integral Ideals: Deriving the Euler Summation Formula for Path Integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogojevic, Aleksandar; Balaz, Antun; Belic, Aleksandar [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and comment on a new quantity that we have recently introduced: the path integral ideal. The new quantity governs the flow of a discrete quantum theory to its continuum limit. Path integral ideals satisfy a unique integral equation - the distinction between different quantum theories being in the boundary conditions. An asymptotic expansion of this equation has led to the derivation of a generalization of Euler's summation formula for path integrals. The new analytical method has brought about a systematic improvement of the convergence of path integrals. Applied to numerical procedures, the new analytical input has resulted in the speedup of numerical simulations by many orders of magnitude. On the analytical side, the integral equation for ideals may turn out to be a useful setting for extending the obtained results to a wider setting - e.g. to p-adic valued theories and theories on non-commuting space-times.

  11. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water heaters to heat pump water heaters with energy factorheat pumps with greater efficiency 40% more efficient cooling technologies more efficient lighting more efficient water heatersheat pumps, boilers 100% OLED TVs, 0.1W standby, more efficient AC, refrigerator, washers More efficient gas water heater

  12. Detection of supercooled liquid in mixedphase clouds using radar Doppler spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    in the temperature range from 0 to -40°C, where both liquid and ice hydrometeor phases are sustainable of their hydrometeors (i.e., liquid or ice). Current cloud parameterizations that parti- tion water into liquid and ice 2010; published 1 October 2010. [1] Cloud phase identification from active remote sensors

  13. Water mist injection in oil shale retorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, T.R.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

    1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Water mist is utilized to control the maximum temperature in an oil shale retort during processing. A mist of water droplets is generated and entrained in the combustion supporting gas flowing into the retort in order to distribute the liquid water droplets throughout the retort. The water droplets are vaporized in the retort in order to provide an efficient coolant for temperature control.

  14. Water on Earth Source % of Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    of heat. High Heat Capacity · Water absorbs or releases more heat than many substances for each degree is lowered. · spread salt on streets in winter to prevent ice formation. High Heat Capacity · Water vapor in our environment. · On earth, water is found as a liquid, as a solid (ice) or as a gas (water vapor

  15. Driving it home: choosing the right path for fueling North America's transportation future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann Bordetsky; Susan Casey-Lefkowitz; Deron Lovaas; Elizabeth Martin-Perera; Melanie Nakagawa; Bob Randall; Dan Woynillowicz

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    North America faces an energy crossroads. With the world fast approaching the end of cheap, plentiful conventional oil, we must choose between developing ever-dirtier sources of fossil fuels -- at great cost to our health and environment -- or setting a course for a more sustainable energy future of clean, renewable fuels. This report explores the full scale of the damage done by attempts to extract oil from liquid coal, oil shale, and tar sands; examines the risks for investors of gambling on these dirty fuel sources; and lays out solutions for guiding us toward a cleaner fuel future. Table of contents: Executive Summary; Chapter 1: Transportation Fuel at a Crossroads; Chapter 2: Canadian Tar Sands: Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel in Endangered Forests; Chapter 3: Oil Shale Extraction: Drilling Through the American West; Chapter 4: Liquid Coal: A 'Clean Fuel' Mirage; Chapter 5: The Investment Landscape: Dirty Fuels Are Risky Business; Chapter 6: The Clean Path for Transportation and Conclusion.

  16. The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemistry, Franklin,...

  17. EECBG Success Story: Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings with Biodiesel EECBG Success Story: Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings with Biodiesel December 7, 2011 - 3:33pm Addthis Downtown...

  18. Modeling Interfacial Liquid Layers in Environmental Ices SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Symbol Quantity ice wf Fugacity of pure ice brine wf^ Fugacity of water in brine layer vap wf Fugacity of water in vapor space above ice wf Fugacity of pure liquid water wx Mole fraction of water in brine layer ice wH Enthalpy of ice at T, P 0,ice wH Enthalpy of ice at reference state brine wH Partial molar

  19. An Optimal Path Model for the Risk-Averse Traveler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leilei Zhang

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 11, 2014 ... The model is suitable for a risk-averse traveler, who prefers a path with ... Citation

  20. Software-based tool path evaluation for environmental sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KONG, DAEYOUNG; Seungchoun Choi; Yusuke Yasui; Sushrut Pavanaskar; Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity, while the sustainability and energy ef?ciencyof sustainability of a tool path (i.e. energy consumption

  1. Kinetics of complex plasma with liquid droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a theoretical basis for the reduction of electron density by spray of water (or other liquids) in hot plasma. This phenomenon has been observed in a hypersonic flight experiment for relief of radio black out, caused by high ionization in the plasma sheath of a hypersonic vehicle, re-entering the atmosphere. The analysis incorporates a rather little known phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of ions from the surface and includes the charge balance on the droplets and number cum energy balance of electrons, ions, and neutral molecules; the energy balance of the evaporating droplets has also been taken into account. The analysis has been applied to a realistic situation and the transient variations of the charge and radius of water droplets, and other plasma parameters have been obtained and discussed. The analysis through made in the context of water droplets is applicable to all liquids.

  2. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  3. Path-transformations in probability and representation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Jonathan

    Path-transformations in probability and representation theory Neil O'Connell University of Warwick Biane and Philippe Bougerol Neil O'Connell Path-transforms in probability and rep. theory #12;Pitman is a three-dimensional Bessel process. Neil O'Connell Path-transforms in probability and rep. theory #12;The

  4. Dynamic Path Consistency for Spatial Reasoning Lamia Belouaer, Maroua Bouzid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Ontology of a given environment. In order to evaluate the performance of our dynamic path consistency method, we reactive planning and path finding. Let us consider the example of an accident at a nuclear plant. Generally if something goes wrong there are always planned paths from any position in the nuclear plant

  5. Your path to a career in Health Care Professions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Your path to a career in Health Care Professions #12;H ealth care professionals have successful careers in a variety of areas. They may work in health care administration, provide patient care, or sell is not the only path to a career in health care. In the following pages, you will find that there are many paths

  6. Robot Path Planning in Uncertain Environments: A Language-Measure-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Robot Path Planning in Uncertain Environments: A Language-Measure- Theoretic Approach Devesh K. Jha the problem of goal-directed robot path planning in the presence of uncertainties that are induced by bounded, probabilistic finite state automata 1 Motivation and Introduction In general, path planning of robots (e

  7. Efficient Path Delay Test Generation with Boolean Satisfiability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Kun

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    delay test generator CodGen. A mixed structural-functional approach was implemented in CodGen where longest paths were detected using the K Longest Path Per Gate (KLPG) algorithm and path justification and dynamic compaction were handled with the SAT...

  8. Walden's Paths quiz: system design and implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arora, Avital Jayant

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have them submitted to the instructor for evaluation. ~ Any enors tn transmitting results to the instructor may cause incorrect analysis by the instructor or incorrect grades. ~ The testing and result reporting mechanism can be a security concern... to Walden's Paths . . Different types of questions. Submitting long answers to instructor for evaluation. . . . . Different types of quizzes. Result page for quiz Preview question. . Printer friendly version. Identifying the user . . Emailing...

