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1

EA-437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and 437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory 1. INTRODUCTION 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 Purpose and Need of the Proposed Action 2.2 Description of the Affected Facilities 2.3 Description of Proposed Action 2.4 Alternatives to the Proposed Action 2.5 Separate But Related Actions 3. AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Physical Environment 3.3 Biological Resources 3.4 Cultural Resources 3.5 Environmental Quality and Monitoring Programs

2

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

3

Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, Jeffrey Whealdon; Nenni, Joseph A; Timothy S. Yoder

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

7

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

8

Out-Of-Drum Grout Mixer Testing With Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2003, alternatives were evaluated for grout formulation development and associated mixing for the Sodium-Bearing Waste cesium ion exchange process. The neutralization agents calcium or sodium hydroxide and the solidification agents Portland cement, with or without blast furnace slag were evaluated. A desired uniform formulation was pursued to develop a grout waste form without any bleed liquid and solidify within a reasonable period of about twenty-eight days. This testing evaluates the out-of-drum alternative of mixing the effluent with solidification agents prior to being poured into drums versus the in-drum alternative of mixing them all together after being poured into the drums. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout using the Autocon continuous mixer within the range of 66 to 72 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 30 weight percent NWCF scrubber simulant also produced an acceptable grout waste form.

B. A. Scholes; A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; S. H. Hinckley

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SRS - Programs - Liquid Waste Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Waste Disposition Liquid Waste Disposition This includes both the solidification of highly radioactive liquid wastes stored in SRS's tank farms and disposal of liquid low-level waste generated as a by-product of the separations process and tank farm operations. This low-level waste is treated in the Effluent Treatment Facility. High-activity liquid waste is generated at SRS as by-products from the processing of nuclear materials for national defense, research and medical programs. The waste, totaling about 36 million gallons, is currently stored in 49 underground carbon-steel waste tanks grouped into two "tank farms" at SRS. While the waste is stored in the tanks, it separates into two parts: a sludge that settles on the bottom of the tank, and a liquid supernate that resides on top of the sludge. The waste is reduced to about 30 percent of its original volume by evaporation. The condensed evaporator "overheads" are transferred to the Effluent Treatment Project for final cleanup prior to release to the environment. As the concentrate cools a portion of it crystallizes forming solid saltcake. The concentrated supernate and saltcake are less mobile and therefore less likely to escape to the environment in the event of a tank crack or leak.

10

INEEL Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of radioactive liquid waste, much of which is Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed, is a high priority at the Idaho National Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Major strides in the past five years have lead to significant decreases in generation and subsequent reduction in the overall cost of treatment of these wastes. In 1992, the INTEC, which is part of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), began a program to reduce the generation of radioactive liquid waste (both hazardous and non-hazardous). As part of this program, a Waste Minimization Plan was developed that detailed the various contributing waste streams, and identified methods to eliminate or reduce these waste streams. Reduction goals, which will reduce expected waste generation by 43%, were set for five years as part of this plan. The approval of the plan led to a Waste Minimization Incentive being put in place between the Department of Energy–Idaho Office (DOE-ID) and the INEEL operating contractor, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This incentive is worth $5 million dollars from FY-98 through FY-02 if the waste reduction goals are met. In addition, a second plan was prepared to show a path forward to either totally eliminate all radioactive liquid waste generation at INTEC by 2005 or find alternative waste treatment paths. Historically, this waste has been sent to an evaporator system with the bottoms sent to the INTEC Tank Farm. However, this Tank Farm is not RCRA permitted for mixed wastes and a Notice of Non-compliance Consent Order gives dates of 2003 and 2012 for removal of this waste from these tanks. Therefore, alternative treatments are needed for the waste streams. This plan investigated waste elimination opportunities as well as treatment alternatives. The alternatives, and the criteria for ranking these alternatives, were identified through Value Engineering meetings with all of the waste generators. The most promising alternatives were compared by applying weighting factors to each based on how well the alternative met the established criteria. From this information, an overall ranking of the various alternatives was obtained and a path forward recommended.

Tripp, Julia Lynn; Archibald, Kip Ernest; Argyle, Mark Don; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Miller, Rose Anna; Lauerhass, Lance

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

INEEL Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of radioactive liquid waste, much of which is Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed, is a high priority at the Idaho National Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Major strides in the past five years have lead to significant decreases in generation and subsequent reduction in the overall cost of treatment of these wastes. In 1992, the INTEC, which is part of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), began a program to reduce the generation of radioactive liquid waste (both hazardous and non-hazardous). As part of this program, a Waste Minimization Plan was developed that detailed the various contributing waste streams, and identified methods to eliminate or reduce these waste streams. Reduction goals, which will reduce expected waste generation by 43%, were set for five years as part of this plan. The approval of the plan led to a Waste Minimization Incentive being put in place between the Department of Energy ? Idaho Office (DOE-ID) and the INEEL operating contractor, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This incentive is worth $5 million dollars from FY-98 through FY-02 if the waste reduction goals are met. In addition, a second plan was prepared to show a path forward to either totally eliminate all radioactive liquid waste generation at INTEC by 2005 or find alternative waste treatment paths. Historically, this waste has been sent to an evaporator system with the bottoms sent to the INTEC Tank Farm. However, this Tank Farm is not RCRA permitted for mixed wastes and a Notice of Non-compliance Consent Order gives dates of 2003 and 2012 for removal of this waste from these tanks. Therefore, alternative treatments are needed for the waste streams. This plan investigated waste elimination opportunities as well as treatment alternatives. The alternatives, and the criteria for ranking these alternatives, were identified through Value Engineering meetings with all of the waste generators. The most promising alternatives were compared by applying weighting factors to each based on how well the alternative met the established criteria. From this information, an overall ranking of the various alternatives was obtained and a path forward recommended.

C. B. Millet; J. L. Tripp; K. E. Archibald; L. Lauerhauss; M. D. Argyle; R. L. Demmer

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

13

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. This report is an update, and replaces the previous report by the same title issued April 2003. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, Jeffrey W.

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Method for treating liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering .sup.99 Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of .sup.99 TcO.sub.4.sup.- from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of .sup.99 Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester .sup.99 Tc from those liquids.

Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Method for treating liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering {sup 99}Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of {sup 99}Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester {sup 99}Tc from those liquids. 6 figs.

Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Singh, P.; Ketring, A.R.

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Newly Generated Liquid Waste Processing Alternatives Study, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies and evaluates three options for treating newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The three options are: (a) treat the waste using processing facilities designed for treating sodium-bearing waste, (b) treat the waste using subcontractor-supplied mobile systems, or (c) treat the waste using a special facility designed and constructed for that purpose. In studying these options, engineers concluded that the best approach is to store the newly generated liquid waste until a sodium-bearing waste treatment facility is available and then to co-process the stored inventory of the newly generated waste with the sodium-bearing waste. After the sodium-bearing waste facility completes its mission, two paths are available. The newly generated liquid waste could be treated using the subcontractor-supplied system or the sodium-bearing waste facility or a portion of it. The final decision depends on the design of the sodium-bearing waste treatment facility, which will be completed in coming years.

Landman, William Henry; Bates, Steven Odum; Bonnema, Bruce Edward; Palmer, Stanley Leland; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Walsh, Stephanie

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solidification of Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, FY-03 Report  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the mechanism and methods of fixation of acidic waste effluents in grout form are explored. From the variations in the pH as a function of total solids addition to acidic waste effluent solutions, the stages of gellation, liquefaction, slurry formation and grout development are quantitatively revealed. Experimental results indicate the completion of these reaction steps to be significant for elimination of bleed liquid and for setting of the grout to a dimensionally stable and hardened solid within a reasonable period of about twenty eight days that is often observed in the cement and concrete industry. The reactions also suggest increases in the waste loading in the direction of decreasing acid molarity. Consequently, 1.0 molar SBW-180 waste is contained in higher quantity than the 2.8 molar SBW-189, given the same grout formulation for both effluents. The variations in the formulations involving components of slag, cement, waste and neutralizing agent are represented in the form of a ternary formulation map. The map in turn graphically reveals the relations among the various formulations and grout properties, and is useful in predicting the potential directions of waste loading in grouts with suitable properties such as slurry viscosity, Vicat hardness, and mechanical strength. A uniform formulation for the fixation of both SBW-180 and SBW-189 has emerged from the development of the formulation map. The boundaries for the processing regime on this map are 100 wt% cement to 50 wt% cement / 50 wt% slag, with waste loadings ranging from 55 wt% to 68 wt%. Within these compositional bounds all the three waste streams SBW-180, SBW-189 and Scrub solution are amenable to solidification. A large cost advantage is envisaged to stem from savings in labor, processing time, and processing methodology by adopting a uniform formulation concept for fixation of compositionally diverse waste streams. The experimental efforts contained in this report constitute the first attempt at developing a uniform methodology.

S. V. Raman; A. K. Herbst; B. A. Scholes; S. H. Hinckley; R. D. Colby

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

System Engineering Design [Nuclear Waste Management using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Engineering System Engineering Design Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology System Engineering Design Bookmark and Share Two major pieces of electrometallurgical process equipment are the Electrorefiner and the Cathode Processor. NE personnel have been involved in the conceptual design, final design, procurement, manufacture,

20

Waste Logic™ Liquid Waste Manager (WL-LWM) Software, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to continuing industry efforts to reduce operating expenditures, EPRI developed the Waste Logic&trade: Liquid Waste Manager code to analyze costs associated with liquid waste processing and the disposition of its resultant solid waste. EPRI's Waste Logic: Liquid Waste Manager software for windows-based PC computers provides a detailed economic and performance view of liquid waste processing activities. The software will help nuclear utilities evaluate the costs associated with liquid radwaste...

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SRS Liquid Waste Program Partnering Agreement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

We the members of the  SRS Liquid Waste Partnering Team do hereby mutually agree to work in a collaborative and cooperative manner through open communication and coordination with team members, and...

22

Method for solidifying liquid radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The quantity of nitrous oxides produced during the solidification of liquid radioactive wastes containing nitrates and nitrites can be substantially reduced by the addition to the wastes of a stoichiometric amount of urea which, upon heating, destroys the nitrates and nitrites, liberating nontoxic N.sub.2, CO.sub.2 and NH.sub.3.

Berreth, Julius R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has-four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

Haaland, Carsten M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

Haaland, Carsten M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Tank waste remediation system engineering plan  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Plan describes the engineering process and controls that will be in place to support the Technical Baseline definition and manage its evolution and implementation to the field operations. This plan provides the vision for the engineering required to support the retrieval and disposal mission through Phase 1 and 2, which includes integrated data management of the Technical Baseline. Further, this plan describes the approach for moving from the ``as is`` condition of engineering practice, systems, and facilities to the desired ``to be`` configuration. To make this transition, Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Engineering will become a center of excellence for TWRS which,will perform engineering in the most effective manner to meet the mission. TWRS engineering will process deviations from sitewide systems if necessary to meet the mission most effectively.

Rifaey, S.H.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Liquid low level waste management expert system  

SciTech Connect

An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs.

Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Jackson, J.R. (Southwest Baptist Univ., Bolivar, MO (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

WASTE INCINERATION AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WASTE INCINERATION AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, IG-0454 WASTE INCINERATION AT THE...

30

Audit Report Waste Treatment Plans at the Idaho National Engineering...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Reduction Plans for the Advanced Mixed Waste TreatmentProject at the Idaho National Engineering and EnvironmentalLaboratory, IG-0611 Energy.gov Careers & Internships Hotline...

31

Engineering-Scale Demonstration of DuraLith and Ceramicrete Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from the Hanford Waste Immobilization and Treatment Plant, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing on four candidate waste forms. Two of the candidate waste forms have not been developed to scale as the more mature waste forms. This work describes engineering-scale demonstrations conducted on Ceramicrete and DuraLith candidate waste forms. Both candidate waste forms were successfully demonstrated at an engineering scale. A preliminary conceptual design could be prepared for full-scale production of the candidate waste forms. However, both waste forms are still too immature to support a detailed design. Formulations for each candidate waste form need to be developed so that the material has a longer working time after mixing the liquid and solid constituents together. Formulations optimized based on previous lab studies did not have sufficient working time to support large-scale testing. The engineering-scale testing was successfully completed using modified formulations. Further lab development and parametric studies are needed to optimize formulations with adequate working time and assess the effects of changes in raw materials and process parameters on the final product performance. Studies on effects of mixing intensity on the initial set time of the waste forms are also needed.

Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Pires, Richard P.; Bickford, Jody; Foote, Martin W.

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

M. D. Staiger M. C. Swenson

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Testing and Disposal Strategy for Secondary Wastes from Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

Herbst, Alan K.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

34

Testing and Disposal Strategy for Secondary Wastes from Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

Herbst, Alan Keith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation final report and recommendation  

SciTech Connect

Using a formalized Systems Engineering approach, the Latched Idaho Technologies Company developed and evaluated numerous alternatives for treating, immobilizing, and disposing of radioactive liquid and calcine wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Based on technical analysis data as of March, 1995, it is recommended that the Department of Energy consider a phased processing approach -- utilizing Radionuclide Partitioning for radioactive liquid and calcine waste treatment, FUETAP Grout for low-activity waste immobilization, and Glass (Vitrification) for high-activity waste immobilization -- as the preferred treatment and immobilization alternative.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

CRAD, Engineering - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Engineering - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Engineering - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization,

37

Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

Kuester, J.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Engineering-Scale Liquid Cadmium Cathode Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Recovery of transuranic actinides (TRU) using electrorefining is a process being investigated as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). TRU recovery via electrorefining onto a solid cathode is very difficult as the thermodynamic properties of transuranics are not favourable for them to remain in the metal phase while significant quantities of uranium trichloride exist in the electrolyte. Theoretically, the concentration of transuranics in the electrolyte must be approximately 106 greater than the uranium concentration in the electrolyte to produce a transuranic deposit on a solid cathode. Using liquid cadmium as a cathode contained within a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, the co-deposition of uranium and transuranics is feasible because the activity of the transuranics in liquid cadmium is very small. Depositing transuranics and uranium in a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) theoretically requires the concentration of transuranics to be two to three times the uranium concentration in the electrolyte. Three LCC experiments were performed in an Engineering scale elecdtrorefiner, which is located in the argon hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex on the Idaho National Laboratory. Figure 1 contains photographs of the LCC assembly in the hot cell prior to the experiment and a cadmium ingot produced after the first LCC test. Figure 1. Liquid Cadmium Cathode (left) and Cadmium Ingot (right) The primary goal of the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments was to electrochemically collect kilogram quantities of uranium and plutonium via a LCC. The secondary goal was to examine fission product contaminations in the materials collected by the LCC. Each LCC experiment used chopped spent nuclear fuel from the blanket region of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II loaded into steel baskets as the anode with the LCC containing 26 kg of cadmium metal. In each experiment, between one and two kilograms of heavy metal was collected in the LCC after passing an integrated current over 500 amp hours. Analysis of samples from the liquid cadmium cathode ingots showed detectable amounts of transuranics and rare-earth elements. Acknowledgements K. B. Davies and D. M. Pace for the mechanical and electrical engineering needed to prepare the equipment for the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments.

D Vaden; B. R. Westphal; S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; K. B. Davies; D. M. Pace

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Hinckley, Steve Harold

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

A. K. Herbst; J. A. McCray; R. J. Kirkham; J. Pao; S. H. Hinckley

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Secondary Waste Considerations for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center FY-2001 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes from the melter off-gas clean up systems. Projected secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

Herbst, A.K.; Kirkham, R.J.; Losinski, S.J.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

Secondary Waste Considerations for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Techology and Engineering Center FY-2001 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes from the melter off-gas clean up systems. Projected secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Kirkham, Robert John; Losinski, Sylvester John

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission W. R. Wilmarth March 5 2009 March 5, 2009 HLW Corporate Board Phoenix AZ HLW Corporate Board, Phoenix, AZ Co-authors M. E. Johnson, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company G. Lumetta, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory N Machara DOE Office of Engineering and Technology N. Machara, DOE Office of Engineering and Technology M. R. Poirier, Savannah River National Laboratory P C S DOE S h Ri P. C. Suggs, DOE Savannah River M. C. Thompson, Savannah River National Laboratory, Retired Retired 2 Background Separations is a fundamental business within DOE. The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval, processing and closure. Recognized as part of E&T Roadmap

44

Future radioactive liquid waste streams study  

SciTech Connect

This study provides design planning information for the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Predictions of estimated quantities of Radioactive Liquid Waste (RLW) and radioactivity levels of RLW to be generated are provided. This information will help assure that the new treatment facility is designed with the capacity to treat generated RLW during the years of operation. The proposed startup date for the RLWTF is estimated to be between 2002 and 2005, and the life span of the facility is estimated to be 40 years. The policies and requirements driving the replacement of the current RLW treatment facility are reviewed. Historical and current status of RLW generation at Los Alamos National Laboratory are provided. Laboratory Managers were interviewed to obtain their insights into future RLW activities at Los Alamos that might affect the amount of RLW generated at the Lab. Interviews, trends, and investigation data are analyzed and used to create scenarios. These scenarios form the basis for the predictions of future RLW generation and the level of RLW treatment capacity which will be needed at LANL.

Rey, A.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles.

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Karthik Subramanian Bruce Wiersma November 2008 High Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting karthik.subramanian@srnl.doe.gov bruce.wiersma@srnl.doe.gov 2 Acknowledgements * Bruce Wiersma (SRNL) * Kayle Boomer (Hanford) * Michael T. Terry (Facilitator) * SRS - Liquid Waste Organization * Hanford Tank Farms * DOE-EM 3 Background * High level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks provide critical interim confinement for waste prior to processing and permanent disposal * Maintaining structural integrity (SI) of the tanks is a critical component of operations 4 Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 * Discuss the HLW tank integrity technology needs based upon the evolving waste processing and tank closure requirements along with its continued storage mission

47

Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory (324 building)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 324 Facility Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is comprised of twenty functional areas. Two of the twenty functional areas (Decontamination and Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration) were determined as nonapplicable functional areas and one functional area (Research and Development and Experimental Activities) was determined applicable, however, requirements are found in other functional areas and will not be duplicated. Each functional area follows as a separate chapter, either containing the S/RID or a justification for nonapplicability. The twenty functional areas listed below follow as chapters: 1. Management Systems; 2. Quality Assurance; 3. Configuration Management; 4. Training and Qualification; 5. Emergency Management; 6. Safeguards and Security; 7. Engineering Program; 8. Construction; 9. Operations; 10. Maintenance; 11. Radiation Protection; 12. Fire Protection; 13. Packaging and Transportation; 14. Environmental Restoration; 15. Decontamination and Decommissioning; 16. Waste Management; 17. Research and Development and Experimental Activities; 18. Nuclear Safety; 19. Occupational Safety and Health; 20. Environmental Protection.

Kammenzind, D.E.

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

System for recovering methane gas from liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

A system for and method of recovering methane gas from liquid waste which is stored within a pit is disclosed herein. The methane gas is produced by causing the liquid waste to undergo anaerobic fermentation. Therefore, it is necessary to close the pit in an air tight fashion. This is carried out using a cover sheet which is fixedly disposed over the pit in an air tight but readily disengagable fashion. The liquid waste within this air tight pit is preferably agitated intermittently during its storage therein whereby to increase the amount of methane gas produced.

Grabis, D.W.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

49

Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nondestructively detecting the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solidified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Sodium Bearing Waste - Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determination  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management, Section I.1.C, requires that all radioactive waste subject to Department of Energy Order 435.1 be managed as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or low-level radioactive waste. Determining the radiological classification of the sodium-bearing waste currently in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility inventory is important to its proper treatment and disposition. This report presents the technical basis for making the determination that the sodium-bearing waste is waste incidental to spent fuel reprocessing and should be managed as mixed transuranic waste. This report focuses on the radiological characteristics of the sodiumbearing waste. The report does not address characterization of the nonradiological, hazardous constituents of the waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

Jacobson, Victor Levon

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

HNPF LIQUID WASTE DISPOSAL COST STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The HNPF cost analysis for waste disposal was made on the basis of 10,000 gallons of laundry waste and 9,000 gallons of other plant waste per year. The costs are compared for storage at HNPF site for 10 yr, packaging and shipment to AEC barial ground, packaging and shipment for sea disposal, and disposal by licensed vendor. A graphical comparison is given for the yearly costs of disposal by licensed vendor and the evaporator system as a function of waste volume. Recommendations are included for the handling of the wastes expected from HNPF operations. (B.O.G.)

Piccot, A.R.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Engineered waste-package-system design specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the waste package performance requirements and geologic and waste form data bases used in developing the conceptual designs for waste packages for salt, tuff, and basalt geologies. The data base reflects the latest geotechnical information on the geologic media of interest. The parameters or characteristics specified primarily cover spent fuel, defense high-level waste, and commercial high-level waste forms. The specification documents the direction taken during the conceptual design activity. A separate design specification will be developed prior to the start of the preliminary design activity.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until recently, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, changing world events have raised questions concerning the need to recover and recycle this material. In April 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the management and disposition of radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste) and 3,800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine waste are in inventory at the ICPP. Legal drivers and agreements exist obligating the INEL to develop, demonstrate, and implement technologies for safe and environmentally sound treatment and interim storage of radioactive liquid and calcine waste. Candidate treatment processes and waste forms are being evaluated using the Technology Evaluation and Analysis Methodology (TEAM) Model. This process allows decision makers to (1) identify optimum radioactive waste treatment and disposal form alternatives; (2) assess tradeoffs between various optimization criteria; (3) identify uncertainties in performance parameters; and (4) focus development efforts on options that best satisfy stakeholder concerns. The Systems Analysis technology evaluation presented in this document supports the DOE in selecting the most effective radioactive liquid and calcine waste management plan to implement in compliance with established regulations, court orders, and agreements.

Murphy, J.A.; Pincock, L.F.; Christiansen, I.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Research and Development FY-2002 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2002, immobilization-related research included of grout formulation development for sodium-bearing waste, absorption of the waste on silica gel, and off-gas system mercury collection and breakthrough using activated carbon. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout at 70 weight percent and onto silica gel at 74 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 11 weight percent mercury in sulfur-impregnated activated carbon was achieved with 99.8% off-gas mercury removal efficiency.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Deldebbio, John Anthony; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Olson, Lonnie Gene; Scholes, Bradley Adams

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Simmons, R. F.; Palethorpe, S. J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Water distillation using waste engine heat from an internal combustion engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To meet the needs of forward deployed soldiers and disaster relief personnel, a mobile water distillation system was designed and tested. This system uses waste engine heat from the exhaust flow of an internal combustion ...

Mears, Kevin S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waste Form Development for the Solidification of PDCF/MOX Liquid Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site, part of the Department of Energy's nuclear materials complex located in South Carolina, cementation has been selected as the solidification method for high-alpha and low-activity waste streams generated in the planned plutonium disposition facilities. A Waste Solidification Building (WSB) that will be used to treat and solidify three radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility is in the preliminary design stage. The WSB is expected to treat a transuranic (TRU) waste stream composed primarily of americium and two low-level waste (LLW) streams. The acidic wastes will be concentrated in the WSB evaporator and neutralized in a cement head tank prior to solidification. A series of TRU mixes were prepared to produce waste forms exhibiting a range of processing and cured properties. The LLW mixes were prepared using the premix from the preferred TRU waste form. All of the waste forms tested passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. After processing in the WSB, current plans are to dispose of the solidified TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and the solidified LLW waste at an approved low-level waste disposal facility.

COZZI, ALEX

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

Waste Form Development for the Solidification of PDCF/MOX Liquid Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site, part of the Department of Energy's nuclear materials complex located in South Carolina, cementation has been selected as the solidification method for high-alpha and low-activity waste streams generated in the planned plutonium disposition facilities. A Waste Solidification Building (WSB) that will be used to treat and solidify three radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility is in the preliminary design stage. The WSB is expected to treat a transuranic (TRU) waste stream composed primarily of americium and two low-level waste (LLW) streams. The acidic wastes will be concentrated in the WSB evaporator and neutralized in a cement head tank prior to solidification. A series of TRU mixes were prepared to produce waste forms exhibiting a range of processing and cured properties. The LLW mixes were prepared using the premix from the preferred TRU waste form. All of the waste forms tested passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. After processing in the WSB, current plans are to dispose of the solidified TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and the solidified LLW waste at an approved low-level waste disposal facility.

COZZI, ALEX

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co. Ltd Place Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 210024 Sector Biomass Product Chinese biomass project developer. The company developed a landfill gas plant in Nanjing, China. Coordinates 32.0485°, 118.778969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0485,"lon":118.778969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Bookmark and Share Much of the NE Division's research is directed toward developing software and performing analyses, system engineering design, and experiments to support the demonstration and optimization of the electrometallurgical

65

Process for immobilizing radioactive boric acid liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of immobilizing boric acid liquid wastes containing radionuclides by neutralizing the solution and evaporating the resulting precipitate to near dryness. The dry residue is then fused into a reduced volume, insoluble, inert, solid form containing substantially all the radionuclides.

Greenhalgh, W.O.

1984-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Process for immobilizing radioactive boric acid liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of immobilizing boric acid liquid wastes containing radionuclides by neutralizing the solution and evaporating the resulting precipitate to near dryness. The dry residue is then fused into a reduced volume, insoluble, inert, solid form containing substantially all the radionuclides.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Iraq liquid radioactive waste tanks maintenance and monitoring program plan.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a project management plan for maintaining and monitoring liquid radioactive waste tanks at Iraq's Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center. Based on information from several sources, the Al-Tuwaitha site has approximately 30 waste tanks that contain varying amounts of liquid or sludge radioactive waste. All of the tanks have been non-operational for over 20 years and most have limited characterization. The program plan embodied in this document provides guidance on conducting radiological surveys, posting radiation control areas and controlling access, performing tank hazard assessments to remove debris and gain access, and conducting routine tank inspections. This program plan provides general advice on how to sample and characterize tank contents, and how to prioritize tanks for soil sampling and borehole monitoring.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Cochran, John Russell; Sol Shamsaldin, Emad (Iraq Ministry of Science and Technology)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

ENGINEERING SPECIALTY ASSESSMENT OF TANK WASTE COMPATIBILITY REPORTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Engineering Specialty Assessment was conducted to review the Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program to assess whether the program meets the needs of accelerated retrieval and closure and waste feed delivery and to identify areas and methods for streamlining the program. The assessment was conducted in June 2003 and resulted in two findings and thirteen observations. The assessment results indicate that significant opportunities exist for streamlining the program by reducing the number of criteria requiring evaluation from 21 to 11, with only six of the criteria requiring evaluation for the majority of transfers. The assessment identified areas where existing criteria require strengthening to ensure that the risks of undesirable solids precipitation, from either waste mixing or waste transfer, are minimized. The assessment further identified opportunities for using existing engineering tools to simplify the calculations involved with preparation of waste compatibility assessments. The need to ensure that a revision to the waste compatibility program is prepared to align the program criteria with those that will be implemented with the DSA approval was also identified. Finally, the assessment identified that corrective actions are required to implement a tank-by-tank PCB inventory within the Best Basis Inventory and to ensure that sample data from external waste generators is entered into the TWINS database.

KNIGHT, M.A.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

SECONDARY WASTE/ETF (EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY) PRELIMINARY PRE-CONCEPTUAL ENGINEERING STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This pre-conceptual engineering study is intended to assist in supporting the critical decision (CD) 0 milestone by providing a basis for the justification of mission need (JMN) for the handling and disposal of liquid effluents. The ETF baseline strategy, to accommodate (WTP) requirements, calls for a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the ETF to provide the needed additional processing capability. This STU is to process the ETF evaporator concentrate into a cement-based waste form. The cementitious waste will be cast into blocks for curing, storage, and disposal. Tis pre-conceptual engineering study explores this baseline strategy, in addition to other potential alternatives, for meeting the ETF future mission needs. Within each reviewed case study, a technical and facility description is outlined, along with a preliminary cost analysis and the associated risks and benefits.

MAY TH; GEHNER PD; STEGEN GARY; HYMAS JAY; PAJUNEN AL; SEXTON RICH; RAMSEY AMY

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Pilot studies to achieve waste minimization and enhance radioactive liquid waste treatment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive and Industrial Wastewater Science Group manages and operates the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The RLWTF treats low-level radioactive liquid waste generated by research and analytical facilities at approximately 35 technical areas throughout the 43-square-mile site. The RLWTF treats an average of 5.8 million gallons (21.8-million liters) of liquid waste annually. Clarifloculation and filtration is the primary treatment technology used by the RLWTF. This technology has been used since the RLWTF became operable in 1963. Last year the RLWTF achieved an average of 99.7% removal of gross alpha activity in the waste stream. The treatment process requires the addition of chemicals for the flocculation and subsequent precipitation of radionuclides. The resultant sludge generated during this process is solidified in drums and stored or disposed of at LANL.

Freer, J.; Freer, E.; Bond, A. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Waste heat recovery in automobile engines : potential solutions and benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Less than 30% of the energy in a gallon of gasoline reaches the wheels of a typical car; most of the remaining energy is lost as heat. Since most of the energy consumed by an internal combustion engine is wasted, capturing ...

Ruiz, Joaquin G., 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) systems engineering policy provided in 97-IMSD-193. The SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Project to implement the policy. The SEMP will be used as the basis for tailoring the systems engineering applications to the development of the physical systems and processes necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program. It is a living document that will be revised as necessary to reflect changes in systems engineering guidance as the program evolves. The US Department of Energy-Headquarters has issued program management guidance, DOE Order 430. 1, Life Cycle Asset Management, and associated Good Practice Guides that include substantial systems engineering guidance.

Peck, L.G.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development > Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Overview Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Generation IV Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Advanced Reactor Development and Technology Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Bookmark and Share STAR-LM: Simplified, Modular, Small Reactor Featuring Flow-thru Fuel Cartridge STAR-LM: Simplified, Modular, Small Reactor Featuring Flow-thru Fuel Cartridge. Click on image to view larger image. Argonne has traditionally been the foremost institute in the US for

74

Low-level liquid waste treatment system start-up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following removal of Cs-137 by ion exchange in the Supernatant Treatment System immediately upstream, the radioactive liquid waste is volume-reduced by evaporation. Trace amounts of Cs-137 in the resulting distillate are removed by ion exchange, then the distillate is discharged to the existing plant water treatment system. The concentrated product, 37 to 41 percent solids (by weight), is encapsulated in cement, producing a stable low-level waste form. This report provides a summary of work performed to test the Liquid Waste Treatment System following construction turnover and prior to radioactive operation. All mechanical and electrical components, piping, valves, pumps, tanks, controls, and instrumentation required to operate the system were tested; first with water, then with simulated waste. Subsystems (individual tanks, pumps, and control loops) were tested individually, then as a complete system. Finally, the system began a controlled start-up phase, which included the first four months of radioactive operation. Components were tested for operability then for performance data to verify the system`s ability to produce an acceptable waste form at design feed rates.

Baker, M.N.; Gessner, R.F.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

EVALUATION OF ULTIMATE DISPOSAL METHOD FOR LIQUID AND SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTES. PART I. INTERIM LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

As the first part of a study to evaluate the economics of the various steps leading to and including the permanent disposal of high-activity liquid and solid radioactive waste, costs of interim liquid storage of acid and alkaline Purex and Thorex wastes were estimated for storage times of 0.5 to 30 years. A 6- ton/day plant was assumed, processing 1500 tons/year of uranium converter fuel at a burnup of 10,000 Mwd/ton and 270 tons/year of thorium converter fuel at a burnup of 20,000 Mwd/ton. Tanks of Savannah River design were assumed, with stainless steel construction for acid wastes and mild steel construction for neutralized wastes. The operating cycle of each tank was assumed to consist of equal filling and emptying periods plus a full (or dead) period. With interim storage time defined as filling time plus full time, tank costs were minimum when full time was 40 to 70% of the interim storage time, using present worth considerations. For waste storage times of 0.5 to 30 years, costs ranged from 2.2 x 10/sup -3/ to 9.5 x 10/sup -3/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for acid wastes and from 1.7 x 10/sup -3/ to 5.1 x 10/sup -3/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for neutralized wastes. (auth)

Bradshaw, R.L.; Perona, J.J.; Roberts, J.T.; Blomeke, J.O.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System (VES-SFE-106)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System located in the adjacent to the Sludge Tank Control House (CPP-648), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory, was developed to meet the interim status closure requirements for a tank system. The system to be closed includes a tank and associated ancillary equipment that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System will be "cleaned closed" in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of acheiving those standards for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System.

S. K. Evans

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Mercury was widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities, resulting in a broad range of mercury-contaminated wastes and wastewaters. Some of the mercury contamination has escaped to the local environment, particularly at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where approximately 330 metric tons of mercury were discharged to the environment between 1953 and 1963 (TN & Associates, 1998). Effective removal of mercury contamination from water is a complex and difficult problem. In particular, mercury treatment of natural waters is difficult because of the low regulatory standards. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has established a national ambient water quality standard of 12 parts-per-trillion (ppt), whereas the standard is 1.8 ppt in the Great Lakes Region. In addition, mercury in the environment is typically present in several different forms, but sorption processes are rarely effective with more than one or two of these forms. To meet the low regulatory discharge limits, an effective sorption process must be able to address all forms of mercury present in the water. One approach is to apply different sorbents in series depending on the mercury speciation and the regulatory discharge limits. ADA Technologies, Inc. has developed four new sorbents to address the variety of mercury species present in industrial discharges and natural waters. Three of these sorbents have been field tested on contaminated creek water at the Y-12 Plant. Two of these sorbents have been successfully demonstrated very high removal efficiencies for soluble mercury species, reducing mercury concentrations at the outlet of a pilot-scale system to less than 12 ppt for as long as six months. The other sorbent tested at the Y-12 Plant targeted colloidal mercury not removed by standard sorption or filtration processes. At the Y-12 Plant, colloidal mercury appears to be associated with iron, so a sorbent that removes mercury-iron complexes in the presence of a magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicated good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and industrial waters, including Hg{sup 2+}, elemental mercury, methyl mercury, and colloidal mercury. The process possesses very fast kinetics, which allows for higher flow rates and smaller treatment units. These sorbent technologies, used in tandem or individually depending on the treatment needs, can provide DOE sites with a cost-effective method for reducing mercury concentrations to very low levels mandated by the regulatory community. In addition, the technologies do not generate significant amounts of secondary wastes for disposal. Furthermore, the need for improved water treatment technologies is not unique to the DOE. The new, stringent requirements on mercury concentrations impact other government agencies as well as the private sector. Some of the private-sector industries needing improved methods for removing mercury from water include mining, chloralkali production, chemical processing, and medical waste treatment. The next logical step is to deploy one or more of these sorbents at a contaminated DOE site or at a commercial facility needing improved mercury treatment technologies. A full-scale deployment is planned in fiscal year 2000.

Robin M. Stewart

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Liquid Waste Processing Facilities (LWPF) Reliability and Availability and Maintainability (RAM) Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analysis was prepared for the liquid effluents support being provided to the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The availability of liquid effluents services to the WTP was determined. Recommendations are provided on improvements and upgrades to increase the availability of the Liquid Waste Processing Facilities treatment and disposal systems.

LOWE, S.S.

2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Savannah River Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the man  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's 49 underground waste tanks, including the removal of waste materials. Once water is removed from the waste tanks, two materials remain: salt and sludge waste. Removing salt waste, which fills approximately 90 percent of the tank space in the SRS tank farms, is a major step toward closing the Site's waste tanks that currently contain approximately 38 million gallons of waste. Due to the limited amount of tank space available in new-style tanks, some salt waste must be dispositioned in the interim to ensure sufficient tank space for continued sludge washing and to support the initial start-up and salt processing operations at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF).

82

Metal decontamination for waste minimization using liquid metal refining technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project flowsheet indicates that no conventional technology, other than surface decontamination, exists for metal processing. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain concentration. This project is in support of the National Mixed Low Level Waste Treatment Program. Because of the high cost of disposal, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low-level contaminated metals. It is important to be able to decontaminate complex shapes where surfaces are hidden or inaccessible to surface decontamination processes and destruction of organic contamination. These goals can be achieved by adapting commercial metal refining processes to handle radioactive and organic contaminated metal. The radioactive components are concentrated in the slag, which is subsequently vitrified; hazardous organics are destroyed by the intense heat of the bath. The metal, after having been melted and purified, could be recycled for use within the DOE complex. In this project, we evaluated current state-of-the-art technologies for metal refining, with special reference to the removal of radioactive contaminants and the destruction of hazardous organics. This evaluation was based on literature reports, industrial experience, plant visits, thermodynamic calculations, and engineering aspects of the various processes. The key issues addressed included radioactive partitioning between the metal and slag phases, minimization of secondary wastes, operability of the process subject to widely varying feed chemistry, and the ability to seal the candidate process to prevent the release of hazardous species.

Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Lally, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

EA-1115: Liquid Waste Treatment at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to treat low-level radioactive liquid and low-level mixed liquid and semi-solid wastes generated at the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada...

84

Tank waste remediation system process engineering instruction manual  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Process Engineering Instruction Manual is to provide guidance and direction to TWRS Process Engineering staff regarding conduct of business. The objective is to establish a disciplined and consistent approach to business such that the work processes within TWRS Process Engineering are safe, high quality, disciplined, efficient, and consistent with Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation Policies and Procedures. The sections within this manual are of two types: for compliance and for guidance. For compliance sections are intended to be followed per-the-letter until such time as they are formally changed per Section 2.0 of this manual. For guidance sections are intended to be used by the staff for guidance in the conduct of work where technical judgment and discernment are required. The guidance sections shall also be changed per Section 2.0 of this manual. The required header for each manual section is illustrated in Section 2.0, Manual Change Control procedure. It is intended that this manual be used as a training and indoctrination resource for employees of the TWRS Process Engineering organization. The manual shall be required reading for all TWRS Process Engineering staff, matrixed, and subcontracted employees.

ADAMS, M.R.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files, Part 1, Mixed waste streams  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum...

87

UNREVIEWED DISPOSAL QUESTION EVALUATION: WASTE DISPOSAL IN ENGINEERED TRENCH #3  

SciTech Connect

Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

Hamm, L.; Smith, F.; Flach, G.; Hiergesell, R.; Butcher, T.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Management Operations Roadmap Document  

SciTech Connect

At the direction of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) is developing roadmaps for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) activities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). DOE-ID has convened a select group of contractor personnel from EG&G Idaho, Inc. to assist DOE-ID personnel with the roadmapping project. This document is a report on the initial stages of the first phase of the INEL`s roadmapping efforts.

Bullock, M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Design and development of eco-friendly alcohol engine fitted with waste heat recovery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper discusses the design and development of an eco-friendly alcohol engine fitted with the waste heat recovery system as a remedial alternative to the existing commonly used internal combustion engine. With the present trends in Internal ...

G. Vijayan Iyer; Nikos E. Mastorakis

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0290-D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F-1 F-1 APPENDIX F PROJECT HISTORY Waste History/Description From 1970 through the early 1980's the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) accepted over 65,000 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and alpha- contaminated waste from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These wastes were placed in above ground storage at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEEL. The wastes are primarily laboratory and processing wastes of various solid materials, including paper, cloth, plastics, rubber, glass, graphite, bricks, concrete, metals, nitrate salts, and absorbed liquids. Over 95 percent of the waste was generated at DOE's Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado and transported to the INEEL by rail in bins, boxes, and drums. All 65,000 cubic meters was

91

Systems engineering identification and control of mixed waste technology development  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop technologies required to meet the Department`s commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. Waste treatment includes all necessary steps from generation through disposal. Systems engineering was employed to reduce programmatic risk, that is, risk of failure to meet technical commitments within cost and schedule. Customer needs (technology deficiencies) are identified from Site Treatment Plans, Consent Orders, ten year plans, Site Technical Coordinating Groups, Stakeholders, and Site Visits. The Technical Baseline, a prioritized list of technology deficiencies, forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. Technology Development Requirements Documents are prepared for each technology selected for development. After technologies have been successfully developed and demonstrated, they are documented in a Technology Performance Report. The Technology Performance Reports are available to any of the customers or potential users of the technology, thus closing the loop between problem identification and product development. This systematic approach to technology development and its effectiveness after 3 years is discussed in this paper.

Beitel, G.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim* and Nina MahootcheianAsl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim in a Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) flow battery that can be used in a stationary energy storage application. Li

Zhou, Yaoqi

94

Technology Evaluations Related to Mercury, Technetium, and Chloride in Treatment of Wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho High-Level Waste and Facility Disposition Environmental Impact Statement defines alternative for treating and disposing of wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Development is required for several technologies under consideration for treatment of these wastes. This report contains evaluations of whether specific treatment is needed and if so, by what methods, to remove mercury, technetium, and chlorides in proposed Environmental Impact Statement treatment processes. The evaluations of mercury include a review of regulatory requirements that would apply to mercury wastes in separations processes, an evaluation of the sensitivity of mercury flowrates and concentrations to changes in separations processing schemes and conditions, test results from laboratory-scale experiments of precipitation of mercury by sulfide precipitation agents from the TRUEX carbonate wash effluent, and evaluations of methods to remove mercury from New Waste Calcining Facility liquid and gaseous streams. The evaluation of technetium relates to the need for technetium removal and alternative methods to remove technetium from streams in separations processes. The need for removal of chlorides from New Waste Calcining Facility scrub solution is also evaluated.

C. M. Barnes; D. D. Taylor; S. C. Ashworth; J. B. Bosley; D. R. Haefner

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Review of Potential Candidate Stabilization Technologies for Liquid and Solid Secondary Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has initiated a waste form testing program to support the long-term durability evaluation of a waste form for secondary wastes generated from the treatment and immobilization of Hanford radioactive tank wastes. The purpose of the work discussed in this report is to identify candidate stabilization technologies and getters that have the potential to successfully treat the secondary waste stream liquid effluent, mainly from off-gas scrubbers and spent solids, produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Down-selection to the most promising stabilization processes/waste forms is needed to support the design of a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). To support key decision processes, an initial screening of the secondary liquid waste forms must be completed by February 2010.

Pierce, Eric M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Scheele, Randall D.; Um, Wooyong; Qafoku, Nikolla

2010-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Engineering program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

97

EA-0843: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed 43: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste Processing, Idaho Falls, Idaho EA-0843: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste Processing, Idaho Falls, Idaho SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to (1) reduce the volume of the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) generated low-level waste (LLW) through sizing, compaction, and stabilization at Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF); and (2) use commercial offsite facilities for supplemental LLW volume reduction (incineration). PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 3, 1994 EA-0843: Finding of No Significant Impact Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste Processing

98

Recovery of valuable materials from waste liquid crystal display panel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Associated with the rapid development of the information and electronic industry, liquid crystal displays (LCDs) have been increasingly sold as displays. However, during the discarding at their end-of-life stage, significant environmental hazards, impacts on health and a loss of resources may occur, if the scraps are not managed in an appropriate way. In order to improve the efficiency of the recovery of valuable materials from waste LCDs panel in an environmentally sound manner, this study presents a combined recycling technology process on the basis of manual dismantling and chemical treatment of LCDs. Three key processes of this technology have been studied, including the separation of LCD polarizing film by thermal shock method the removal of liquid crystals between the glass substrates by the ultrasonic cleaning, and the recovery of indium metal from glass by dissolution. The results show that valuable materials (e.g. indium) and harmful substances (e.g. liquid crystals) could be efficiently recovered or separated through above-mentioned combined technology. The optimal conditions are: (1) the peak temperature of thermal shock to separate polarizing film, ranges from 230 to 240 deg. C, where pyrolysis could be avoided; (2) the ultrasonic-assisted cleaning was most efficient at a frequency of 40 KHz (P = 40 W) and the exposure of the substrate to industrial detergents for 10 min; and (3) indium separation from glass in a mix of concentrated hydrochloric acid at 38% and nitric acid at 69% (HCl:HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}O = 45:5:50, volume ratio). The indium separation process was conducted with an exposure time of 30 min at a constant temperature of 60 deg. C.

Li Jinhui [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University (China); Sino-Italia Environmental Energy Building, Room 804, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn; Gao Song; Duan Huabo; Liu Lili [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University (China)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Systems Engineering in the Development and Implementation of the Savannah River Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Program  

SciTech Connect

The use of systems engineering facilitated the strategic planning and implementation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) transuranic waste disposal program. This application represented the first SRS use of systems engineering in the pre-program planning stages during the development of a comprehensive strategic plan for the disposal of transuranic waste at the Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The use of systems engineering focused the efforts of the technical experts to devise a three initiative plan for the disposal of transuranic waste where previous efforts failed. Continued application of systems engineering facilitated the further development and implementation of the first initiative outlined in the strategic plan, i.e., set-up the program and process to begin to characterize and ship waste to the WIPP.This application of systems engineering to the transuranic waste program represented the first opportunity at the SRS for a comprehensive usage of systems engineering at all program levels. The application was initiated at the earliest possible point in the program development, i.e., strategic planning, and successively was used in detailed development and implementation of the program. Systems engineering successfully focused efforts to produce a comprehensive plan for the disposal of SRS transuranic waste at the WIPP, and facilitated development of the SRS capability and infrastructure to characterize, certify, and ship waste.

Fayfich, R.R.

1999-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radioactive Liquid Waste Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory OAS-L-13-15 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 26, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT MANAGER LOS ALAMOS FIELD OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is a Government- owned, contractor operated Laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex. Los Alamos' primary responsibility is to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Development of the SREX process for the treatment of ICPP liquid wastes  

SciTech Connect

The removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual and simulated wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been demonstrated with the SREX process. This solvent extraction process employs the extractant 4{prime},4{prime}(5{prime}) di-(t-butylcyclohexano)-18-crown-6 in 1-octanol or a mixture of tributyl phosphate and a hydrocarbon diluent called Isopar L{reg_sign}. Process flowsheets have been designed for testing in countercurrent experiments with centrifugal contractors. The flowsheets have been designed using batch contract solvent extraction methods. The extraction of Sr as well as other interfering ions has been studied. The effect of various parameters including nitric acid dependence, extractant concentration dependence, hydronium ion concentration, and interferent concentrations upon the extraction efficiency of the process has been evaluated. The radiolysis of the SREX solvent has also been investigated as a function of absorbed gamma radiation. The extraction efficiency of the solvent has been shown to be only slightly dependent upon absorbed dose in the range 0--1,000 kGy. The decontamination of actual sodium-bearing waste and dissolved calcine solutions has been accomplished in batch contact flowsheets. Decontamination factors as high as 10E3 have been obtained with sequential batch contacts. Flowsheets have been developed to accomplish decontamination of the liquid wastes with respect to {sup 90}Sr as well as the removal of Pb and Hg. Pb may be partitioned from the Sr fraction in a separate stripping procedure using ammonium citrate. This work has led to the formulation of countercurrent flowsheets which have been tested in centrifugal contractors with actual waste and reported in the document INEEL/EXT-97-00832.

Wood, D.J.; Law, J.D.; Garn, T.G.; Tillotson, R.D.; Tullock, P.A.; Todd, T.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Development of the SREX Process for the Treatment of ICPP Liquid Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The removal of Sr-90 from actual and simulated wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been demonstrated with the SREX process. This solvent extraction process employs the extractant 4',4' (5') de-(t-butylcyclohexano)-18-crown-6 in 1-octanol or a mixture of tributyl phosphate and a hydrocarbon diluent called Isopar L. This development work is based upon earlier work performed by Horwitz, et al. at Argonne National Laboratory. Process flowsheets have been designed for testing in countercurrent experiments with centrifugal contactors. The flowsheets have been designed using batch contact solvent extraction methods. The extraction of Sr as well as other interfering ions has been studied. The effect of various parameters including nitric acid dependence, extractant concentration dependence, Hydronium ion concentration, and interferent concentrations upon the extraction efficiency of the process has been evaluated. The radiolysis of the SREX solvent has also been investigated as a function of absorbed gamma radiation. The extraction efficiency of the solvent has been shown to be only slightly dependent upon absorbed dose in the range 0-1000 kGy. The decontamination of actual sodium-bearing waste and dissolved calcine solutions has been accomplished in batch contact flowsheets. Decontamination factors as high as 10E3 have been obtained with sequential batch contacts. Flowsheets have been developed to accomplish decontamination of the liquid wastes with respect to Sr-90, as well as the removal of Pb and Hg. Pb may be partitioned from the Sr fraction in a separate stripping procedure using ammonium citrate. This work has led to the formulation of countercurrent flowsheets which have been tested in centrifugal contactors with actual waste and reported in the document INEEL/EXT-97-00832.

D. J. Wood; Garn, T. G.; J. D. Law; P. A. Tullock; R. D. Tillotson; T. A. Todd

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Discharges in 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents radioactive discharges from the TA50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facilities (RLWTF) during calendar 2011. During 2011, three pathways were available for the discharge of treated water to the environment: discharge as water through NPDES Outfall 051 into Mortandad Canyon, evaporation via the TA50 cooling towers, and evaporation using the newly-installed natural-gas effluent evaporator at TA50. Only one of these pathways was used; all treated water (3,352,890 liters) was fed to the effluent evaporator. The quality of treated water was established by collecting a weekly grab sample of water being fed to the effluent evaporator. Forty weekly samples were collected; each was analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Weekly samples were also composited at the end of each month. These flow-weighted composite samples were then analyzed for 37 radioisotopes: nine alpha-emitting isotopes, 27 beta emitters, and tritium. These monthly analyses were used to estimate the radioactive content of treated water fed to the effluent evaporator. Table 1 summarizes this information. The concentrations and quantities of radioactivity in Table 1 are for treated water fed to the evaporator. Amounts of radioactivity discharged to the environment through the evaporator stack were likely smaller since only entrained materials would exit via the evaporator stack.

Del Signore, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site December 8, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award to Savannah River Remediation, LLC as the liquid waste contractor for DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $3.3 billion over the entire contract, consisting of a base period of six years, plus an option to extend for up to two additional years. The base performance period of the contract will be from April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2015. A 90-day transition period will begin January 2, 2009.