  9. Systematically Accelerated Convergence of Path Integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogojevic, A.; Balaz, A.; Belic, A. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new analytical method that systematically improves the convergence of path integrals of a generic N-fold discretized theory. Using it we calculate the effective actions S{sup (p)} for p{<=}9, which lead to the same continuum amplitudes as the starting action, but that converge to that continuum limit as 1/N{sup p}. We checked this derived speedup in convergence by performing Monte Carlo simulations on several different models.

  10. Free Energy Changes, Fluctuations, and Path Probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We illustrate some of the static and dynamic relations discovered by Cohen, Crooks, Evans, Jarzynski, Kirkwood, Morriss, Searles, and Zwanzig. These relations link nonequilibrium processes to equilibrium isothermal free energy changes and to dynamical path probabilities. We include ideas suggested by Dellago, Geissler, Oberhofer, and Schoell-Paschinger. Our treatment is intended to be pedagogical, for use in an updated version of our book: Time Reversibility, Computer Simulation, and Chaos. Comments are very welcome.

  11. (Ionization in liquids)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes charge transport following ionization of model liquids and how this process may be important in carcinogenesis. 15 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs. (MHB)

  12. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  13. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  14. Unloading using auger tool and foam and experimental identification of liquid loading of low rate natural gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Rana

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    flow rate versus liquid flow rate at 30 psi……………………… 68 8.1b Air flow rate versus liquid flow rate at 22 psi……………………… 68 8.1c Air flow rate versus liquid flow rate at 15 psi……………………… 69 8.2a Liquid holdup through the tubing at 30 psi... with and without Auger (air-water) and with and without Auger (air-foam)……………70 8.2b Liquid holdup through the tubing at 22 psi with and without Auger(air-water) and with and without Auger (air-foam)…………… 71 8.2c Liquid...

  15. Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model J. M. Dong,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model J. M. Dong,1 H. F. Zhang,1 and G. Royer) The proton radioactivity half-lives of spherical proton emitters are investigated theoretically. The potential barriers preventing the emission of proton are determined in the quasimolecular shape path within

  16. Liquid level, void fraction, and superheated steam sensor for nuclear-reactor cores. [PWR; BWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure relates to an apparatus for monitoring the presence of coolant in liquid or mixed liquid and vapor, and superheated gaseous phases at one or more locations within an operating nuclear reactor core, such as pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor.

  17. Metal-air cell comprising an electrolyte with a room temperature ionic liquid and hygroscopic additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Cody A.; Krishnan, Ramkumar; Tang, Toni; Wolfe, Derek

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell comprising an electrolyte comprising water and a hydrophobic ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. A hydrophilic or hygroscopic additive modulates the hydrophobicity of the ionic liquid to maintain a concentration of the water in the electrolyte is between 0.001 mol % and 25 mol %.

  18. Apparatus and method for ultrasonic treatment of a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus for ultrasonically treating a liquid to generate a product. The apparatus is capable of treating a continuously-flowing, or intermittently-flowing, liquid along a line segment coincident with the flow path of the liquid. The apparatus has one or more ultrasonic transducers positioned asymmetrically about the line segment. The ultrasonic field encompasses the line segment and the ultrasonic energy may be concentrated along the line segment. Lysing treatments have been successfully achieved with efficiencies of greater than 99% using ultrasound at MHz frequencies without erosion or heating problems and without the need for chemical or mechanical pretreatment, or contrast agents. The present invention overcomes drawbacks of current ultrasonic treatments beyond lysing and opens up new sonochemical and sonophysical processing opportunities.

  19. Apparatus and method for ultrasonic treatment of a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Darrell P [Richland, WA; Posakony, Gerald J [Richland, WA; Bond, Leonard J [Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA

    2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for ultrasonically treating a liquid to generate a product. The apparatus is capable of treating a continuously-flowing, or intermittently-flowing, liquid along a line segment coincident with the flow path of the liquid. The apparatus has one or more ultrasonic transducers positioned asymmetrically about the line segment. The ultrasonic field encompasses the line segment and the ultrasonic energy may be concentrated along the line segment. Lysing treatments have been successfully achieved with efficiencies of greater than 99% using ultrasound at MHz frequencies without erosion or heating problems and without the need for chemical or mechanical pretreatment, or contrast agents. The present invention overcomes drawbacks of current ultrasonic treatments beyond lysing and opens up new sonochemical and sonophysical processing opportunities.

  20. Non-dissipative energy capture of confined liquid in nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Baoxing; Chen, Xi [Columbia Nanomechanics Research Center, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Lu, Weiyi; Zhao, Cang [Department of Structural Engineering, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0085 (United States); Qiao, Yu, E-mail: yqiao@ucsd.edu [Department of Structural Engineering, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0085 (United States); Program of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, energy absorption of protection/damping materials is mainly based on energy dissipation, which causes a fundamental conflict between the requirements of safety/comfort and efficiency. In the current study, a nanofluidic “energy capture” system is reported, which is based on nanoporous materials and nonwetting liquid. Both molecular dynamics simulations and experiments show that as the liquid overcomes the capillary effect and infiltrates into the nanopores, the mechanical energy of a stress wave could be temporarily stored by the confined liquid phase and isolated from the wave energy transmission path. Such a system can work under a relatively low pressure for mitigating high-pressure stress waves, not necessarily involved in any energy dissipation processes.

  1. Refrigeration system with a compressor-pump unit and a liquid-injection desuperheating line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaul, Christopher J. (Thornton, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The refrigeration system includes a compressor-pump unit and/or a liquid-injection assembly. The refrigeration system is a vapor-compression refrigeration system that includes an expansion device, an evaporator, a compressor, a condenser, and a liquid pump between the condenser and the expansion device. The liquid pump improves efficiency of the refrigeration system by increasing the pressure of, thus subcooling, the liquid refrigerant delivered from the condenser to the expansion device. The liquid pump and the compressor are driven by a single driving device and, in this regard, are coupled to a single shaft of a driving device, such as a belt-drive, an engine, or an electric motor. While the driving device may be separately contained, in a preferred embodiment, the liquid pump, the compressor, and the driving device (i.e., an electric motor) are contained within a single sealable housing having pump and driving device cooling paths to subcool liquid refrigerant discharged from the liquid pump and to control the operating temperature of the driving device. In another aspect of the present invention, a liquid injection assembly is included in a refrigeration system to divert liquid refrigerant from the discharge of a liquid pressure amplification pump to a compressor discharge pathway within a compressor housing to desuperheat refrigerant vapor to the saturation point within the compressor housing. The liquid injection assembly includes a liquid injection pipe with a control valve to meter the volume of diverted liquid refrigerant. The liquid injection assembly may also include a feedback controller with a microprocessor responsive to a pressure sensor and a temperature sensor both positioned between the compressor to operate the control valve to maintain the refrigerant at or near saturation.

  2. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  3. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  4. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  5. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  6. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of this contract, we participated in another ARM-sponsored experiment at the NSA during February-March 2007. This experiment is called the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) and the GSR was operated successfully for the duration of the campaign. One of the principal goals of the experiment was to provide retrievals of water vapor during PWV amounts less than 2 mm and to compare GSR data with ARM radiometers and radiosondes. A secondary goal was to compare the radiometric response of the microwave and millimeter wavelength radiometers to water and ice clouds. In this final report, we will include the separate progress reports for each of the three years of the project and follow with a section on major accomplishments of the project.