105

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site December 8, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award to Savannah River Remediation, LLC as the liquid waste contractor for DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $3.3 billion over the entire contract, consisting of a base period of six years, plus an option to extend for up to two additional years. The base performance period of the contract will be from April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2015. A 90-day transition period will begin January 2, 2009.

106

Liquid low-level waste generation projections for ORNL in 1993  

SciTech Connect

Liquid low-level waste (LLLW) is generated by various programs and projects throughout Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These wastes are collected in underground collection tanks, bottles, and trucks; they are then neutralized with sodium hydroxide and treated for volume reduction at the ORNL evaporator facility. This report presents historical and projected data concerning the volume and characterization of LLLW, prior to and after evaporation. Storage space for projected waste generation is also discussed.

DePaoli, S.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EVALUATION OF ULTIMATE DISPOSAL METHODS FOR LIQUID AND SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTES. PART II. CONVERSION TO SOLID BY POT CALCINATION  

SciTech Connect

The costs of pot calcination of Purex and Thorex wastes were calculated. The wastes were assumed produced by a plant processing 1500 ton/year of U converter fuel at a burnup of 10,000 Mwd/ton and 270 ton/year of Th converter fuel at 20,000 Mwd/ton. Costs were calculated for processing Purex waste in acidic and reacidified forms and for processing Thorex wastes in acidic and reacidified forms and with constituents added for producing an acidic Thorex glass. Calcination vessel designs were right circular cylinders similar to those used in engineering development studies. Costs were calculated for processing in 6-, 12-, and 24-in.-dia vessels with a fixed length of 10 ft. Vessel costs used, based on estimates from private industry, were calculated for wastes decayed 120 days and 1, 3, 10, and 30 years after reactor discharge prior to calcination. Aging had negligible effect on costs, except as it permitted larger diameter vessels to be used, because vessel and operating costs were much larger than capital costs in all cases. The lowest cost was 0.87 x 10/sup -2/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for processing acidic Purex and Thorex wastes in 24-in.-dia vessels, and the highest was 5.0 x 10/sup -2/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for processing reacidified Purex and Thorex wastes in 6-in.-dia vessels. About 7 years of interim liquid storage would be required before acidic Purex wastes could be processed in 24-in.-dia vessels. (auth)

Perona, J.J.; Bradshaw, R.L.; Roberts, J.T.; Blomeke, J.O.

1961-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an inventory of calcined waste produced at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center during the period from December 1963 to May 2000. The report was prepared based on calciner runs, operation of the calcined solids storage facilities, and miscellaneous operational information that establishes the range of chemical compositions of calcined waste stored at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The report will be used to support obtaining permits for the calcined solids storage facilities, possible treatment of the calcined waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and to ship the waste to an off-site facility including a geologic repository. The information in this report was compiled from calciner operating data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, calcine temperature monitoring records, and facility design of the calcined solids storage facilities. A compact disk copy of this report is provided to facilitate future data manipulations and analysis.

Staiger, Merle Daniel; M. C. Swenson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Management of alpha-contaminated wastes at the radioactive waste management complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Problems related to above ground storage of radioactive wastes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and steps taken to resolve these difficulties are discussed. The quantity of wastes now in storage and the amount forecasted to be in place by 1985 are disclosed. The condition of containers placed for storage between 1954 and 1970 is described. Programs for retrieval and repackaging for shipment to federal repositories are discussed. (DC)

McCormack, M.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Waste Reduction Plans for the Advanced Mixed Waste TreatmentProject at the Idaho National Engineering and EnvironmentalLaboratory, IG-0611  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since the early 1970s, the Department of Energy has stored about 65,000 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste and mixed low-level waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental...

111

Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

Biggs, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ``where we are now`` to ``where we want and need to be.`` The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed.

Smith, M.J.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

115

System for removing liquid waste from a tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tank especially suited for nuclear applications is disclosed. The tank comprises a tank shell for protectively surrounding the liquid contained therein; an inlet positioned on the tank for passing a liquid into the tank; a sump positioned in an interior portion of the tank for forming a reservoir of the liquid; a sloped incline for resting the tank thereon and for creating a natural flow of the liquid toward the sump; a pump disposed adjacent the tank for pumping the liquid; and a pipe attached to the pump and extending into the sump for passing the liquid therethrough. The pump pumps the liquid in the sump through the pipe and into the pump for discharging the liquid out of the tank.

Meneely, Timothy K. (Penn Hills, PA); Sherbine, Catherine A. (N. Versailles Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

System for removing liquid waste from a tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tank especially suited for nuclear applications is disclosed. The tank comprises a tank shell for protectively surrounding the liquid contained therein; an inlet positioned on the tank for passing a liquid into the tank; a sump positioned in an interior portion of the tank for forming a reservoir of the liquid; a sloped incline for resting the tank thereon and for creating a natural flow of the liquid toward the sump; a pump disposed adjacent the tank for pumping the liquid; and a pipe attached to the pump and extending into the sump for passing the liquid there through. The pump pumps the liquid in the sump through the pipe and into the pump for discharging the liquid out of the tank. 2 figures.

Meneely, T.K.; Sherbine, C.A.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

Developments Towards a Liquid Piston Stirling Engine Tracking # 132055  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A LUMPED-PARAMETER DYNAMIC MODEL OF A THERMAL REGENERATOR FOR FREE-PISTON STIRLING ENGINES Mark the mass flow, piston dynamics, and control volume behavior inside a free-piston Stirling engine. A new model for a Stirling engine thermal regenerator that incorporates a dynamically changing temperature

Van de Ven, James D.

118

Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process June 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Sahid C. Smith Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process June 2009 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Review Team thanks Ms. Sonitza Blanco, Team Lead Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office and Mr. Pete Hill, Liquid Waste Planning Manager for Washington Savannah River Company, for their

119

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files: Part 2, Low-level waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report documents those studies so the project can continue with an evaluation of programmatic options, system tradeoff studies, and the conceptual design phase of the project. This report, appendix B, comprises the engineering design files for this project study. The engineering design files document each waste steam, its characteristics, and identified treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Recovery of Tritium from Pharmaceutical Mixed Waste Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

W. T. Shmayda; R. D. Gallagher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Action plan for response to abnormal conditions in Hanford high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks containing flammable gases. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive liquid waste tends to produce hydrogen as a result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. In tanks containing organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen gas as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia can be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site, contain waste that retains the gases produced in them until large quantities are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks filled to near capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore, if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture may result. The most notable waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Waste in this tank has occasionally released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several other waste tanks exhibit similar behavior to a lesser magnitude. Administrative controls have been developed to assure that these Flammable Gas Watch List tanks are safely maintained. Responses have also been developed for off-normal conditions which might develop in these tanks. In addition, scientific and engineering studies are underway to further understand and mitigate the behavior of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks.

Sherwood, D.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons 74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility at Technical Area 16, U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55-gallon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

123

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Project Annual Operating Report CY 1999  

SciTech Connect

A total of 5.77 x 10 7 gallons (gal) of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Complex (PWTC) - Building 3544 ion exchange system during calendar year (CY) 1999. This averaged to 110 gpm throughout the year. An additional 3.94 x 10 6 gal of liquid waste (average of 8 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated using the zeolite treatment system due to periods of high Cesium levels in the influent wastewater. A total of 6.17 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste (average of 118 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated at Building 3544 during the year. During the year, the regeneration of the ion exchange resins resulted in the generation of 8.00 x 10 3 gal of Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) concentrate and 9.00 x 10 2 gal of LLLW supernate. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at Building 3544. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the Process Waste Collection and Transfer System and Figure 2 shows a diagram of the Building 3544 treatment process. Figures 3, 4 5, and 6 s how a comparison of operations at Building 3544 in 1997 with previous years. Figure 7 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1995.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Liquid Metal Engineering by Application of Intensive Melt Shearing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new liquid metal treatment technology has been developed which comprises of a ... P-18: Phosphorus Partitioning During EAF Refining of DRI Based Steel.

125

Assessment of Tank 241-S-112 Liquid Waste Mixing in Tank 241-SY-101  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to evaluate mixing of liquid waste from Tank 241-S-112 with waste in Tank 241-SY-101 and to determine the properties of the resulting waste for the cross-site transfer to avoid potential double-shell tank corrosion and pipeline plugging. We applied the time-varying, three-dimensional computer code TEMPEST to Tank SY-101 as it received the S-112 liquid waste. The model predicts that temperature variations in Tank SY-101 generate a natural convection flow that is very slow, varying from about 7 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -3} ft/sec (0.3 to about 4 ft/hr) in most areas. Thus, natural convection would eventually mix the liquid waste in SY-101 but would be very slow to achieve nearly complete mixing. These simulations indicate that the mixing of S-112 and SY-101 wastes in Tank SY-101 is a very slow process, and the density difference between the two wastes would further limit mixing. It is expected to take days or weeks to achieve relatively complete mixing in Tank SY-101.

Onishi, Yasuo; Trent, Donald S.; Wells, Beric E.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Engineering Model of Liquid Storage Utility Tank for Heat Transfer Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The utility or chemical storage tank requires special engineering attention and heat transfer analysis because the tank content is very sensitive to temperature and surrounding environment such as atmospheric or outside air, humidity, and solar radiation heat. A simplified heat transfer model was developed to calculate the liquid content temperature of utility storage tank. The content of the utility storage tanks can be water or any other chemical liquid. An engineering model of liquid storage tank for heat transfer analysis and temperature calculations are presented and discussed in the examples of Tanks No. 1 containing oxalic acid and No. 2 containing sodium tetraphenylborate solution.

Kwon, K.C.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The project completed TPA Milestone M-083-032 to 'Complete those activities required by the 241-Z Treatment and Storage Unit's RCRA Closure Plan' four years and seven months ahead of this legally enforceable milestone. In addition, the project completed TPA Milestone M-083-042 to 'Complete transition and dismantlement of the 241-2 Waste Treatment Facility' four years and four months ahead of schedule. The project used an innovative approach in developing the project-specific RCRA closure plan to assure clear integration between the 241-Z RCRA closure activities and ongoing and future CERCLA actions at PFP. This approach provided a regulatory mechanism within the RCRA closure plan to place segments of the closure that were not practical to address at this time into future actions under CERCLA. Lessons learned from th is approach can be applied to other closure projects within the DOE Complex to control scope creep and mitigate risk. A paper on this topic, entitled 'Integration of the 241-Z Building D and D Under CERCLA with RCRA Closure at the PFP', was presented at the 2007 Waste Management Conference in Tucson, Arizona. In addition, techniques developed by the 241-Z D&D Project to control airborne contamination, clean the interior of the waste tanks, don and doff protective equipment, size-reduce plutonium-contaminated process piping, and mitigate thermal stress for the workers can be applied to other cleanup activities. The project-management team developed a strategy utilizing early characterization, targeted cleanup, and close coordination with PFP Criticality Engineering to significantly streamline the waste- handling costs associated with the project . The project schedule was structured to support an early transition to a criticality 'incredible' status for the 241-Z Facility. The cleanup work was sequenced and coordinated with project-specific criticality analysis to allow the fissile material waste being generated to be managed in a bulk fashion, instead of individual waste packages. This approach negated the need for real-time assay of individ

JOHNSTON GA

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A Generic Technology for treatment of DOE Metal-Bearing Liquid Waste The DOE metal-bearing liquid waste inventory is large and diverse, both with respect to the metals (heavy metals, transuranics, radionuclides) themselves, and the nature of the other species (annions, organics, etc.) present. Separation and concentration of metals is of interest from the standpoint of reducing the volume of waste that will require special treatment or isolation, as well as, potentially, from the standpoint of returning some materials to commerce by recycling. The variety of metal-bearing liquid waste in the DOE complex is so great that it is unlikely that any one process (or class of processes) will be suitable for all material. However, processes capable of dealing with a wide variety of wastes will have major advantages in terms of process development, capital, and operating costs, as well as in environmental and safety permitting. Moreover, to the extent that a process operates well with a variety of metal-bearing liquid feedwastes, its performance is likely to be relatively robust with respect to the inevitable composition variations in each waste feed. One such class of processes involves high-temperature treatment of atomized liquid waste to promote reactive capture of volatile metallic species on collectible particulate substrates injected downstream of a flame zone. Compared to low-temperature processes that remove metals from the original liquid phase by extraction, precipitation, ion exchange, etc., some of the attractive features of high-temperature reactive scavenging are: The organic constituents of some metal-bearing liquid wastes (in particular, some low-level mixed wastes) must be treated thermally in order to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and the laws of various states. No species need be added to an already complex liquid system. This is especially important in light of the fact that DOE has already experienced problems with organic complexants added to precipitate radionuclides. For example, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has expressed, in a formal Recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, its concern about the evolution of benzene vapor in concentrations greater then the lower flammability limit from tanks to which sodium tetraphenylborate has been added to precipitate 137Cs in the ''In-Tank Precipitation'' (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site. Other species added to the waste in the ITP process are sodium titanate (to adsorb 90Sr and Pu), and oxalic acid. Avoiding addition of organics to radioactive waste has the additional advantage that is likely to significantly reduce the rate of radiolytic and radiolytically-induced hydrogen generation (c.f. Meisel et al., [1993]), in which it is shown that removal of organics reduces the rate of hydrogen generation in simulated waste from Hanford tank 241-SY-101 by over 70%. Organic species already present are destroyed with very high efficiency. This attribute is especially attractive with respect to high-level tank waste at the Hanford Site, in which large amounts of citrate, glyoxylate, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), and HEDTA [N-(2- hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid] were added to precipitate radionuclides. These organic species are important in the thermal and radiolytic generation of methane, hydrogen, and nitrous oxide, flammable mixtures of which are episodically vented from 25 tanks on Hanford's Flammable Gas Watch List [Hopkins, 1994]. The same basic approach can be used to treat a broad range of liquid wastes, in each case concentrating the metals (regardless of liquid-phase oxidation state or association with chelators or absorbents) using a collectible sorbent, and destroying any organic species present. In common with the Army's approach (see section 2.2) to the thermal destruction of a 10 range of chemical warfare agents (GB, VX, and two blister agents), this may drastically simplify process and plant design and

Wendt, Jost O.L.

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation of interim and final waste forms for the newly generated liquid low-level waste flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this review is to evaluate the final forms that have been proposed for radioactive-containing solid wastes and to determine their application to the solid wastes that will result from the treatment of newly generated liquid low-level waste (NGLLLW) and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Since cesium and strontium are the predominant radionuclides in NGLLLW and MVST supernate, this review is focused on the stabilization and solidification of solid wastes containing these radionuclides in cement, glass, and polymeric materials-the principal waste forms that have been tested with these types of wastes. Several studies have shown that both cesium and strontium are leached by distilled water from solidified cement, although the leachabilities of cesium are generally higher than those of strontium under similar conditions. The situation is exacerbated by the presence of sulfates in the solution, as manifested by cracking of the grout. Additives such as bentonite, blast-furnace slag, fly ash, montmorillonite, pottery clay, silica, and zeolites generally decrease the cesium and strontium release rates. Longer cement curing times (>28 d) and high ionic strengths of the leachates, such as those that occur in seawater, also decrease the leach rates of these radionuclides. Lower cesium leach rates are observed from vitrified wastes than from grout waste forms. However, significant quantities of cesium are volatilized due to the elevated temperatures required to vitrify the waste. Hence, vitrification will generally require the use of cleanup systems for the off-gases to prevent their release into the atmosphere.

Abotsi, G.M.K. [Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States); Bostick, D.T.; Beck, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous recovery of Radioactive Nuclides from Liquid Radioactive Wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to solvents, and methods, for selectively extracting and recovering radionuclides, especially cesium and strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive wastes. More specifically, the invention relates to extracting agent solvent compositions comprising complex organoboron compounds, substituted polyethylene glycols, and neutral organophosphorus compounds in a diluent. The preferred solvent comprises a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenyl-dibutylmethylenecarbamoylphosphine oxide, PEG-400, and a diluent of phenylpolyfluoroalkyl sulfone. The invention also provides a method of using the invention extracting agents to recover cesium, strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive waste.

Romanovskiy, Valeriy Nicholiavich; Smirnov, Lgor V.; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Solvent extraction in the treatment of acidic high-level liquid waste : where do we stand?  

SciTech Connect

During the last 15 years, a number of solvent extraction/recovery processes have been developed for the removal of the transuranic elements, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste. These processes are based on the use of a variety of both acidic and neutral extractants. This chapter will present an overview and analysis of the various extractants and flowsheets developed to treat acidic high-level liquid waste streams. The advantages and disadvantages of each extractant along with comparisons of the individual systems are discussed.

Horwitz, E. P.; Schulz, W. W.

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

132

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report investigated the potential of using municipal solid waste (MSW) to make synthesis gas (syngas) suitable for production of liquid fuels. Issues examined include: • MSW physical and chemical properties affecting its suitability as a gasifier feedstock and for liquid fuels synthesis • expected process scale required for favorable economics • the availability of MSW in quantities sufficient to meet process scale requirements • the state-of-the-art of MSW gasification technology.

Valkenburg, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Use of Chemical Pretreatment to Enhance Liquid Waste of Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details unique chemical pretreatment and processing techniques presently used by utilities in their nuclear plant liquid radwaste treatment programs. It presents specific utility experience from a number of plants employing these processing alternatives.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

134

Preliminary Waste Form Compliance Plan for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory High-Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has specific technical and documentation requirements for high-level waste (HLW) that is to be placed in a federal repository. This document describes in general terms the strategy to be used at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that vitrified HLW, if produced at the INEEL, meets these requirements. Waste form, canister, quality assurance, and documentation specifications are discussed. Compliance strategy is given, followed by an overview of how this strategy would be implemented for each specification.

B. A. Staples; T. P. O' Holleran

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

M. D. Staiger

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Update of the management strategy for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strategy for management of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) radioactively contaminated liquid waste was reviewed in 1991. The latest information available through the end of 1990 on waste characterization, regulations, US Department of Energy (DOE) budget guidance, and research and development programs was evaluated to determine how the strategy should be revised. Few changes are needed to update the strategy to reflect new waste characterization, research, and regulatory information. However, recent budget guidance from DOE indicates that minimum funding will not be sufficient to accomplish original objectives to upgrade the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system to comply with the Federal Facilities Agreement, provide long-term LLLW treatment capability, and minimize environmental, safety, and health risks. Options are presented that might allow the ORNL LLLW system to continue operations temporarily, but they would significantly reduce its capabilities to handle emergency situations, provide treatment for new waste streams, and accommodate waste from the Environmental Restoration Program and from decontamination and decommissioning of surplus facilities. These options are also likely to increase worker radiation exposure, risk of environmental insult, and generation of solid waste for on-site and off-site disposal/storage beyond existing facility capacities. The strategy will be fully developed after receipt of additional guidance. The proposed budget limitations are too severe to allow ORNL to meet regulatory requirements or continue operations long term.

Robinson, S.M.; Abraham, T.J.; DePaoli, S.M.; Walker, A.B.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Resource-Limited Multiattribute Value Analysis of Alternatives for Immobilizing Radioactive Liquid Process Waste Stored in Saluggia, Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This large Italian public works project started with the development of engineering data to support the evaluation of three alternatives for processing nuclear waste. After an analysis of the alternatives' performance from an engineering perspective ... Keywords: EUREX, Sogin, alternatives, applications, decision analysis, decision making, decision theory, energy, environment, multiattribute value analysis, nuclear waste

Alan J. Brothers; Shas V. Mattigod; Denis M. Strachan; Gordon H. Beeman; Paul K. Kearns; Angelo Papa; Carlo Monti

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

THE ROLE OF LIQUID WASTE PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN SOLVING THE DOE CLEAN-UP MISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to describe the pretreatment solutions that allow treatment to be tailored to specific wastes, processing ahead of the completion schedules for the main treatment facilities, and reduction of technical risks associated with future processing schedules. Wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River offer challenging scientific and engineering tasks. At both sites, space limitations confound the ability to effectively retrieve and treat the wastes. Additionally, the radiation dose to the worker operating and maintaining the radiochemical plants has a large role in establishing the desired radioactivity removal. However, the regulatory requirements to treat supernatant and saltcake tank wastes differ at the two sites. Hanford must treat and remove radioactivity from the tanks based on the TriParty Agreement and Waste Incidental to Reprocessing (WIR) documentation. These authorizing documents do not specify treatment technologies; rather, they specify endstate conditions. Dissimilarly, Waste Determinations prepared at SRS in accordance with Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act along with state operating permits establish the methodology and amounts of radioactivity that must be removed and may be disposed of in South Carolina. After removal of entrained solids and site-specific radionuclides, supernatant and saltcake wastes are considered to be low activity waste (LAW) and are immobilized in glass and disposed of at the Hanford Site Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) or formulated into a grout for disposal at the Savannah River Site Saltstone Disposal Facility. Wastes stored at the Hanford Site or SRS comprise saltcake, supernate, and sludges. The supernatant and saltcake waste fractions contain primarily sodium salts, metals (e.g., Al, Cr), cesium-137 (Cs-137), technetium-99 (Tc-99) and entrained solids containing radionuclides such as strontium-90 (Sr-90) and transuranic elements. The sludges contain many of the transition metal hydroxides that precipitate when the spent acidic process solutions are rendered alkaline with sodium hydroxide. The sludges contain Sr-90 and transuranic elements. The wastes stored at each site have been generated and stored for over fifty years. Although the majority of the wastes were generated to support nuclear weapons production and reprocessing, the wastes differ substantially between the sites. Table 5 shows the volumes and total radioactivity (including decay daughters) of the waste phases stored in tanks at each site. At Hanford, there are 177 tanks that contain 56.5 Mgal of waste. SRS has 51 larger tanks, of which 2 are closed, that contain 36.5 Mgal. Mainly due to recovery operations, the waste stored at Hanford has less total curies than that stored at Savannah River. The total radioactivity of the Hanford wastes contains approximately 190 MCi, and the total radioactivity of the Savannah River wastes contains 400 MCi.

Wilmarth, B; Sheryl Bush, S

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1943 the Hanford Site was chosen as a location for the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. The 100-N Area at Hanford was used from 1963 to 1987 for a dual-purpose, plutonium production and steam generation reactor and related operational support facilities (Diediker and Hall 1987). In November 1989, the reactor was put into dry layup status. During operations, chemical and radioactive wastes were released into the area soil, air, and groundwater. The 1325-N LWDF was constructed in 1983 to replace the 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility (1301-N LWDF). The two facilities operated simultaneously from 1983 to 1985. The 1301-N LWDF was retired from use in 1985 and the 1325-N LWDF continued operation until April 1991, when active discharges to the facility ceased. Effluent discharge to the piping system has been controlled by administrative means. This report discusses ground water contamination resulting from the 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal facility.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

BEE 4760. Solid Waste Engineering Spring Semester 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry, energy balance, environmental impacts & controls Sanitary Landfills: planning & operation, gas characterization and reduction; collection and transport systems; waste-to-energy combustion; sanitary landfills) management. 2. An ability to plan and design MSW disposal facilities ­ landfills and incineration. 3

Walter, M.Todd

142

BEE 476. Solid Waste Engineering Spring Semester 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry, energy balance, environmental impacts & controls Sanitary Landfills: planning & operation, gas characterization and reduction; collection and transport systems; waste-to-energy combustion; sanitary landfills) management. 2. An ability to plan and design MSW disposal facilities ­ landfills and incineration. 3

Walter, M.Todd

143

BEE 476. Solid Waste Engineering Spring Semester 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry, energy balance, environmental impacts & controls Sanitary Landfills: planning & operation, gas characterization and reduction; collection and transport systems; waste-to-energy combustion; sanitary landfills) management. 2. An ability to plan and design MSW disposal facilities ­ landfills and incineration. 3

Walter, M.Todd

144

Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Audit of the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) generates radioactive and liquid wastes that must be treated before being discharged to the environment. Presently, the liquid wastes are treated in the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility), which is over 30 years old and in need of repair or replacement. However, there are various ways to satisfy the treatment need. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos cost effectively managed its Treatment Facility operations. The audit determined that Los Alamos` treatment costs were significantly higher when compared to similar costs incurred by the private sector. This situation occurred because Los Alamos did not perform a complete analysis of privatization or prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its treatment operations, although a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan requirement was incorporated into the contract in 1996. As a result, Los Alamos may be spending $2.15 million more than necessary each year and could needlessly spend $10.75 million over the next five years to treat its radioactive liquid waste. In addition, Los Alamos has proposed to spend $13 million for a new treatment facility that may not be needed if privatization proves to be a cost effective alternative. We recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque), (1) require Los Alamos to prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its radioactive liquid waste treatment operations, (2) review the plan for approval, and (3) direct Los Alamos to select the most cost effective method of operations while also considering other factors such as mission support, reliability, and long-term program needs. Albuquerque concurred with the recommendations.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-464, immobilized high-level waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-46 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

Wecks, M.D.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste plan  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-465 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

Latray, D.A.

1998-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations -HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations - HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis Overview There are two problems that were voiced by Solar Innovations, HVAC system design and recycling stream improvement. The HVAC system was not providing even conditioning of office

Demirel, Melik C.

151

Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1994-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ultrafiltration treatment for liquid laundry wastes from nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

The authors conduct a comprehensive analysis of the waste constituents--radioactive and organic--of the laundry water resulting from the on-site laundering and decontamination of clothing worn in nuclear power plants. The primary isotope contaminants consist of niobium and zirconium 95, manganese 54, cobalt 60, iron 59, and cesium 134 and 137. A variety of filter and adsorbent materials used in an ultrafiltration process are comparatively tested for their effectiveness in removing not only these isotopes but also the organic contaminants in the process of recycling the water. Those materials consist of copper hexacyanoferrate, polyacrylophosphonic acid, and several metal-polymer complexes.

Kichik, V.A.; Maslova, M.N.; Svittsov, A.A.; Kuleshov, N.F.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Acknowledgements The Review Team thanks Mr. Glyn Trenchard, Team Lead for Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of River Protection, Mr. Paul Rutland, RPP System Planning Manager for Washington River Protection Solutions, and Mr. Ernie Lee,

154

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

155

Process for Removing Radioactive Wastes from Liquid Streams  

SciTech Connect

The process is under development at Mound Laboratory to remove radioactive waste (principally plutonium-238) from process water prior to discharge of the water to the Miami river. The contaminated water, as normally received, is at a pH between 6 and 90. Under these conditions, plutonium in all its oxidation states is hydrolyzed; however, the level of the radioactive solids varies from about 50ppm down to about 50 ppb and the plutonium remains in a colloidal or subcolloidal condition. The permissible concentration for discharge to the river is about 50 parts per trillion. Pilot plant test show that 95-99% of the radioactive material is removed by adsorption on diatomaceous earth. The remainder is removed by passage through a bed of either dibasic or tribasic calcium phosphate. Ground phosphate rock is equally effective in removing the radioactive material if the flow rate is controlled to permit sufficient contact time. Parameters for optimizing the process are now under study. Future plans include application of the process to wastes from reactor fuels reprocessing.

Kirby, H. W.; Blane, D. E.; Smolin, R. I.

1972-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Use of engineered soils and other site modifications for low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires that low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities be designed to minimize contact between waste and infiltrating water through the use of site design features. The purpose of this investigation is to identify engineered barriers and evaluate their ability to enhance the long-term performance of an LLW disposal facility. Previously used barriers such as concrete overpacks, vaults, backfill, and engineered soil covers, are evaluated as well as state-of-the-art barriers, including an engineered sorptive soil layer underlying a facility and an advanced design soil cover incorporating a double-capillary layer. The purpose of this investigation is also to provide information in incorporating or excluding specific engineered barriers as part of new disposal facility designs. Evaluations are performed using performance assessment modeling techniques. A generic reference disposal facility design is used as a baseline for comparing the improvements in long-term performance offered by designs incorporating engineered barriers in generic and humid environments. These evaluations simulate water infiltration through the facility, waste leaching, radionuclide transport through the facility, and decay and ingrowth. They also calculate a maximum (peak annual) dose for each disposal system design. A relative dose reduction factor is calculated for each design evaluated. The results of this investigation are presented for concrete overpacks, concrete vaults, sorptive backfill, sorptive engineered soil underlying the facility, and sloped engineered soil covers using a single-capillary barrier and a double-capillary barrier. Designs using combinations of barriers are also evaluated. These designs include a vault plus overpacks, sorptive backfill plus overpacks, and overpack with vault plus sorptive backfill, underlying sorptive soil, and engineered soil cover.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Applying the Systems Engineering Process for Establishing Requirements for the Safety and Health Monitoring System of the Waste Solidification Building at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safety and Health Monitoring (SHM) System technical basis document for the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) was developed by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company design team. The WSB is being designed and built to support the waste disposal needs of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The main mission of the WSB is to process the radiological liquid waste streams from the PDCF and the MFFF into a solid waste form. The solid waste form, concrete encased waste, is acceptable for shipment and disposal as transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and as Low Level Waste (LLW) at on-site disposal areas. The SHM System will also handle the job control waste from the PDCF, the MFFF, and the WSB. The SHM System will serve the WSB by monitoring personnel radiation exposure and environmental releases. The WSB design used HPT design support in determining the air monitoring equipment required for the WSB. The Systems Engineering (SE) process was applied to define the functions and requirements necessary to design and operate the SHM System. The SE process is a proven disciplined approach that supports management in clearly defining the mission or problem, managing system functions and requirements, identifying and managing risk, establishing bases for informed decision making, and verifying that products and services meet customer needs. This SE process applied to the SHM System was a major effort encompassing requirements analysis and interface control. Use of the SE process combined with HPT design input resulted in well-defined requirements to support the procurement of a safe-mission essential SHM System.

Simpkins, P.J.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

158

Techniques and Facilities for Handling and Packaging Tritiated Liquid Wastes for Burial  

SciTech Connect

Methods and facilities have been developed for the collection, storage, measurement, assay, solidification, and packaging of tritiated liquid wastes (concentrations up to 5 Ci/ml) for disposal by land burial. Tritium losses to the environment from these operations are less than 1 ppm. All operations are performed in an inert gas-purged glovebox system vented to an effluent removal system which permits nearly complete removal of tritium from the exhaust gases prior to their dischardge to the environment. Waste oil and water from tritium processing areas are vacuum-transferred to glovebox storage tanks through double-walled lines. Accommodations are also available for emptying portable liquid waste containers and for removing tritiated water from molecular sieve beds with heat and vacuum. The tritium concentration of the collected liquids is measured by an in-line calorimeter. A low-volume metering pump is used to transfer liquids from holding tanks to heavy walled polyethylene drums filled with an absorbent or cement for solidification. Final packaging of the sealed polyethylene drums is in either an asphalt-filled combination 30- and 55- gallon metal drum package or a 30-gallon welded stainless steel container.

Rhinehammer, T. B.; Mershad, E. A.

1974-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Municipal Solid Waste Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a project to conduct engineering and economic evaluations of renewable energy technologies, including wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, hydro, and ocean tidal and wave (Program 84). The goal of the evaluations is to develop an objective and consistent assessment of the current performance and project the future performance of the technologies with regard to thermal efficiency, capital and operation and maintenance costs, resource requirement...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned.

Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Microsoft PowerPoint - S05-07_Varona_Solid-Liquid Waste Interface.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Interface Monitor Liquid Interface Monitor (SLIM) Jose Varona D. Roelant, A. Awwad, D. McDaniel Florida International University's Applied Research Center EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange November 17, 2010 Print Close Disclaimer This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government (Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, under Grant No. DE-FG01-05EW07033). Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of its contractors, subcontractors, nor their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,

162

Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging  

SciTech Connect

Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

The results of an ecological risk assessment screening at the Idaho National Engineering`s waste area group 2  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern Idaho and occupies approximately 890 square miles on the northwestern portion of the eastern Snake River Plain. INEL has been devoted to nuclear energy research and related activities since its establishment in 1949. In the process of fulfilling this mission, wastes were generated, including radioactive and hazardous materials. Most materials were effectively stored or disposed of, however, some release of contaminants to the environment has occurred. For this reason, the INEL was listed by the US environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List (NPL), in November, 1989. This report describes the results of an ecological risk assessment performed for the Waste Area Groups 2 (WAG 2) at the INEL. It also summarizes the performance of screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERA).

VanHorn, R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc., Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8679 8679 Thursday June 1, 1995 Part III Department of Energy Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc.; Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs: Notice 28680 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 105 / Thursday, June 1, 1995 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy has issued a Record of Decision on Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs. The Record of Decision includes a Department-wide decision to

165

Current Practices: Solid Waste Management from Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to identify current practices used by power plants to manage their solid waste residuals from zero liquid discharge (ZLD) operations treating flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Because there are such few FGD ZLD systems in operation not only in the United States but also worldwide, the study scope was expanded to include non-FGD ZLD operations, as well. Only two of the seven facilities interviewed in this study operate ZLDs on FGD water; therefore, much of the current ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Digestion of frozen/thawed food waste in the hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid system  

SciTech Connect

The hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid (HASL) system, which is a modified two-phase anaerobic digester, is to be used in an industrial scale operation to minimize disposal of food waste at incineration plants in Singapore. The aim of the present research was to evaluate freezing/thawing of food waste as a pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system. The hydrolytic and fermentation processes in the acidogenic reactor were enhanced when food waste was frozen for 24 h at -20 deg. C and then thawed for 12 h at 25 deg. C (experiment) in comparison with fresh food waste (control). The highest dissolved COD concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 16.9 g/l on day 3 in the control and 18.9 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The highest VFA concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 11.7 g/l on day 3 in the control and 17.0 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The same volume of methane was produced during 12 days in the control and 7 days in the experiment. It gave the opportunity to diminish operational time of batch process by 42%. The effect of freezing/thawing of food waste as pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system was comparable with that of thermal pre-treatment of food waste at 150 deg. C for 1 h. However, estimation of energy required either to heat the suspended food waste to 150 deg. C or to freeze the same quantity of food waste to -20 deg. C showed that freezing pre-treatment consumes about 3 times less energy than thermal pre-treatment.

Stabnikova, O. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)], E-mail: costab@ntu.edu.sg; Liu, X.Y.; Wang, J.Y. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Engineered barrier system and waste package design concepts for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are using an iterative process to develop preliminary concept descriptions for the Engineered Barrier System and waste-package components for the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The process allows multiple design concepts to be developed subject to major constraints, requirements, and assumptions. Involved in the highly interactive and interdependent steps of the process are technical specialists in engineering, metallic and nonmetallic materials, chemistry, geomechanics, hydrology, and geochemistry. We have developed preliminary design concepts that satisfy both technical and nontechnical (e.g., programmatic or policy) requirements.

Short, D.W.; Ruffner, D.J.; Jardine, L.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coal-liquid fuel/diesel engine operating compatibility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is intended to assess the possibilities of using coal-derived liquids (CDL) represented by a specific type (SRC II) and shale-derived distillate fuel in blends of petroleum-derived fuels in medium-speed, high-output, heavy-duty diesel engines. Conclusions are as follows: (1) Blends of solvent refined coal and diesel fuel may be handled safely by experienced diesel engine mechanics. (2) A serious corrosion problem was found in the fuel pump parts when operating with solvent refined coal blended with petroleum. It is expected that a metallurgy change can overcome this problem. (3) Proper selection of materials for the fuel system is required to permit handling coal-derived liquid fuels. (4) A medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine can be operated on blends of solvent refined coal and petroleum without serious consequences save the fuel system corrosion previously mentioned. This is based on a single, short durability test. (5) As represented by the product evaluated, 100% shale-derived distillate fuel may be used in a medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine without significant consequences. (6) The shale product evaluated may be blended with petroleum distillate or petroleum residual materials and used as a fuel for medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engines. 7 references, 24 figures, 20 tables.

Hoffman, J.G.; Martin, F.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EVALUATION AND SELECTION OF 99TC GETTERS FOR SEQUESTRATION OF LIQUID SECONDARY WASTE RESULTING FROM VITRIFICATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE FROM HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Getters are most commonly inorganic materials that selectively adsorb radionuclide and metallic contaminants. Typically, these materials have been deployed in two different modes to immobilize and retard contaminant release from monolithic waste forms. One mode is to first use getters to selectively scavenge the radionuclide of interest from a liquid waste stream, and then incorporate the radionuclide-loaded getters in cementitious or other monolithic waste forms. The other mode consists of mixing getters and liquid waste together during formulation of monolithic waste forms. Desirable characteristics for a getter material include, (1) specific adsorption of radionuclide of interest and very high selectivity toward radionuclides of concern in concentrations that would be several orders of magnitude less than the concentrations of competing anions and cations, (2) adsorption capacity that should be sufficient for the mass and volume of the material that will be deployed to be within practicable limits, (3) long-term adsorption and retention of radionuclide, (4) sufficient physical and chemical stability that its radionuclide retention performance will not degrade significantly during the designed life span of the waste form, (5) chemical stability under the range of Eh, pH, and solution conditions that exist in the waste form environment, and (6) should not adversely affect chemical and physical integrity of waste forms. We conducted a literature review to identify getters that are suitable for effectively sequestering 99Tc in monolithic waste forms that are being evaluated for stabilizing secondary liquid waste streams resulting from treatment and vitrification of radioactive tank wastes at Hanford. As a result of this review, we identified a set of getters that warrant further evaluation for this specific application.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Audit Report Waste Treatment Plans at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, DOE/IG-0440  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (Laboratory) stores nearly 65,000 cubic meters of waste generated on site or brought to the State of Idaho (Idaho) from Department of...

171

Selection of liquid-level monitoring method for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive liquid low-level waste tanks, remedial investigation/feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

Several of the inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contain residual wastes in liquid or solid (sludge) form or both. A plan of action has been developed to ensure that potential environmental impacts from the waste remaining in the inactive LLLW tank systems are minimized. This document describes the evaluation and selection of a methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in inactive LLLW tanks. Criteria are established for comparison of existing level monitoring and leak testing methods; a preferred method is selected and a decision methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in the tanks is presented for implementation. The methodology selected can be used to continuously monitor the tanks pending disposition of the wastes for treatment and disposal. Tanks that are empty, are scheduled to be emptied in the near future, or have liquid contents that are very low risk to the environment were not considered to be candidates for installing level monitoring. Tanks requiring new monitoring equipment were provided with conductivity probes; tanks with existing level monitoring instrumentation were not modified. The resulting data will be analyzed to determine inactive LLLW tank liquid level trends as a function of time.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program  

SciTech Connect

EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Roadmapping Process Improvements by Experience at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory High Level Waste Program and Synergistic Interfaces with Decision-Making  

SciTech Connect

Six technology roadmaps were developed for various technologies under consideration for the treatment of sodium bearing liquid and calcine wastes. In the process of creating these roadmaps, a number of process improvements were identified for each of the formal roadmapping phases as described in the Department of Energy’s draft roadmapping guidance. The lessons learned, presented as beneficial improvements to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) High Level Waste Program, are proposed to be added to the draft guidance. Additionally, synergistic interfaces between the roadmapping and decision-making processes were observed and reported on. With these improvements, technology roadmapping has become an effective integration tool at the INEEL for planning technology development.

Murphy, James Anthony; Olson, Arlin Leland

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Status of integrated performance assessment of the waste packages and engineered barrier system  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessment of the engineered barrier system for a nuclear waste repository combines information from relevant disciplines and predicts the net long-term performance of the EBS in unites of regulatory goals for performance. The performance assessment models are specific to the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada site. Early assessments are used for project planning and feedback. The EBS scenarios activity develops the scenarios and the consequent event sequences. Initial model development for single waste packages indicates that the radionuclide release rate performance is sensitive to the water flux, element solubilities, and/or the mode of water contact with the waste. The latter in turn depends on local scale hydrology and the modes of corrosion for the container material. For the release rate summed over waste packages, variations among waste packages and their near-field environments are anticipated. These variations place demands on data acquisition and modeling, as well as modulate the impact of localized changes of conditions. Sampling in uncertainty assessment is a subsequent step in examining the reliability of predictions made in the performance assessments. Advances made in sampling methods are referenced. 14 refs., 6 figs.

O`Connell, W.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Incineration of DOE offsite mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is one of three incinerators in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Complex capable of incinerating mixed low-level waste (MLLW). WERF has received MLLW from offsite generators and is scheduled to receive more. The State of Idaho supports receipt of offsite MLLW waste at the WERF incinerator within the requirements established in the (INEEL) Site Treatment Plan (STP). The incinerator is operating as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status Facility, with a RCRA Part B permit application currently being reviewed by the State of Idaho. Offsite MLLW received from other DOE facilities are currently being incinerated at WERF at no charge to the generator. Residues associated with the incineration of offsite MLLW waste that meet the Envirocare of Utah waste acceptance criteria are sent to that facility for treatment and/or disposal. WERF is contributing to the treatment and reduction of MLLW in the DOE Complex.

Harris, J.D.; Harvego, L.A.; Jacobs, A.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Willcox, M.V. [Dept. of Energy Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992  

SciTech Connect

A total of 6.05 x 10{sup 7} gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10{sup 6} gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system`s discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system`s discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10{sup 3} gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10{sup 4} gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10{sup 3} ft{sup 3}) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10{sup 2} ft{sup 3} of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10{sup 8} gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10{sup 7} gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10{sup 3} ft{sup 3}) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter press room.

Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Environmental assessment for liquid waste treatment at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) examines the potential impacts to the environment from treatment of low-level radioactive liquid and low-level mixed liquid and semi-solid wastes generated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The potential impacts of the proposed action and alternative actions are discussed herein in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended in Title 42 U.S.C. (4321), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) policies and procedures set forth in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1021 and DOE Order 451.1, ``NEPA Compliance Program.`` The potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, construction and operation of a centralized liquid waste treatment facility, were addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada. However, DOE is reevaluating the need for a centralized facility and is considering other alternative treatment options. This EA retains a centralized treatment facility as the proposed action but also considers other feasible alternatives.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Environmental sampling program for a solar evaporation pond for liquid radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is evaluating solar evaporation as a method for disposal of liquid radioactive wastes. This report describes a sampling program designed to monitor possible escape of radioactivity to the environment from a solar evaporation pond prototype constructed at LASL. Background radioactivity levels at the pond site were determined from soil and vegetation analyses before construction. When the pond is operative, the sampling program will qualitatively and quantitatively detect the transport of radioactivity to the soil, air, and vegetation in the vicinity. Possible correlation of meteorological data with sampling results is being investigated and measures to control export of radioactivity by biological vectors are being assessed.

Romero, R.; Gunderson, T.C.; Talley, A.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes to a solid, relatively insoluble, thermally stable form is provided and comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, e.g., kaolin, bentonite, dickite, halloysite, pyrophyllite, etc., with the sodium nitrate-containing radioactive wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at a temperature of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to thereby entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid waste, such as neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes (e.g., anhydrous salt cake) is converted at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to the solid mineral form-cancrinite having an approximate chemical formula 2(NaAlSiO.sub.4) .sup.. xSalt.sup.. y H.sub.2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO.sub.3. In another embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C, the resulting reaction product is air dried eitheras loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600.degree. C to form the solid mineral form-nepheline which has the approximate chemical formula of NaAlSiO.sub.4. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10.sup.-.sup.2 to 10.sup.-.sup.4 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for cancrinite and 10.sup.-.sup.3 to 10.sup.-.sup.5 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for nepheline.

Barney, Gary S. (Richland, WA); Brownell, Lloyd E. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

New methods for determination of interstitial liquid levels in Hanford waste tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key to the leak detection program for many tanks at Hanford is the method used to evaluate the apparent interstitial liquid interface (ILL) within the pore space of the solid waste medium (either crystalline or sludge). Three new approaches were introduced in the summer of 1993 (count rate, derivative, and sigmoid), all of which significantly improved the accuracy and repeatability of interstitial liquid level values from neutron survey data. This paper summarizes the three new methods and details a case study in which, as a direct result of this improved analysis, a tank that had been declared an ``assumed leaker`` was reclassified as ``sound`` for the first time in Hanford`s 50 year history.

Barnes, D.A.; Raymond, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Whitney, P.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Detection of free liquid in drums of radioactive waste. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nondestructive thermal imaging method for detecting the presence of a liquid such as water within a sealed container is described. The process includes application of a low amplitude heat pulse to an exterior surface area of the container, terminating the heat input and quickly mapping the resulting surface temperatures. The various mapped temperature values can be compared with those known to be normal for the container material and substances in contact. The mapped temperature values show up in different shades of light or darkness that denote different physical substances. The different substances can be determined by direct observation or by comparison with known standards. The method is particularly applicable to the detection of liquids above solidified radioactive wastes stored in sealed containers.

Not Available

1979-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

An Istrument for Measuring the TRU Concentration in High-Level Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online monitor has been designed, built, and tested, which is capable of measuring the residual transuranic concentrations in processed high-level wastes with a detection limit of 370 Bq/ml (10 nCi/ml) in less than six hours. The monitor measures the neutrons produced by the transuranics, primarily via (?,n) reactions, in the presence of gamma-ray fields up to 1 Sv/h (100 R/h). The optimum design was determined by Monte Carlo modeling and then tempered with practical engineering and cost considerations. Correct operation of the monitor was demonstrated in a hot cell utilizing an actual sample of high-level waste. Results of that demonstration are given, and suggestions for improvements in the next generation system are discussed.

Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, R. A.; Fink, Samuel D.; Hensley, Walter K.; Holt, Noah O.; Knopf, Michael A.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Mullen, O Dennis; Salaymeh, Saleem R.; Samuel, Todd J.; Smart, John E.; Tinker, Michael R.; Walker, Darrell D.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Waste Characterization Data Manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Section IX.G.1. Section IX.G.1 of the FFA requires waste characterizations be conducted and provided to EPA and TDEC for all LLLW tanks that are removed from service. These waste characterizations shall include the results of sampling and analysis of the tank contents, including wastes, liquids, and sludges. This manual was first issued as ORNL/ER-80 in June 1992. The waste characterization data were extracted from ORNL reports that described tank sampling and analysis conducted in 1988 for 32 out-of-service tanks. This revision of the manual contains waste characterization data for 54 tanks, including the 32 tanks from the 1988 sampling campaign (Sects. 2.1 through 2.32) and the 22 additional tanks from a subsequent sampling campaign in 1992 and 1993 (Sects. 2.33 through 2.54). Data are presented from analyses of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds. As additional data resulting from analyses of out-of-service tank samples become available, they will be added to this manual.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Selection of a computer code for Hanford low-level waste engineered-system performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planned performance assessments for the proposed disposal of low-level waste (LLW) glass produced from remediation of wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington will require calculations of radionuclide release rates from the subsurface disposal facility. These calculations will be done with the aid of computer codes. Currently available computer codes were ranked in terms of the feature sets implemented in the code that match a set of physical, chemical, numerical, and functional capabilities needed to assess release rates from the engineered system. The needed capabilities were identified from an analysis of the important physical and chemical process expected to affect LLW glass corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. The highest ranked computer code was found to be the ARES-CT code developed at PNL for the US Department of Energy for evaluation of and land disposal sites.

McGrail, B.P.; Mahoney, L.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Title I preliminary engineering for: A. S. E. F. solid waste to methane gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assignment to provide preliminary engineering of an Advanced System Experimental Facility for production of methane gas from urban solid waste by anaerobic digestion is documented. The experimental facility will be constructed on a now-existing solid waste shredding and landfill facility in Pompano Beach, Florida. Information is included on: general description of the project; justification of basic need; process design; preliminary drawings; outline specifications; preliminary estimate of cost; and time schedules for design and construction of accomplishment of design and construction. The preliminary cost estimate for the design and construction phases of the experimental program is $2,960,000, based on Dec. 1975 and Jan. 1976 costs. A time schedule of eight months to complete the Detailed Design, Equipment Procurement and the Award of Subcontracts is given.

None

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Double liquid membrane system for the removal of actinides and lanthanides from acidic nuclear wastes  

SciTech Connect

Supported liquid membranes (SLM), consisting of an organic solution of n-octyl-(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in decalin are able to perform selective separation and concentration of actinide and lanthanide ions from aqueous nitrate feed solutions and synthetic nuclear wastes. In the membrane process a possible strip solution is a mixture of formic acid and hydroxylammonium formate (HAF). The effectiveness of this strip solution is reduced and eventually nullified by the simultaneous transfer through the SLM of nitric acid which accumulates in the strip solution. A possible way to overcome this drawback is to make use of a second SLM consisting of a primary amine which is able to extract only HNO/sub 3/ from the strip solution. In this work the results obtained by experimentally studying the membrane system: synthetic nuclear waste/CMPO-TBP membrane/HCOOH-HAF strip solution/primary amine membrane/NaOH solution, are reported. They show that the use of a second liquid membrane is effective in controlling the HNO/sub 3/ concentration in the strip solution, thus allowing the actinide and lanthanide ions removal from the feed solution to proceed to completion. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Chiarizia, R.; Danesi, P.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Development of high temperature liquid lubricants for low-heat rejection heavy duty diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a liquid lubricant that will allow advanced diesel engines to operate at top ring reversal temperatures approaching 500 C and lubricant sump temperatures approaching 250 C. Base stock screening showed that aromatic esters and diesters has the lowest deposit level, compared to polyol esters, poly-alpha-olefins, or refined mineral oil of comparable viscosity. Classical aryl and alkyl ZDP antiwear additives are ineffective in reducing wear with aromatic esters; the phosphate ester was a much better antiwear additive, and polyol esters are more amenable to ZDP treatment. Zeolites and clays were evaluated for filtration.