  7. Radial Inflow Gas Turbine Flow Path Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samip Shah; Gaurang Chaudhri; Digvijay Kulshreshtha; S. A. Channiwalla

    Abstract:- A new method for radial inflow gas turbine flow paths design based on a unique integrated conceptual design environment AxSTREAM is presented in this paper. This integrated environment is a seamless and swift processing scheme that incorporates stages aerodynamic analysis and preliminary design/sizing based on the one dimensional method. The environment makes possible to find number of different designs with inverse task solver, basing on initially specified boundary conditions, closing conditions and design variables. Design space explorer provides easy and visual comparison for range of obtained design in customizable coordinate axes. Solution filtering on different parameters, such as meridional and axial dimensions, maximal blades weight, saving the time to choose from thousands obtained solutions the only one right design. Flexibility of presented approach allows to built-up complete gas turbine flow path from consequence of individual elements: stationary and rotating elements, ducts, heat exchangers, and analyze it in common environment. Complete control of all aspects of aerodynamic flow path quality, structural reliability, and integral performances on design and offdesign conditions is performing throughout all design process. This gives full interaction between user and system for immediate correction and enhancement of current design data using various optimization capabilities to feel the impact of changes on each design step. Integrated system AxSTREAM significantly shortening the design cycle time from initial machine concept to finalized design with all offdesign performances details. The design process is demonstrated for a 25kW radial inflow gas turbine. Keywords:- Radial Inflow Turbine, Performance Maps, AxSTREAM I.

  8. Priming on the path of least resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wruck, Eric Michael

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , of the different measures of representativeness, the model predicts Output Dominance will account for the most variance in how frequently an exemplar is used in an imagination task ( i. e. Imagination Frequency). Another significant feature of the path of least... Frequency-Convergent = IF-C; Imagination Frequency-Divergent = IF-D. 25 Table 2 (continued) output typic I'amil IF- T IF- C IF- D saying the pledge of allegiance 2 4. 6 4. 6 0 0 0 senior ring dunking tribal worship/ceremonies tucking children in 4 7...

  9. The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart (PPPL) [PPPL

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

  10. Flight Path 30L - ICE House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R is aL

  11. Flight Path 30R | ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R is

  12. Flight Path Target 4 East Port

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R90L

  13. Career Paths | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruary 26,ComputersTrinity /Paths | National Nuclear

  14. PathScale Compliers at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTestPhysicsParticipantsPartners ofPatents Kumar, PathScale

  15. Flight Path 30L - About ICE House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14Publications

  16. Flight Path 30L - ICE House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14PublicationsLinks

  17. Flight Path 30L - ICE House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path

  18. Flight Path 60R - About GEANIE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight

  19. Flight Path 60R - GEANIE Collaborators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTarget 4

  20. Flight Path 60R - GEANIE publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTarget 4R -

  1. Flight Path 90L - About TPC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTarget 4R

  2. Flight Path 90L - About TPC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTarget

  3. Flight Path 90L - About TPC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL -

  4. Water and Solute Flow in a Highly-Structured Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallmark, C. Tom; Wilding, Larry P.; McInnes, Kevin J.; Heuvelman, Willem J.

    Prevention of groundwater contamination by agricultural activities is a high priority in the United States. Water and contaminants often follow particular flow paths through the soil that lead to rapid movement of pesticides out of the rootzone...

  5. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  6. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  7. ARM - PI Product - Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheatProductsISDAC Microphysics ARM DataProductsLarge

  8. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein N. (Los Gatos, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

  9. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 Table 2. 2010 and 2030 Commercial Space Heating Technology3. Commercial Space Heating Technology Efficiencies overCommercial Water Heating Technology Shares and Efficiencies,

  10. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial Primary Energy Use (Mtce) More gas boiler & heat pumps with greater efficiency 40% more efficient cooling technologies more efficient lighting more efficient water heaters

  11. Electrically Deformable Liquid Marbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Bormashenko; Roman Pogreb; Tamir Stein; Gene Whyman; Marcelo Schiffer; Doron Aurbach

    2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid marbles, which are droplets coated with a hydrophobic powder, were exposed to a uniform electric field. It was established that a threshold value of the electric field, 15 cgse, should be surmounted for deformation of liquid marbles. The shape of the marbles was described as a prolate spheroid. The semi-quantitative theory describing deformation of liquid marbles in a uniform electric field is presented. The scaling law relating the radius of the contact area of the marble to the applied electric field shows a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  13. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  14. Hydrophilization of Liquid Surfaces by Plasma Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Multanen; Gilad Chaniel; Roman Grynyov; Ron Yosef Loew; Naor Siany; Edward Bormashenko

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of the cold radiofrequency air plasma on the surface properties of silicone oils (polydimethylsiloxane) was studied. Silicone oils of various molecular masses were markedly hydrophilized by the cold air plasma treatment. A pronounced decrease of the apparent water contact angles was observed after plasma treatment. A general theoretical approach to the calculation of apparent contact angles is proposed. The treated liquid surfaces demonstrated hydrophobic recovery. The characteristic time of the hydrophobic recovery grew with the molecular mass of the silicone oil.

  15. Noble Travails: Noble Liquid Dark Matter Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golwala, Sunil

    , or water, 0.1x flux per 10 cm Cosmic Ray Muons generate high energy neutrons 50 MeV - 3 GeV which are toughGaitskell Noble Travails: Noble Liquid Dark Matter Detectors Rick Gaitskell Particle Astrophysics://particleastro.brown.edu/ http://gaitskell.brown.edu v1 #12;LUX Dark Matter Collaboration 2007 v01_7mm Dark Matter Theory

  16. A route to explain water anomalies from results on an aqueous solution of salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Corradini; M. Rovere; P. Gallo

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the possibility to detect the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water in supercooled aqueous solutions of salts. Molecular dynamics computer simulations are conducted on bulk TIP4P water and on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride in TIP4P water, with concentration c = 0.67 mol/kg. The liquid-liquid critical point is found both in the bulk and in the solution. Its position in the thermodynamic plane shifts to higher temperature and lower pressure for the solution. Comparison with available experimental data allowed us to produce the phase diagrams of both bulk water and the aqueous solution as measurable in experiments. Given the position of the liquid-liquid critical point in the solution as obtained from our simulations, the experimental determination of the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water in aqueous solutions of salts appears possible.

  17. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicolás

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  18. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushner, Mark Jay [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  19. Molecular Structure of Water at Gold Electrodes Revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Structure of Water at Gold Electrodes Revealed Print The structure of liquid water has been intensely studied, but until recently, it has not been clear what happens to...

  20. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hindin, Saul G. (Mendham, NJ); Roberts, George W. (Westfield, NJ)

    1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  1. Construction of vertex-disjoint paths in alternating group networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shuming; Xiao, Wenjun; Parhami, Behrooz

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    misplaced symbols are Construction of vertex-disjoint paths32845671 ? 23145678 ? e Construction of vertex-disjoint2164537 ? e ? 2314567 ? e Construction of vertex-disjoint

  2. Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–C: Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment Andrew Held, Senior Director of Feedstock Development, Virent, Inc.