Wiczynski, T.A.; Marolewski, T.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Characterization and monitoring of 300 Area Facility liquid waste streams: Status report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of characterizing and monitoring the following sources during a portion of this year: liquid waste streams from Buildings 331, 320, and 3720; treated and untreated Columbia River water; and water at the confluence of the waste streams (that is, end-of-pipe). Characterization and monitoring data were evaluated for samples collected between March 22 and June 21, 1994, and subsequently analyzed for hazardous chemicals, radioactivity, and general parameters. Except for bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, concentrations of chemicals detected and parameters measured at end-of-pipe were below the US Environmental Protection Agency existing and proposed drinking water standards. The source of the chemicals, except bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, is not currently known. The bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate is probably an artifact of the plastic tubing used in the early stages of the sampling program. This practice was stopped. Concentrations and clearance times for contaminants at end-of-pipe depended strongly on source concentration at the facility release point, waste stream flow rates, dispersion, and the mechanical action of sumps. When present, the action of sumps had the greatest impact on contaminant clearance times. In the absence of sump activity, dispersion and flow rate were the controlling factors.

Manke, K.L. [ed.; Riley, R.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Damberg, E.G.; Evans, J.C.; Ikenberry, A.S.; Olsen, K.B.; Ozanich, R.M.; Thompson, C.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Recycle of the treated effluent from the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility: Engineering study  

SciTech Connect

During normal N Reactor operation there will be low-level radioactive liquid effluent flows discharged to the planned Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility (LETF). The LETF will filter and treat these flows to decrease the radioactive prior to discharging the effluent to the Liquid Waste Disposal Facility (LWDF) soil column. This report examines the feasibility and economics of recycling the treated effluent to the N Reactor for reuse thus eliminating or reducing discharges to the soil. The study concluded that recycling LETF effluent for reuse in the primary coolant system and in the fuel storage basin is technically feasible. However, the high cost to provide recycle water meeting the minimum N reactor chemical requirements and radiological concerns may not be justified due to the limited reactor operating life. The study concluded that inexpensive piping modifications to the Building 107N recirculation system would provide additional flow to alleviate the fuel basin clarity problem during refueling. This change would avoid the disposal of 62.2 million gal of treated water per year to the soil column. 21 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Shearer, E.A.; Janke, D.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Draft environmental assessment -- Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce these risks to human health and the environment and to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. The WCF closure project is described in the DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (Programmatic EIS). DOE determined in the Programmatic EIS Record of Decision (ROD) that certain actions would be implemented and other actions deferred. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations. Based on the analysis in the EA, the action will not have a significant effect on the human environment.

Braun, J.B.; Irving, J.S.; Staley, C.S.; Stanley, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Application of thermogravimetric analysis to study the thermal degradation of solid and liquid organic wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the thermolysis of composite binary mixtures of refinery or coal-processing waste with waste biomass and D-grade (long-flame) coal was analyzed in order to increase the efficiency of the cothermolysis of chemically different organic wastes mainly because of the synergism of the thermolysis of mixture components and, correspondingly, the selectivity of formation of high-quality by-products (solid, gaseous, or liquid). A new approach to the analysis of thermogravimetric data was proposed and developed as applied to complex binary mixtures of carbon-containing materials. This approach was based on (1) the preliminary separation of the thermal degradation of individual carbon-containing mixture components into individual structural constituents and (2) the monitoring of the conversion of each particular structure fragment as a constituent of the mixtures in the course of the cothermolysis of the mixtures of starting components. Based on the approach developed, data on the main synergism effects in the course of cothermolysis in the binary test systems were obtained: the temperature regions of the appearance of these effects were distinguished, the main conclusions were made with respect to particular structure fragments in complex organic wastes responsible for the interaction of components in composite systems, and the directions (positive or negative) of changes in the yields of solid by-products and the degrees of effects (difference between the yields of cothermolysis by-products in each particular region of the appearance of synergistic effects in the systems) were determined. Additionally, the influence of alkali metal carbonate additives on synergistic effects in the interaction between binary system components under the process conditions of cothermolysis was analyzed.

E.S. Lygina; A.F. Dmitruk; S.B. Lyubchik; V.F. Tret'yakov [Tugan-Baranovsky State University of Economy and Trade, Donetsk (Ukraine)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

DOE/EA-1149; Environmental Assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility, Idaho Nation Engineering Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 July 1996 Environmental Assessment Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CLOSURE OF THE WASTE CALCINING FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce the risks to human

194

High Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0831, for the construction and operation of the High-Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement (HLWTFR) Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The HLWTFR Project as originally proposed by the DOE and as analyzed in this EA included: (1) replacement of five high-level liquid waste storage tanks with four new tanks and (2) the upgrading of existing tank relief piping and high-level liquid waste transfer systems. As a result of the April 1992 decision to discontinue the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at INEL, DOE believes that it is unlikely that the tank replacement aspect of the project will be needed in the near term. Therefore, DOE is not proposing to proceed with the replacement of the tanks as described in this-EA. The DOE`s instant decision involves only the proposed upgrades aspect of the project described in this EA. The upgrades are needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act requirements, and the Department`s obligations pursuant to the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement and Consent Order among the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Idaho. The environmental impacts of the proposed upgrades are adequately covered and are bounded by the analysis in this EA. If DOE later proposes to proceed with the tank replacement aspect of the project as described in the EA or as modified, it will undertake appropriate further review pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Environmental assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to close the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). The WCF is a surplus DOE facility located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six facility components in the WCF have been identified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Ace (RCRA)-units in the INEL RCRA Part A application. The WCF is an interim status facility. Consequently, the proposed WCF closure must comply with Idaho Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste contained in the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) Section 16.01.05. These state regulations, in addition to prescribing other requirements, incorporate by reference the federal regulations, found at 40 CFR Part 265, that prescribe the requirements for facilities granted interim status pursuant to the RCRA. The purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment, and to comply with the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) requirements.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste  

SciTech Connect

Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The Point Defect Model (PDM) is directly applied as the theoretical assessment method for describing the passive film formed on iron/steels. The PDM is used to describe general corrosion in the passive region of iron. In addition, previous work suggests that pit formation is due to the coalescence of cation vacancies at the metal/film interface which would make it possible to use the PDM parameters to predict the onset of pitting. This previous work suggests that once the critical vacancy density is reached, the film ruptures to form a pit. Based upon the kinetic parameters derived for the general corrosion case, two parameters relating to the cation vacancy formation and annihilation can be calculated. These two parameters can then be applied to predict the transition from general to pitting corrosion for iron/mild steels. If cation vacancy coalescence is shown to lead to pitting, it can have a profound effect on the direction of future studies involving the onset of pitting corrosion. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture events in stress corrosion cracking, and the determination of kinetic parameters for the generation and annihilation of point defects in the passive film on iron. The existence of coupling between the internal crack environment and the external cathodic environment, as predicted by the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM), has also been indisputably established for the AISI 4340/NaOH system. It is evident from the studies that analysis of coupling current noise is a very sensitive tool f

Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Preliminary analysis of the ORNL Liquid Low-Level Waste system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to summarize the status of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) Systems Analysis project. The focus of this project has been to collect and tabulate data concerning the LLLW system, analyze the current LLLW system operation, and develop the information necessary for the development of long-term treatment options for the LLLW generated at ORNL. The data used in this report were collected through a survey of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) literature, various letter reports, and a survey of all current LLLW generators. These data are also being compiled in a user friendly database for ORNL-wide distribution. The database will allow the quick retrieval of all information collected on the ORNL LLLW system and will greatly benefit any LLLW analysis effort. This report summarizes the results for the analyses performed to date on the LLLW system.

Abraham, T.J.; DePaoli, S.M.; Robinson, S.M.; Walker, A.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Understanding Cement Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... Ongoing nuclear operations, decontamination and decommissioning, salt waste disposal, and closure of liquid waste tanks result in ...

199

CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE F0RhqE.R SITE OF THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (TA-45)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CERTIFICATION DOCKET CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE F0RhqE.R SITE OF THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (TA-45) AND THE EFFLUENT RECEIVING AREAS OF ACID, PUEBLO, AND LOS ALAMOS CANYOM, LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects -. CONTENTS A Page - Introduction to the Certification Docket for the Former Site of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Plant (TA-45) and the Effluent Receiving Areas of Acid, Pueblo, and Los Alamos Canyons, Los Alamos, New Mexico Description of the Formeriy Utilized Sites Program at the Former Site of the T.4-45 Treatment Plant and Acid, Pueblo, and Los Alamos Canyons Purpose Property Identification Docket Contents

200

An Instrument for Measuring the TRU Concentration in High-Level Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online monitor has been designed, built, and tested that is capable of measuring the residual transuranic concentrations in processed high-level wastes with a detection limit of 370 Bq/ml (10 nCi/ml) in less than six hours. The monitor measures the ({alpha},n) neutrons in the presence of gamma-ray fields up to 1 Sv/h (100 R/h). The optimum design was determined by Monte Carlo modeling and then tempered with practical engineering and cost considerations. A multiplicity counter is used in data acquisition to reject the large fraction of coincident and highly variable cosmic-ray-engendered background events and results in a S/N ratio {approx}1.

Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, R A.; Fink, Samuel D.; Hensley, Walter K.; Holt, Noah OA; Knopf, Michael A.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Mullen, O Dennis; Salaymeh, Saleem R.; Samuel, Todd J.; Smart, John E.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, D

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Characterization and monitoring of 300 Area facility liquid waste streams: 1994 Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of characterizing and monitoring the following sources during calendar year 1994: liquid waste streams from Buildings 306, 320, 324, 326, 331, and 3720 in the 300 Area of Hanford Site and managed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory; treated and untreated Columbia River water (influent); and water at the confluence of the waste streams (that is, end-of-pipe). Data were collected from March to December before the sampling system installation was completed. Data from this initial part of the program are considered tentative. Samples collected were analyzed for chemicals, radioactivity, and general parameters. In general, the concentrations of chemical and radiological constituents and parameters in building wastewaters which were sampled and analyzed during CY 1994 were similar to historical data. Exceptions were the occasional observances of high concentrations of chloride, nitrate, and sodium that are believed to be associated with excursions that were occurring when the samples were collected. Occasional observances of high concentrations of a few solvents also appeared to be associated with infrequent building r eases. During calendar year 1994, nitrate, aluminum, copper, lead, zinc, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and gross beta exceeded US Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels.

Riley, R.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Damberg, E.G.; Evans, J.C.; Julya, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Ozanich, R.M.; Thompson, C.J.; Vogel, H.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Engineered Osmosis for Energy Efficient Separations: Optimizing Waste Heat Utilization FINAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT DOE F 241.3  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to design (i) a stripper system where heat is used to strip ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from a diluted draw solution; and (ii) a condensation or absorption system where the stripped NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} are captured in condensed water to form a re-concentrated draw solution. This study supports the Industrial Technologies Program of the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and their Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge award solicitation. Results from this study show that stimulated Oasys draw solutions composed of a complex electrolyte solution associated with the dissolution of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} gas in water can successfully be stripped and fully condensed under standard atmospheric pressure. Stripper bottoms NH{sub 3} concentration can reliably be reduced to < 1 mg/L, even when starting with liquids that have an NH{sub 3} mass fraction exceeding 6% to stimulate diluted draw solution from the forward osmosis membrane component of the process. Concentrated draw solution produced by fully condensing the stripper tops was show to exceed 6 M-C with nitrogen-to-carbon (N:C) molar ratios on the order of two. Reducing the operating pressure of the stripper column serves to reduce the partial vapor pressure of both NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} in solution and enables lower temperature operation towards integration of industrial low-grade of waste heat. Effective stripping of solutes was observed with operating pressures as low as 100 mbar (3-inHg). Systems operating at reduced pressure and temperature require additional design considerations to fully condense and absorb these constituents for reuse within the Oasys EO system context. Comparing empirical data with process stimulation models confirmed that several key parameters related to vapor-liquid equilibrium and intrinsic material properties were not accurate. Additional experiments and refinement of material property databases within the chosen process stimulation software was required to improve the reliability of process simulations for engineering design support. Data from experiments was also employed to calculate critical mass transfer and system design parameters (such as the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP)) to aid in process design. When measured in a less than optimal design state for the stripping of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from a simulated dilute draw solution the HETP for one type of commercial stripper packing material was 1.88 ft/stage. During this study it was observed that the heat duty required to vaporize the draw solution solutes is substantially affected by the amount of water boilup also produced to achieve a low NH{sub 3} stripper bottoms concentration specification. Additionally, fluid loading of the stripper packing media is a critical performance parameter that affects all facets of optimum stripper column performance. Condensation of the draw solution tops vapor requires additional process considerations if being conducted in sub-atmospheric conditions and low temperature. Future work will focus on the commercialization of the Oasys EO technology platform for numerous applications in water and wastewater treatment as well as harvesting low enthalpy energy with our proprietary osmotic heat engine. Engineering design related to thermal integration of Oasys EO technology for both low and hig-grade heat applications is underway. Novel thermal recovery processes are also being investigated in addition to the conventional approaches described in this report. Oasys Water plans to deploy commercial scale systems into the energy and zero liquid discharge markets in 2013. Additional process refinement will lead to integration of low enthalpy renewable heat sources for municipal desalination applications.

NATHAN HANCOCK

2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

Surveillance and maintenance plan for the inactive liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORNL has a total of 54 inactive liquid low-level waste (ILLLW) tanks. In the past, these tanks were used to contain radioactive liquid wastes from various research programs, decontamination operations, and reactor operations. The tanks have since been removed from service for various reasons; the majority were retired because of their age, some due to integrity compromises, and others because they did not meet the current standards set by the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA). Many of the tanks contain residual radioactive liquids and/or sludges. Plans are to remediate all tanks; however, until remediation of each tank, this Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan will be used to monitor the safety and inventory containment of these tanks.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Efficacy of backfilling and other engineered barriers in a radioactive waste repository in salt  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, investigation of potential host geologic formations was expanded in 1975 to include hard rocks. Potential groundwater intrusion is leading to very conservative and expensive waste package designs. Recent studies have concluded that incentives for engineered barriers and 1000-year canisters probably do not exist for reasonable breach scenarios. The assumption that multibarriers will significantly increase the safety margin is also questioned. Use of a bentonite backfill for surrounding a canister of exotic materials was developed in Sweden and is being considered in the US. The expectation that bentonite will remain essentially unchanged for hundreds of years for US repository designs may be unrealistic. In addition, thick bentonite backfills will increase the canister surface temperature and add much more water around the canister. The use of desiccant materials, such as CaO or MgO, for backfilling seems to be a better method of protecting the canister. An argument can also be made for not using backfill material in salt repositories since the 30-cm-thick space will provide for hole closure for many years and will promote heat transfer via natural convection. It is concluded that expensive safety systems are being considered for repository designs that do not necessarily increase the safety margin. It is recommended that the safety systems for waste repositories in different geologic media be addressed individually and that cost-benefit analyses be performed.

Claiborne, H.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Annual report -- 1992: Environmental surveillance for EG & G Idaho Waste Management Facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the 1992 environmental surveillance activities of the Environmental Monitoring Unit of EG&G Idaho, Inc., at EG&G Idaho-operated Waste Management facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Included are some results of the sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and the United States Geological Survey. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to ensure compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1992 environmental surveillance data with DOE derived concentration guides, and with data from previous years.

Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.; McBride, D.W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Office of Inspector General audit report on waste treatment plans at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (Laboratory) stores nearly 65,000 cubic meters of waste generated on site or brought to the State of Idaho (Idaho) from Department of Energy (DOE) sites across the country since 1970. This represents approximately 62 percent of the stored waste that DOE plans to ship and permanently dispose of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. In December 1996, DOE met the first milestone by awarding a fixed-price contract to a private company to construct and operate the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility) -- nearly 6 months ahead of schedule. Because the Treatment Facility would not be available to meet the 3,100 cubic meter milestone by December 31, 2002, DOE decided to dispose of untreated waste using the characterization process that was in place in 1989, and adapting it to meet new characterization requirements. The purpose of the audit was to determine whether it is in the best interest of the Government to defer processing the 3,100 cubic meters of waste until the new Treatment Facility can do so. The analysis showed that waiting until the Treatment Facility can process the 3,100 cubic meters of waste would be more economic and reduce the environmental risks to Laboratory employees. Therefore, a compromise between DOE and Idaho officials allowing such a deferral would be in the best interest of the Government.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory code assessment of the Rocky Flats transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

This report is an assessment of the content codes associated with transuranic waste shipped from the Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado, to INEL. The primary objective of this document is to characterize and describe the transuranic wastes shipped to INEL from Rocky Flats by item description code (IDC). This information will aid INEL in determining if the waste meets the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The waste covered by this content code assessment was shipped from Rocky Flats between 1985 and 1989. These years coincide with the dates for information available in the Rocky Flats Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). The majority of waste shipped during this time was certified to the existing WIPP WAC. This waste is referred to as precertified waste. Reassessment of these precertified waste containers is necessary because of changes in the WIPP WAC. To accomplish this assessment, the analytical and process knowledge available on the various IDCs used at Rocky Flats were evaluated. Rocky Flats sources for this information include employee interviews, SWIMS, Transuranic Waste Certification Program, Transuranic Waste Inspection Procedure, Backlog Waste Baseline Books, WIPP Experimental Waste Characterization Program (headspace analysis), and other related documents, procedures, and programs. Summaries are provided of: (a) certification information, (b) waste description, (c) generation source, (d) recovery method, (e) waste packaging and handling information, (f) container preparation information, (g) assay information, (h) inspection information, (i) analytical data, and (j) RCRA characterization.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Microsoft Word - FINAL 7-12-10 Site Visit Report - LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Facility FCA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility - June 2010 This site visit report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of the Facility Centered Assessment (FCA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLW). This review, conducted June 9-25, 2010, was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and LANL, and conducted jointly by HSS, LASO, and LANL staff. The Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations was the overall lead organization for evaluation of the FCA process with the participation of the LASO Facility Representative assigned to RLW.

211

Information; and Other Matters- Amount of Uranium in Liquid Waste Effluents, Treated Domestic Sanitary Wastewater Sampling, and Liquid Effluent Collection and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the AES exemption request related to commencement of construction (Ref. 2). On October 15, 2009, AES submitted the response to the NRC RAIs related to commencement of construction (Ref. 3). Subsequently, the NRC requested additional information regarding the AES response. Enclosure 1.1 provides the AES response to the additional information regarding preconstrucion activities requested by the NRC. Enclosure 2.1 provides the markup pages of the EREF ER. On August 10, 2009, the NRC transmitted to AES RAIs regarding the EREF Environmental Report (ER) (Ref. 4). On September 9, 2009, AES submitted the response to the NRC ER RAIs (Ref. 5). Subsequently, the NRC requested additional information regarding other matters including the amount of uranium in liquid waste effluents, treated domestic sanitary wastewater sampling, and Liquid Effluent Collection and Treatment System evaporator sediment sampling. Enclosure 1.2 provides the AES response regarding the amount of uranium in liquid waste effluent. There are no markup pages to the EREF ER for this response. Enclosure 1.3 provides the AES response regarding treated domestic sanitary wastewater sampling. Enclosure 2.2 provides the markup pages of the EREF ER. Enclosure 1.4 provides the AES

Eagle Rock; Enrichment Facility

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Analysis of Advanced Liquid Waste Minimization Techniques at a PWR: Advanced Media, Pleated Filters, and Ecomomic Evaluation Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities may employ a number of options for processing radioactive liquids or improving processing system O&M. This report summarizes low level waste minimization studies for the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. These studies involved the performance of selective ion media, optimization of the chemical volume control system (CVCS) demineralizers, performance assessment of the application of advanced minimum precoat elements for processing condensate demineralizer system rinse water, and evaluation of the econ...

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through December 1999.

NONE

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through June 1998.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through April 1998.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through January 2000.

NONE

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through October 1999.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through November 1999.

NONE

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through February 1999.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through September 1999.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A human factors engineering evaluation of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methods and results of a human factors engineering (HFE) review conducted on the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Project 236A, to be constructed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility at Hanford, Washington. This HFE analysis of the MWTF was initiated by WHC to assess how well the current facility and equipment design satisfies the needs of its operations and maintenance staff and other potential occupants, and to identify areas of the design that could benefit from improving the human interfaces at the facility. Safe and effective operations, including maintenance, is a primary goal for the MWTF. Realization of this goal requires that the MWTF facility, equipment, and operations be designed in a manner that is consistent with the abilities and limitations of its operating personnel. As a consequence, HFE principles should be applied to the MWTF design, construction, its operating procedures, and its training. The HFE review was focused on the 200-West Area facility as the design is further along than that of the 200-East Area. The review captured, to the greatest extent feasible at this stage of design, all aspects of the facility activities and included the major topics generally associated with HFE (e.g., communication, working environment). Lessons learned from the review of the 200 West facility will be extrapolated to the 200-East Area, as well as generalized to the Hanford Site.

Donohoo, D.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sarver, T.L. [ARES Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory`s 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory`s Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram.

O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effect of in-cylinder liquid fuel films on engine-out unburned hydrocarbon emissions for SI engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly all of the hydrocarbon emissions from a modern gasoline-fueled vehicle occur when the engine is first started. One important contributing factor to this is the fact that, during this time, temperatures throughout ...

Costanzo, Vincent S. (Vincent Stanley), 1979-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D`Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program.

Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R. [eds.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Wicks, G.G. [ed.] [Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Mercury removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility  

SciTech Connect

Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

S. C. Ashworth

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

Mercury Removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility  

SciTech Connect

Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

Ashworth, Samuel Clay; Wood, R. A.; Taylor, D. D.; Sieme, D. D.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible D.I. diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection Diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Espey, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

APPLICATION OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORP/DOE), through Columbia Energy & Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper discusses results of pre-project pilot-scale testing by Columbia Energy and ongoing technology maturation development scope through fiscal year 2012, including planned additional pilot-scale and full-scale simulant testing and operation with actual radioactive tank waste.

TEDESCHI AR; WILSON RA

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN SUPPORT OF QUALIFICATION OF PROCESSING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE LOW-LEVEL LIQUID WASTE INTO SALTSTONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) immobilizes low-level liquid waste into Saltstone to be disposed of in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility, Class Three Landfill. In order to meet the permit conditions and regulatory limits set by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), both the low-level salt solution and Saltstone samples are analyzed quarterly. Waste acceptance criteria (WAC) are designed to confirm the salt solution sample from the Tank Farm meets specific radioactive and chemical limits. The toxic characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) is used to confirm that the treatment has immobilized the hazardous constituents of the salt solution. This paper discusses the methods used to characterize the salt solution and final Saltstone samples from 2007-2009.

Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, C.; Cozzi, A.; Staub, A.; Ray, J.

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering Engineering1354608000000EngineeringSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Engineering Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Reference Standards Data Sources Organizations Journals Key Resources Engineering Village Includes Engineering Index (Ei) and Compendex Knovel Handbooks, databases, and eBooks integrated with analytical and search tools IEEE Xplore Full text access to technical literature, standards, and conference proceedings in engineering and technology SPIE Digital Library Full-text papers from SPIE journals and proceedings published since 1998; subject coverage includes optics, photonics, electronic imaging, visual information processing, biomedical optics, lasers, and

234

Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1, Methodology and results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste. Although numerous caveats must be placed on the results, the general findings were as follows: Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrodynamics Bioscience, Biosecurity, Health Chemical Science Earth, Space Sciences Energy Engineering High Energy Density Plasmas, Fluids Information Science, Computing,...

237

Baseline Flowsheet Generation for the Treatment and Disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Sodium Bearing Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste (HLW) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) must implement technologies and processes to treat and qualify radioactive wastes located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) for permanent disposal. This paper describes the approach and accomplishments to date for completing development of a baseline vitrification treatment flowsheet for sodium-bearing waste (SBW), including development of a relational database used to manage the associated process assumptions. A process baseline has been developed that includes process requirements, basis and assumptions, process flow diagrams, a process description, and a mass balance. In the absence of actual process or experimental results, mass and energy balance data for certain process steps are based on assumptions. Identification, documentation, validation, and overall management of the flowsheet assumptions are critical to ensuring an integrated, focused program. The INEEL HLW Program initially used a roadmapping methodology, developed through the INEEL Environmental Management Integration Program, to identify, document, and assess the uncertainty and risk associated with the SBW flowsheet process assumptions. However, the mass balance assumptions, process configuration and requirements should be accessible to all program participants. This need resulted in the creation of a relational database that provides formal documentation and tracking of the programmatic uncertainties related to the SBW flowsheet.

Barnes, Charles Marshall; Lauerhass, Lance; Olson, Arlin Leland; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Valentine, James Henry; Lockie, Keith Andrew

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Baseline Flowsheet Generation for the Treatment and Disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Sodium Bearing Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste (HLW) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) must implement technologies and processes to treat and qualify radioactive wastes located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) for permanent disposal. This paper describes the approach and accomplishments to date for completing development of a baseline vitrification treatment flowsheet for sodium-bearing waste (SBW), including development of a relational database used to manage the associated process assumptions. A process baseline has been developed that includes process requirements, basis and assumptions, process flow diagrams, a process description, and a mass balance. In the absence of actual process or experimental results, mass and energy balance data for certain process steps are based on assumptions. Identification, documentation, validation, and overall management of the flowsheet assumptions are critical to ensuring an integrated, focused program. The INEEL HLW Program initially used a roadmapping methodology, developed through the INEEL Environmental Management Integration Program, to identify, document, and assess the uncertainty and risk associated with the SBW flowsheet process assumptions. However, the mass balance assumptions, process configuration and requirements should be accessible to all program participants. This need resulted in the creation of a relational database that provides formal documentation and tracking of the programmatic uncertainties related to the SBW flowsheet.