  3. Rethinking the Cyber Threat A Framework and Path Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Rethinking the Cyber Threat A Framework and Path Forward SCOTT CHARNEY Corporate Vice President ..................................................................................................................................................5 Understanding the Cyber Threat .................................................................................................................5 Rethinking the Cyber Threat

  4. Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

  5. Distributional properties of stochastic shortest paths for smuggled nuclear material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roach, Fred [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The shortest path problem on a network with fixed weights is a well studied problem with applications to many diverse areas such as transportation and telecommunications. We are particularly interested in the scenario where a nuclear material smuggler tries to succesfully reach herlhis target by identifying the most likely path to the target. The identification of the path relies on reliabilities (weights) associated with each link and node in a multi-modal transportation network. In order to account for the adversary's uncertainty and to perform sensitivity analysis we introduce random reliabilities. We perform some controlled experiments on the grid and present the distributional properties of the resulting stochastic shortest paths.

  6. DOE EM Landfill Workshop and Path Forward - July 2009

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that account for uncertainty in meteorological conditions, contaminant source, and degradation mechanisms. Path Forward: Systems 15 A: Liner Transport - Define existing...

  7. GRASP WITH PATH-RELINKING FOR THE MULTI-PLANT ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 21, 2008 ... sectors, for example, in the mattress, stainless steel, and beverage industries, where plants are spread out .... The pure GRASP heuristic does not have the path

  8. Solution Methods for the Multi-trip Elementary Shortest Path ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    builds partial paths, it assigns a label to each, indicating the resource .... node are used to update the elapsed time and the vehicle load (resources consumed),.

  9. Identification of MHF Fracture Planes and Flow Paths- a Correlation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow paths. We applied this technique to seismic data collected during a massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatment and found that the fracture planes determined by the...

  10. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

  11. Minimal paths between communities induced by geographical networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Arruda, Henrique Ferraz; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we investigate the betweenness centrality in geographical networks and its relationship with network communities. We show that nodes with large betweenness define what we call characteristic betweenness paths in both modeled and real-world geographical networks. We define a geographical network model that possess a simple topology while still being able to present such betweenness paths. Using this model, we show that such paths represent pathways between entry and exit points of highly connected regions, or communities, of geographical networks. By defining a new network, containing information about community adjacencies in the original network, we describe a means to characterize the mesoscale connectivity provided by such characteristic betweenness paths.

  12. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  13. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  14. Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Preliminary Plant Design For Bitumen Separation Using Ionic Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    For Bitumen Separation Using Ionic Liquid Overview IL Fuels LLC invented a novel way to separate bitumen from of producing 5,000 barrels of bitumen per day while maximizing the recovery of ionic liquid and water of bitumen/day Maintain a maximum of 0.2% loss of ionic liquids to the cleaned sands Improve overall

  15. Using liquid desiccant as a regenerable filter for capturing and deactivating contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slayzak, Steven J. (Denver, CO); Anderson, Ren S. (Broomfield, CO); Judkoff, Ronald D. (Golden, CO); Blake, Daniel M. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Ryan, Joseph P. (Golden, CO)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, and systems for implementing such method, for purifying and conditioning air of weaponized contaminants. The method includes wetting a filter packing media with a salt-based liquid desiccant, such as water with a high concentration of lithium chloride. Air is passed through the wetted filter packing media and the contaminants in are captured with the liquid desiccant while the liquid desiccant dehumidifies the air. The captured contaminants are then deactivated in the liquid desiccant, which may include heating the liquid desiccant. The liquid desiccant is regenerated by applying heat to the liquid desiccant and then removing moisture. The method includes repeating the wetting with the regenerated liquid desiccant which provides a regenerable filtering process that captures and deactivates contaminants on an ongoing basis while also conditioning the air. The method may include filtration effectiveness enhancement by electrostatic or inertial means.

  16. Liquid film thickness measurement by two-line TDLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Huinan [School of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 200093, Shanghai, China and IVG, University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg (Germany); Chen, Jun; Cai, Xiaoshu [School of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 200093, Shanghai (China); Greszik, Daniel; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof [IVG, University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber-based two-line tunable diode-laser absorption sensor with two near-infrared (NIR) distributed-feedback (DFB) diode lasers at ?1.4 ?m was used for non-intrusive time-resolved liquid water film thickness measurement. When probing the liquid film at two different wavelengths with significantly different absorption cross-sections, the additional signal losses due to surface fowling, reflection and beam steering can be eliminated. In this work, the evaporation process of a liquid film on transparent quartz plate was tracked and large fluctuations of film thickness were found at the end of the evaporation.

  17. Hot gas path component cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  18. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  19. X-rays at Solid-Liquid Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, Helmut (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research) [Max Planck Institute for Metals Research

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-liquid interfaces play an important role in many areas of current and future technologies, and in our biosphere. They play a key role in the development of nanofluidics and nanotribology, which sensitively depend on our knowledge of the microscopic structures and phenomena at the solid-liquid interface. The detailed understanding of how a fluid meets a wall is also a theoretical challenge. In particular, the phenomena at repulsive walls are of interest, since they affect many different phenomena, such as water-repellent surfaces or the role of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding. Recent x-ray reflectivity studies of various solid-liquid interfaces have disclosed rather intriguiing phenomena, which will be discussed in this lecture: premelting of ice in contact with silica; liquid Pb in contact with Si; water in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. These experiments, carried out with high-energy x-ray microbeams, reveal detailed insight into the liquid density profile closest to the wall. A detailed insight into atomistic phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is also a prerequisite in the microscopic control of electrochemical reactions at interfaces. Recent x-ray studies show the enormous future potential of such non-destructive analytical tools for the in situ observation of (electro-)chemical surface reactions. This lecture will review recent x-ray experiments on solid-liquid interfaces.

  20. Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Alleman, T. L.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Document details the evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch diesel, a gas-to-liquid fuel, in medium-duty delivery vehicles at Yosemite Waters. The study was conducted by NREL at the company's Fullerton, California, bottling headquarters.

  1. Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach....

  2. Journal of Differential Equations Ramification of rough paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 1, 2009 ... B-series. The stack of iterated integrals of a path is embedded in a larger al- gebraic structure ... iterated integrals [18,19] which is at the base of Lyons theory of rough paths [20]. Lyons theory ...... ?|b| ? g(|b|)(rs), see e.g. [5, p.

  3. On the Optimal Path Length for Tor Kevin Bauer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borisov, Nikita

    -hop paths trivially reveal entry guards to exit routers, but even with three-hop paths the exit can learn disadvantage of a two-hop design is that exit routers can triv- ially discover clients' entry guards, since they communicate directly. We empir- ically demonstrate that malicious exit routers can identify clients' entry

  4. Improved Hardness of Approximation for Stackelberg Shortest-Path Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verbrugge, Clark

    the Stackelberg shortest-path pricing problem, which is defined as follows. Given a graph G with fixed-cost on the predefined fixed costs and our prices, a customer purchases a cheapest s-t-path in G and we receive payment costs, we may assign prices to a subset of the items. Given both fixed costs and prices, a single

  5. Large deviations for rough paths of fractional Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millet, Annie

    limit theorem. Stochastic modeling deals basically with rough path controls. Indeed, the ground-breaking It^o's theory on stochastic differential equations is based on Brownian motion, which has almost surely nowhere differentiable sam- ple paths but only -H¨older continuous ones, with ]0, 1 2 [. Note

  6. Power Transmission Network Design by Greedy Randomized Adaptive Path Relinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    different solutions could be reached exploring these different trajectories. The electric power system1 Power Transmission Network Design by Greedy Randomized Adaptive Path Relinking Haroldo Faria Jr Adaptive Path Relinking, applied to solve static power transmission network design problems. This new

  7. SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Efficient camera path planning algorithm for human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    , and a near-optimal path can be obtained. In addition, some COMPUTER ANIMATION AND VIRTUAL WORLDS Comp. AnimSPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Efficient camera path planning algorithm for human motion overview I-Cheng Yeh1 research topic, benefiting many animation applications. Existing optimal-based approaches are generally

  8. Columbia University Energy Options & Paths to Climate Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    -lived radioactive components. · Safe: no catastrophic accidents; Low-risk for nuclear materials proliferation WhyMike Mauel Columbia University Energy Options & Paths to Climate Stabilization Aspen, 9 July 2003 Fusion Energy: "Pipe Dream or Panacea" #12;Mike Mauel Columbia University Energy Options & Paths

  9. VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES ZHENJIE REN Abstract, inspired by [3], we define the viscosity solution, by using the nonlinear expectation. The paper contains , that for any bounded viscosity subsolution u1 and Key words and phrases. Path dependent PDEs, Dirichlet problem

  10. A middle path for electricity options and sustainable development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, J.I.; Herring, J.S.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a landmark article in Foreign Affairs in October 1976, Amory Lovins presented his vision of two vastly different and seemingly irreconcilable paths that energy provision might take into the future. One path was a ``hard`` path, characterized by extensive development of large, capital-intensive centralized electrical generating facilities and their peripherals, designed with little consideration given to the matching of these facilities to the requirements of the end-use needs. The second, ``soft`` path was characterized by energy technologies that are diverse, operate on renewable energy flows, are relatively simple, less capital-intensive, and matched in scale and energy quality to end-use needs. One of the most controversial arguments in the Lovins` paper was that the ``hard`` and ``soft`` paths are culturally and institutionally antagonistic. In retrospect, it seems this argument was self-fulfilling, for the history of the energy debate throughout the developed world since the appearance of the Lovins` article has been marked by an either-or antagonism that has left little room for serious discussion of a ``middle-path.`` In this paper, we argue that ``middle-path,`` paved with elements of both the soft and hard, is especially suited for developing countries, since they do not now carry the burden of an existing and extensive ``hard path`` energy infrastructure.

  11. MIXED INTEGER PROGRAMMING FOR MULTI-VEHICLE PATH PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How, Jonathan P.

    .up.pt http://www.fe.up.pt/ecc2001/ Keywords: autonomous vehicles, path planning, collision avoidance Abstract This paper presents a new approach to fuel-optimal path plan- ning of multiple vehicles using a combination will be optimized with respect to both fuel and/or time, and must ensure that the vehicles do not collide with each

  12. Analog VLSI for Robot Path Planning Mircea Stan Wayne Burleson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan, Mircea R.

    . In cartesian space there are two or three dimensions and the robot arm's nonzero dimensions must be takenAnalog VLSI for Robot Path Planning Mircea Stan Wayne Burleson Department of Electrical & Computer­545­4611 fax Abstract Analog VLSI provides a convenient and high­ performance engine for robot path planning

  13. Path Integrals and Lorentz Violation in Polymer Quantized Scalar Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nirmalya Kajuri

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain a path integral formulation of polymer quantized scalar field theory, starting from the Hilbert Space framework. This brings the polymer quantized scalar field theory under the ambit of Feynman diagrammatic techniques. The path integral formulation also shows that Lorentz invariance is lost for the Klein-Gordon field.

  14. Performance-Aware Speculation Control using Wrong Path Usefulness Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Austin {cjlee, patt}@ece.utexas.edu §School of Computer Science Georgia Institute of Technology hyesoon are useless for processor performance and try to eliminate the execution of all wrong-path instructions incurred by fetch gating mech- anisms that assume wrong-path execution is useless, thereby both im- proving

  15. Used powdex resin for liquid waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, C.J.; Bramblett, J.W.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powdex resin has traditionally been used on the Secondary side for condensate polishing. The resins on these polishers are backwashed periodically based on chemical breakthrough or high differential pressure. Upon the backwash, the ion exchange capacity on the powdex resin is not completely exhausted. In the past, this partially used powdex resin was sluiced to a liner and treated as waste for disposal. In an effort to reduce radioactivity being released from segregated, high chemical concentration wastes, the idea of trying used powdex resin was initiated. In 1992, Duke Power Company began processing problem liquid waste streams with used Secondary powdex and subsequent decanting of the waste water for release. the results have shown significant reductions in the activity of this water. This paper will detail the history, method, and the results of using Secondary powdex for liquid radwaste processing. It will also describe the benefits, such as: (1) Processing waste streams not suitable for bead resin demineralizers. (2) Ability to process large volumes of waste water in a short period of time. (3) Recycling media thought to be useless. (4) > 80% Reduction in activity of water processed. (5) Overall curies reduction. (6) Improved bead demineralizer performance.

  16. A New Weighted Shortest Path Tree for Convergecast Traffic Routing in WSN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , existing SPT approaches aim to construct a tree rooted at the sink such that the cost of the path from any to the basic one. Index Terms--Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN), Shortest Path Tree (SPT), weighted path cost such that the path cost from any node to the sink is minimal. In existing construction algorithms, the cost of a path

  17. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy(trihexyl)phosphonium dicyanamide as the RTIL. It was determined that it has good absorption properties for methanol and ?-pinene, is thermally stable, and is relatively easy to synthesize. It has a density of 0.89 g/mL at 20°C and a molecular weight of 549.9 g/mol. Trials were conducted with a small absorption system and a larger absorption system. Methanol, formaldehyde, and other HAPs were absorbed well, nearly 100%. Acetaldehyde was difficult to capture. Total VOC capture, while satisfactory on methanol and ?-pinene in a lab system, was less than expected in the field, 60-80%. The inability to capture the broad spectrum of total organics is likely due to difficulties in cleaning them from the ionic liquid rather than the ability of the ionic liquid to absorb. It’s likely that a commercial system could be constructed to remove 90 to 100% of the gas contaminates. Selecting the correct ionic liquid would be key to this. Absorption may not be the main selection criterion, but rather how easily the ionic liquid can be cleaned is very important. The ionic liquid absorption system might work very well in a system with a limited spectrum of pollutants, such as a paint spray line, where there are not very high molecular weight, non volatile, compounds in the exhaust.

  18. ECO2M: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2, Including Super- and Sub-Critical Conditions, and Phase Change Between Liquid and Gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECO2M is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O - NaCl - CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for temperature, pressure and salinity conditions in the range of 10 C {le} T {le} 110 C, P {le} 600 bar, and salinity from zero up to full halite saturation. The fluid property correlations used in ECO2M are identical to the earlier ECO2N fluid property package, but whereas ECO2N could represent only a single CO{sub 2}-rich phase, ECO2M can describe all possible phase conditions for brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This allows for seamless modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-and three-phase mixtures of aqueous, liquid CO{sub 2} and gaseous CO{sub 2} phases. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. TOUGH2/ECO2M is upwardly compatible with ECO2N and accepts ECO2N-style inputs. This report gives technical specifications of ECO2M and includes instructions for preparing input data. Code applications are illustrated by means of several sample problems, including problems that had been previously solved with TOUGH2/ECO2N.