Barnes, C.M.; Lauerhass, L.; Olson, A.L.; Taylor, D.D.; Valentine, J.H.; Lockie, K.A. (DOE- ID)

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

239

Genetic engineering of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for bioremediation of mixed waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The legacy of the cold war includes sites across the U.S. storing mixed waste for a lack of a feasible treatment option. Simplification of the… (more)

Rothfuss, Heather Michelle, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 2002 Cummins ISM engine was modified to be optimized for operation on gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and advanced emission control devices. The engine modifications included increased exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), decreased compression ratio, and reshaped piston and bowl configuration.

Alleman, T. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Barton, G.; Rumminger, M.; Duggal, V.; Nelson, C.; Ray, M.; Cherrillo, R. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

HWMA closure plan for the Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) calcined and evaporated aqueous wastes generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The calciner operated from 1963 to 1981, primarily processing high level waste from the first cycle of spent fuel extraction. Following the calciner shutdown the evaporator system concentrated high activity aqueous waste from 1983 until 1987. In 1988, US Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) requested interim status for the evaporator system, in anticipation of future use of the evaporator system. The evaporator system has not been operated since it received interim status. At the present time, DOE-ID is completing construction on a new evaporator at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) and the evaporator at the WCF is not needed. The decision to not use the WCF evaporator requires Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) and DOE-ID to close these units. After a detailed evaluation of closure options, LITCO and DOE-ID have determined the safest option is to fill the voids (grout the vessels, cells and waste pile) and close the WCF to meet the requirements applicable to landfills. The WCF will be covered with a concrete cap that will meet the closure standards. In addition, it was decided to apply these closure standards to the calcining system since it is contained within the WCF building. The paper describes the site, waste inventory, closure activities, and post-closure care plans.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, Brazilian´s Light Emitting Diode - Liquid Crystal Display (LED-LCD) End-of-Life (EoL) disposal is traditionally landfills and incineration.

243

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - HANDSS-55 TRANSURANIC WASTE REPACKAGING MODULE  

SciTech Connect

The Transuranic waste generated at the Savannah River Site from nuclear weapons research, development, and production is currently estimated to be over 10,000 cubic meters. Over half of this amount is stored in 55-gallon drums. The waste in drums is primarily job control waste and equipment generated as the result of routine maintenance performed on the plutonium processing operations. Over the years that the drums have been accumulating, the regulatory definitions of materials approved for disposal have changed. Consequently, many of the drums now contain items that are not approved for disposal at DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The HANDSS-55 technology is being developed to allow remote sorting of the items in these drums and then repackaging of the compliant items for disposal at WIPP.

Unknown

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

ICPP Waste Management Technology Development Program  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the decision to curtail reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), a Spent fuel and Waste Management Technology Development plan has been implemented to identify acceptable options for disposing of the (1) sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, (2) radioactive calcine, and (3) irradiated spent fuel stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan was developed jointly by DOE and WINCO.

Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.; Knecht, D.A. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bonkoski, M.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

State-of-the-art of liquid waste disposal for geothermal energy systems: 1979. Report PNL-2404  

SciTech Connect

The state-of-the-art of geothermal liquid waste disposal is reviewed and surface and subsurface disposal methods are evaluated with respect to technical, economic, legal, and environmental factors. Three disposal techniques are currently in use at numerous geothermal sites around the world: direct discharge into surface waters; deep-well injection; and ponding for evaporation. The review shows that effluents are directly discharged into surface waters at Wairakei, New Zealand; Larderello, Italy; and Ahuachapan, El Salvador. Ponding for evaporation is employed at Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Deep-well injection is being practiced at Larderello; Ahuachapan; Otake and Hatchobaru, Japan; and at The Geysers in California. All sites except Ahuachapan (which is injecting only 30% of total plant flow) have reported difficulties with their systems. Disposal techniques used in related industries are also reviewed. The oil industry's efforts at disposal of large quantities of liquid effluents have been quite successful as long as the effluents have been treated prior to injection. This study has determined that seven liquid disposal methods - four surface and three subsurface - are viable options for use in the geothermal energy industry. However, additional research and development is needed to reduce the uncertainties and to minimize the adverse environmental impacts of disposal. (MHR)

Defferding, L.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

State-of-the-art of liquid waste disposal for geothermal energy systems: 1979. Report PNL-2404  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art of geothermal liquid waste disposal is reviewed and surface and subsurface disposal methods are evaluated with respect to technical, economic, legal, and environmental factors. Three disposal techniques are currently in use at numerous geothermal sites around the world: direct discharge into surface waters; deep-well injection; and ponding for evaporation. The review shows that effluents are directly discharged into surface waters at Wairakei, New Zealand; Larderello, Italy; and Ahuachapan, El Salvador. Ponding for evaporation is employed at Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Deep-well injection is being practiced at Larderello; Ahuachapan; Otake and Hatchobaru, Japan; and at The Geysers in California. All sites except Ahuachapan (which is injecting only 30% of total plant flow) have reported difficulties with their systems. Disposal techniques used in related industries are also reviewed. The oil industry's efforts at disposal of large quantities of liquid effluents have been quite successful as long as the effluents have been treated prior to injection. This study has determined that seven liquid disposal methods - four surface and three subsurface - are viable options for use in the geothermal energy industry. However, additional research and development is needed to reduce the uncertainties and to minimize the adverse environmental impacts of disposal. (MHR)

Defferding, L.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Synthesis of three advanced biofuels from ionic liquid-pretreated switchgrass using engineered Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One approach to reducing the costs of advanced biofuel production from cellulosic biomass is to engineer a single microorganism to both digest plant biomass and produce hydrocarbons that have the properties of petrochemical ...

Bokinsky, Gregory

248

Compact Liquid Waste Evaporator for Cleanup on Hanfords Hot Cells [FULL PAPER  

SciTech Connect

Removal of radionuclide and hazardous contaminants from hot cells in Hanford's 324 Building will produce an aqueous waste stream requiring volume reduction and packaging. This paper describes a compact and remotely-operated evaporator system that was designed for use in the 324 Building's B-Cell (a shielded hot cell) to volume-reduce the waste waters that are generated from pressure washing of hot cell ceiling, wall, and floor surfaces. The evaporator incorporates an electric-heated reboiler to provide evaporation and drying to allow disposal of waste material. Design features of the evaporator system were strongly influenced by the need for remote handling and remote maintenance. Purified water vapor from the evaporation process will be released directly to the hot cell ventilation air.

HOBART, R.L.

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II.

O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet.

O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Engineering study of the potential uses of salts from selective crystallization of Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Salt Process (CSP) is the fractional crystallization of nitrate salts from tank waste stored on the Hanford Site. This study reviews disposition options for a CSP product made from Hanford Site tank waste. These options range from public release to onsite low-level waste disposal to no action. Process, production, safety, environment, cost, schedule, and the amount of CSP material which may be used are factors considered in each option. The preferred alternative is offsite release of clean salt. Savings all be generated by excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization. Income would be received from sales of salt products. Savings and income from this alternative amount to $1,027 million, excluding the cost of CSP operations. Unless public sale of CSP products is approved, the material should be calcined. The carbonate form of the CSP could then be used as ballast in tank closure and stabilization efforts. Not including the cost of CSP operations, savings of $632 million would be realized. These savings would result from excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization and reducing purchases of chemicals for caustic recycle and stabilization and closure. Dose considerations for either alternative are favorable. No other cost-effective alternatives that were considered had the capacity to handle significant quantities of the CSP products. If CSP occurs, full-scale tank-waste stabilization could be done without building additional treatment facilities after Phase 1 (DOE 1996). Savings in capital and operating cost from this reduction in waste stabilization would be in addition to the other gains described.

Hendrickson, D.W.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Home Technologies Core Competencies Showcase Careers Partnerships About Advanced Manufacturing Developing high-performance materials, devices, components, and assemblies enabled by innovative design tools and novel manufacturing techniques Learn more Applied Electromagnetics Supporting the development of electromagnetic systems that are pervasive and paramount to the greater National Security community. Learn more Data Sciences Enabling better decisions through the development and application of state-of-the-art techniques in machine learning, statistics, and decision sciences Learn more Precision Engineering Embracing determinism to guide rigorous design, construction, and metrology of mechatronic systems, instruments, and manufactured components

253

CORROSION CONTROL MEASURES FOR LIQUID RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has stored radioactive wastes in large, underground, carbon steel tanks for approximately 60 years. An assessment of potential degradation mechanisms determined that the tanks may be vulnerable to nitrate- induced pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Controls on the solution chemistry and temperature of the wastes are in place to mitigate these mechanisms. These controls are based upon a series of experiments performed using simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks. The technical bases and evolution of these controls is presented in this paper.

Wiersma, B.; Subramanian, K.

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

255

Soil stabilization using oil shale solid wastes: Laboratory evaluation of engineering properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale solid wastes were evaluated for possible use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study was conducted and consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern shale can be used for soil stabilization if limestone is added during combustion. Without limestone, eastern oil shale waste exhibits little or no cementation. The testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented. 11 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Turner, J.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A preliminary parametric performance assessment for the disposal of alpha-contaminated mixed low-level waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary parametric performance assessment (PA) has been performed of potential waste disposal systems for alpha-contaminated mixed low-level waste (ALLW) currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The radionuclide-confinement performance of treated ALLW in various final waste forms, in various disposal locations, and under various assumptions was evaluated. Compliance with performance objectives was assessed for the undisturbed waste scenario and for intrusion scenarios. Some combinations of final waste form, disposal site, and environmental transport assumptions lead to calculated does that comply with the performance objectives, while others do not. The results will help determine the optimum degree of ALLW immobilization to satisfy the performance objectives while minimizing cost.

Smith, T.H.; Anderson, G.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Myers, J. [IT Corp. (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a comparison of hydrologic issues and technical approaches used in deep-well injection and disposal of liquid wastes, and those issues and approaches associated with injection and storage of CO{sub 2} in deep brine formations. These comparisons have been discussed in nine areas: (1) Injection well integrity; (2) Abandoned well problems; (3) Buoyancy effects; (4) Multiphase flow effects; (5) Heterogeneity and flow channeling; (6) Multilayer isolation effects; (7) Caprock effectiveness and hydrogeomechanics; (8) Site characterization and monitoring; and (9) Effects of CO{sub 2} storage on groundwater resources There are considerable similarities, as well as significant differences. Scientifically and technically, these two fields can learn much from each other. The discussions presented in this paper should help to focus on the key scientific issues facing deep injection of fluids. A substantial but by no means exhaustive reference list has been provided for further studies into the subject.

Tsang, C.-F.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Industrial waste management information for 1990 and record-to-date  

SciTech Connect

This product provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil consumption, and water usage for the calendar year 1990. It summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Industrial Waste Management Information System (IWMIS).

Litteer, D.L.; Peterson, C.N.; Sims, A.M.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radioactive waste systems and radioactive effluents  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste systems for handling gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes generated at light and pressurized water reactors are described. (TFD)

Row, T.H.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Chemical Engineering Division waste management programs. Quarterly report, January--March 1975  

SciTech Connect

Development work on the study of consolidation techniques for Zircaloy fuel-cladding hulls included scouting tests on volatility schemes for separating the zirconium as the volatile tetrachloride and ignition tests on several Zircaloy materials to further characterize the pyrophoric behavior of Zircaloy. All tests were with nonirradiated metal pending acquisition of irradiated samples. Installation is nearly complete of a glovebox facility for studies on the salvage of alpha-contaminated metals by pyrochemical methods. Disposal of a major portion of fission product tritium formed in light water reactor fuels by deep- well injection of the low-level aqueous waste from plants reprocessing such fuels is being evaluated. The question of siting is a very important factor in determining the feasibility of this particular disposal option. A review is given of the status of information for U. S. sedimentary basins, the areas most likely to be generally suitable for siting of waste wells. Work on the reliability of high-level-waste canisters included an examination of creep, shot- peening, and subcooling of the filler canister below storage temperatures, as methods of relieving stresses induced in canisters due to differential contraction of canister and glass during cooling. A method was investigated for relieving stresses in calcine-filled canisters. Properties of fission product oxides were examined to elucidate possible adverse corrosive effects at the canister-waste interface. (LK)

Steindler, M.J.; Levitz, N.M.; Mecham, W.J.; Seefeldt, W.B.; Trevorrow, L.E.; Winsch, I.O.; Cannon, T.F.; Gerding, T.J.; Kullen, B.J.; Webster, D.S.; Burris, L.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Successful Use of Remote Engineering Technology to Upgrade Electrical Power Supplies to a Plant Producing Vitrified Highly Active Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a remote handling intervention project on the Sellafield site in the UK that successfully replaced a critical part of a critical plant in a highly radioactive and contaminated cell. The aim of the project was to replace the existing design of electrical power supplies inside the plant that vitrifies high level liquid waste with a new improved design. The project designed and built a hydraulic manipulator and associated work-heads and tooling to be deployed in cell to remotely replace the power supplies. As part of this replacement process, the project also designed and built a drilling rig to remotely drill holes through the cell wall suitable for the new design of electrical power supplies. (authors)

Harken, J.P. [Nexia Solutions Ltd, Workington, Cumbria CA (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

FULL SCALE TESTING TECHNOLOGY MATURATION OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR FOR HIGH-LEVEL LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT AT HANFORD - 12125  

SciTech Connect

Simulant testing of a full-scale thin-film evaporator system was conducted in 2011 for technology development at the Hanford tank farms. Test results met objectives of water removal rate, effluent quality, and operational evaluation. Dilute tank waste simulant, representing a typical double-shell tank supernatant liquid layer, was concentrated from a 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.5 using a 4.6 m{sup 2} (50 ft{sup 2}) heated transfer area Rototherm{reg_sign} evaporator from Artisan Industries. The condensed evaporator vapor stream was collected and sampled validating efficient separation of the water. An overall decontamination factor of 1.2E+06 was achieved demonstrating excellent retention of key radioactive species within the concentrated liquid stream. The evaporator system was supported by a modular steam supply, chiller, and control computer systems which would be typically implemented at the tank farms. Operation of these support systems demonstrated successful integration while identifying areas for efficiency improvement. Overall testing effort increased the maturation of this technology to support final deployment design and continued project implementation.

TEDESCHI AR; CORBETT JE; WILSON RA; LARKIN J

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Off-gas characteristics of defense waste vitrification using liquid-fed Joule-heated ceramic melters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Off-gas and effluent characterization studies have been established as part of a PNL Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter development program supporting the Savannah River Laboratory Defense Waste Processing Facility (SRL-DWPF). The objectives of these studies were to characterize the gaseous and airborne emission properties of liquid-fed joule-heated melters as a function of melter operational parameters and feed composition. All areas of off-gas interest and concern including effluent characterization, emission control, flow rate behavior and corrosion effects have been studied using alkaline and formic-acid based feed compositions. In addition, the behavioral patterns of gaseous emissions, the characteristics of melter-generated aerosols and the nature and magnitude of melter effluent losses have been established under a variety of feeding conditions with and without the use of auxiliary plenum heaters. The results of these studies have shown that particulate emissions are responsible for most radiologically important melter effluent losses. Melter-generated gases have been found to be potentially flammable as well as corrosive. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide present the greatest flammability hazard of the combustibles produced. Melter emissions of acidic volatile compounds of sulfur and the halogens have been responsible for extensive corrosion observed in melter plenums and in associated off-gas lines and processing equipment. The use of auxiliary plenum heating has had little effect upon melter off-gas characteristics other than reducing the concentrations of combustibles.

Goles, R.W.; Sevigny, G.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

None

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Chemical Engineering Division waste management programs. Quarterly report, April--June 1975  

SciTech Connect

Consolidation techniques for Zircaloy fuel-cladding hulls were studied. They included (1) further work on a pyrochemical-volatility scheme for separating the zirconium as the volatile tetrachloride and (2) ignition tests and shock- ignition tests on several Zircaloy materials to further characterize the pyrophoric behavior of Zircaloy and the impact on hulls management. Quantitative results on the reaction with molten zinc chloride are presented. A series of steel-melting experiments examined the compatibility of various crucible materials with the molten steel and provided information on the behavior (distribution) of CeO$sub 2$ and UO$sub 2$ (used as stand-ins for PuO$sub 2$). Examination of existing information on deep-well injection of industrial wastes and on low-level aqueous wastes from fuel reprocessing led to the conclusions that the technology is generally available from industrial practice, that costs are of the order of 10$sup -4$ mill/kWh, that environmental effects could be insignificant in normal operation (but could include contamination of groundwater and resources and also stimulation of minor earthquakes in maloperation), that legal constraints may be the most significant barrier to adopting the practice, and that the site of such an operation would best be at a fuel reprocessing plant located at one of the U. S. sedimentary basins. The conclusions and recommendations from a study of the reliability of high-level-waste canisters are presented. (auth)

Steindler, M.J.; Levitz, N.M.; Mecham, W.J.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Selection of a computer code for Hanford low-level waste engineered-system performance assessment. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planned performance assessments for the proposed disposal of low-activity waste (LAW) glass produced from remediation of wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington will require calculations of radionuclide release rates from the subsurface disposal facility. These calculations will be done with the aid of computer codes. The available computer codes with suitable capabilities at the time Revision 0 of this document was prepared were ranked in terms of the feature sets implemented in the code that match a set of physical, chemical, numerical, and functional capabilities needed to assess release rates from the engineered system. The needed capabilities were identified from an analysis of the important physical and chemical processes expected to affect LAW glass corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. This analysis was repeated in this report but updated to include additional processes that have been found to be important since Revision 0 was issued and to include additional codes that have been released. The highest ranked computer code was found to be the STORM code developed at PNNL for the US Department of Energy for evaluation of arid land disposal sites.

McGrail, B.P.; Bacon, D.H.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluation of ultrafiltration membranes for treating low-level radioactive contaminated liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments were performed on Waste Disposal Facility (WD) influent using Romicon hollow fiber ultrafiltration modules with molecular weight cutoffs ranging from 2000 to 80,000. The rejection of conductivity was low in most cases. The rejection of radioactivity ranged from 90 to 98%, depending on the membrane type and on the feed concentration. Typical product activity ranged from 7 to 100 dis/min/ml of alpha radiation. Experiments were also performed on alpha-contaminated laundry wastewater. Results ranged from 98 to >99.8%, depending on the membrane type. This yielded a product concentration of less than 0.1 dis/min/ml of alpha radiation. Tests on PP-Building decontamination water yielded rejections of 85 to 88% alpha radiation depending on the membrane type. These experiments show that the ability to remove radioactivity by membrane is a function of the contents of the waste stream because the radioactivity in the wastewater is in various forms: ionic, polymeric, colloidal, and absorbed onto suspended solids. Although removal of suspended or colloidal material is very high, removal of ionic material is not as effective. Alpha-contaminated laundry wastewater proved to be the easiest to decontaminate, whereas the low-level PP-Building decontamination water proved to be the most difficult to decontaminate. Decontamination of the WD influent, a combined waste stream, varied considerably from day to day because of its constantly changing makeup. The WD influent was also treated with various substances, such as polyelectrolytes, complexing agents, and coagulants, to determine if these additives would aid in the removal of radioactive material from the various wastewaters by complexing the ionic species. At the present time, none of the additives evaluated has had much effect; but experiments are continuing.

Koenst, J.W.; Roberts, R.C.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition 7: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition SUMMARY This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 12, 2010 EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition January 4, 2010

272

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0287 (September 2002)

273

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorption of cesium and strontium on kaolinite powders was investigated as a means to minimize the emissions of these metals during certain high temperature processes currently being developed to isolate and dispose of radiological and mixed wastes. In this work, non-radioactive aqueous cesium acetate or strontium acetate was atomized down the center of a natural gas flame supported on a variable-swirl burner in a refractory-lined laboratory-scale combustion facility. Kaolinite powder was injected at a post-flame location in the combustor. Cesium readily vaporizes in the high temperature regions of the combustor, but was reactively scavenged onto dispersed kaolinite. Global sorption mechanisms of cesium vapor on kaolinite were quantified, and are related to those available in the literature for sodium and lead. Both metal adsorption and substrate deactivation steps are important, and so there is an optimum temperature, between 1400 and 1500 K, at which maximum sorption occurs. The presence of chlorine inhibits cesium sorption. In contrast to cesium, and in the absence of chlorine, strontium was only partially vaporized and was, therefore, only partially scavengeable. The strontium data did not allow quantification of global kinetic mechanisms of interaction, although equilibrium arguments provided insight into the effects of chlorine on strontium sorption. These results have implications for the use of sorbents to control cesium and strontium emissions during high temperature waste processing including incineration and vitrification.

William Linak

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid scintillation vials must be collected separately. 5. Any "mixed waste" must be cleared with the RSO and labeled

275

Fundamental Interaction Mechanisms of Engineered ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental Interaction Mechanisms of Engineered Nanomaterials with DNA. Summary: We utilized isotope-dilution liquid ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

In situ technology evaluation and functional and operational guidelines for treatability studies at the radioactive waste management complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide EG G Idaho's Waste Technology Development Department with a basis for selection of in situ technologies for demonstration at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and to provide information for Feasibility Studies to be performed according to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The demonstrations will aid in meeting Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) schedules for remediation of waste at Waste Area Group (WAG) 7. This report is organized in six sections. Section 1, summarizes background information on the sites to be remediated at WAG-7, specifically, the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. Section 2 discusses the identification and screening of in situ buried waste remediation technologies for these sites. Section 3 outlines the design requirements. Section 4 discusses the schedule (in accordance with Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) scoping). Section 5 includes recommendations for the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. A listing of references used to compile the report is given in Section 6. Detailed technology information is included in the Appendix section of this report.

Hyde, R.A.; Donehey, A.J.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.; Rubert, A.L.; Walker, S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development of ultrafiltration and inorganic adsorbents for reducing volumes of low-level and intermediate-level liquid waste. Quarterly report, October, November, December 1976  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate separation methods for removing radionuclides from liquid process waste streams. As part of this program, Mound Laboratory will develop lower cost alternatives for use i n1980 fuel reprocessing and waste solidification plants, evaluate the processes within the nuclear fuel cycle which contribute to low-level and intermediate-level waste, and determine the feasibility of ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, inorganic adsorbents and other separation concepts as additions to process design to reduce the generation of this type of waste. In the initial phase of this program, membrane equipment will be obtained from a commercial membrane manufacturer. After the pilot plant is installed, it will be checked out on cold feed in order to obtain initial flux and rejection data for comparison to data obtained later in the program. After completion of the cold tests, the membrane pilot plant will be run on a combined contaminated feed emanating from showers, laboratory drains, janitorial sinks and decontamination in processing areas, as well as a laundry waste stream containing alpha-contaminated wastes. This combined waste stream contains only alpha contamination (uranium and plutonium). However, as part of this program, gamma activity will be added to the waste stream. These wastes will be representative of those streams found at fuel reprocessing plants, as well as various ERDA processing facilities such as Mound, LASL, Hanford, and Rocky Flats. For the second part of the program, laboratory tests will be run on various adsorbents to evaluate their capacities for removing radionuclides. As part of this program, a technique for screening adsorbents developed at Mound Laboratory will be utilized.

1976-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Author manuscript, published in "8th World Congress of Chemical Engineering, Montréal: Canada (2009)" A SIMPLE GAS-LIQUID MASS TRANSFER JET SYSTEM,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: An original gas-liquid contacting system is proposed, consisting of a pump, an orifice, a vertical tube coaxial to the orifice and an impinging plate. The pump generates a downward vertical liquid jet through the orifice situated above the gas-liquid dispersion level. The two phase jet is directed towards an impinging plate near the bottom of the tank and dispersed in the volume of the liquid. Liquid is withdrawn below the impinging plate and recycled. This reactor may be used for gas-liquid reactions (ie hydrogenations) and also to mix liquids, to disperse particles, to oxygenate waste water etc…. Performances and design rules of this equipment are proposed. Then, the results are compared to performances of bubble columns, stirred tanks, and other academic and industrial jet systems. It is shown that, at a given energy dissipation, this system yields much higher mass transfer densities than a classical stirred tank provided with a Rushton turbine. Finally some suggestions about mass transfer mechanisms and efficiency of dissipated power are given.

Roger Botton; Dominique Cosserat; Souhila Poncin; Gabriel Wild

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Engineering design and test plan for demonstrating DETOX treatment of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

DETOX is a cocatalyzed wet oxidation process in which the catalysts are a relatively great concentration of iron ions (typically as iron(III) chloride) in the presence of small amounts of platinum and ruthenium ions. Organic compounds are oxidized completely to carbon dioxide, water, and (if chlorinated) hydrogen chloride. The process has shown promise as a non-thermal alternative to incineration for treatment and/or volume reduction of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes. Design and fabrication of a demonstration unit capable of destroying 25. Kg/hr of organic material is now in progress. This paper describes the Title 2 design of the demonstration unit, and the planned demonstration effort at Savannah River Site (SRS) and Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP).