  19. Shear viscosity of hot nuclear matter by the mean free path method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Q. Fang; Y. G. Ma; C. L. Zhou

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The shear viscosity of hot nuclear matter is investigated by using the mean free path method within the framework of IQMD model. Finite size nuclear sources at different density and temperature are initialized based on the Fermi-Dirac distribution. The results show that shear viscosity to entropy density ratio decreases with the increase of temperature and tends toward a constant value for $\\rho\\sim\\rho_0$, which is consistent with the previous studies on nuclear matter formed during heavy-ion collisions. At $\\rho\\sim\\frac{1}{2}\\rho_0$, a minimum of $\\eta/s$ is seen at around $T=10$ MeV and a maximum of the multiplicity of intermediate mass fragment ($M_{\\text{IMF}}$) is also observed at the same temperature which is an indication of the liquid-gas phase transition.

  20. Controlling Low-Rate Signal Path Microdischarge for an Ultra-Low-Background Proportional Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, Emily K.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Day, Anthony R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Seifert, Allen

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed an ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) made of high purity copper. These detectors are part of an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) in the newly constructed shallow underground laboratory at PNNL (at a depth of ~30 meters water-equivalent). To control backgrounds, the current preamplifier electronics are located outside the ULBCS shielding. Thus the signal from the detector travels through ~1 meter of cable and is potentially susceptible to high voltage microdischarge and other sources of electronic noise. Based on initial successful tests, commercial cables and connectors were used for this critical signal path. Subsequent testing across different batches of commercial cables and connectors, however, showed unwanted (but still low) rates of microdischarge noise. To control this noise source, two approaches were pursued: first, to carefully validate cables, connectors, and other commercial components in this critical signal path, making modifications where necessary; second, to develop a custom low-noise, low-background preamplifier that can be integrated with the ULBPC and thus remove most commercial components from the critical signal path. This integrated preamplifier approach is based on the Amptek A250 low-noise charge-integrating preamplifier module. The initial microdischarge signals observed are presented and characterized according to the suspected source. Each of the approaches for mitigation is described, and the results from both are compared with each other and with the original performance seen with commercial cables and connectors.

  1. NGNP Program 2013 Status and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology can play an important role in the energy future of the United States by extending the use of nuclear energy for non-electricity energy production missions, as well as continuing to provide a considerable base load electric power generation capability. Extending nuclear energy into the industrial and transportation sectors through the coproduction of process heat and electricity provides safe, reliable energy for these sectors in an environmentally responsible manner. The modular HTGR provides a substantial improvement in nuclear plant safety for the protection of the public and the environment, and supports collocation of the HTGRhigh temperature gas-cooled reactor with major industrial facilities. Under U.S. Department of Energy direction since 2006, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project at Idaho National Laboratory has been working toward commercializing the HTGR technology. However, a recent decision by the Secretary of Energy to reduce the scope of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to a research and development program, considerable realignment has taken place. This report: (1) summarizes the accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program from FY2011 through FY2013; (2) lays out the path forward necessary to achieve the ultimate objective of commercializing HTGR technology; and (3) discusses ongoing technical, licensing, and evaluation activities under the realigned Next Generation Nuclear Plant program considered important to preserve the significant investment made by the government to-date and to maintain some progress in meeting the objectives of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct2005).

  2. Using shortest path to discover criminal community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magalingam, Pritheega; Rao, Asha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracting communities using existing community detection algorithms yields dense sub-networks that are difficult to analyse. Extracting a smaller sample that embodies the relationships of a list of suspects is an important part of the beginning of an investigation. In this paper, we present the efficacy of our shortest paths network search algorithm (SPNSA) that begins with an "algorithm feed", a small subset of nodes of particular interest, and builds an investigative sub-network. The algorithm feed may consist of known criminals or suspects, or persons of influence. This sets our approach apart from existing community detection algorithms. We apply the SPNSA on the Enron Dataset of e-mail communications starting with those convicted of money laundering in relation to the collapse of Enron as the algorithm feed. The algorithm produces sparse and small sub-networks that could feasibly identify a list of persons and relationships to be further investigated. In contrast, we show that identifying sub-networks o...

  3. A Path to Collaborative Strategic Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy M. Carlson

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative learning is critical for the future of any organization and must align with the strategic organizational processes that result in products valued by others. To discover these processes, proposal preparation is explored using topic-oriented ethnography, grounded theory, and an innovative addition to qualitative interviewing, called metainquiry. Using interview data from editors, graphic artists, text processors, scientists, engineers, and technical managers, substantive theory emerges. The research discovers the five essential processes of owning, visioning, reviewing, producing, and contributing needed for organizational strategic learning to occur. The dimensions of these processes are made explicit and can be used to gauge the health of any organization. The substantive theory also provides insight into the ability of collaborative learning to evolve, flourish, and adapt to the strategic advantage of the organization. Lastly, actionable goals with ten essential elements emerge that link owning, visioning, reviewing, producing, and contributing as a path for all organizations to follow to promote collaborative learning communities and enhance their competitive advantage.

  4. Observation of crystallization slowdown in supercooled para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium quantum liquid mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Kühnel; José M. Fernández; Filippo Tramonto; Guzmán Tejeda; Elena Moreno; Anton Kalinin; Marco Nava; Davide E. Galli; Salvador Montero; Robert E. Grisenti

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a quantitative experimental study of the crystallization kinetics of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures of para-hydrogen (pH$_2$) and ortho-deuterium (oD$_2$) by high spatial resolution Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets. We show that in a wide range of compositions the crystallization rate of the isotopic mixtures is significantly reduced with respect to that of the pure substances. To clarify this behavior we have performed path-integral simulations of the non-equilibrium pH$_2$-oD$_2$ liquid mixtures, revealing that differences in quantum delocalization between the two isotopic species translate into different effective particle sizes. Our results provide first experimental evidence for crystallization slowdown of quantum origin, offering a benchmark for theoretical studies of quantum behavior in supercooled liquids.

  5. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

  6. liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving Christopher D. Carroll ccarroll to the optimal consumption/saving problem under uncertainty have long known that there are quantitatively important in- teractions between liquidity constraints and precautionary saving behavior. This paper

  7. Properties of Liquid Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Unalloyed polycrystalline Pu displays extreme thermal expansion behavior, i.e., {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} increases by 25% in volume and {delta} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid decreases by 4.5% in volume. Thus, making it difficult to measure density into the liquid state. Dilatometer outfitted with CaF molten metal cell offers a proven capability to measure thermal expansion in molten metals, but has yet to be proven for Pu. Historic data from the liquid nuclear fuels program will prove extremely useful as a guide to future measurements. 3.3at% Ga changes Pu molten metal properties: 50% increase in viscosity and {approx}3% decrease in density. Fe may decrease the density by a small amount assuming an averaging of densities for Pu-Ga and Pu-Fe liquids. More recent Boivineau (2009) work needs some interpretation, but technique is being employed in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} nuclear fuels program (Pu Futures, 2012).

  8. Breakup of Liquid Filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Hutchings, I.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , including the dispersion of liquid drugs into res- pirable droplets, microfluidics, crop- and paint-spraying, and ink-jet printing [2–4]. There are also biological sys- tems in which either long filaments remain intact, or many droplets are formed [5, 6...

  9. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Heat Pump Centralized AC by NG Max Tech Scenario Water Heating Unlike space heating and cooling,Cooling Technology Shares 2010 Technology Shares Office Centralized AC Room AC Geothermalcooling, there is some but much less technology switching with generally increasing shares of geothermal

  10. Water in a Crowd In many situations, form biology to geology, water occurs not as the pure bulk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water in a Crowd In many situations, form biology to geology, water occurs not as the pure bulk species, and interacting with large organic molecules. In such situations, water does not behave in the same manner as it does in the pure bulk liquid. Water dynamics are fundamental to many processes

  11. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  12. Lexicalisation Patterns of Rendering Path Descriptions in Polish Translation from English

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch?opek, Dorota

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with constructions lexicalising precise path through satellites, Polish translation renders the path, neutralises it, changes it, or omits the path conveyed by the original version, which is illustrated by this paper....

  13. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko; David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  14. NMR evidence of a sharp change in a measure of local order in deeply supercooled confined water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    in thermody- namical properties such as compressibility, isobaric heat capacity, and thermal expansion of maximum correlation length at 240 K, consistent with the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis for water received support from various theoretical studies (4­7) is the liquid-liquid (LL) critical point hypothesis

  15. Condensate Water Collection for an Institutional Building in Doha, Qatar: An Opportunity for Water Sustainability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, J. A.; Ahmed, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditioning system. Internal loads and additional outside ventilation air all generate considerable latent loads on these systems and exacerbate the already difficult moisture control problem. A manifestation of this load is the liquid water condensate...

  16. On a phase field model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distinct phases. This is the case for solid-liquid mix- tures (e.g. ice-water or alloys duringOn a phase field model for solid-liquid phase transitions S. Benzoni-Gavage , L. Chupin , D. Jamet 3.2 Back to physical variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 4 Well-posedness 17 4

  17. The recoiling of liquid droplets upon collision with solid surfaces H.-Y. Kima)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho-Young

    solid surfaces polycarbonate and silicon oxide . The droplet dynamics are experimentally studied using of different liquid droplets water, ink, and silicone oil on different solid surfaces polycarbonate and silicon. Fukai et al.14,15 conducted a theoretical study on the spreading and recoiling of a liquid droplet upon

  18. Liquid-solid phase transitions in a deformable Pavel Krejci, Elisabetta Rocca, and Jurgen Sprekels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Elisabetta

    differences in the specific volume, specific heat and speed of sound in the solid and liquid phases and of the liquid phase, assuming first that the speed of sound and the specific heat are the same in solid the speed of sound in water is less than one half of the one in ice. The main goal of this contribution

  19. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Wenpeng Liu*,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Wenpeng Liu*,a and Chao that performance and design of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell DMFC is controlled not only by electrochemical kinetics and methanol crossover but also by water transport and by their complex interactions

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Energy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPEN ORIGINAL ARTICLE Energy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are miniature energy harvesters that use bacteria to convert biomass from liquids into usable advantages of MFCs is that they can be used to both clean water and produce electrical power, the objective

  1. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Development of a Compact Liquid Fueled Pulsed Detonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    automotive ignition system. Pre-heated liquid fuel is sprayed into a current of pre-heated air and thoroughly Hz. The PDE set up is water cooled allowing long duration testing. Diagnostics are performed using it necessary to preheat the fuel and/or air and to use nozzles to finely atomize the fuel spray. Liquid fueled

  2. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  3. Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

    1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo`s structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated. 5 figures.

  4. Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo's structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated.

  5. Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, David N. (Lebanon, OR); Galvan, Gloria J. (Albany, OR); Hundley, Gary L. (Corvallis, OR); Wright, John B. (Albany, OR)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

  6. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barkey, Dale P. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid embrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selected for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  7. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barkey, Dale P. (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid membrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selective for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  8. Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Liquid-Rack Cooling Systems in Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, TengFang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the modular liquid cooling system with varying supply waterinlet supply air temperature, while modular system coolingcooling needed (up to 9.8 kW/rack) at various supply water

  9. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Liquid Methanol Microjets: Bulk Electronic Structure and Hydrogen Bonding Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    of ice,15,16 or at the liquid-gas interface.3 As expected, water in its various phases is a natural, Sweden, AdVanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720

  10. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  11. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, K.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals. Alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, heptanol, 1-hexadecanol, 2-methyl-pentanol, 4-methyl-2-penthanol (methylisobutyl carbinol), n-octanol, s-octanol, and cyclohexanol as probe compounds are utilized to evaluate hydrophilicity of coals and coal minerals. N-alkanes such as hexane, heptane and octane, and stearic acid are employed as probe compounds to evaluate hydrophobicity of coals and coal minerals. Aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene as probe compounds are used to examine aromaticity of coal surface. Aromatic acids such as o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, phenol and B-naphthol are used to detect aromatic acidic sites of coal surface. Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromaticity of surfaces for either raw coals or treated coals in water are relatively determined by evaluating both equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption and dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on various raw coals and treated coals to compare affinities of coals for water.

  12. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Abstract:...

  13. Analysis & Simulation of Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmatad, Yael Sarah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moreover, the heat capacity of that liquid is also higherthe intensive heat capacities of the liquid and the crystal,

  14. The Boson peak in supercooled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradeep Kumar; K. Thor Wikfeldt; Daniel Schlesinger; Lars G. M. Pettersson; H. E. Stanley

    2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line $T_W$. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih.

  15. Optimally controlling hybrid electric vehicles using path forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsargyri, Georgia-Evangelina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) with path-forecasting belong to the class of fuel efficient vehicles, which use external sensory information and powertrains with multiple operating modes in order to increase fuel economy. ...

  16. Human-Automation Path Planning Optimization and Decision Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, M.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Path planning is a problem encountered in multiple domains, including unmanned vehicle control, air traffic control, and future exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. Due to the voluminous and complex nature of the ...

  17. Finding Smallest Paths in Rectilinear Polygons on a Hypercube Multiprocessor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    vertices on a hypercube multiprocessor with max(n; p) processors in time O(t + log n) where p = n log n). Smallest paths have applications in VLSI design (minimizing vias), robot motion planning, and the design

  18. Thin magnetic crystals are path to ferromagnetic graphene | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thin magnetic crystals are path to ferromagnetic graphene January 23, 2015 The crystal structure of CrI3 includes hexagonal nets formed by Cr atoms (blue) with magnetic moments...

  19. Combining Path Integration and Remembered Landmarks When Navigating without Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrater, Paul R.

    This study investigated the interaction between remembered landmark and path integration strategies for estimating current location when walking in an environment without vision. We asked whether observers navigating without ...

  20. Optimally Controlling Hybrid Electric Vehicles using Path Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.

    The paper examines path-dependent control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs). In this approach we seek to improve HEV fuel economy by optimizing charging and discharging of the vehicle battery depending on the forecasted ...

  1. Path dependent receding horizon control policies for hybrid electric vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.