Goldblatt, S.; Dhooge, P.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Geochemistry of the Dakota Formation of Northwestern New Mexico: Relevance to Radioactive Waste Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Backfill as an Engineered Barrier for Radioactive Waste Management / Radioactive Waste Management

Douglas G. Brookins

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.

Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C; Gaddy, J.L.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Shockwave Engine: Wave Disk Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: MSU is developing a new engine for use in hybrid automobiles that could significantly reduce fuel waste and improve engine efficiency. In a traditional internal combustion engine, air and fuel are ignited, creating high-temperature and high-pressure gases which expand rapidly. This expansion of gases forces the engine’s pistons to pump and powers the car. MSU’s engine has no pistons. It uses the combustion of air and fuel to build up pressure within the engine, generating a shockwave that blasts hot gas exhaust into the blades of the engine’s rotors causing them to turn, which generates electricity. MSU’s redesigned engine would be the size of a cooking pot and contain fewer moving parts—reducing the weight of the engine by 30%. It would also enable a vehicle that could use 60% of its fuel for propulsion.

None

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermoelectric generator shorting system provides the capability to monitor and short-out individual thermoelectric couples in the event of failure. This makes the series configured thermoelectric generator robust to individual thermoelectric couple failure. Open circuit detection of the thermoelectric couples and the associated short control is a key technique to ensure normal functionality of the TE generator under failure of individual TE couples. This report describes a five-year effort whose goal was the understanding the issues related to the development of a thermoelectric energy recovery device for a Class-8 truck. Likely materials and important issues related to the utility of this generator were identified. Several prototype generators were constructed and demonstrated. The generators developed demonstrated several new concepts including advanced insulation, couple bypass technology and the first implementation of skutterudite thermoelectric material in a generator design. Additional work will be required to bring this system to fruition. However, such generators offer the possibility of converting energy that is otherwise wasted to useful electric power. Uur studies indicate that this can be accomplished in a cost-effective manner for this application.

None

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

The effect of TDC temperature and density on the liquid-phase fuel penetration in a D.I. Diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A parametric study of the liquid-phase fuel penetration of evaporating Diesel fuel jets has been conducted in a directinjection Diesel engine using laser elastic-scatter imaging. The experiments were conducted in an optically accessible Diesel engine of the ``heavy-duty`` size class at a representative medium speed (1200 rpm) operating condition. The density and temperature at TDC were varied systematically by adjusting the intake temperature and pressure. At all operating conditions the measurements show that initially the liquid fuel penetrates almost linearly with increasing crank angle until reaching a maximum length. Then, the liquid-fuel penetration length remains fairly constant although fuel injection continues. At a TDC density of 16.6 kg/m{sup 3} and a temperature of about 1000 K the maximum penetration length is approximately 23 mm. However, it varies significantly as TDC conditions are changed, with the liquid-length being less at higher temperatures and at higher densities. The corresponding apparent heat release rate plots are presented and the results of the liquid-phase fuel penetration are discussed with respect to the ignition delay and premixed bum fraction.

Espey, C. [Daimler-Benz AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Numerical simulation of hydrothermal salt separation process and analysis and cost estimating of shipboard liquid waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to environmental regulations, waste water disposal for US Navy ships has become a requirement which impacts both operations and the US Navy's budget. In 2006, the cost for waste water disposal Navy-wide was 54 million ...

Hunt, Andrew Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Planning for the Management and Disposition of Newly Generated TRU Waste from REDC  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the waste characteristics of newly generated transuranic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the basic certification structure that will be proposed by the University of Tennessee-Battelle and Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for this waste stream. The characterization approach uses information derived from the active production operations as acceptable knowledge for the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center transuranic waste. The characterization approach includes smear data taken from processing and waste staging hot cells, as well as analytical data on product and liquid waste streams going to liquid waste disposal. Bechtel Jacobs Company and University of Tennessee-Battelle are currently developing the elements of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-compliant program with a plan to be certified by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for shipment of newly generated transuranic waste in the next few years. The current activities include developing interface plans, program documents, and waste stream specific procedures.

Coffey, D. E.; Forrester, T. W.; Krause, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Implementation Plan for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These commitments were initially submitted in ES/ER-17&Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The plans and schedules for implementing the FFA compliance program that were submitted in ES/ER-17&Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tanks Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are updated in this document. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro-cogeneration System based on a Modified Stirling Engine and Fuelled by a Wood Derived Fas Pyrolysis Liquid-ethanol Blend.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A residential micro-cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine unit was modified to operate with wood derived fast pyrolysis liquid (bio-oil)-ethanol blend. A pilot stabilized… (more)

Khan, Umer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Waste Form Performance Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

293

Organization - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

294

Achievements: Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

295

Waste form product characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has operated nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to support national interests for several decades. Since 1953, it has supported the development of technologies for the storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and the resultant wastes. However, the 1992 decision to discontinue reprocessing of SNF has left nearly 768 MT of SNF in storage at the INEL with unspecified plans for future dispositioning. Past reprocessing of these fuels for uranium and other resource recovery has resulted in the production of 3800 M{sup 3} calcine and a total inventory of 7600 M{sup 3} of radioactive liquids (1900 M{sup 3} destined for immediate calcination and the remaining sodium-bearing waste requiring further treatment before calcination). These issues, along with increased environmental compliance within DOE and its contractors, mandate operation of current and future facilities in an environmentally responsible manner. This will require satisfactory resolution of spent fuel and waste disposal issues resulting from the past activities. A national policy which identifies requirements for the disposal of SNF and high level wastes (HLW) has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) Sec.8,(b) para(3)) [1982]. The materials have to be conditioned or treated, then packaged for disposal while meeting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The spent fuel and HLW located at the INEL will have to be put into a form and package that meets these regulatory criteria. The emphasis of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) future operations has shifted toward investigating, testing, and selecting technologies to prepare current and future spent fuels and waste for final disposal. This preparation for disposal may include mechanical, physical and/or chemical processes, and may differ for each of the various fuels and wastes.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

EA-0843: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste Processing, Idaho Falls, Idaho EA-0843: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste...

297

Thermodynamic estimation of minor element distribution between immiscible liquids in Fe-Cu-based metal phase generated in melting treatment of municipal solid wastes  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two liquids separation of metal occurs in the melting of municipal solid waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of PGMs etc. between two liquid metal phases is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quite simple thermodynamic model is applied to predict the distribution ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au and Ag originated from WEEE are found to be concentrated into Cu-rich phase. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has become an important target in managing material cycles from the viewpoint of not only waste management and control of environmental pollution but also resource conservation. This study investigated the distribution tendency of trace elements in municipal solid waste (MSW) or incinerator ash, including valuable non-ferrous metals (Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, Mo, Ti, V, W, Zr), precious group metals (PGMs) originated from WEEE (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt), and others (Al, B, Pb, Si), between Fe-rich and Cu-rich metal phases by means of simple thermodynamic calculations. Most of the typical alloying elements for steel (Co, Cr, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti, V, and W) and Rh were preferentially distributed into the Fe-rich phase. PGMs, such as Au, Ag, and Pd, were enriched in the Cu-rich phase, whereas Pt was almost equally distributed into both phases. Since the primary metallurgical processing of Cu is followed by an electrolysis for refining, and since PGMs in crude copper have been industrially recovered from the resulting anode slime, our results indicated that Ag, Au, and Pd could be effectively recovered from MSW if the Cu-rich phase could be selectively collected.

Lu, X. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, The University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Nakajima, K.; Sakanakura, H. [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Matsubae, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Bai, H. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, The University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Nagasaka, T., E-mail: t-nagasaka@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

In Situ Grouting of Liquid Waste Disposal Trenches and Experimental Reactor Fuel Disposal Wells at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the early to mid-1960's, liquid low-level wastes (LLLW) generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were disposed of in specially-constructed, gravel-filled trenches within the Melton Valley watershed at the lab. The initial selected remedy for Trenches 5 and 7 was in situ vitrification; however, an amendment to the record of decision changed the remedy to in situ grouting of the trenches. The work was accomplished by filling the void space within the crushed stone section of each trench with cementitious grout. The contaminated soil surrounding the trenches (1-m perimeter) was then grouted with acrylamide grout. At the HRE fuel wells, a 1-m ring of soil surrounding the fuel wells was grouted with acrylamide. The results of the hydraulic conductivity tests ranged from 4.74 x 10{sup -6} to 3.60 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec, values that were well below the 1 x 10{sup -5} cm/sec design criterion. In summary: The ISG Project was conducted to decrease hydraulic conductivity and thereby decrease water flow and contaminate migration from the area of the trenches. The initial remedy for Trenches 5 and 7 in the Melton Valley ROD was for in situ vitrification of the trench matrix. The remedy was changed to in situ grouting of the trenches and HRE fuel wells through an amendment to the ROD after moisture was found in the trenches. The grouting of the trenches was accomplished by filling the void space within the crushed stone section of each trench with cementitious grout. The contaminated soil surrounding the trenches (1-m perimeter) was then grouted with acrylamide grout to further reduce water infiltration. Soil backfill above each of the seven HRE fuel wells was removed to a depth of approximately 1 m by augering, and the soils were replaced with a cement plug to prevent water infiltration from migrating down the original borehole. Soil surrounding the fuel wells was then grouted with acrylamide to ensure water infiltration through the HRE fuel wells is prevented. A summary of the quantities used is shown. After completion of grouting, in-situ hydraulic conductivities of the grouted materials were measured to verify attainment of the design objective. The areas were then covered with multi-layer caps as part of the MV hydrologic isolation project. (authors)

Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J.; Lambert, R. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trujillo, E. [BWXT Pantex, LLC, Amarillo, TX (United States); Julius, J. [U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Prediction of performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fueled with biodiesel produced from waste frying palm oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its fuel properties and compatibility with the petroleum-based diesel fuel (PBDF). Therefore, in this study, the prediction of the engine performance and exhaust emissions is carried ... Keywords: ANN, Biodiesel, Diesel engine, Emissions, Engine performance

Mustafa Canakci; Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Erol Arcaklioglu; Ahmet Erdil

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

Reaven, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part B  

SciTech Connect

Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Engineering study - alternatives for SHMS high temperature/moisture gas sample conditioners for the aging waste facility  

SciTech Connect

The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems have been experiencing high temperature/moisture problems with gas samples from the Aging Waste Tanks. These moist hot gas samples have stopped the operation of the SHMS units on tanks AZ-101, AZ-102, and AY-102. This study looks at alternatives for gas sample conditioners for the Aging Waste Facility.

THOMPSON, J.F.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

303

RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN CHEMISTRY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange technology is being considered for cesium removal using a polymer resin made of resorcinol formaldehyde that has been engineered into microspheres. The waste under study is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste; therefore, the resin performance was evaluated with actual dissolved salt waste. The ion exchange performance and resin chemistry results are discussed.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

High level waste facilities -- Continuing operation or orderly shutdown  

SciTech Connect

Two options for Environmental Impact Statement No action alternatives describe operation of the radioactive liquid waste facilities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The first alternative describes continued operation of all facilities as planned and budgeted through 2020. Institutional control for 100 years would follow shutdown of operational facilities. Alternatively, the facilities would be shut down in an orderly fashion without completing planned activities. The facilities and associated operations are described. Remaining sodium bearing liquid waste will be converted to solid calcine in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) or will be left in the waste tanks. The calcine solids will be stored in the existing Calcine Solids Storage Facilities (CSSF). Regulatory and cost impacts are discussed.

Decker, L.A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Technology of high-level nuclear waste disposal. Advances in the science and engineering of the management of high-level nuclear wastes. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The twenty papers in this volume are divided into three parts: site exploration and characterization; repository development and design; and waste package development and design. These papers represent the status of technology that existed in 1981 and 1982. Individual papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Hofmann, P.L. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

PILOT-SCALE TEST RESULTS OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA -11364  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

CORBETT JE; TEDESCH AR; WILSON RA; BECK TH; LARKIN J

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loss in class I waste injection wells, in: Apps J.A. andR.F. , An overview of injection well history in the Unitedmeasures for Class I injection wells, in Apps J.A. and Tsang

Tsang, C.-F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Preliminary parametric performance assessment of potential final waste forms for alpha low-level waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a preliminary parametric performance assessment (PA) of potential waste disposal systems for alpha-contaminated, mixed, low-level waste (ALLW) currently stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of INEL. The ALLW, which contains from 10 to 100 nCi/g of transuranic (TRU) radionuclides, is awaiting treatment and disposal. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of several parameters on the radiological-confinement performance of potential disposal systems for the ALLW. The principal emphasis was on the performance of final waste forms (FWFs). Three categories of FWF (cement, glass, and ceramic) were addressed by evaluating the performance of two limiting FWFs for each category. Performance at five conceptual disposal sites was evaluated to illustrate the effects of site characteristics on the performance of the total disposal system. Other parameters investigated for effects on receptor dose included inventory assumptions, TRU radionuclide concentration, FWF fracture, disposal depth, water infiltration rates, subsurface-transport modeling assumptions, receptor well location, intrusion scenario assumptions, and the absence of waste immobilization. These and other factors were varied singly and in some combinations. The results indicate that compliance of the treated and disposed ALLW with the performance objectives depends on the assumptions made, as well as on the FWF and the disposal site. Some combinations result in compliance, while others do not. The implications of these results for decision making relative to treatment and disposal of the INEL ALLW are discussed. The report compares the degree of conservatism in this preliminary parametric PA against that in four other PAs and one risk assessment. All of the assessments addressed the same disposal site, but different wastes. The report also presents a qualitative evaluation of the uncertainties in the PA and makes recommendations for further study.

Smith, T.H.; Sussman, M.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Myers, J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; DeBiase, T.A.; Goodrich, M.T.; DeWitt, D. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effect of directed port air flow on liquid fuel transport in a port fuel injected spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With highly efficient modem catalysts, startup HC emissions have become a significant portion of the trip total. Liquid fuel is a major source of HC emissions during the cold start and fast idle period. Thus the control ...

Scaringe, Robert J. (Robert Joseph)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Decommissioning and safety issues of liquid-mercury waste generated from high power spallation sources with particle accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large spallation sources are intended to be constructed in Europe (EURISOL nuclear physics facility and ESS-European Spallation Source). These facilities accumulate more than 20 metric tons of irradiated mercury in the target, which has to be treated as highly radioactive and chemo-toxic waste. Because solids are the only appropriate (immobile) form for this radiotoxic and toxic type of waste solidification is required for irradiated mercury. Our irradiation experimental studies on mercury waste revealed that mercury sulfide is a reasonable solid for disposal and shows larger stability in assumed accidents with water ingress in a repository compared to amalgams. For preparation of mercury sulfide a wet process is more suitable than a dry one. It is easier to perform under hot cell conditions and allows complete Hg-conversion. Embedding HgS in a cementitious matrix increases its stability.

Chiriki, S; Odoj, R; Moormann, R; Hinssen, H. K; Bukaemskiy, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Engineering modifications to existing waste atactic polypropylene to fuel conversion plant, Novamont Corp. , LaPorte, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Procedyne Corp. demonstrated a process for the conversion of waste atactic polypropylene to fuel oil on Contract No. EC-77-C-01-5077 dated 9/12/77. The demonstration program was successful and resulted in construction of the first commercial scale Waste Atactic to Fuel Conversion plant at the Novamont Corp. polypropylene producing plant in Texas. The design capacity of the plant is 17,000,000 lbs per year of waste atactic polypropylene converted to 2,300,000 gallons per year of fuel oil. The commercial plant has been in startup operation since early 1980. The conversion process has been successfully operated; however, there are four areas which are giving difficulties and preventing stable long-term operation. The report is accompanied by a quotation for the necessary modifications for the plant to meet design basis operation. The price of this work is $282,729. Delivery of all items will be before March 30, 1981. It is anticipated that the proposed modifications will eliminate current operating difficulties. The success of the commercial operation on the Novamont Corp. plant, LaPorte, Texas, is fundamentally important to the success of the total waste atactic to fuel conversion program and to the waste plastic to fuel conversion program.

Amato, A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

LNG – Engine Delivery  

This is a method of improved delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) within an engine delivery system. The LNG gas is first be pumped into the insulated ...

313

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

314

Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) underground storage tanks (Uses) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. A total of 55 FFA Category D inactive LLLW tanks are discussed in this manual. Of the 39 tanks at ORNL that have been accepted into the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program, all have been sampled for preliminary characterization, except for 5 tanks that were found to be empty plus I that was found not to exist. The remaining 16 tanks are in the Waste Management (WM) Program. Twelve were sampled for preliminary characterization, and four were found empty. Each sampled tank was scored on a scale of I to 5 on the basis of three criteria: (1) leak characteristics, (2) location, and (3) toxicological characteristics of residual sludges and liquids. Each criterion was assigned a weighing factor based on perceived importance. The criterion score multiplied by the weighting factor equaled the tank`s total score for that criterion. The three weighted criterion scores for each tank were then summed for a total score for that tank. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending rank order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation. Of the 54 tanks sampled in the risk characterization, 23 tanks scored 16 or higher, 11 scored between 10 and 15, 5 scored between 4 and 9, and 15 scored 3 or less.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) underground storage tanks (USTs) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. A total of 55 FFA Category D inactive LLLW tanks are discussed in this manual. Of the 39 tanks at ORNL that have been accepted into the Environmental Restoration (ER) Pregrain, all have been sampled for preliminary characterization, except for 5 tanks that were found to be empty plus 1 that was found not to exist. The remaining 16 tanks are in the Waste Management (WM) Program. Twelve were sampled for preliminary characterization, and four were found empty. Each sampled tank was scored on a scale of I to 5 on the basis of three criteria: (1) leak characteristics, (2) location, and (3) toxicological characteristics of residual sludges and liquids. Each criterion was assigned a weighing factor based on perceived importance. The criterion score multiplied by the weighting factor equaled the tank`s total score for that criterion. The three weighted criterion scores for each tank were then summed for a total score for that tank. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending rank order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation. Of the 54 tanks sampled in the risk characterization, 23 tanks scored 16 or higher, 11 scored between 10 and 15, 5 scored between 4 and 9, and 15 scored 3 or less.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburg, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

Zaitsev, Boris N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M. (St. Petersburg, RU); Lazarev, Leonard N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Dzekun, Evgeniy G. (Ozersk, RU); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Monitoring the Long-Term Performance of Engineered Containment Systems for Radioactive Waste: What can We Learn From Ecological Monitoring Approaches?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to technical and economic limitations, chemical and radioactive wastes will require isolation in engineered containment facilities at many sites including the former nuclear weapons facilities within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Also, while our experience with currently favored designs is only a few decades at best, the materials being isolated may require effective containment for hundreds to thousands of years. It is becoming clear that without monitoring of both the engineered barriers and the associated institutional controls and intervention, engineered containment systems will ultimately fail. Monitoring of engineered barriers is often limited to groundwater monitoring and physical inspections. The database managed by the DOE Office of Legacy Management provides information concerning barrier performance at uranium mill tailings sites over several years to decades. The current monitoring approach that focuses on groundwater, while necessary for regulatory compliance, does not provide an early warning. Rather, it provides detection of barrier failure as opposed to indications of barrier degradation. Identification and monitoring of precursors to failure are needed. Furthermore, existing monitoring strategies typically omit ecological monitoring. Additional understanding of the interaction between barrier degradation and ecological dynamics could provide a basis for monitoring and managing barriers as well. Monitoring the long-term performance of systems of interest is a challenge not only to the Department of Energy but to other institutions and federal agencies. National Environmental Research Parks (NERP), National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERR), and Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) areas operated by the US government agencies are designed with the specific goal of intensely monitoring and conducting research over long time scales and within diverse geographical settings. This presentation will address the importance of understanding ecological interactions as they are expressed over decades and centuries in respect to federal long-term monitoring programs, and to delineate how multifaceted sets of ecological data can be used to interpret the overall integrity of ecosystems. Furthermore, important components of these programs will be identified that may have merit in the design of long-term monitoring programs for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites. (authors)

Traynham, B. [Vanderbilt Univ., Research Assistant, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Clarke, J.H. [Vanderbilt Univ., Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Burger, J. [Rutgers Univ., Professor, Biology (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0290-D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-1-1 E-1-1 APPENDIX E TECHNICAL METHODOLOGIES AND KEY DATA E-1 SOCIOECONOMICS E-1.1 Methodology and Key Assumptions for Socioeconomics The socioeconomic impact analysis evaluates both the impacts on regional economic activity, as measured by changes in employment and earnings, and the impacts on communities surrounding Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), as measured by changes in population and the demand for housing and public services. The study area comprises a seven-county Region of Influence (ROI) and socioeconomic impacts are estimated for each of the proposed Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) alternatives. The methodology employed for the AMWTP Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is similar to that used in the Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Report of results of the vapor vacuum extraction test at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the state of Idaho  

SciTech Connect

A test-scale vapor vacuum extraction (VVE) system was installed and operated at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), which is west of Idaho Falls, Idaho and is managed by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office. The system was constructed for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of VVE or vapor venting technology to abate a volatile organic compound (VOC) plume located in the vadose zone below the subsurface disposal area at the complex. To date, the system has been operated for two periods, a two-week test and a four-month test. The purpose of the two-week test was to determine what would be extracted from the borehole and to verify the design of the system to handle what would be extracted.

Chatwin, T.D.; Miyasaki, D.H.; Sisson, J.B.; Sondrup, A.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Report of results of the vapor vacuum extraction test at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the state of Idaho  

SciTech Connect

A test-scale vapor vacuum extraction (VVE) system was installed and operated at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), which is west of Idaho Falls, Idaho and is managed by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office. The system was constructed for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of VVE or vapor venting technology to abate a volatile organic compound (VOC) plume located in the vadose zone below the subsurface disposal area at the complex. To date, the system has been operated for two periods, a two-week test and a four-month test. The purpose of the two-week test was to determine what would be extracted from the borehole and to verify the design of the system to handle what would be extracted.

Chatwin, T.D.; Miyasaki, D.H.; Sisson, J.B.; Sondrup, A.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ICPP waste management technology development program  

SciTech Connect

A program has been implemented at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) to identify technologies for disposing of sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, radioactive calcine, and irradiated spent fuel stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The sodium bearing waste and calcine, have resulted from ICPP reprocessing operations conducted since 1953. The irradiated spent fuel consists of various fuel compositions and ranges from complete fuel elements to fuel pieces for which no reprocessing flowsheet had been identified. The program includes a very strong systems analysis program to assure complete consideration of all issues (technical, economic, safety, environmental, etc.) affecting final disposal of the waste and spent fuel. A major goal of the program is to assure the final implementation is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.; Knecht, D.A. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bonkoski, M.J. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst: Final Report, 24 February 2004 -- 23 February 2006  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas NREL Technical Monitor: R. Parish Prepared under Subcontract No. ZCI-4-32049-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

325

Executive Bios: Christopher Grandy - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

326

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

327

Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

328

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

329

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

330

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

331

Fuel Cycle Technologies Program - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

332

International Safety Projects - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

333

Michael C. Billone - Engineering Development and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

334

Facility Safety Assessment - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

335

Computer Facilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

336

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

337

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

338

Advanced Computation & Visualization - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

339

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

340

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Facilities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Safety - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

342

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

343

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

344

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

345

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

346

Secondary Waste Form Down Selection Data Package – Ceramicrete  

SciTech Connect

As part of high-level waste pretreatment and immobilized low activity waste processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility. Currently, four waste forms are being considered for stabilization and solidification of the liquid secondary wastes. These waste forms are Cast Stone, Ceramicrete, DuraLith, and Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer. The preferred alternative will be down selected from these four waste forms. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing data packages to support the down selection process. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilization and solidification of the liquid secondary wastes. The information included will be based on information available in the open literature and from data obtained from testing currently underway. This data package is for the Ceramicrete waste form. Ceramicrete is a relatively new engineering material developed at Argonne National Laboratory to treat radioactive and hazardous waste streams (e.g., Wagh 2004; Wagh et al. 1999a, 2003; Singh et al. 2000). This cement-like waste form can be used to treat solids, liquids, and sludges by chemical immobilization, microencapsulation, and/or macroencapsulation. The Ceramicrete technology is based on chemical reaction between phosphate anions and metal cations to form a strong, dense, durable, low porosity matrix that immobilizes hazardous and radioactive contaminants as insoluble phosphates and microencapsulates insoluble radioactive components and other constituents that do not form phosphates. Ceramicrete is a type of phosphate-bonded ceramic, which are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics. The Ceramicrete binder is formed through an acid-base reaction between calcined magnesium oxide (MgO; a base) and potassium hydrogen phosphate (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}; an acid) in aqueous solution. The reaction product sets at room temperature to form a highly crystalline material. During the reaction, the hazardous and radioactive contaminants also react with KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} to form highly insoluble phosphates. In this data package, physical property and waste acceptance data for Ceramicrete waste forms fabricated with wastes having compositions that were similar to those expected for secondary waste effluents, as well as secondary waste effluent simulants from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant were reviewed. With the exception of one secondary waste form formulation (25FA+25 W+1B.A. fabricated with the mixed simulant did not meet the compressive strength requirement), all the Ceramicrete waste forms that were reviewed met or exceeded Integrated Disposal Facility waste acceptance criteria.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Strategies for the cost effective treatment of Oak Ridge legacy wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and development treatment strategies for treatment or elimination of several Oak Ridge plant liquid, solid, and legacy wastes are detailed in this report. Treatment strategies for volumetrically contaminated nickel; enriched uranium-contaminated alkali metal fluorides; uranium-contaminated aluminum compressor blades; large, mercury-contaminated lithium isotope separations equipment; lithium process chlorine gas streams; high-concentration aluminum nitrate wastes, and high-volume, low-level nitrate wastes are discussed. Research needed to support engineering development of treatment processes is detailed.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Wilson, D.F.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Treatment option evaluation for liquid effluent secondary streams on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This study, conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), examines the range of secondary waste types and volumes likely to result from treatment of contaminated liquid effluents. Alternatives for treatment of these effluents were considered, taking into account the implementation of the ''best-available technology'' as assumed in current and ongoing engineering studies for treating the various liquid effluent waste streams. These treatment alternatives, and potential variations in the operating schedules for Hanford Site facilities generating contaminated liquid effluents, were evaluated to project an estimated range for the volume of each of the various secondary waste streams that are likely to be generated. The conclusions and recommendations were developed, based on these estimates. 23 refs., 34 figs., 16 tabs.