    Future hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) may use path-dependent operating policies to improve fuel economy. In our previous work, we developed a dynamic programming (DP) algorithm for prescribing the battery state of charge ...

  2. Multiphase flow and control of fluid path in microsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhunjhunwala, Manish

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miniaturized chemical-systems are expected to have advantages of handling, portability, cost, speed, reproducibility and safety. Control of fluid path in small channels between processes in a chemical/biological network ...

  3. Asymptotically optimal path planning and surface reconstruction for inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by inspection applications for marine structures, this thesis develops algorithms to enable their autonomous inspection. Two essential parts of the inspection problem are (1) path planning and (2) surface ...

  4. Maximal Sensitive Dependence and the Optimal Path to Epidemic Extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forgoston, Eric; Shaw, Leah B; Schwartz, Ira B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extinction of an epidemic or a species is a rare event that occurs due to a large, rare stochastic fluctuation. Although the extinction process is dynamically unstable, it follows an optimal path that maximizes the probability of extinction. We show that the optimal path is also directly related to the finite-time Lyapunov exponents of the underlying dynamical system in that the optimal path displays maximum sensitivity to initial conditions. We consider several stochastic epidemic models, and examine the extinction process in a dynamical systems framework. Using the dynamics of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents as a constructive tool, we demonstrate that the dynamical systems viewpoint of extinction evolves naturally toward the optimal path.

  5. Panel Discussion: Career Paths in Energy & Sustainability: Perspective...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a.m.-7 p.m. The events include: 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Panel Discussion "Career Paths in Energy & Sustainability: Perspectives from Successful Women Professionals," including Dr....

  6. Threat-aware Path Planning in Uncertain Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoude, Georges

    This paper considers the path planning problem for an autonomous vehicle in an urban environment populated with static obstacles and moving vehicles with uncertain intents. We propose a novel threat assessment module, ...

  7. Thermal Conductivity Spectroscopy Technique to Measure Phonon Mean Free Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, A. J.

    Size effects in heat conduction, which occur when phonon mean free paths (MFPs) are comparable to characteristic lengths, are being extensively explored in many nanoscale systems for energy applications. Knowledge of MFPs ...

  8. Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–C: Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment Arunas Chesonis, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board, Sweetwater Energy

  9. The paths and characteristics of real estate entrepreneurs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazmierski, Michael (Michael Anthony)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What paths have real estate entrepreneurs taken to establish their own firm? Also, what characteristics did they develop and utilize in the process? This thesis gives the unique opportunity to better understand the life ...

  10. Stochastic mobility-based path planning in uncertain environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    The ability of mobile robots to generate feasible trajectories online is an important requirement for their autonomous operation in unstructured environments. Many path generation techniques focus on generation of time- ...

  11. Alarm guided critical function and success path monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of alarm indication on the overview (IPSO) display to initiate diagnosis of challenges to critical functions or unavailability of success paths, and further alarm-based guidance toward ultimate diagnosis.

  12. Optimal multi-robot path planning with temporal logic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulusoy, Alphan

    In this paper we present a method for automatically planning optimal paths for a group of robots that satisfy a common high level mission specification. Each robot's motion in the environment is modeled as a weighted ...

  13. Glider Path-Planning for Optimal Sampling of Mesoscale Eddies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Glider Path-Planning for Optimal Sampling of Mesoscale Eddies Daniel Hernandez1 , Ryan Smith2 these, mesoscale eddies are of particular interest due to the relevance they have in many oceano

  14. Vickrey Prices and Shortest Paths: What is an edge worth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    network and electrical routing, trans- portation, robot motion planning, critical path computation interest in pric- ing networks and computing resources, which in turn is prompted by the prominent role

  15. Vickrey Prices and Shortest Paths: What is an edge worth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    . Their applications include network and electrical routing, trans­ portation, robot motion planning, critical path by recent interest in pric­ ing networks and computing resources, which in turn is prompted by the prominent

  16. Integrated photoelectrochemical cell and system having a liquid electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming (Sylvania, OH); Xu, Liwei (Sylvania, OH)

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell generates hydrogen and oxygen from water while being illuminated with radiation. The PEC cell employs a liquid electrolyte, a multi-junction photovoltaic electrode, and a thin ion-exchange membrane. A PEC system and a method of making such PEC cell and PEC system are also disclosed.

  17. Liquid Holdup Profiles in Structured Packing Determined via Neutron Radiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldridge, R. Bruce

    scans of an operating air-water contactor were performed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR packings are widely employed in vapor-liquid contacting devices for distillation, absorption, and stripping. The high specific surface areas (ap), regular geometries, and high void fraction () of structured packing

  18. Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC different excess Gibbs free energy models are evaluated: the NRTL, UNIQUAC and electrolyte- NRTL (eNRTL) models. In the case of eNRTL, a new formulation of the model is used, based on a symmetric reference

  19. Help cut pollution with vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woinsky, S.G.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators are common in chemical process industries plants. In addition to separating phases, these devices can aid in reducing pollution in the plant. Two-phase separators achieve pollution prevention via recycling of intermediates and final products. It is doubtful that most vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators are used specifically for pollution prevention projects. They may have another purpose yet provide pollution prevention as a bonus. The first step in achieving pollution prevention by design is for operating companies to be aware of vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators as potential pollution prevention devices. Then, likely applications need to be investigated. Since the quantities of material recovered are relatively small, higher value products are the most likely targets, especially for liquid/liquid separators. However, for vapor/liquid separators, the costs involved are usually relatively low since only the cost of a separator pad is normally involved, and more moderately valued products can be targets.

  20. Decommissioning and Dismantling of Liquid Waste Storage and Liquid Waste Treatment Facility from Paldiski Nuclear Site, Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvas, M. [AS ALARA, Leetse tee 21, Paldiski, 76806 (Estonia); Putnik, H. [Delegation of the European Commission to Russia, Kadashevskaja nab. 14/1 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nirvin, B.; Pettersson, S. [SKB, Box 5864, Stockholm, SE-102 40 (Sweden); Johnsson, B. [Studsvik RadWaste, Nykoping, SE-611 82 (Sweden)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paldiski Nuclear Facility in Estonia, with two nuclear reactors was owned by the Soviet Navy and was used for training the navy personnel to operate submarine nuclear reactors. After collapse of Soviet Union the Facility was shut down and handed over to the Estonian government in 1995. In co-operation with the Paldiski International Expert Reference Group (PIERG) decommission strategy was worked out and started to implement. Conditioning of solid and liquid operational waste and dismantling of contaminated installations and buildings were among the key issues of the Strategy. Most of the liquid waste volume, remained at the Facility, was processed in the frames of an Estonian-Finnish co-operation project using a mobile wastewater purification unit NURES (IVO International OY) and water was discharged prior to the site take-over. In 1999-2002 ca 120 m{sup 3} of semi-liquid tank sediments (a mixture of ion exchange resins, sand filters, evaporator and flocculation slurry), remained after treatment of liquid waste were solidified in steel containers and stored into interim storage. The project was carried out under the Swedish - Estonian co-operation program on radiation protection and nuclear safety. Contaminated installations in buildings, used for treatment and storage of liquid waste (Liquid Waste Treatment Facility and Liquid Waste Storage) were then dismantled and the buildings demolished in 2001-2004. (authors)