Holter, G.M.; Triplett, M.B.; Fow, C.L.; White, M.K.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Vitrified waste option study report  

SciTech Connect

A {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all radioactive high-level waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This report investigates vitrification treatment of all ICPP calcine, including the existing and future HLW calcine resulting from calcining liquid Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW). Currently, the SBW is stored in the tank farm at the ICPP. Vitrification of these wastes is an acceptable treatment method for complying with the Settlement Agreement. This method involves vitrifying the calcined waste and casting the vitrified mass into stainless steel canisters that will be ready to be moved out of the Idaho for disposal by 2035. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) until they are sent to a HLW national repository. The operating period for vitrification treatment will be from 2013 through 2032; all HLW will be treated and in storage by the end of 2032.

Lopez, D.A.; Kimmitt, R.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cementitious waste option scoping study report  

SciTech Connect

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

Air Products and Chemicals

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

Engineered Infills for Concrete Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... INEEL Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory ... a 240 MW thermal sodium–cooled, graphite ... for cement based waste forms which ...

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines - Direct Injection - Omnivorous Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Omnivorous Engine Omnivorous Engine Setup Omnivorous Engine Setup New engine technology has made possible engines that will operate on a wide variety of fuel inputs, from gasoline to naptha to ethanol to methanol, without driver intervention. Although flexible fuel vehicles have been produced in the millions, their engines have always been optimized for gasoline operation while accepting significant performance and efficiency degradations when using the alternative fuel. This project seeks to combine in-cylinder measurement technology, and advanced controls to optimize spark timing, the quantity and timing of injected fuel, to produce an "omnivorous engine"--one that will be able to run on any liquid spark ignition fuel with optimal efficiency and low

355

System Modeling of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect

To improve the system performance of the GHP, modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated by using ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Software, which is used to predict steady-state heating and cooling performance of variable-speed vapor compression air-to-air heat pumps for a wide range of operational variables. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine, the SHR can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% in rated operating conditions.

Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shen, Bo [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Simulation of logistics systems: simulation model for shipment of waste to the waste isolation pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy has agreed to ship 15,000 drums of cold war legacy waste from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This waste must undergo characterization ...

Cathy J. Barnard; David H. Van Haaften

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of a pilot safety information document (PSID) for the replacement of radioactive liquid waste treatment facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on recent decisions made by Los Alamos National Laboratory concerning the development of site-wide National Environmental Policy Act documents, an effort was undertaken to develop a Pilot Safety Information Document (PSID) for the replacement Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. The PSID documents risk analysis for the proposed facility and some of the alternatives, accident analysis, radioactive and hazardous material doses to off-site individuals, and the cumulative safety risk from adjacent facilities. In addition, this study also compared two methods for calculating the consequences of a radioactive spill. The methods compared were the Superfund model and the release fraction model. It was determined that the release fraction model gives a more realistic estimate of the doses incurred as the result of an accident, and that the Superfund model should be used for estimating the dose before and during the remediation effort. The cumulative safety risk was determined by calculating the exceedance probability if the individual dose from four geographically related facilities. The risk for cancer fatalities was determined to be within the DOE's Nuclear Safety Policy Goals.

Selvage, Ronald Derek

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE (HMI) EVALUATION OF ROOMS TA-50-1-60/60A AT THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY (RLWTF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This effort addressed an evaluation of human machine interfaces (HMIs) in Room TA-50-1-60/60A of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The evaluation was performed in accordance with guidance outlined in DOE-STD-3009, DOE Standard Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, 2006 [DOE 2006]. Specifically, Chapter 13 of DOE 2006 highlights the 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, 2012, [CFR 2012] and DOE G 421.1-2 [DOE 2001a] requirements as they relate to the human factors process and, in this case, the safety of the RLWTF. The RLWTF is a Hazard Category 3 facility and, consequently, does not have safety-class (SSCs). However, safety-significant SSCs are identified. The transuranic (TRU) wastewater tanks and associated piping are the only safety-significant SSCs in Rooms TA-50-1-60/60A [LANL 2010]. Hence, the human factors evaluation described herein is only applicable to this particular assemblage of tanks and piping.

Gilmore, Walter E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stender, Kerith K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terrel J. Spears Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste Disposition Project 2 Waste Disposition Project - Mission Radioactive Liquid Waste - Tank Waste Stabilization and Disposition - Disposition 36 million gallons of radioactive liquid waste - Close 49 underground storage tanks in which the waste now resides 3 36.7 Million 33.7 Mgal (92%) 3.0 Mgal (8%) Saltcake Sludge Salt Supernate Volume Curies 397 Million Curies (MCi) 212 MCi (54%) 185 MCi (46%) Gallons (Mgal) 36.5 Million 33.5 Mgal (92%) 3.0 Mgal (8%) Liquid Waste Background Liquid Waste Background * 2 tanks closed * 49 tanks remaining to close - aging, carbon steel - 27 compliant, 22 non-compliant - 12 have known leak sites

360

Treatability studies for polyethylene encapsulation of INEL low-level mixed wastes. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Treatability studies for polyethylene encapsulation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level mixed wastes were conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The treatability work, which included thermal screening and/or processibility testing, was performed on priority candidate wastes identified by INEL to determine the applicability of polyethylene encapsulation for the solidification and stabilization of these mixed wastes. The candidate wastes selected for this preliminary study were Eutectic Salts, Ion Exchange Resins, Activated Carbons, Freon Contaminated Rags, TAN TURCO Decon 4502, ICPP Sodium Bearing Liquid Waste, and HTRE-3 Acid Spill Clean-up. Thermal screening was conducted for some of these wastes to determine the thermal stability of the wastes under expected pretreatment and processing conditions. Processibility testing to determine whether the wastes were amenable to extrusion processing included monitoring feed consistency, extruder output consistency, waste production homogeneity, and waste form performance. Processing parameters were not optimized within the scope of this study. However, based on the treatability results, polyethylene encapsulation does appear applicable as a primary or secondary treatment for most of these wastes.

Lageraaen, P.R.; Patel, B.R.; Kalb, P.D.; Adams, J.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CRYSTALLIZATION IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASSES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION WTP ENGINEERING DIVISION  

SciTech Connect

Various circumstances influence crystallization in glassmaking, for example: (1) crystals nucleate and grow before the glass-forming melt occurs; (2) crystals grow or dissolve in flowing melt and during changing temperature; (3) crystals move under the influence of gravity; (4) crystals agglomerate and interact with gas bubbles; (5) high-level wastes (HLW) are mixtures of a large number of components in unusual proportions; (6) melter processing of HLW and the slow cooling of HLW glass in canisters provides an opportunity for a variety of crystalline forms to precipitate; (7) settling of crystals in a HLW glass melter may produce undesirable sludge at the melter bottom; and (8) crystallization of the glass product may increase, but also ruin chemical durability. The conclusions are: (1) crystal growth and dissolution typically proceed in a convective medium at changing temperature; (2) to represent crystallization or dissolution the kinetics must be expressed in the form of rate equations, such as dC/dt = f(C,T) and the temperature dependence of kinetic coefficients and equilibrium concentrations must be accounted for; and (3) non-equilibrium phenomena commonly occur - metastable crystallization, periodic distribution of crystals; and dendritic crystal growth.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

Gong, W. L.; Lutz, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

On the role of external combustion engines for on-site power generation  

SciTech Connect

Stationary external combustion engines are prime movers that have potential for becoming viable power generation machines in both the residential/commercial and industrial sectors. These large engines are being developed with the capability to employ alternative and/or non-scarce fuels. Energy sources under consideration include coal, coal derived liquids and gases, low-grade petroleum residues, biomass, and municipal wastes. Advantages of external combustion engines relative to conventional prime movers are: greater fuel efficiency, reduced environmental impacts (noise and emissions), and a high degree of fuel flexibility. External combustion engines include steam turbines, Stirling cycle engines, and externally-fired Brayton gas turbines. Among the various applications for external combustion engines are: total energy plants, ICES, industrial cogeneration, small municipal generating plants, and pumping stations. It is not necessary for all the heat supplied an external combustion engine to come from a single source. Various non-coal sources that can be used either independently or integrated with others to supply heat to external combustion engines include solar energy, municipal wastes, biomass, and geothermal. Stirling engine based systems are described. The development of the Stirling engine is briefly discussed. (MCW)

Holtz, R.E.; Uherka, K.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

TSA waste stream and final waste form composition  

SciTech Connect

A final vitrified waste form composition, based upon the chemical compositions of the input waste streams, is recommended for the transuranic-contaminated waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The quantities of waste are large with a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of various waste materials. It is therefore impractical to mix the input waste streams into an ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste. As a result, waste stream input to a melter could vary widely in composition, with the potential of affecting the composition and properties of the final waste form. This work examines the extent of the variation in the input waste streams, as well as the final waste form under conditions of adding different amounts of soil. Five prominent Rocky Flats Plant 740 waste streams are considered, as well as nonspecial metals and the ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste streams. The metals waste stream is the most extreme variation and results indicate that if an average of approximately 60 wt% of the mixture is soil, the final waste form will be predominantly silica, alumina, alkaline earth oxides, and iron oxide. This composition will have consistent properties in the final waste form, including high leach resistance, irrespective of the variation in waste stream. For other waste streams, much less or no soil could be required to yield a leach resistant waste form but with varying properties.

Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Development and Deployment of Advanced Corrosion Monitoring Systems for High-Level Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a collaborative technology development program, sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area, to use electrochemical noise (EN) for corrosion monitoring in underground storage tanks. These tanks, made of carbon or stainless steels, contain high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) generated by weapons production or radioactive liquid waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing activities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The term EN is used to describe low frequency fluctuations in current and voltage measurements associated with corrosion. In their most basic form, EN-based corrosion monitoring systems measure and record these fluctuations over time from electrodes immersed in the environment of interest--in this case, radioactive tank waste. The resulting EN signals have characteristic patterns for different corrosion mechanisms. In recent years, engineers and scientists from several DOE sites, in collaboration with several private companies, have conducted laboratory studies and field applications to correlate the EN signals with corrosion mechanisms active in the radioactive waste tanks. The participating DOE sites are Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge Reservation and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The commercial vendors have included HiLine Engineering and Fabrication, Inc., EIC Laboratories, Inc., and AEA Technologies. Successful deployment of the EN technology will yield improved information of waste tank corrosion conditions, better tank management, and lower overall cost.

Terry, M. T.; Edgemon, G. L.; Mickalonis, J. I.; Mizia, R. E.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Development and deployment of advanced corrosion monitoring systems for high-level waste tanks.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a collaborative technology development program, sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area, to use electrochemical noise (EN) for corrosion monitoring in underground storage tanks. These tanks, made of carbon or stainless steels, contain high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) generated by weapons production or radioactive liquid waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing activities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The term EN is used to describe low frequency fluctuations in current and voltage measurements associated with corrosion. In their most basic form, EN-based corrosion monitoring systems measure and record these fluctuations over time from electrodes immersed in the environment of interest - in this case, radioactive tank waste. The resulting EN signals have characteristic patterns for different corrosion mechanisms. In recent years, engineers and scientists from several DOE sites, in collaboration with several private companies, have conducted laboratory studies and field applications to correlate the EN signals with corrosion mechanisms active in the radioactive waste tanks. The participating DOE sites are Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge Reservation and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The commercial vendors have included HiLine Engineering and Fabrication, Inc., EIC Laboratories, Inc., and M A Technologies. Successful deployment of the EN technology will yield improved information of waste tank corrosion conditions, better tank management, and lower overall cost.

Terry, M. T. (Michael T.); Edgemon, G. L. (Glenn L.); Mickalonis, J. I. (John I.); Mizia, R. E. (Ronald E.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

HYDROCARBON LIQUID FLOW CALIBRATION SERVICE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and is the cross correlation coefficient ... a NIST Hydrocarbon Liquid Flow Calibration Facility ... FED2004-56790, 2004 Heat Transfer/Fluids Engineering ...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Radioactive Liquid Processing Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents guidance for utility liquid radwaste processing program managers. The document is a summation of utility and vendor processing experience, and is intended for use as a tool to enhance liquid radwaste processing programs. Utilization of this information will result in optimized system performance, and a reduction in waste volumes and program costs.

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

369

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION SUBMERGED BED SCRUBBER CONDENSATE DISPOSITION PROJECT - ABSTRACT # 13460  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

YANOCHO RM; CORCORAN C

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

372

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Federal Facility Agreement plans and schedules for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section 9 and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review or approval. The initial issue of this document in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. The current revision of this document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA, and it summarizes the progress that has been made over the past year. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System, the objectives of the FFA, the organization that has been established to bring the system into compliance, and the plans for achieving compliance. Chapters 2 through 7 of this report contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

EIS-0290: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) EIS-0290: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory...

376

Cost of meeting geothermal liquid effluent disposal regulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is presented on the characteristics of liquid wastes and the available disposal options. Regulations that may directly or indirectly influence liquid waste disposal are reviewed. An assessment of the available wastewater-treatment systems is provided. A case study of expected liquid-waste-treatment and disposal costs is summarized. (MHR)

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Price, B.A.; Rogers, E.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Developing Engineered Fuel (Briquettes) Using Fly Ash from the Aquila Coal-Fired Power Plant in Canon City and Locally Available Biomass Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore the feasibility of producing engineered fuels from a combination of renewable and non renewable energy sources. The components are flyash (containing coal fines) and locally available biomass waste. The constraints were such that no other binder additives were to be added. Listed below are the main accomplishments of the project: (1) Determination of the carbon content of the flyash sample from the Aquila plant. It was found to be around 43%. (2) Experiments were carried out using a model which simulates the press process of a wood pellet machine, i.e. a bench press machine with a close chamber, to find out the ideal ratio of wood and fly ash to be mixed to get the desired briquette. The ideal ratio was found to have 60% wood and 40% flyash. (3) The moisture content required to produce the briquettes was found to be anything below 5.8%. (4) The most suitable pressure required to extract the lignin form the wood and cause the binding of the mixture was determined to be 3000psi. At this pressure, the briquettes withstood an average of 150psi on its lateral side. (5) An energy content analysis was performed and the BTU content was determined to be approximately 8912 BTU/lb. (6) The environmental analysis was carried out and no abnormalities were noted. (7) Industrial visits were made to pellet manufacturing plants to investigate the most suitable manufacturing process for the briquettes. (8) A simulation model of extrusion process was developed to explore the possibility of using a cattle feed plant operating on extrusion process to produce briquettes. (9) Attempt to produce 2 tons of briquettes was not successful. The research team conducted a trial production run at a Feed Mill in La Junta, CO to produce two (2) tons of briquettes using the extrusion process in place. The goal was to, immediately after producing the briquettes; send them through Aquila's current system to test the ability of the briquettes to flow through the system without requiring any equipment or process changes. (10) Although the above attempt failed, the plant is still interested in producing briquettes. (11) An economic analysis of investing in a production facility manufacturing such briquettes was conducted to determine the economic viability of the project. Such a project is estimated to have an internal rate of return of 14% and net present value of about $400,000. (12) An engineering independent study class (4 students) is now working on selecting a site near the power plant and determining the layout of the future plant that will produce briquettes.

H. Carrasco; H. Sarper

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Executive Bios: Dr. Robert N. Hill - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

379

Executive Bios: Dr. David C. Wade - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

380

Executive Bios: Jerome L. Gaston - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Executive Bios: A. C. (Paul) Raptis - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

382

Executive Bios: Dr. Hussein S. Khalil - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

383

Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

384

Executive Bios: Dr. Temitope Taiwo - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

385

Sloshing response of module-type worm tank - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

386

Executive Bios: Dr. Thomas F. Ewing - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

387

Executive Bios: Dr. John G. Stevens - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

388

Dr. Mitchell T. Farmer - Engineering Development and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

389

Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) in the News - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

390

Executive Bios: Dr. Pete Heine - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

391

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

392

Executive Bios: Dr. Tanju Sofu - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

393

Risk and Safety Assessments - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

394

Executive Bios: Dr. Ken Natesan - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

395

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

396

Carbon Material Based Heat Exchanger for Waste Heat Recovery ...  

Industrial processing plants Nuclear power Solar power ... Carbon Material Based Heat Exchanger for Waste Heat Recovery from Engine Exhaust Contact:

397

Unit Process Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurg...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

398

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear material production operations at SRS resulted in the generation of liquid radioactive waste that is being stored, on an interim basis, in 49 underground waste storage tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms.

400

Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Engine Combustion Engine Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Combustion Engine Research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Support for the delisting of decontaminated liquid chemical surety materials as listed hazardous waste from specific sources (state) MD02 in COMAR 10. 51. 02. 16-1. Technical report, December 1987-February 1988  

SciTech Connect

Maryland recently enacted regulations that listed decontaminated residues of certain chemical warfare agents as hazardous wastes. The State would consider delisting if the Army document the effects of its decontamination procedures. Army specialists at U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center (CRDEC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, have had exhaustive experience in this area since 1918 when chemical agents were first used in combat in World War I. Competence accrued during this 70-year legacy includes destruction of laboratory and training wastes, combat decontamination, and largescale demilitarization of unserviceable and obsolete agent-filled munitions. The facts and circumstances enumerated in this document indicate that current decontamination practices are safe, scientifically valid, and result in the total destruction of agents in questions.

Durst, H.D.; Sarver, E.W.; Yurow, H.W.; Beaudry, W.T.; D'Eramo, P.A.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste - General Presentation Modular Hot Cell Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Murray Paul Murray Oak Ridge, TN July 29, 2009 Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste- GENERAL PRESENTATION MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY - July 29, 2009 ADAPTING AREVA'S TECHNOLOGY AREVA Worldwide Nuclear Lifecycle Transmission & Distribution Renewable Energy AREVA US Nuclear Fuel Services Nuclear Engineering Services AREVA Federal Services, LLC. (AFS) Federal Services Major Projects * MOX-MFFF * Yucca Mountain Project * DUF6 * Plateau Remediation Contract * Washington River Closure Project * SRS Liquid Waste AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY - July 29, 2009 ADAPTING AREVA'S TECHNOLOGY AFS Technology Provider

403

Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 18, 2010 What are Secondary Wastes? Process condensates and scrubber andor off-gas treatment liquids from the pretreatment and ILAW melter facilities at the Hanford WTP....

404

Removal of radioisotopes from waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises removing radioisotopes from waste liquids or solutions by passing these through filters and through a column containing a suitable salt of phosphoric acid. (Official Gazette)

Kirby, H.W.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0290-D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B-1 B-1 APPENDIX B FACILITY DESCRIPTION INFORMATION The following descriptions are taken from BNFL-5232-RCRA-01, Rev. 0, Hazardous Waste Management Act/Toxic Substances Control Act (HWMA/TSCA) permit application for the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) facility. B-1 Nonthermal Treatment Operations Waste containers within the nonthermal treatment areas are managed in a manner to prevent container rupture or leakage and to minimize exposure of AMWTP facility personnel. Operating standards used in conducting nonthermal treatment activities include: * Wastes slated for direct supercompaction have been identified by item description codes, generator- supplied information, and real-time radiography examination. Other wastes for supercompaction and macroencapsulation are sorted, segregated, and size reduced in the pretreatment lines prior to

406

1 Copyright 2010 by ASME ASME 2010 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes and a conceptual Liquid Piston Stirling Engine are immediate applications. Proposed is a thin

Van de Ven, James D.

407

Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of a practice lecture given in preparation for a review lecture on the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. The author begins by a brief review of the thermodynamic principles underlying the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. Remember from thermodynamics class that there are two kinds of heat engines, the heat engine or the prime mover which produces work from heat, and the refrigerator or heat pump that uses work to pump heat. The device operates between two thermal reservoirs at temperatures T{sub hot} and T{sub cold}. In the heat engine, heat flows into the device from the reservoir at T{sub hot}, produces work, and delivers waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub cold}. In the refrigerator, work flows into the device, lifting heat Q{sub cold} from reservoir at T{sub cold} and rejecting waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub hot}.

Swift, G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management Waste Management Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Read more Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Department has approximately 88 million gallons of liquid waste stored in underground tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic meters of solid waste derived from the liquids stored in bins. The current DOE estimated cost for retrieval, treatment and disposal of this waste exceeds $50 billion to be spent over several decades.

409

Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria Technology available for licensing: Using photosynthetic bacteria to produce biofuels. 30-70% of the fuel's waste can be used to...

410

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Combustion Advanced Combustion Engines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Advanced Combustion Engines

411

Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

Higley, B.A.

1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part Engineering Center of Columbia University investigated the waste management system of Montevideo, Uruguay

Columbia University

413

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Services » Waste Management » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Nuclear material production operations at SRS resulted in the generation of liquid radioactive waste that is being stored, on an interim basis, in 49 underground waste storage tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms. SWPF Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste Disposition Packaging and Transportation Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D)

415

Test plan for evaluation of plasma melter technology for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a test plan for the conduct of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384212] is the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC) in Pittsburgh, PA. WSTC authors of the test plan are D. F. McLaughlin, E. J. Lahoda, W. R. Gass, and N. D`Amico. The WSTC Program Manager for this test is D. F. McLaughlin. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes melting of glass frit with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a plasma arc fired furnace.

McLaughlin, D.F.; Lahoda, E.J.; Gass, W.R.; D`Amico, N. [ed.

1994-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

Engineering and Cost Assessment of Listed Special Waste Designation of Coal Combustion Residuals Under Subtitle C of the Resource Co nservation and Recovery Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) undertook this project to identify engineering cost estimates for the changes at power plants needed to comply with the Subtitle C option in proposed federal rules regarding the management of coal combustion residuals. The analysis represents a high level evaluation of various plant operations before such federal rules are finalized. It relies on best engineering judgment interpretations of applying the proposed regulations on current practices for generating...

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

417

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Ignition Engines Spark Ignition Engines Thomas Wallner and omni engine Thomas Wallner and the omnivorous engine Background Today the United States import more than 60% of its crude oil and petroleum products. Transportation accounts for a major portion of these imports. Research in this field is focused on reducing the dependency on foreign oil by increasing the engine efficiency on the one hand and blending gasoline with renewable domestic fuels, such as ethanol, on the other. Argonne's Research The main focus of research is on evaluation of advanced combustion concepts and effects of fuel properties on engine efficiency, performance and emissions. The platforms used are a single-cylinder research engine as well as an automotive-size four-cylinder engine with direct fuel injection.

418

Steam assisted gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine is disclosed which has an integral steam power system consisting of heat absorbing boilers which convert an unpressurized liquid into an expanded and heated steam by utilizing heat normally lost through component cooling systems and the exhaust system. Upon completion of the steam power cycle, the steam is condensed back to a liquid state through a condensing system located within the compressor and other functional components of the gas turbine engine. A system of high pressure air and friction seals restrict steam or liquid condensate within designed flow bounds. The gas turbine engine disclosed is designed to give improved fuel efficiency and economy for aircraft and land use applications.

Coronel, P.D.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

419

Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data Package—Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual  

SciTech Connect

A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version.

Larson, D.E. [ed.; Watrous, R.A.; Kruger, O.L. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid waste engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Direct cementitious waste option study report  

SciTech Connect

A settlement agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target data of 2035. This study investigates the direct grouting of all ICPP calcine (including the HLW dry calcine and those resulting from calcining sodium-bearing liquid waste currently residing in the ICPP storage tanks) as the treatment method to com